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Publication numberUS3428969 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 25, 1969
Filing dateJul 17, 1967
Priority dateJul 17, 1967
Publication numberUS 3428969 A, US 3428969A, US-A-3428969, US3428969 A, US3428969A
InventorsJoseph Diemond, Melvin Y Gershman, Henry L Sundberg Jr
Original AssigneeColeco Ind Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Water-retaining recreational structure for swimming pools and the like
US 3428969 A
Images(3)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 25, 1969 J. DIEMOND ET AL WATER-RETAINING RECREATIONAL STRUCTURE FOR POOLS AND THE LIKE Filed July 17, 1967 M/VEA/TURS.

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xii/4A United States Patent O 3,428,969 WATER-RETAINING RECREATIONAL STRUC- TURE FOR SWIMMING POOLS AND THE LIKE Joseph Diemond, Simsbury, Melvin Y. Gershman, Wes Hartford, 'Conn., and Henry L. Sundberg, Jr., Longmeadow, Mass., assignors to Coleco Industries, Inc., Hartford, Conn., a corporation of Connecticut Filed July 17, 1967, Ser. No. 653,750 US. Cl. 4172 21 Claims Int. Cl. E04h 3/16 ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE There is disclosed a water-retaining, above ground prefabricated recreational structure for swimming pools and the like which is adapted to be assembled and disassembled and which employs a substantially dumbbell-shaped peripheral configuration defined by a pair of circular components interconnected by a generally rectangular intermediate component of lesser width than the diameter of the circular components. The rectangular component has a frame assembly at each side thereof with substantially rigid wall means providing firm support for the support panel and linear member contained therein, a main vertical support member resisting outward pressures thereon and compensating means to resist displacement and bending of the main vertical support member.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Prefabricated pools of the type employing a flexible liner and a relatively rigid metal frame have enjoyed sub- :stantial acceptance in producing above-ground pools for use by families and organizations at considerably lower cost and with considerably greater ease than possible with concrete or other masonry pools which generally extend substantially below ground. Such pools have the advantages of being readily disassembled and of being portable to new locations and are also readily maintained and repaired.

Generally, such pools have assumed a rectangular configuration such as illustrated in Hooper United States Patents No. 1,740,305 and No. 1,742,313 and Phillips United States Patent No. 1,753,427; or a circular configuration such as illustrated in Arnold United States Patent No. 2,939,153 and Friedlander et al. United States Patent No. 2,989,757. It has also been proposed to use an oval configuration as illustrated by Hooper United States Patent No. 1,786,613. Of the various designs, the circular configuration has enjoyed extremely widespread application because of the fact the pressures of the water upon the frame may be more readily withstood by avoiding points of excess stress, thus facilitating construction and minimizing cost and problems in erection. As a result, circular pools of relatively large diameter have become more prevalent in an effort to provide larger family pools.

To achieve a longer swimming length, the width of such a circular pool is also necessarily increased, which may be undesirable both in terms of cost and in terms of the overall area required for the pool. Although an oval pool configuration would permit such elongation without increase in width, it is generally required that extensive reinforcing be provided at spaced points along the sides to resist the pressures upon the framework as illustrated in the aforementioned Hooper United States Patent No. 1,786,613.

More recently, in Diemond et a1. United States Patent 3,274,621, there was disclosed and claimed a water-retaining recreational structure of elongated configuration provided by a plurality of circular components intersecting ice at apices to provide a curvilinear peripheral configuration wherein the apices were reinforced by vertical support members thereat so as to resist the concentration of pressures acting against the wall of the structure at the apices. To resist the pressures acting upon the vertical support members, various means are disclosed and claimed to compensate against the pressures thereon. Generally, structures of the Diemond et al. patent have enjoyed widespread acceptance and commercial success. However, the overall effective length of even this pool has been largely dependent upon the diameter of the circular components although three or more circular components may be in end-to-end relationship as disclosed and claimed therein by use of strong vertical support members at each of the several apices together with compensating means cooperating therewith.

It is an object of the present invention to provide a novel water-retaining recreational structure of elongated configuration which is easily assembled and highly rugged in construction.

It is also an object to provide such a structure with a rugged frame assembly capable of withstanding pressures upon the peripheral wall exerted by large volumes of water or displacement of the water and therein such pressures are concentrated along a rectilinear wall section.

Still another object is to provide such a water-retaining recreational structure which may be readily assembled, which is relatively economical and simple to manufacture and which will provide relatively long life and low maintenance.

Szdmmary of the invention It has now been found that the foregoing and related objects can be readily obtained in a water-retaining, above ground prefabricated recreational structure which is adapted to be assembled and disassembled by using a substantially dumbbell-shaped peripheral configuration defined by a pair of generally circular components interconnected by a rectangular intermediate component of lesser width than the diameter of the circular components. A liner member of flexible, relatively waterproof sheet material has a 'bottom wall portion and a side wall portion extending about the periphery thereof which is afforded relatively rigid horizontal support in the peripheral configuration by a relatively rigid, generally vertical support panel extending thereabout and closely adjacent thereto. A plurality of elongated horizontal support members extend in end-to-end relationship about the liner member at the circular components of the peripheral configuration so as to predetermine and maintain the size and configuration thereof.

A frame assembly at each side of the rectangular component includes substantially rigid wall means extending along the length of the rectangular component outwardly of the support panel and providing firm support for the support panel against outwardly directed pressure over at least the major portion of the height thereof. A main vertical support member outwardly of the rigid wall means along the length of the rectangular component inwardly from the ends thereof provides support for the rigid wall means to resist outward pressures thereon. Although the rigid wall means has end portions extending a substantial length beyond a main support member so as to be cantilevered therefrom, the frame assembly of the present invention will resist the torque of the end portion about the support member. In addition, the frame assembly includes compensating means resisting displacement and bending of the main vertical support member. Coupling means engage the adjacent ends of the horizontal support member with the frame assembly and the horizontal support members of the circular components diverge outwardly from the frame assembly.

The rigid wall means may take a variety of forms depending upon the pressures to be encountered, the length thereof, the relative performance of the assembly and the availability of manpower for the erection thereof. Although its height may be as little as only one-half the height of the vertical wall panel, it preferably is at least two-thirds and, most desirably, substantially the entire height thereof to give optimum support and provide the desired degree of rigidity and structural security. In its preferred embodiment, the rigid wall means comprises a box-like structure formed by vertical frame members at or adjacent the ends of the rectangular component and horizontal frame members extending therebetween. In relatively long rectangular components, intermediate vertical frame members along the length of the horizontal frame members may be desirable. For optimum structural strength commensurate with economy, the horizontal and vertical frame members are desirably channelor I-shaped members although bar stock or tubular elements may also be employed. In another embodiment, the rigid wall means may comprise a relatively rigid plate member. However, this will tend to have far greater weight'than the open box-like frame structure in order to be able to resist concentrations of pressures at various locations thereon equivalent to the ability of box-like structure.

Although a single main vertical support member may be spaced outwardly from the rigid wall means and connected thereto by rigid members extending horizontally from a plurality of points spaced along the length of the rigid Wall means at the top and bottom thereof to provide a truss-like structure, the preferred arrangement employs the main vertical support member in abutting engagement with the outer surface of the rigid wall means which is disposed at about the center of the rectangular component, although two or three members spaced along the length thereof but inwardly from the end thereof may be used Where the length of the unsupported end portions imposes excessive torque. However, use of a single main support member as is generally possible with the present invention will normally afford significant advantages from cost and assembly standpoints. Although the main vertical support member may assume a variety of forms, most desirably it is a member of channelor Ishaped cross-sectional configuration.

The compensating means provided at the main vertical support members to compensate against the pressure thereon which would tend to produce deformation or warping thereof may take a number of forms. An extremely rugged assembly utilizes vertical support members of relatively great strength extending below the bottom of the vertical wall and into the ground therebelow. At or adjacent the lower end thereof, a compression coupling is provided between the main vertical support members at the opposite sides of the rectangular component and tension coupling means are provided therebetween at a point spaced upwardly therefrom but also below the horizontal support members. A single member such as an I-beam may provide both tension and compression members by the two flanges thereof. In other embodiments, the compensating means may be provided by a single member extending between the vertical support members at the intersections, or by utilizing a bracing or buttressing arrangement extending outwardly from the vertical support members at the intersections to support the vertical support member intermediate the height thereof or along the entire length thereof, or by the combination thereof. Straps, chains, rods, tubes and various metal members such as I-beams, or combinations thereof, may be used to tie the vertical support members at the opposite sides of the rectangular component so as to allow them to function as a unit in resisting the pressures upon the structure. Such members used to tie the vertical support members at the opposed points of intersection, whether functioning in compression or in tension, are referred to herein as tie means, and such tie means includes tension and compression members whether used singly or jointly. In still another embodiment the vertical support members at the intersections may simply comprise posts of relatively greater length which extend below the base horizontal support members into the ground so as to derive support therefrom in resisting deformation and such members are most desirably coupled with external bracing or buttressing extending outwardly therefrom.

Where the compensating means includes a portion on the main vertical support members adapted to extend into the ground desirably laterally extending elements are provided on this lower portion which will more firmly seat and anchor the vertical support member in the ground and tend to resist bending or twisting moments thereon. Such bending or twisting moments are, of course, also resisted by relatively rigid tie means extending between the main vertical support members at opposite sides of the rectangular component.

Depending upon the particular structure employed for the rigid wall means and its configuration, a horizontal cover member will normally extend along the top of the length of the rectangular component so as to receive the upper edge portion of the vertical support panel. This cover member may be secured in position by various means but threaded fasteners engaged in suitable seating plates are preferred to provide a relatively rigid assembly while at the same time permitting facile disassembly. The coupling means for engaging the adpacent horizontal support members with the rigid wall means may take a variety of forms but a preferred arrangement employs a seating surface on the rigid wall means which will receive threaded fasteners passed through the ends of the horizontal support members and thus provide a rugged durable construction.

Brief description of the drawings FIGURE 1 is a plan view of a swimming pool embodying the present invention;

FIGURE 2 is a fragmentary perspective view of the swimming pool of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 3 is a fragmentary plan view of the rectangular component portion thereof with the liner, sidewall member and cover rails removed for clarity of illustration;

FIGURE 4 is a perspective view to an enlarged scale of the assembly of the main vertical support members and compensating means illustrated in FIGURE 3;

FIGURE 5 is a perspective view of the rigid wall means of FIGURE 3 with the main vertical support member shown in phantom line;

FIGURE 6 is a view similar to FIGURE 3 showing an alternate embodiment for the frame assembly of the rectangular component; and

FIGURE 7 is a perspective view to an enlarged scale of a frame assembly and compensating means of the embodiment of FIGURE 6.

Description of the preferred embodiment Turning now to FIGURES 1-5 of the attached drawings in detail, there is illustrated the preferred embodiment of the present invention. As seen in FIGURE 1, the peripheral configuration is of generally dumbbellshape with two generally circular components designated by the letters A, B and a generally rectangular component designated by the letter C extending therebetween. The width of the rectangular component C is less than the diameter of the circular components A, B thus providing a narrow waist of rectangular cross-section with arcuate portions expanding outwardly therefrom.

It will be appreciated that the water pressures acting upon the side walls in the circular components A, B will tend to distribute equally about the circumference thereof by reason of the circular configuration. By dimensioning the circular components A, B substantially equal, equalization of pressures in the two circular components can be generally attained. However, the rectangular component C will tend to experience a concentration of stresses at various points along the length and height thereof because of its linearity and because of the reduction in width thereat.

The construction of the framing for the circular components A, B is the same as that employed in the aforementioned Diemond et al. Patent 3,274,621 to which reference may be made for the details thereof. A multiplicity of top horizontal support members or rails extend about the top of the circular components A, B and are disposed in end-to-end relationship at vertical support members or posts 2 at a multiplicity of points about the circumference and to which posts 2 they are secured by fasteners (not shown). Cover members 12 overlie the junctures of the adjacent top horizontal support members 10 and the fastening elements. Base horizontal support members 4 extend about the bottom of the circular components A, B and have their ends telescopically received in base locking elements 6 which also seat the lower ends of the vertical posts 2. The horizontal support members 10 provide opposed channels along the inner side thereof which seat the top and bottom edges of the vertical support panel 8 which preferably extends continuously about the entire periphery. The water itself is held by a flexible liner 14 which is secured over the edge of the vertical support panel 8.

In the embodiment of FIGURES 1-5, the rectangular component C has a pair of opposed rigid wall means each generally designated by the numeral 16 and a main vertical support member generally designated by the numeral 18 abutting against the outer surface thereof at about the midpoint of the length thereof. As best seen in FIGURE 4, the rigid wall means 16 has a pair of opposed channel or U-shaped members 20 extending vertically at the ends thereof and a pair of horizontal frame members 22 of generally I-shaped cross section extending therebetween adjacent the top and bottom ends thereof. An angle iron 24 extends vertically between the frame members 22 at about the midpoint thereof to increase the ruggedness thereof and the several members are secured together by bolts or the like 26.

Seating plates 28 on the upper ends of the channel members 20 extend in both directions from the web portion thereof and U-shaped locating plates 30 adjacent the bottom end thereof extend outwardly only. The top hori zontal support members 10 of the circular components A, B and the elongated cover rail member 32 fit over the seating plates 28 and are secured thereto by a locking element and fasteners (not shown) such as those illustrated in the aforementioned Diemond et a1. patent. The base horizontal support members 4 of the circular components A, B fit under the locating plates 30 and are secured thereto by fasteners (not shown) such as sheet metal screws and the like. The cover rail member 32 is of greater width than the top horizontal frame member 22 and has a depending lip spread inwardly therefrom so as to provide a channel therebetween receiving the upper edge portion of the vertical support panel 8. A similar bottom rail member 33 provides a bottom channel therefor.

The main vertical support members 18 are illustrated as Ibeams with flanges 34, 36 and a Web 38 extending therebetween and fasteners 37 lock the members 18 to the outer flanges of the top and bottom horizontal frame members 22. The members 18 are of a length greater than the height of the rigid wall means 16 so as to provide a lower portion to extending therebelow and into the ground preferably to a distance of about one-third the height thereof.

The bending pressures upon the main vertical support members 18 are resisted by compensating means including the tension members generally designated by the numeral 42 and the compression members generally designated by the numeral 44, both of which extend between the main support members 18 at the opposite sides of the rectangular component C to tie them together as a working unit. A pair of compression rods 46 each having an end with a recess therein so as to fit over a generally circular boss 48 at the lower end of the inner flange 34 of a main support member 18 and joined together at the other end in an internally threaded coupling 50 provide the compression member 44.

Tension rod brackets 52 are provided on the outer flange 36 upwardly of the bosses 48 and project laterally outwardly therefrom to provide arm portions to either side of the main support member 18. Extending between each arm portion of the brackets 52 are a pair of tension rods 54, 56 which are threada'bly engaged at one end in the brackets 52 by the nuts 58 and coupled at their opposed ends by the threaded coupling elements 60 which provide an adjustable connection therebetween. In this manner, an adjustable tension member 42 is provided cooperating with the compression member 44 to tie the two frame assemblies together and resist displacement and bending pressures. To seat the main vertical support members 18 in the ground and resist twisting moments, a stabilizer bar 62 is provided on the support members 18 and extends laterally outwardly therefrom into the ground, which, together with the tension rod bracket 52 and the -I-cross section of the support member 18, provide a great surface area resisting twisting and displacing moments.

If so desired, brackets (not shown) can be mounted on the vertical frame members 20 of the rigid wall means 16 to support a deck of redwood or the like placed thereon and over the cover rail member 32 as illustrated in phantom line in FIGURE 1. This permits a most convenient seating surface for users of the pool while increasing the overall attractiveness of the design.

In assembling the embodiment of FIGURES 1-4, the centers of the two circular components A and B are first located and a line is extended therebetween. The midpoint along this line is then determined and the points to either side are located where the main vertical support members will be placed. The location for the rigid wall means 16 is then established with the two ends thereof on either side being masked. The stabilizing bar 62 is assembled to the base of the members 18 by the bolts 64 and the tension rod brackets 52 are thereafter attached. The circular bosses 48 for locating the compression rods 46 are attached to the bases of the members 18. The compression rods 46 are then threaded into the coupling 50 until they butt.

Holes are then dug to the desired depth for the support members 18 and a trench of equivalent depth is dug therebetween. The members 18 are inserted into the holes prepared therefor, and the compression bars 46 are then inserted into the trench and fitted onto the bosses 48 at the bases of the members 18. To ensure that they are perfectly vertical and of equal height, the members 18 are now checked, conveniently by placing a plank therebetween and locating a level thereon. Adjustments may be required and may be made easily by removing earth from one side or the other until the desired leveled condition is obtained. Stakes are desirably provided to hold the members 18 in proper alignment, and some dirt is introduced into the trench and into the bottom of the hold about the members 18 and thereafter tamped.

The tension rods 54, 56 are threaded through the tension rod brackets 52 .and secured thereto by the nuts 58. The tension rod couplings 60 are then tightened on the opposed ends of the tension rods 54, 56 only partially.

The locating plates 30 and seating plates 28 are secured to the U-shaped vertical frame members 20 and the vertical frame members 20 and horizontal frame members 22 are then secured together by nuts and bolts. The central angle iron 24 is also secured between the top and bottom horizontal frame members 22. The assembled frame or rigid wall means 16 are then placed on the inside of the vertical support members 18 in the predetermined position, and the bottom rail members 33 are placed thereunder. Fasteners 37 lock the rigid wall means 16 and support members 18 in assembly, and the tension couplings 60 are then turned to produce the precise interior spac ing and tension. The trench between the support members 18 and thereabout is then completely filled with dirt which is tamped down.

The base horizontal support members 4 are attached to the locating plates 30 on the members 18 by fitting them thereunder and securing them in position with sheet metal screws. The remaining base members 4 are then assembled in end-to-end relationship with the base locking elements 6 to define the curvilinear outline of the pool components A, B. The side wall panel 8 is then uncoiled and seated into the channels 7 of the base horizontal support members 4 and base locking elements 6 respectively and the overlapping ends thereof secured together by fastening means (not shown). The posts 2 are then inserted into the base locking elements 6 and secured thereto. Desirably, a layer of sifted dirt is placed around the bottom of the pool to protect the liner from injury by the base members 4. The liner 14 is then mounted by fitting it over the upper edge of the side wall panel 8 and securing it thereto by coping means (not shown).

The cover rail member 32 is placed over the top frame member 22 and inner seating plates 28. The top horizontal support members 10 are now assembled to the rigid wall means 16 by seating them on the outer seating plates 28 and securing them thereto. The rest of the top rails 10 are readily assembled to the posts 2 about the remainder of the circular components A and B in end-to-end relationship and the cover members 12 are placed over the abutting ends.

Thus, it can be seen that the assembly is readily erected and adjusted to ensure maximum structural strength. The tension and compression rods are disassembable for shipping and storage and the tension rods are adjustable to obtain proper action in cooperation with the compression rods.

Turning now to FIGURES 6 and 7, the rigid wall means generally designated by the numeral .116 is again rigidly supported by a main vertical support member generally designated by the numeral 118 which is now located at a point spaced outwardly therefrom. Top and bottom truss mounting plates 166, 168 are provided on the inner flange 134 of the support member 118 and a plurality of truss members 170 are secured at an end thereto and at the other end to spaced points along the length of the top and bottom horizontal frame members 122 of the rigid wall means 116. Tension and compression members generally designated by the numerals 142, 144, respectively, extend between the main vertical support members 1.18 as in the prior embodiment.

In each of the embodiments hereinbefore specifically described, the structure has a dumbbell-shaped peripheral configuration defined by a pair of generally circular components and an interconnecting rectangular component of lesser width than the diameter of the circular components. The elongated rectangular components have rigid wall means which are supported by main vertical support members at about their midpoints to provide a firm assembly wherein the horizontal support members diverge outwardly from the rigid wall means to form the walls of the circular components. Compensating means are provided to increase the ability of the main vertical support members to resist deformation by the pressures exerted thereon, most desirably in the form of actual tie means between the main vertical support members although external buttressing may also be employed.

Thus, it can be seen that the present invention provides a novel water-retaining recreational structure adapted to form an elongated configuration and which is easily assembled and highly rugged in construction. The structure of the present invention utilizes a rugged frame assembly of great strength capable of withstanding pressures upon the peripheral wall exerted by large volumes of water or rapid displacement of the water during use. The structure is readily assembled, long-lived with low maintenance,

relatively economical and simple to manufacture and may be readily disassembled for portage or storage.

Having thus described the invention, we claim:

1. A water-retaining, above-ground prefabricated recreational structure adapted to be disassembled and having a substantially dumbbell-shaped peripheral configuration defined by a pair of generally circular components interconnected by a generally rectangular intermediate component of lesser width than the diameter of said circular components, said recreational structure having a liner member of flexible, relatively waterproof sheet material providing a bottom wall portion and a side wall portion extending about the periphery of said bottom wall portion; a relatively rigid, generally vertical support panel extending about the periphery of said liner side wall portion and closely adjacent thereto to provide a relatively rigid horizontal support therefor in said peripheral configuration; a plurality of elongated horizontal support members extending in end-to-end relationship about said liner member at said circular components of said peripheral configuration; a frame assembly at each side of said rectangular component including substantially rigid wall means extending along the length of said rectangular component outwardly of said support panel and providing firm support for said support panel against outwardly directed pressure over at least the major portion of the height thereof, a main vertical support member outwardly of said rigid wall means along the length of said rectangular component inwardly from the ends thereof and providing support for said rigid wall means to resist outward pressures thereon, and compensating means resisting displacement and being of said main vertical support member, said rigid wall means having end portions extending a substantial length beyond a main vertical support member; and coupling means engaging the adjacent ends of horizontal support members of said circular components with said frame assemblies, said horizontal support members diverging outwardly from said frame assemblies.

2. The water-retaining recreational structure of claim 1 wherein said substantially rigid wall means extends over substantially the entire height of said vertical support panel and wherein said main vertical support member extends over substantially the entire height of said rigid wall means at about the center of said rectangular component.

3. The water-retaining recreational structure of claim 1 wherein said compensating means includes portions of said main vertical support members extending substantially below said vertical support panel and adapted to extend into the ground, and tension and compression members extending between the portions of said main vertical support members below said vertical support panel, said tension member being disposed toward said vertical support panel and said compression member toward the lower ends of said main vertical support members.

4. The water-retaining recreational structure of claim 3 wherein the portions of said main vertical support members below said vertical support panel have laterally projecting elements adapted to more firmly seat the support member in the ground and resist twisting moment thereon.

5. The Water-retaining recreational structure of claim 1 wherein tie means extend between said main vertical support members below said liner member.

6. The water-retaining recreational structure of claim 1 wherein said compensating means includes outwardly projecting braces on said main vertical support members at said apices and adapted to bear upon the ground and provide a buttress support therefor.

7. The water-retaining recreational structure of claim 1 wherein said main vertical support member abuts against the outer surface of said rigid wall means.

8. The water-retaining recreational structure of claim 1 wherein said main vertical support member is spaced outwardly from said rigid wall means and rigid members extend horizontally thereto from a plurality of points spaced along the length of said rigid wall means and at the top and bottom thereof to provide a truss.

9. The water-retaining recreational structure of claim 1 wherein said rigid wall means is a metal plate.

10. The water-retaining recreational structure of claim 1 wherein said rigid wall means includes vertical frame members at the ends of said rectangular component and horizontal frame members extending therebetween to provide a box-like frame structure.

11. The water-retaining recreational structure of claim 1 wherein a horizontal member is mounted on said rigid wall and provides a channel receiving the upper edge of said vertical support panel.

12. The water-retaining recreational structure of claim 1 wherein said horizontal support members extend above the upper and lower edges of said vertical support panel and have opposed channels therein receiving the edge portions of said vertical support panel.

13-. The water-retaining recreational structure of claim 1 wherein said coupling means includes seating portions on said rigid wall means at the upper end thereof and depending retaining elements on the end portions of the adjacent horizontal support members engaged in said seating surface portions.

14. The water-retaining recreational structure of claim 1 wherein said main vertical support members are of generally I-shaped cross section providing inner and outer flanges and a web portion extending generally perpendicularly to said rigid wall means and wherein said coupling means includes elements mounted on said rigid wall means releasably engaging the adjacent ends of horizontal support members, and wherein said compensating means includes a portion on said main vertical support member extending substantially below said vertical support panel and edepted to extend into the ground so as to be anchored therein, a tension member extending between said portions of said main vertical support members at opposite sides of said rectangular component below said liner member and a compression member extending therebetween adjacent the lower ends thereof.

15. The water-retaining recreational structure of claim 14 wherein said rigid wall means includes vertical frame members at the ends of said rectangular component and horizontal frame members extending therebetween to provide a box like frame structure.

16. The water-retaining recreational structure of claim 15 wherein said main vertical support member abuts against the center portion of the outer surface of said rigid wall means.

17. The water-retaining recreational structure of claim 12 wherein vertical support members extend between said horizontal support members at points spaced about the periphery of said generally circular components.

18. A water-retaining, above-ground prefabricated recreational structure adapted to be disassembled and having a substantially dumbbell-shaped peripheral configuration defined by a pair of generally circular components interconnected by a generally rectangular intermediate component of lesser width than the diameter of said circular components, said recreational structure having a liner member of flexible, relatively waterproof sheet material providing a bottom wall portion and a side wall portion extending about the periphery of said bottom wall portion; a relatively rigid, generally vertical support panel extending about the periphery of said liner side wall portion and closely adjacent thereto to provide a relatively rigid horizontal support therefor in said peripheral configuration; a plurality of elongated horizontal support members extending in end-to-end relationship about both the top and bottom of said linear member and vertical support panel as said circular components of said peripheral configuration, said horizontal support members providing opposed channels receiving the edge portions of said vertical support panel; vertical support posts extending between said top and bottom horizontal support members at a multiplicity of points spaced about the periphery of said circular components; a frame assembly at each side of said rectangular component including a substantially rigid wall frame extending along the length of said rectangular component outwardly of said support panel and providing firm support for said support panel against outwardly directed pressure, said wall frame including vertical frame members at the end of said rectangular component and horizontal frame members extending therebetween to provide a box like structure, a main vertical support member abutting against the outer surface of said rigid wall means at about the center of said rectangular component to provide support for said rigid wall means to resist outward pressures thereon, said main vertical support member having a portion extending substantially below said vertical support frame and adapted to extend into the ground, and tension and compression members extending between the portions of said main vertical support members below said vertical support panel, said tension member being disposed toward said vertical support panel and said compression member toward the lower ends of said main vertical support members, for resisting displacement and bending of said main vertical support members; and coupling means engaging the adjacent ends of horizontal support members with said rigid wall means, said horizontal support members diverging outwardly from said rigid wall means.

19. The water-retaining recreational structure of claim 18, wherein the portions of said main vertical support members below said vertical support panel have laterally projecting elements adapted to more firmly seat the support member in the ground and resist twisting moment thereon.

20. The water-retaining recreational structure of claim 18 wherein said coupling means includes seating portions on said rigid wall means at the upper end thereof and depending retaining elements on the end portions of the adjacent horizontal support members engaged in said seating surface portions.

21. The water-retaining recreational structure of claim 18 wherein said vertical support members are of generally I-shaped cross section providing inner and outer flanges and a web portion extending generally perpendicularly to said rigid wall frame.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 488,451 12/1892 Quatermass 52-169 592,738 10/1897 Judson 52169 1,233,080 7/ 1917 McClintook 52-169 1,652,415 12/1927 Schenker 52169 3,225,362 12/1965 Barrera 4-172 3,233,251 12/1965 Barrera 4-172 3,274,621 12/196 5 Diemond et a1 4-172 3,315,278 4/1967 Schatzki 4172 LAVERNE -D. GEIGER, Primary Examiner.

H. K. ARTIS, Assistant Examiner.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3530512 *Jan 26, 1968Sep 29, 1970Haugh S Products LtdPrefabricated above-ground swimming pool
US3546720 *Dec 12, 1967Dec 15, 1970Wilkes Pool CorpRectangular swimming pool
US3638245 *Aug 28, 1969Feb 1, 1972Timber Structures IncTruss beam swimming pool
US3745593 *Sep 23, 1971Jul 17, 1973Doughboy Ind IncMulti-piece vertical support for swimming pools
US3793651 *Aug 23, 1971Feb 26, 1974Atreo Mfg Co IncPortable swimming pool
US3934277 *Apr 8, 1974Jan 27, 1976Quirouette Richard LPortable swimming pool construction
US4283804 *Dec 31, 1979Aug 18, 1981Mahoney Morgan DSwimming pool structure
US6094877 *Aug 24, 1998Aug 1, 2000White; Charles L.Frame support assembly and method for curved walls
US7210271Sep 17, 2002May 1, 2007Flexability Concepts LlcHeader apparatus and method for a structural framing system
US20130318900 *Nov 21, 2012Dec 5, 2013Johnny R. FriesenGrain Bin Floor Support Member
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/245, D25/2
International ClassificationE04H4/00
Cooperative ClassificationE04H4/0043
European ClassificationE04H4/00C3
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Sep 26, 1984AS06Security interest
Owner name: CHASE MANHATTAN BANK, THE (NATIONAL ASSOCIATION),
Effective date: 19831231
Owner name: COLECO INDUSTRIES, INC.
Sep 26, 1984ASAssignment
Owner name: CHASE MANHATTAN BANK, THE (NATIONAL ASSOCIATION),
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:COLECO INDUSTRIES, INC.;REEL/FRAME:004304/0617
Effective date: 19831231
Jan 16, 1984ASAssignment
Owner name: COLECO INDUSRIES, INC., 945 ASYLUM AVE., HARTFORD,
Free format text: RELEASED BY SECURED PARTY;ASSIGNOR:STATE STREET BANK AND TRUST COMPANY;REEL/FRAME:004212/0129
Effective date: 19830525
Jun 13, 1983AS17Release by secured party
Owner name: CHASE MANHATTAN BANK (NATIONAL ASSOCIATION) THE
Owner name: COLECO INDUSTRIES, INC., 945 ASYLUM AVENUE HARTFOR
Effective date: 19830526
Jun 13, 1983ASAssignment
Owner name: COLECO INDUSTRIES, INC.,
Free format text: RELEASED BY SECURED PARTY;ASSIGNOR:BA COMMERCIAL CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:004136/0446
Effective date: 19830523
Owner name: COLECO INDUSTRIES, INC., 945 ASYLUM AVENUE HARTFOR
Free format text: RELEASED BY SECURED PARTY;ASSIGNOR:CHASE MANHATTAN BANK (NATIONAL ASSOCIATION) THE;REEL/FRAME:004151/0312
Effective date: 19830526
May 6, 1983ASAssignment
Owner name: COLECO INDUSTRIES, INC.
Free format text: RELEASED BY SECURED PARTY;ASSIGNOR:DOLLAR-DRY DOCK SAVINGS BANK OF NEW YORK;REEL/FRAME:004126/0120
Effective date: 19830414
Jul 9, 1982ASAssignment
Owner name: CHASE MANHATAN BANK N.A., THE 1 CHASE MANHATTAN PL
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:COLECO INDUSTRIES, INC., A CORP. OF CT;REEL/FRAME:004011/0699
Effective date: 19820507
Sep 11, 1981ASAssignment
Owner name: STATE STREET AND TRUST COMPANY, 225 FRANKLIN ST.,
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:COLECO INDUSTRIES, INC.;REEL/FRAME:003909/0232
Effective date: 19810624