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Publication numberUS3426892 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 11, 1969
Filing dateAug 2, 1966
Priority dateAug 2, 1966
Publication numberUS 3426892 A, US 3426892A, US-A-3426892, US3426892 A, US3426892A
InventorsGeorge W Poncy
Original AssigneeGeorge W Poncy
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Roll of tubing on a core and method of making it
US 3426892 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 11, 1969 w. PONCY 3,426,892

ROLL OF TUBING ON A CORE AND METHOD OF MAKI NG IT Filed Aug. 2, 1966 INVENTOR GEORGE W. PONCY ATTORNEY- United States Patent 3,426,892 ROLL 0F TUBING ON A CORE AND METHOD OF MAKING IT 59 Dale Drive, Chatham, NJ. 07928 2, 1966, Ser. No. 569,712

Claims George W. Poncy,

Filed Aug.

US. Cl. 206-59 Int. Cl. B65h 55/00, 1 7/02; 1331c ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE Related invention I have invented a special purpose machine for making bags for which I have a pending application Ser. No. 418,616, filed Dec. 16, 1964, which requires tubing of paper or other materials to be furnished in roll form on a core so that it can be supported on trunnions on said machine and fed thereto as desired. I particularly use paper, such as Kraft, coated on one face with a thermoplastic material such as polyethylene, although other materials having similar properties may be used. This coated paper in fiat web form is run through a tube making machine which folds the flat web so that one side edge overlaps the other so as to permit heat sealing them together, and at the same time forms gussets in the edges of the tube. The tube so made is formed into rolls for feeding into the machine identified above, to make bags.

Background of the invention I am aware that it is possible to obtain commercially seamless tubing made of extruded thermoplastic materials, such as polyethylene, the tubing being gusseted. Such tubing is unsatisfactory for my purpose, which is to make a self sustaining bag, that is, a bag having side walls which are capable of standing erect when opened, without extraneous support. It is not now possible to obtain gusseted, non-porous materials such as seamed coated paper tubing as described, in a roll on a core, because paper suppliers up to the present time have been unable to wind such tubing on a core due to the volume of air trapped within the tubing during its manufacture from web form. Attempts heretofore to wind such tubing on a core so that it can be shipped and handled as a compact package have not been successful, because after the winding of a few convolutions, the trapped air within the tubing prevents the successive convolutions from lying flat, one over another on the core. The tendency is for the central portion of the material to lie flat on the core and for the air within the tube to fiow into the gusseted portions and blow them up, preventing the high speed winding which is necessary for commercial purposes. A further difiiculty is that under these conditions the ballooning of the tubing causes extensive creasing thereof which renders it commercially unfit. The present invention avoids these objections.

While the apparatus presently employed in the making of bags is varied, it is common practice to physically associate the apparatus for the manufacture and forming of the tube from a fiat web with the bag making machine.

3,426,892 Patented Feb. 11, 1959 Such a combined tube forming and bag making machine takes up a considerable amount of space and is therefore unsuitable for my special purpose which requires a machine occupying a minimum of space. Accordingly, the operation of my machine requires special tubing on a core for insertion into my machine. So far as I am aware, it is not common, and it is unknown to provide a roll of seamed, non-porous tubing, whether with or without gussets, on a core for mounting in a bag making machine of the special type designed by me to make, at will, a bag of any desired length, such machine being disclosed in the application identified above.

It is a principal object of this invention, therefore, to overcome these ditficulties, and to wind such seamed non-porous, tubular material, with or without gussets, onto a core in such a manner that the material is tightly and efiiciently wound thereon, without creases, and the material and core constitute a compact package which may easily be handled and mounted in a machine for making bags.

The foregoing object is accomplished by winding said tubing on a core which is of less width than the width of the tubing extending between the gusseted portions, if gusseted tubing is being wound. In winding the material on such a core, the central portion of the tubing can be substantially freed of trapped air just prior to winding so that this portion will lie flat on the core, the air, in part, escaping into the adjacent side edges of the tubing which extend outwardly of or overhang the core, the absence of the core adjacent these side edges permitting the convolutions of tubing with trapped air to bunch up and balloon about the ends of the core without deleteriously affecting the roll. Eventually, most of the trapped air will escape from the free open end of the tube, but in the meantime a compact roll of tubing on a core is achieved, which can be loaded into the machine referred to above for bag making purposes.

A more complete understanding of the invention will be obtained by reference to the accompanying specification and drawings, wherein practical embodiments of the invention are described and shown.

Description of the invention FIGURE 1 shows, in cross section, a roll of tubing on a core according to the present invention.

FIGURES 2 and 2a show front elevations of modified forms of cores.

FIGURE 3 shows in diagrammatic form in plan view, a means for pressing the central portion of the tubing to reduce the volume of air therein.

FIGURE 4 is a sectional side view in diagrammatic form, of what is shown in FIGURE 3.

FIGURE 5 shows a transverse cross section of the seamed, gusseted tubing, and

FIGURE 6 is a similar view of a multi-layered tube.

In one form of the invention, the core 10 comprises a tube or hollow cylinder, or annular section of rigid stock, which may be wood,'metal, paper or other suitable material, which is of a length substantially less than the width of the tubing 11 to be supported thereon. As shown in the several figures of the drawing, the tubing is gusseted, but it need not be, as the principle of this invention will apply equally well to seamed tubing which has no gussets.

This tubing is made from a flat web (not shown) on tube and gusset forming apparatus (not shown) and passes from the tube former to a tube winder (not shown) where the tube is wound up on a core such as the core 10. A pair of upper and lower pressure rolls P are positioned with respect to the tube as shown in FIGURES 3 and 4 to exert pressure on the opposite side walls of the tube in the directions indicated by the arrows 12 for the O purpose of expelling the air from the portion of the tube between the gussets G, such air then flowing largely into the gusseted or end portions G of the tubing, the ballooning of the gusseted portion of the tube being exaggerated for the purpose of illustration.

Such entrapped ambient air has heretofore made it impossible to wind such tubing on a core in a compact and eflicient manner, and I have found it impossible at the present time to obtain such a roll commercially. In my method, the tubing is maintained under some tension as it is wound on the core, and this, together with the pressure rolls P tends to flatten the portion of the tubing between the gussets G and causes it to be wound with some pressure over the core 10, the pressure being maintained in the succeeding convolutions until the roll is completed. This pressure tends to cause the entrapped air to escape to the gusseted or end portions which become slightly inflated, and made it impossible heretofore to achieve a compact roll of tubing of any practical proportions.

With the use of a core 10, of a length substantially equal to a width of that portion 13 of the tubing bracketed between the gussets G, FIGURE 3, it becomes possible to wind such tubing in any practical desired length upon a core, since the pressure that is brought to bear upon the roll as it is wound will be confined to the central area 13 that is supported, that is, over the core surface only. The air-containing end or gusseted portions G of the tubing on each side of the central portion over the core, can balloon inwardly and outwardly of the core without affecting the pressure contact with the core and with the successive convolutions.

Modified forms of the cores are shown in FIGURES 2 and 2a, which facilitate the mounting of these cores on a mandrel, for support in a winding machine. In FIG- URE 2, the core is shown as having a central cylindrical portion a with integral end extensions 1011, said end extensions being tapered from the said cylindrical portion outwardly and shaped in the form of a truncated cone. The core is provided with a bore 10c to receive the winding machine mandrel. The modified core of FIGURE 2a has a central cylindrical portion 10a with integral reduced concentric extensions 10b and a bore 100.

In each of these modified forms, the tubing will largely engage the cylindrical portion of the core as described in connection with FIGURE 1, the gusseted portions G extending outwardly and overhanging the extensions 10b or 10b, and ballooning inwardly and outwardly thereof during winding. In the case of these modified forms or cores, the tubing may be coextensive in width with that of its respective core. In storage, the air has a tendency to escape, and the ballooning gusseted or end portions largely collapse, thereby still further facilitating the bandling of the core.

Multilayered tubes may be handled in the same manner, and FIGURE 6 shows a cross section of such a tube wherein one layer may be coated paper and the other layer a metal foil, sealed together in any appropriate manner, in flat web form and then later formed into a tube.

In tubing which has no gussets, the supporting core will be substantially less than the overall width of the tubing, in the manner shown in FIGURE 1, and the ambient air will be trapped in those portions of the tubing extending beyond or overhanging the side edges of the supporting core.

I claim:

1. A roll comprising a core, a winding of tubing about said core, said core having a width substantially less than that of said tubing, the edge portions of the tubing overhanging the ends of the core.

2. A roll according to claim 1, in which the tubing is gusseted, with the gusseted portions of the tubing overhanging the edges of the core.

3. A roll according to claim 1, in which the first convolution of the winding is in pressure contact with said Cir core, and successive convolutions are in pressure contact with each other, the portions of said tubing overhanging the ends of said core being substantially free of pressure contact.

4. A roll according to claim 1, in which the tubing convolutions overlying the core are in greater pressure contact with each other than those portions overhanging the ends of the core.

5. A roll according to claim 1, in which the tubing is gusseted at each side edge and in which the core is positioned between the gusseted portions of the tube.

6. A roll according to claim 1 in which the tubing is paper.

7. A roll according to claim 2 in which the tubing comprises paper.

8. A roll according to claim 1 in which the tubing is multilayered.

9. A roll according to claim 1 in which the tubing is multilayered and the layers comprise paper and heat and pressure sensitive material.

10. A roll according to claim 1 in which the tubing is multilayered and the layers comprise paper and metal foil.

11. A roll comprising a core and flexible seamed tubing wound about said core, said core having a central substantially cylindrical portion and reduced end portions, the convolutions of said tubing about said cylindrical portions being in greater pressure contact with each other than the portions of said tubing over said reduced end portions.

12. A roll according to claim 11 in which said reduced end portions are conical extensions of said cylindrical portions.

13. A roll according to claim 11 in which said reduced end portions are cylindrical and concentric.

14. A roll comprising a core, a winding of gusseted tubing about said core, said winding being in pressure contact with said core and successive convolutions only in the area between the gusseted portions of said tubing.

15. The method of forming rolls of tubing having ambient air trapped therein comprising, folding a sheet of material to form a tube therefrom, guiding said tube to a core having less width than the tube, winding said tube about said core so that said core is substantially centrally positioned between the edges of said tube, and pressing said tube substantially centrally between the edges thereof, as it passes to the core, over an area corresponding substantially to the width of the core to force the air out of said area as it passes to said core.

16. The method according to claim 15 in which the tubing is folded to form gussets at the edges thereof, in which the core is of a length corresponding to the distance on a face of the tube between the guusets, and in which the tubing is pressed to expel the air in the portions between the gussets, and is wound over the core with the gusseted portions overhanging the edges of said core.

17. The method of forming rolls of tubing having ambient air trapped therein comprising folding a sheet of material to form a tube thereof, guiding said tube to a core, pressing said tube between the edges thereof as it moves to said core to expel the air therein, winding a portion of said tubing over said core under tension to create pressure contact therewith and with successive convolutions of said tubing, and maintaining the remaining portions of said tubing free of substantial pressure contact with said core and successive convolutions.

18. An assembly of a core and flexible tubing wound about said core with ambient air within said tubing confined at the side edges of said tubing by reason of compression of the body of said tubing over the body of said core, said assembly comprising a core having said tubing wound thereabout, said core having an annular body of less width than said tubing whereby the edges of said tubing freely overhang the edges of said core, the convolutions of said tubing about said core being in greater pressure contact with each other than the overhanging portions are with each other.

19. An assembly of a core and flexible gusseted tubing wound about said core with the ambient air within said tubing confined at the gusseted'portions thereof by reason of the compression of the body of said tubing, between said gusseted portions, over said core, said assembly comprising a core of a width less than that of said tubing, said tubing being wound about said core, with the gusseted portions thereof overhanging the ends of said core, the convolutions of the tubing wound about said core being in greater pressure contact with each other than the remaining portions of said tubing overhanging said core are with each other.

20. An assembly of a core and flexible tubing wound about said core with the ambient air within said tubing confined at the side edges thereof by reason of compression of the body of said tubing over the body of said core, said assembly comprising a core having a substan- References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,279,171 9/1918 Sullivan 229-69 2,772,774 12/1956 Rabuse 20659 3,015,385 1/1962 Chesnut 2G6-59 3,300,082 1/1967 Patterson 20658 WILLIAM T. DIXSON, Jr., Primary Examiner.

US Cl. X.R. 24268.5; 93-94

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1279171 *May 10, 1915Sep 17, 1918Standard Paper Bag CompanyContinuous bag.
US2772774 *Mar 19, 1953Dec 4, 1956Minnesota Mining & MfgTape roll and core
US3015385 *Nov 6, 1959Jan 2, 1962Johnson & JohnsonSilicone rubber tape roll
US3300082 *Feb 15, 1965Jan 24, 1967Charles M PattersonWaste receptacle
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4114756 *Dec 13, 1976Sep 19, 1978W. R. Grace & Co.Winding core for heat shrinkable film material
US4242297 *Dec 31, 1979Dec 30, 1980W. R. Grace & Co.Winding core for heat shrinkable film material
US4296582 *Dec 31, 1975Oct 27, 1981Star Manufacturing Company Of OklahomaConstruction system and fasteners therefore
US4641795 *Sep 19, 1984Feb 10, 1987Ferag AgPrinted product coil
US5765421 *Nov 5, 1996Jun 16, 1998Kvaerner U.S. Inc.Use of a stub mandrel and coiling spool in a reversing rolling mill application
US5884857 *Jan 2, 1998Mar 23, 1999Thimon, S.A.Pre-stretched film, and apparatus and a method for outer packaging
US7775717Oct 12, 2005Aug 17, 2010Sealed Air Corporation (Us)Compacted bag configuration and method for making the same
Classifications
U.S. Classification242/160.4, 242/613.1, 242/520, 493/292, 493/303, 242/908
International ClassificationB65H75/00
Cooperative ClassificationB65H75/00, Y10S242/908
European ClassificationB65H75/00