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Publication numberUS3430963 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 4, 1969
Filing dateMar 22, 1967
Priority dateMar 22, 1967
Publication numberUS 3430963 A, US 3430963A, US-A-3430963, US3430963 A, US3430963A
InventorsEdward J Jacques, John J Wozniak
Original AssigneeEdward J Jacques, John J Wozniak
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Golf putter
US 3430963 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 1969 J. J. WOZNIAK ET AL. 3,430,963

GOLF PUTTER Filed March 22 1967 Sheet INVENTORS JOHN J. WOZNIAK W ATTORNEY March 4, 1969 J. J. WOZNlAK ET AL 3,430,963

GOLF PUTTER Filed March 22, 1967 Sheet 2 INVENTORS JOHN J. WOZNIAK EDWARD J. JACQUES Y ATTORNEY United States Patent 2 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A golf putter includes a head having the shape of a cylinder, a shaft and a narrow runner connecting the shaft to a convex side of the head. The runner is longitudinally and transversely curved throughout its length and extends from a central part of the head to the lower end of the shaft. The length and longitudinal curvature of the runner and the diameter of the head are such that when the shaft is positioned at an angle of approximately 3050 degrees to a horizontal putting surface, the lowermost convex side of the head is positioned above the horizontal surface and the head may be moved on said runner so that a convex side of the head impacts the ball above the center of the ball to impart overspin thereto. The upper surface of the head includes a len thwise extending sighting groove.

Background of the invention Heretofore golf putters have been made with flat heads. The head and shaft of each putter were arranged whereby a right-handed player would stroke the ball with a conventional swing from right to left. The putter of the present invention is designed so that the putter is moved or urged with a straight forward stroke and the ball is contacted by the front surface of the head.

Summary of the invention It is an essential object of this invention to provide an improved golf putter so designed that the ball is stroked with a straight forward motion to achieve greater accuracy.

Another object of the invention is to provide a golf putter having an elongated head and having a shaft extending from the head in a plane at right angles to the longitudinal axis of the head and midway between the ends of the head.

Another object is to provide a golf putter wherein the front face of the head provides a ball-contacting surface.

Another object is to provide a golf putter wherein the ball-contacting surface is longitudinally straight and transversely convex.

Another object is to provide a golf putter having a cylindrical head.

Another object is to provide sighting means on the head to facilitate orienting the head relative to a golf ball and the hole.

Another object is to provide a golf putter having a narrow ridge or runner reducing the friction of ground contact during a putting stroke.

Another object is to provide a golf putter in which the shaft extends upwardly in the position of use at an angle of between approximately 30 and 50 to the horizontal.

Other objects of the invention will become apparent as the description proceeds especially when taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, illustrating a preferred embodiment of the invention, wherein:

FIGURE 1 is a perspective view showing a golfer preparing to execute a putting stroke with a golf putter constructed in accordance with our invention.

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FIGURE 2 is a perspective view, with parts broken away, of the golf putter shown in FIGURE 1.

FIGURE 3 is a side elevational view showing the lower end of the golf putter at the instant of contact with a golf ball, or in the position of the putter head when the golfer is addressing and lining up the ball.

FIGURE 4 is similar to FIGURE 3 but ilustrating the shaft of the putter at a different angle with respect to the head.

FIGURE 5 is similar to FIGURES 3 and 4 but illustrating the shaft of the putter at a still different angle with respect to the head.

FIGURE 6 is a front elevational view of the putter head.

FIGURE 7 is a perspective view showing a modification of a golf putter.

FIGURE 8 is a perspective view showing another modification of a golf putter.

Referring now more particularly to the drawings and especially to FIGURES 1-6 inclusive thereof, the golf putter of our invention is generally designated by the reference character 10 and includes a unitary or one-piece putter head 12 and a shaft 14 secured to the head 12. The head 12 includes an elongated cylinder or cylindrical member 16 of transverse circular cross section having a ball-contacting front face or surface 18; a bottom or lower surface 20 provided with a downwardly and rearwardly extending re'atively narrow and elongated ridge or runner 22 terminating rearwardly of the rear face or surface 24 of the cylindrical member 16; and a generally cylindrical shaft extension or stem portion 26 connected to the cylindrical member 16 and runner 22 by a connecting part or portion 25. The shaft extension 26 has an axis located in a plane at right angles to the longitudinal axis of the cylindrical member 16 and midway between the ends 27 of such member 16. The cylindrical extension 26 is provided on the upper end thereof with an elongated socket 28 for receiving a reduced portion of the shaft 14 as will be subsequently described.

The unitary putter head 12 including the cylindrical member 16, runner 22, cylindrical shaft extension 26 and the connecting portion is formed in molds by an appropriate molding or casting operation. The unitary head 12 may be formed of any suitable material such, for example, as aluminum or brass. The unitary head 12 may be hollow but in the present embodiment is preferably solid and, in either event, is balanced by an appropriate distribution of weight. The outer surfaces of the cylindrical member 16 are smooth as are the other portions forming the unitary head 12.

The cylindrical member 16 is provided with a straight channel or groove 30 in its upper surface. The channel or groove 30 extends throughout the full length of the cylindrical member 16 and is parallel to the longitudinal central axis of such member 16. Preferably the sides 32 of the channel 18 form sharp straight intersections with the upper surface of the cylindrical member 16 and with the base or bottom 34 of the channel 30 to provide a plurality of sharp straight lines for use in lining up or sighting the putter head 12 with the ball and the hole. As shown, the sides 32 may be parallel to one another and substantially normal to the upper surface of the member 16, and the base 34 of the channel 30 may form substantially right angles with respect to the two sides 32. In some instances the sides and bottom of channel 30 may be curved and thus form a groove or passage of transverse curvature throughout its length. In either case a pair of sharp straight sighting lines 33 are provided to facilitate orienting the putter relative to the golf ball and the holev The main shaft 14 is provided with a reduced lower extension 38 which extends into and is secured in the socket 28 provided at the upper end of the stern portion 3 or cylindrical connection 26. The upper end of the shaft 14 is provided with a hand grip 40 which has an axis which is coaxial with the axis of the shaft 14 and the cylindrical connection 26. The main portion of the shaft 14 may be formed of wood or metal, as is conventional in the art. The gripping portion or hand grip 40 may, as an example, be provided with a layer of suitable gripping material wrapped or sleeved over the upper end of the shaft 14 to provide a hand grip as is conventional in the art. The head 12 is connected permanently to the shaft 14 by any appropriate fastening means now utilized in the art. As an example, if the shaft and head are both made from metal such parts may be joined by a connection which may be welded, screwed, brazed, or soldered.

The cylindrical connection 26, shaft 14 and grip 40 lie in a straight line and have a common longitudinal axis which extends at right angles to the cylindrical member 16 although it is offset rearwardly therefrom by the connecting part 25.

The cylindrical member 16, as an example, has an outside diameter of 1 /2" i /m" and a length of approximately 3 /2. The diameter of the cylindrical member 16 is smaller than the outside diameter of a standard golf ball which is approximately 1 or 1.680. The ends or end surfaces 27 of the smooth cylinder or member 16 may be fiat and parallel and thus perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the member 16 or the ends 27 may be spherically convex as illustrated in FIGURE 6 or the ends 27 may be even spherically concave as illustrated in FIGURES 7 and 8 to be subsequently described.

The ridge or runner 22 has a depth of approximately A" measured along the vertical plane containing the axis of the member 16. The runner 22 is constructed perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the member 16 midway between the ends 27 thereof and extends in the direction of the putting stroke as will subsequently appear. In the present embodiment the runner has a length of approximately 1%. It has been found however that the runner 22 may have a length from to 3 /2 inclusive. If the depth of the runner 22 is increased the outside diameter of the cylindrical member 16 would be decreased so that the ball-contacting front surface 18 of the member 16 would strike the golf ball at generally the same point of curvature.

The centrally located runner 22, located generally below the connecting part 25, is relatively narrow, straight and elongated. The runner 22 is transversely curved throughout its length so as to provide a narrow substantially horizontal ground contacting surface as shown in FIGURE 6. The area of the runner 22 is relatively small when compared with the total area of the lower surface of the member 16. Thus the frictional contact between the runner 22 and the putting surface is relatively small when the golf putter is stroked forwardly on the putting surface toward the ball during a putting stroke.

The cylindrical connection 26 is joined to the member 16 and runner 22 by the enlarged curved connecting part 25. The angle of the connection 26 and the shaft 14 is important. In use, the connection 26 and shaft 14 preferably extend upwardly from the ground in a rearward direction at an angle of approximately 30 to 50". FIG- URE 3 shows the shaft 14 at a angle during which time the runner 22 lies substantially flat upon the ground. FIGURE 4 illustrates the shaft 14 at a 38 angle while FIGURE 5 illustrates the shaft 14 at a 30 angle.

In any one of the positions shown in FIGURES 3-5 inclusive, the ground contacting ridge or runner 22 is generally the only portion of the putter head 12 which contacts the putting surface or green. In use the putter head 12 rests on the putting surface during the back stroke and during the completion of the forward stroke of the putter 10. Thus the ridge or runner 22 presents only a small friction contact area when compared to the area of the bottom surface of the member 16.

FIGURE 1 illustrates the golf putter 10 being used in a putting stroke. Initially the golfer brings the ball contacting surface 18 of the putter 10 into contact with the ball 44. The golfer then utilizes the groove 18 and the straight sharp longitudinal lines of sight 33 to line up the putter head 12 with the ball 44 and the cup or hole 46 on the putting green 48. Thus the golfer sights the ball 44 and orients the putter head 12 at right angles to the line of the putting stroke. Thereafter, with the putter head 12 resting on the putting surface 48, the golfer moves the putter head 12 in a linear back stroke away from the ball 44 a relatively short distance and thereafter the golfer completes the forward stroke by moving the putter head 12 across the putting surface 48 to strike the ball 44 towards the cup 46.

The golfer strokes the ball 44 towards the hole 46 with the putter 10 using a straight forward linear motion rather than a side to side motion as is conventional. Hence, the golfer can look straight ahead and putt substantially in the line of his sight and stance. The ball contacting front surface 18 of the member 16 is convex in transverse section while the longitudinal elements of the surface 18 are straight. The ridge or runner 22 is disposed in the line of the putting stroke and the cylindrical member 16 is maintained substantially horizontal and at right angles to the putting stroke.

It should be noted that the golf putter 10, in the various positions of FIGURES 3-5 inclusive has the center of the cylindrical member 16 slightly above the center of the ball so as to induce forward rotation after the ball 44 is stroked.

FIGURE 7 shows a modification of the golf putter in which like parts are indicated 'by the same characters of reference. The sighting groove along the top surface of the cylindrical member 16 is of arcuate cross section rather than of the right angle channel cross section in FIGURES 25 inclusive. This groove, designated 30, provides sharp straight sight lines where it intersects the ball surface, for sighting purposes. Otherwise, the groove 30 is like the groove 30. The ends of the cylindrical member 16 in FIGURE 7, designated 27, are spherically concave rather than convex. The hand grip 40 for the golf putter shown in- FIGURE 7 differs from the grip 40 in FIGURES l-6 inclusive in that its upper gripping end 50 is turned so as to extend rearwardly of and be substantially horizontal during the putting stroke. This turned gripping end 50 lies in the plane of the remainder of the shaft 14 at substantially right angles .to the axis of the cylindrical member 16 and has finger recesses 52 along the under side for the comfort and convenience of the golfer. Otherwise, the putter of FIGURE 7 is like the one shown in FIGURES 1-6 inclusive.

FIGURE 8 shows a further modification in which the upper end of the shaft 14 has a gripping end 60 which extends substantially parallel to the cylindrical member 16 and is connected to the shaft 14 midway between its ends. This gripping end 60 may also have finger recesses for comfort and convenience of the golfer.

It will be understood that any one or more of the features discussed above in connection with FIGURES 7 and 8 could be incorporated in the gulf putter of FIG- URES 1-6 inclusive.

The golf putter of the present invention makes putting considerably easier than conventional prior art putters since the golf ball and the cup are in full view of the player. The golfer visibly lines up the ball and cup. The use of the golf putter of the present invention does not require any stance adjusting or any turning of the hands or any club measuring. In use the putter requires only a straight forward action. The golf putter centers on the cylindrical head which is solid for perfect contact ball control.

The drawings and the foregoing specification constitute a description of the improved golf putter in such full, clear, concise and exact terms as to enable any person skilled in the art to practice the invention, the scope of which is indicated by the appended claims.

What we claim as our invention is:

1. A golf putter comprising a head and an elongated shaft, said shaft having a longitudinal axis, an upper end and a lower end, the shape of said head corresponding to that of a cylinder having first and second ends whereby said head has convex sides extending between the ends of said head, said head being adapted to be positioned with the longitudinal axis thereof extending horizontally, whereby a first convex side of said head extending between the ends thereof may be used to strike a golf ball, means for connecting the lower end of said shaft to said head midway of the ends of said head, said connecting means comprising an elongated runner having a narrow width, a longitudinal axis, and a lower surface longitudinally and transversely curved throughout its length, the Width of said runner being substantially less than the length of said head, the longitudinal axes of said shaft and runner lying in the same plane, the longitudinal axis of said runner extending perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of said head from the lower end of said shaft to said head, the length and longitudinal curvature of said runner and the diameter of said head being such that when the longitudinally and transversely curved lower surface of said runner is positioned on a horizontal putting surface and the longitudinal axis of said shaft is positioned at an angle of approximately 30 degrees to 50 degrees to said horizontal surface, the lowermost convex side of said head is spaced above said horizontal surface, whereby said narrow runner provides the sole contact between said head and said horizontal surface, and said head may be moved relative to the horizontal surface on said runner in a vertical plane containing the longitudinal axis of said shaft to contact a golf ball above a horizontal plane passing through the center of said ball whereby overspin may be imparted to said 'ball.

2. The golf putter defined in claim 1 wherein said head has an elongated groove extending lengthwise along the upper surface thereof to provide a sighting means for orienting the head relative to a golf ball and the hole.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,433,150 10/1922 Reach 273-1 64 3,199,873 8/1965 Surratt 273-167 X FOREIGN PATENTS 713,954 7/1965 Canada. 1,459,095 10/ 1966 France.

GEORGE I. MARLO, Primary Exwmr'ner.

US. Cl. X.R.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1433150 *Feb 11, 1922Oct 24, 1922Spalding & Bros AgGolf club
US3199873 *Apr 1, 1963Aug 10, 1965Dwight F SurrattGolf putter equipped with userpositioned sighting means
CA713954A *Jul 20, 1965Wright WilliamGolf putter
FR1459095A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3625518 *May 23, 1969Dec 7, 1971Solheim KarstenGolf club head with complex curvature for the sole and/or the striking face
US3830503 *Apr 6, 1973Aug 20, 1974Consoli NGolf club for hazard surfaces
US3908996 *Aug 2, 1974Sep 30, 1975Molinaro John MGame ball rammer
US3909005 *Jan 15, 1974Sep 30, 1975Piszel Geza AGolf club
US4325550 *Aug 1, 1980Apr 20, 1982Stan Thompson Golf Club CompanyPutter with shaft axis focussed at blade keel
US4828265 *Apr 23, 1984May 9, 1989Antonious A JGolf club head
US5090698 *Mar 27, 1990Feb 25, 1992Kleinfelter Thomas AGolf putter
US5207721 *Jun 9, 1992May 4, 1993Thomas LobdellPutter
US5433441 *Nov 22, 1993Jul 18, 1995Olsen; Christopher K.Golf putter with cylindrical clubhead
US5746662 *May 6, 1997May 5, 1998Squire; Herbert D.Controlled pendulum golf putter
US5800283 *Apr 4, 1995Sep 1, 1998Nomura; SuekiKneeling putter
US6767292 *Dec 13, 2002Jul 27, 2004Richard John Skalla, Sr.Golf putter with a rear mounted shaft
US6767293Feb 15, 2002Jul 27, 2004Martin PechterGolf club putter and method of putting
US6776727Jan 23, 2003Aug 17, 2004Duane Charles John EngdahlBalanced putter for practice and play
US7048643Jun 2, 2003May 23, 2006Richard Paul WelshDo-drop golf putter
US7115041Aug 6, 2004Oct 3, 2006Callaway Golf CompanyPutter-type golf club head with an insert
US7374500Sep 15, 2005May 20, 2008Duane Charles John EngdahlPutter with fixable shaft that rotates to convert the putter from practice to play
US7419439 *May 19, 2005Sep 2, 2008Aleamoni Aran SGolf putter
US7833108 *Apr 20, 2006Nov 16, 2010Peter Kim HosowichTraining head for golf training putter, and method of training
US20030064822 *Sep 16, 2002Apr 3, 2003Arvidson Roy EinarGolf putter and method for putting
US20030157993 *Feb 15, 2002Aug 21, 2003Martin PechterGolf club putter and method of putting
US20040198531 *Apr 27, 2004Oct 7, 2004Martin PechterGolf club putter and method of putting
US20040259654 *Jun 20, 2003Dec 23, 2004Failla William C.Shuffle putter
US20050119069 *Aug 6, 2004Jun 2, 2005Guard John G.Putter-type golf club head with an insert
US20060014591 *Sep 15, 2005Jan 19, 2006Engdahl Duane C JPutter with fixable shaft that rotates to convert the putter from practice to play
US20060258472 *Apr 20, 2006Nov 16, 2006Hosowich Peter KTraining head for golf training putter, and method of training
US20080146372 *Feb 19, 2008Jun 19, 2008Duane Charles JohnAdjustable putter head
US20120329579 *Sep 6, 2012Dec 27, 2012Marc Dewey ArnetteMethod of putting
US20160144254 *Jun 24, 2014May 26, 2016Stephen Patrick FeeneySports Equipment
WO2003070331A1 *Feb 14, 2003Aug 28, 2003Martin PechterGolf club putter and method of putting
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/251, 473/293, 473/330
International ClassificationA63B53/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63B53/007, A63B49/06
European ClassificationA63B53/00P