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Publication numberUS342988 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 1, 1886
Publication numberUS 342988 A, US 342988A, US-A-342988, US342988 A, US342988A
InventorsCharles P. Wymae
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of making paper fabric
US 342988 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

UNITED STATES VPATENT OFFICE.

CHARLES P. \VYMAN, OF ARLINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS.

METHOD OF MAKING PAPER FABRIC.

SPECIFICATION forming part ofLetters Patent No. 342,988, dated June 1, 1886.

Application filed September 10, 1885. Serial No. 176,750. (Specimens) To aZZ whom it may concern:

Be it known thatI, CHARLES P. WYMAN, a citizen of the United States, residing at Arlington, in the county of Middlesex and State of Massachusetts, have invented a new and useful Method of Making Paper Fabric, of which the following is a specification.

My invention relates to an improved method of making a fabric composed of paper twine or paper twine combined with yarn made of other material than paper. My method is as follows: I take a fine tissue paper, made of Manila hemp or other suitable fiber, and cut it into narrow strips. 1 usually out these strips about threeeighths of an inch in width, (more or less, as the quality is to be fine or coarse,) and wind these strips onto bobbins or be desired.

spools, so that these bobbins orspools can be conveniently put on a twisting-frame. This Work is done on a paper cutting and winding machine designed for the purpose. These strips of paper are then thoroughly wet. This I prefer to do by putting them in a water. bath. This bath may contain die or size, or the paper may be drawn uni-oiled through such baths. \Vhen the paper is thoroughly wet, I put it on a twisting-frame and twist it hard. Alittle practice will enable the operator to put in the right amount of twist. The amount depends upon the kind of yarn needed, the thickness and width of the paper. After the yarn is twisted, and while it is in a. damp pliable condition, I draw it off from the twister-bobbins and wind it on smaller bobbins to be used as weft. This can be done on the common quiller. This takes out kinks and draws the paper into a more compact thread. The yarn may be twisted directly onto the weft-bobbins, but I think the former method better. During this rapid process the yarn has not time to dry, and in itsdamp pliable state put it in the shuttie and weave it into cloth, using paper twine or any kind of suitable yarn for warp. I prefer, however, to use cotton warp. When I use paper yarn for warp, I find it is better to size it; the same as if it were cotton.

In practice I find that to make a light, pliable, springy, cheap fabric cotton warp and paper filling is the best. The springiness of the goods is in proportion to the amount of paper it contains.

In the manufacture of paper fabrics to be used as skirtings I use what is generally called Manila tissue-paper weighing nine and one-half pounds to the ream, (twenty-four by thirty-six inch sheets,) cut into strips about three'eighths of an inch wide, and twisted hard for weft, and for warp No.22 single cotton yarn. eighteen hundred and sixty ends. This fabric weighs about five ounces to the yard, and is twenty-seven inches wide. The weight of the warp is about two ounces, and the weft about three ounc s. There are twenty-four picks to the inch. After the fabric has been woven, I finish it by dying, calendering, or other process ommon to textile fabrics, as may \Vhat I claim as my invention, and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is-

l. The method herein set forth of making fabric of paper twine, which method consists in first cutting thin tissue paper made of Manila hemp or any suitable fiber into narrow strips, then winding these strips onto bobbins or spools, then wetting these strips of paper by any suitable means, then twisting the paper while it is in a damp state into a hard twine, then while the twine is in adamp pliable condition weaving it either as warp or weft, or both, into cloth, substantially as described. 7

2. The method herein set forth of making fabric of paper twine, which method consists in first cutting thin tissue-paper made of Manila hemp or any suitable fiber into narrow strips, then winding these strips of paper onto bobbins or spools, then wetting these strips of paper by any suitable means, then twisting the paper while it is in a damp state into a hard twine, then, while the twine is in adamp pliable condition, weaving it as warp or weft, or both, into cloth, then finishing the fabric by dyeing, calendering, or other process com mon to textile fabrics, substantially as herein described.

(3. P. WYMAN. Witnesses:

GEORGE DENNISON, HENRY H. FITCH.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3010181 *Apr 15, 1958Nov 28, 1961 Method of producing knitted yardage
US6506697Aug 5, 1999Jan 14, 2003Merida Meridian, Inc.Tightly woven paper textile products
EP2014807A1 *Feb 27, 2006Jan 14, 2009Mimcord S.A.Carpet and production method thereof
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationD03D25/00