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Publication numberUS3433459 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 18, 1969
Filing dateMay 2, 1967
Priority dateMay 2, 1967
Publication numberUS 3433459 A, US 3433459A, US-A-3433459, US3433459 A, US3433459A
InventorsRichard W Logan
Original AssigneeFederal Sign And Signal Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Load handling apparatus
US 3433459 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 18, 1969 R. w. LOGAN LOAD HANDLING APPARATUS l of 5 Sheet Filed May 2, 1967 INVENTOR RICHARD W. LOGAN A0124, A /MP FIG. I

ATTORNEYS,

March 18, 1969 R. w. LOGAN LOAD HANDLING APPARATUS Sheet 2 of 5 Filed May 2, 1967 INVENTOR RICHARD w. LOGAN ATroRxn's March 18, 1969 R. w. LOGAN LOAD HANDLING APPARATUS 5 ofs Sheet Filed May 2. 1967 INVENTOR RICHARD W. LOGAN i 0 iW MPM ATTORNEYS,

March 18, 1969 R. w. LOGAN 5 LOAD HANDLING APPARATUS Filed May 2, 196? Sheet 4 of a FIG.

FE Q 8 INVENTOR RICHARD W. LOGAN ATTOR NEYS.

March 18, 1969 R. w. LOGAN LOAD HANDLING APPARATUS Sheet Filed May 2. 1967 INVENTOR RICHARD w, LOGAN ATTORNEYS.

United States Patent ()1 Bee 3,433,459 LOAD HANDLING APPARATUS Richard W. Logan, Dade County, Fla., assignor, by mesne assignments, to Federal Sign and Signal Corporation,

Blue Island, Ill., a corporation of New York Filed May 2, 1967, Ser. No. 635,621

U.S. Cl. 254139.1 12 Claims Int. Cl. B66c 5/00, 1/28; B66f 9/00 ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A portable jet engine hoist having a pair of horizontally spaced base units, each supporting an upright mast. A boom extends horizontally from an upper portion of each mast. In one embodiment of the invention, the two booms jointly carry a load supporting mechanism. This load supporting mechanism includes a pair of spaced, load lifting points and a force transmitting connection which is shiftable between the load lifting points. In this embodiment of the invention the article may be selectively shifted transversely of the booms.

In another embodiment of the invention each boom individually supports an article supporting mechanism. This article supporting mechanism includes a pair of spaced article engaging or load lifting points and a force transmitting connection shiftable between these two points.

Background of the invention The servicing of modern day jet aircraft requires adherence to exacting safety standards and a unique degree of flexibility in being able to handle aircraft engines mounted in a variety of fashions.

The arrangements for mounting jet aircraft engines often create real problems of accessibility for load handling devices. In addition, the removal of aircraft engines and their subsequent reinstallation requires that the engines be maintained in a stable posture at all times, with an operator having positive cont-r01 over their movements.

The broad concept of stabilizing an engine relative to a hoisting mechanism is disclosed in a United States Austin Patent 2,412,488. The broad concept of a hoisting device where the hoisting mechanism solves some access problems by being able to straddle a load is disclosed in the United States Ormsby Patent 2,549,120. The Ormsby device is additionally advantageous in that the base of this device may be moved beneath a site from which a load is to be hoisted.

The advantages of the Ormsby and Austin devices notwithstanding, such prior art mechanisms lack the flexibility necessary to handle the installation and removal of modern day jet aircraft under the variety of installation conditions that exist. In addition these devices do not provide the overall positive control with respect to effecting engine movement and insuring engine stabilization which are necessary to properly handle jet aircraft engines.

It is also desirable that aircraft service equipment in use today be characterized by a high degree of portability. Portable load handling apparatus, which may be folded when not in use so as to facilitate transportation and storage, are featured in United States Freed Patent 2,675,209 and in the United States Jones et al. Patent 3,083,837. However, neither the Jones et al. device nor the Freed device provide for selective load apportionment relative to a load supporting means or selective load movement transversely of a hoisting device so as to provide for maximized control over a load handling operation.

Summary of the invention It is a specific object of the invention to provide an 3,433,459 Patented Mar. 18, 1969 improved load handling apparatus uniquely adapted to handle jet aircraft engines and provide maximized control over the engine handling operation.

It is a particular object of the invention to provide such a load handling apparatus including plural, independently controllable, load hoisting devices so as to provide for independent movements of spaced portions of a load being lifted and enable the load to be rotated.

It is also an object of the invention to provide such a load handling apparatus including means for selectively shifting a load transversely of a pair of hoisting beams so as to effect selective positioning of the article transversely of the beams.

It is also an object of the invention to provide a load handling apparatus which enables an article to be selectively moved in a plurality of directions, with control over the article movements being maintained.

It is also an object of the invention to provide a load handling apparatus which is flexible in character and which may effectively handle jet aircraft engines from a pair of top lifting points or, alternatively, handle an aircraft engine from lifting points disposed on its opposite sides.

A further object of the invention is to provide an improved engine hoist which may be collapsed for storage and transportation purposes and yet which retains a high degree of structural ruggedness and operational versatility.

It is also an object of the invention to provide a load handling apparatus wherein the moments of force exerted by an aircraft engine on a pair of spaced engine engaging means may be selectively adjusted and continuously and visibly monitored.

In accomplishing at least some of the foregoing objectives there is provided a load handling apparatus characterized by a pair of boom means and a pair of load beam means. In one embodiment of the invention, the load beam means are interconnected, with one beam being jointly supported by the two boom means and the other beam being connected to a load by two spaced load lifting means.

In another embodiment of the invention each load beam is separately supported by one boom, with each load beam providing two article engaging or load lifting means.

Another independently significant facet of the invention resides in a unique structural arrangement by means of which spaced portions of an article may be independently hoisted, while providing for the selective adjustment or apportioning of moments of force exerted by an article on spaced article engaging or load lifting means.

In the embodiments where the two load beams are interconnected, the interconnection between the beams allows for the point of connection between the beams to be shifted longitudinally and selectively of either beam. This allows for a load to be selectively moved transversely between the load supporting booms and also allows for the balancing of the moments of force exerted by a load on the load supporting mechanism.

Drawings In describing the invention reference will be made to preferred embodiments shown in the appended drawings.

In the drawings:

FIGURE 1 provides a perspective view illustrating a preferred embodiment of the invention which is characterized by a pair of spaced booms supporting a crossed and interconnected load beam arrangement which serves to support a jet aircraft engine;

FIGURE 2 provides a side elevational view of the FIG- URE l apparatus, illustrating, in phantom line, the collapsing of the booms of the apparatus to their folded position;

FIGURE 3 provides a side elevational view of the FIG- URE 1 apparatus with the booms and mast of the apparatus collapsed or folded;

FIGURE 4 provides a top plan view of the collapsed apparatus shown in FIGURE 3;

FIGURE provides an end elevational view of the collapsed FIGURE 3 apparatus, viewing the FIGURE 3 apparatus from its right end;

FIGURE 6 provides a front elevational view of the interconnected load beam arrangement incorporated in the FIGURE 1 apparatus;

FIGURE 7 illustrates an alternative embodiment of the invention where the beams of the FIGURE 1 apparatus are separately supported from an individual boom and used to engage side lifting points of an aircraft engine cradle;

FIGURE 8 provides a top plan view of the FIGURE 7 apparatus, illustrating the manner in which the load lifting beams of this embodiment of the apparatus are engaged with opposite sides of a jet aircraft engine cradle;

FIGURE 9a illustrates a strut arrangement which provides a rigid triangular framework to facilitate the raising and lowering of the mast units of the apparatus shown in FIGURE 1, showing the mast units in their upright positions;

FIGURE 9]) illustrates the position of the FIGURE 9a structure when the mast unit has been laid down to its collapsed position;

FIGURE illustrates, in side elevation, a modification applicable to each of these boom units of the FIGURE 1 or FIGURE 7-8 apparatus, illustrating an articulating boom structure which enables the elevation of the boom extremity to be varied while maintaining the outer portion of the boom in a substantially horizontally extending posture;

FIGURE 11 illustrates, in side elevation, another modification applicable either to the FIGURE 1 or FIGURE 78 embodiments of the apparatus, which modification includes a unique arrangement for detachably anchoring a pulley block to a boom extremity; and

FIGURE 12 illustrates the FIGURE 11 pulley block mounting arrangement, viewing a boom from its free end with the pulley block detachably secured or clipped to a boom end.

Basic support structure FIGURES 1 through 5 illustrate details of the basic support structure of the hoist apparatus 1 of the present invention.

Apparatus 1 includes a pair of horizontally spaced and generally parallel base units 2 and 3. Base units 2 and 3 are substantially identical. Each comprises an elongate, box-grider unit mounted for rolling movement on a pair of caster-like wheels. Thus base unit 2 is mounted on caster units 4 disposed at each of its ends while base unit 3 is mounted on caster units 5 disposed at each of its ends. Each of the caster units 4 and 5 may be swivel mounted so as to facilitate the steering of the apparatus as it is moved from one location to the other. As will be appreciated, the single solid caster wheels illustrated may be replaced by single or dual, pneumatic tire caster units.

A pair of upright support or mast units 6 and 7 are mounted on the base units 4 and 5 respectively. Thus, the mast unit 6 is connected by a conventional pivot mount 8 to base unit 2 while mast unit 7 is connected by a conventional pivot mount 9 to base unit 3. Pivot units 8 and 9 have coaxial pivot axes disposed perpendicular to the median planes of the base units 2 and 3. Thus, upright support unit 6 is pivotable through a substantially vertical plane toward and away from its associated base unit 2, while upright support unit 7 is pivotable through a vertical plane toward and away from its base unit 3.

Upright support units 6 and 7 may be interconnected and braced by conventional truss-like framing 10 so as to be pivotable together as an integral unit relative to the base units 2 and 3.

A pair of boom units 11 and 12 are carried respectively at the upper ends of the upright support units 6 and 7. The boom units 11 and 12 may be journaled on a single shaft 13 which extends from the upper end of the support unit 6 through a hollow sleeve portion 14 of framing 10 the upper end of upright support unit 7. Alternatively the booms, masts, and framework 10 may be interconnected by a pair of shaft segments, each of which extends from one of the mast units, through an adjacent boom unit, and partially into the sleeve portion 14. In this connection, it will be appreciated that these shaft segments may be supported by sleeve-like bearings mounted at the pivot points of each of the mast and boom units, following conventional fabricating techniques.

As illustrated'in FIGURE 1, the two boom units 11 and 12 are horizontally spaced but disposed between the upright support units 6 and 7.

As is also apparent by reference to FIGURE 1, the boom units 11 and 12 are spaced above the base units 2 and 3 and are supported in a cantilever fashion. This arrangement provides a horizontally facing passage between the boom units and the base units having an open end facing away from the mast units 6 and 7.

Similarly, the base units 2 and 3 are spaced apart so as to define a horizontally extending passageway open at either end.

With this arrangement, the base units 2 and 3 may straddle a load to be handled by the apparatus and the load may be suspended vertically between the boom units 11 and 12 and the base units 4 and 5 and moved laterally of the boom units. Viewing FIGURE 1, it will be apparent that the vertical opening between the base and boom units will enable a load to be shifted laterally, even beyond the lateral position of the boom units.

Bracing for foldabl'e components and boom erecting structures FIGURE 1 illustrates the boom units 11 and 12 in their horizontally supported position and the upright mast units 6 and 7 in their vertically supported positions.

The mast units 6 and 7 are supported in their upright positions by conventional trusses 15, 16, 17 and 18. Each such supporting trusses, like the truss 15, is connected by a pivot mount 19 to its associated mast and connected by a detachable pin connection 20 to its associated base unit 2. Thus by disconnecting the pin connections 20 of all of the trusses, the masts 6 and 7 and their connecting framework 10 are pivotable as a unit toward the base units 2 and 3.

Boom units 11 and 12 are supported by structure including a generally rectangular and vertically extending framework 21 and a rectangular and generally horizontally extending framework 22. The tie rod or cable 23 extends from a mid portion of boom 11 to a top connection 24 of framework 21. A cable or tie rod 25 extends from top connection 24 to end connection 26 of framework 22. A cable or tie rod 27 extends downwardly from connection 26 to a turnbuckle 28 detachably connected to the base unit 2.

Structure identical to the elements 23, 24, 25, 26, 27 and 28 serves to detachably connect the boom unit 12 to the base unit 3 and these units have been so numbered in FIGURE 1. By adjusting the turnbuckle 28, the inclination of the boom units 11 and 12 may be modified. The height adjustment capability of the outermost extermities of the boom units should enable a substantial vertical variation in the height of the boom tips, on the order of a few feet. This height adjustment will enable the booms to be supported at varying elevations appropriate to the elevation of a particular load to be handled. With this arrangement, the booms may be elevated to enable the engine hoisting portion of the apparatus to be connected with a jet engine mounted relatively high on an aircraft.

When the turnbuckles 28 are disconnected from the base units 2 and 3 (by releasing conventional fastening means such as hooks, clevises, etc.) the boom units 11 and 12 become pivotable about their supporting shaft 13.

Upright framework 21 may be detachably secured to sockets 29 and 30. As illustrated in FIGURE 1, sockets 29 and 30 are rigidly mounted on booms 11 and 12 respectively. Similarly, framework 22 may be detachably secured in sockets (not shown) also carried by boom units 11 and 12.

The selective raising and lowering of the boom units 11 and 12, as well as the mast units 6 and 7, may be effected by a load hoisting mechanism carried by the apparatus 1. This hoisting mechanism includes a conventional, motor-operated cable hoist 31 carried by the base unit 2 and a companion but independently operable motor hoist 32 carried by the base unit 3. Hoist units 31 and 32 may be operated by electric, hydraulic or pneumatic motors. In most instances, conventional electric motor operated hoist units will be employed because of the more common availability of electrical power sources. sources.

A cable 33 extends from hoist unit 31 upwardly to a sheave 34 carried by connection 26 associated with boom unit 11. Cable 33 passes through connection 26 and through the interior of boom 11 to a sheave 34a. Cable 33 extends downwardly from sheave 34 to terminate in a conventional hook 35.

Similarly, a cable 36 extends upwardly from hoist unit 32 to a sheave 37 carried by the connecting unit 26 associated with the boom unit 12. Cable 36 extends through boom unit 12 to a sheave 38. Cable 36 passes downward ly from sheave 38 to a hook 39.

With the hook units and 39 detached from a load and secured to a frame portion of the ends of the boom units 11 and 12, and with the turnbuckles 28 released from the base units 2 and 3, the hoist units 31 and 32 may be used to lower the booms 11 and 12 from their cantilever position. By paying out the cables 33 and 36, the booms 'will be lowered as shown in FIGURE 2.

When the booms have moved downwardly, so as to lie immediately between the mast units 6 and 7, the booms and masts may be temporarily interconnected by a pipe or bar 40 slid between aligned openings of the boom and mast units. With the mast units thus lowered, the pin connections 20 may be disconnected so as to free the truss units 15 and 16, 17 and 18 from the base units 2 and 3. With the mast units thus free of the immobilizing effect of their associated truss supports, further paying out of the cables 27 and 36 will effect lowering of the now interlocked booms and masts to the collapsed or lowered position shown in FIGURE 3. In this connection, it should be noted that the framework 21 is dimensioned so as to lie above the lower extremities of the caster units 4 and 5.

Referring to FIGURES 3 and 4, it will be noted that with the booms and masts collapsed, the masts 6 and 7 are supported directly on top of the base units 2 and 3. The boom units 11 and 12 are horizontally aligned with but disposed between the mast units 6 and 7 so as to lie somewhat generally above the base units 2 and 3, as shown for example in FIGURE 5.

Restoration of the boom and mast units to their FIG- URE 1 or operational position may be effected by reversing the procedures previously delineated.

Load support structure The second load beam 43 extends perpendicular of the first load beam 42, i.e., generally parallel to the base units 2 and 3 and is disposed beneath the first load beam 42. A pair of load lifting or article-engaging units 46 and 47 extend downwardly from the underside of beam 43 to a load such as the schematically illustrated jet engine 48.

As shown in FIGURE 6, article-engaging unit 46 includes a conventional, visibily indicating weight recorder or load cell 49 connected by releasable clevis means 50 to beam 43. Clevis means 51 connects -a force-transmitting element of recorder 49 to an engine-engaging clamp 52. Fitting 52 engages a lifting bracket 53 on the top of the engine 48 shown in FIGURE 1. With engine connecting fitting 52, being conventional in character, its structural details have not been shown.

Similarly, load-lifting or article-engaging means 47 includes a load cell or visibly indicating, weight measuring unit 54 connected through releasable clevis means 55 to beam unit 43. Mechanism 47 additionally includes clevis means 56 which serves to connect a force-transmitting element of load cell 47 to an engine-engaging fitting 57, similar to fitting 52. As shown in FIGURE 1, fitting 57 engages a lifting connection 58 on engine 48.

As is apparent by reference to FIGURE 6, load lifting means 46 and 47 are longitudinally spaced along the beam 43.

Beam units 42 and 43 are interconnected by a selectively positionable connecting unit 59. Connecting unit 59 comprises an upper trolley unit 60 mounted for longitudinal sliding :movement on beam 42 and a lower trolley unit 61 mounted for longitudinal sliding movement on beam 43.

Trolley unit 60 comprises frame means 62 which supports a pair of rotary wheel units 63 and 64. As shown in FIGURE 6, wheel units 63 and 64 are disposed for rolling and sliding movement on the flange portions of the beam 42 on opposite sides of its web.

Similarly, trolley unit 61 includes frame means 65 and a plurality of rotatable wheel units 66. Wheel units 66 are in rolling engagement with flange portions of beam 43 on opposite sides of the beam web.

The position of trolley unit 6.1 longitudinally of beam 43 is determined by a conventional, lead screw adjusting mechanism 67. Lead screw adjusting mechanism 67 includes a conventional lead screw 68 mounting brackets 69, 70 and 71 which journal lead screw 68 on beam 43, and a manually operable lead screw turning handle 72. Lead screw 68 rotat-ably engages a trolley block 73. Thus, by rotating the handle 72, the lead screw is rotated so as to move the trolley 61 selectively between the pair of articleengaging or load-supporting units 46 and 47.

A substantially identical lead screw adjusting mechanism 74 is mounted on beam unit 42 and serves to selectively determine the position of trolley unit 60 between the lifting eyes 45 and 44.

As shown in FIGURE 6, trolley units 60 and 61 are interconnected. This interconnection may be detachable in character and comprise a removable threaded fastening pin 75 carried by trolley 60. Pin 75 intersects an apertured portion of a mounting shaft or transverse member 76 carried by trolley 61. With threaded pin 75 removed from cross member 76, the trolley units 60 and 61 may be separated. Pin 75 may then be reinstalled so as to provide a cross member within the trolley 60. As will be obvious, a conventional swivel hook carried by trolley 60 may engage cross member 76 so as to support trolley 61. This arrangement will enable beam 43 to swivel about a vertical axis relative to beam 42.

With this trolley arrangement, the moments of force exerted by the non-symmetric engine 48 on the articleengaging means 46 and 47 may be selectively apportioned. By merely adjusting the position of the trolley unit 61, which serves as a force-transmitting connection between beams 42 and 43, the moments of force exerted on the beam 43 on opposite sides of the trolley 61 may be balanced. In this way, the engine 48 may be supported in a stabilized or balanced condition.

By selectively adjusting the position of the trolley unit 60 along the beam 42, the stabilized engine 48 may be shifted laterally of the booms 11 and 12 so as to effect lateral engine movements without casuing: lateral movement of the overall apparatus 1 or the boom units 11 and 12. Additionally, this laterally shiftable connection of the point of application of force to beam unit 42 enables a selective apportionment of force between the boom'units 11 and 12.

As shown in FIGURE 1, the hoist unit 1 is moved into position adjacent the tail area of an aircraft, with the base units 2 and 3 moving beneath the elevation of the engine and is associated mounting foil. The boom units 11 and 12 are then spaced above the engine 48 so that the engine 48 may be vertically supported. With the engine-engaging units 46 and 47 connected to the engine lifting pads 58 and 53, the engine may be stably supported while it is being disconnected from the aircraft. If desired, the disconnected engine 48 may be shifted laterally of the load beam 42 so as to be positively freed from the engine mount and then lowered to a dolly positioned between the base units 2 and 3. As will be appreciated, the dolly may be rolled into position through the open passage which extends between the base units 2 and 3. With the engine supported on the dolly, the engine may then be rolled through this passage and on to a service area.

In the alternative embodiment shown in FIGURES 7 and 8, the beams 42 and 43 have been separated. Beam 43 is shown with its associated trolley mechanism 61 engaged with the hook 35 extending downwardly from boom 11. The beam 42 is similarly supported by the hook 39 of the boom unit 12.

This modified load-supporting structure may be achieved by disconnecting the trolley units 60 and 61. The tranverse member 76 of trolley 61 may then be connected to the hook 35 so as to provide a single loadsupporting beam supported from the boom .11. The separated beam 42 is inverted and the transverse member 75 of its trolley 60 supported from the hook 39 extending from the boom 12.

As shown in FIGURE 7, the clevis units 50 and 51 have been disconnected from the force-monitoring units 47 and 49 and connected directly with lifting brackets 77 and 78 of an engine supporting cradle 79. Similarly, clevises connected with eyelet 44 of beam 42 and auxiliary eyelet 80 of this beam serve to connect the beam 42 with dolly lifting points on the side of the engine opposite to that from the beam 43.

As shown in FIGURE 8, this mounting arrangement is particularly useful when moving an engine into and out of a confined area such as the interior of an aircraft. The jet engine 81 shown in FIGURES 7 and 8 is illustrated, in FIGURE 8, as it is being either moved into or out of the interior of a transport aircraft. While being so moved, the base units 2 and 3 extend beneath the aircraft fuselage while the boom units 11 and 12 move with the engine 81 into the loading door of the aircraft.

As will be appreciated, the trolleys 60 and 61 may be selectively positioned relative to the beams 42 and 43 so as to balance the engine 81 relative to the hoisting cables 33 and 36.

By individually controlling the movement of the hoisting cables 33 and 36, the engine may be selectively rotated about its longitudinal axes to maintain or obtain a desired engine position.

As will be appreciated, the FIGURES 7 and 8 loading supporting structure may also be employed in effecting the removal and installation of engines which are secured in place so as to require side lifting.

It will also be recognized that the FIGURE 7-8 embodiment is particularly useful for handling engines where overhead height is limited. With a single load beam being supported from each boom, the vertical displacement between the engine and the booms is minimized.

It will also be recognized that the load beams 42 and 43 in the FIGURE 7-8 embodiment may be secured either to the engine cradle 79 or directly to conventional lifting lugs or connections on the sides of the engine 81.

As will also be appreciated, other arrangements of the elements of the FIGURE 1 apparatus may be employed. For example, the lower load beam 43 of the FIGURE 1 apparatus may be connected directly to the hoist cables 33 and 36 through the utilization of additional mounting eyelets on the upper side of the beam 43.

It will also be recognized that where overhead height is limited, the lower load beam 43 may be supported by the hooks 35 and 39 by adding connections 44 and 45 to beam 43. The load engaging units 46 and 47 may then be transferred upwardly to the load beam 42 and used to support the engine 48 from this upper load beam.

Where the engine load is supported from the upper load beam 42, and the lower load beam 43 serves to provide the connection to the boom units, it may be desirable to integrate or rigidify the frame portions of the pulley block and 61 into a single housing unit, employing conventional fabrication techniques.

With all of the variously described embodiments of the invention, the load lifting mechanism is subject to the positive control of independently operable and spaced hoisting mechanisms. Further, in these various embodiments, the moments of force imposed by the load on the load-supporting mechanism may be selectively apportioned between load-engaging points so as to obtain a desired stabilization or balancing of the load.

In the FIGURE 1 embodiment, the load may be shifted laterally of the boom for the purpose of effecting load repositioning or for the purpose of obtaining a desired apportionment of load between the two booms of the apparatus.

The ability of an engine to be shifted longitudinally along the beam 43, or laterally along the beam 42, provides a unique apparatus versatility. This versatility is particularly important in the handling of jet aircraft engines since some engines must be moved longitudinally to free them from their mountings while others must be moved laterally. Thus, with the single apparatus shown in FIGURE 1, either degree of engine movement necessary to effect the freeing of an engine from its mounting may be easily effected.

Structural embellishments The overall utility and efiiciency of the embodiments shown in FIGURE 1 and FIGURES 7-8 may be enhanced by the addition of certain structural embellishments.

For example, each of the support trusses 16 and 1'8 may be rigidly connected with their respectively associated mast units 6 and 7 during at least the mast raising and lowering operation. Thus, as shown in FIGURE 9a, a strut 82 may be detachably secured in a truss socket 83 at one end and detachably secured in a mast socket 84 at its other end so as to rigidly interconnect the base of mast 6 and the base of truss 16. With this triangular arrangement, the cable 33 will rest on the junction of the strut 82 and the truss 16 as the mast unit 6 is being lowered. This will provide a greater moment arm for the cable 33 and facilitate mast movements in the vicinity of the collapsed mast position shown in FIGURE 9b.

As will be appreciated once the masts have been collapsed, the truss supporting members 82 may be removed from their sockets so as to enable the trusses 16 and 18 to be laid down, as shown in FIGURE 3.

When the apparatus is being used to move an engine into or out of the interior of an aircraft, through its relatively restricted door, it may become desirable to adjust the elevation of the outer extremities of the boom ends to enable them to move into or out of the aircraft interior with the engine. In such instances it may also be desirable to maintain a horizontal inclination for the outer portions of the booms so as to enable the boom ends to move freely into and out of the aircraft doorway. FIGURE 1 illustrates, in schematic form, an arrangement which facilitates such free ingress and egress of the booms.

FIGURE 10 illustrates structure associated with the boom 11. However, it will be appreciated that this structure is equally applicable to the boom 12. As shown in FIGURE l0, boom unit 11 has been articulated, i.e., broken down into an inner boom portion 11a and an outer boom portion 11b joined by a conventional, pin type, pivot joint 85. A conventional adjusting screw 86 is carried by a frame portion of boom section 11b and abuttingly engages an abutment plate 87 carried by a frame portion of the boom portion 11a. By adjusting the adjusting screw 86, the boom portion 111) may be maintained in a substantially horizontally extending posture, regardless of the elevation of its outer extremity. Thus, regardless of the elevation of the tips of the booms, the outer boom portions may remain horizontal so as to enable them to move freely in and out of limited passages.

During the raising and lowering of the mast and boom units, it becomes desirable to temporarily secure the free ends of the cables 33 and 36 relative to the free ends of their associated booms.

Such securing may be effected on a temporary basis by connecting the cable hooks to frame portions of the boom ends. However, a more positive securing arrangement applicable to either boom, is illustrated in FIG- URES 11 and 12 in connection with hook 35, cable 33 and boom 11. This arrangement, of course, is equally applicable to hook 39, cable 36 and boom 12.

Thus, as shown in FIGURE 11, the cable 33 passes downwardly from sheave 34a to a sheave =88 mounted in a conventional pulley block 89. Cable 33 extends upwardly from sheave 88 to a conventional cable end anchoring arrangement 90 on the underside of the boom 11.

As illustrated, pulley block 89 supports hook 35 and includes, on an upper portion, a resilient clip-like metallic clamp 91. Clamp 91 is adapted to resiliently and clampingl engage an anchor plate 92 carried on the underside of the end of boom 11 between the strands of the cable 33.

As the pulley block 89 is drawn upwardly toward the anchor plate 92, in response to shortening of the cable 33, the clip like member 91 will resiliently and clampingly, automatically engage the boom anchoring plate 92, as shown in FIGURE 12. This will bring the end of cable 33 into temporarily secured relationship with the free end of the boom 11 so as to enable boom lowering or raising and mast lowering or raising to take place as previously described. As will be appreciated, with slack in the cable 33, a downward pull exerted on the hook 35 will free the pulley block clip 91 from the anchoring plate 92.

When the apparatus 1 is being rolled on its casters from one location to another, or when exceedingly heavy loads are being handled, it may be appropriate to provide temporary truss-like bridging between either or both ends of the base units 2 and 3. Such temporary bridging may be secured by conventional releasable pin fastening arrangements and be fabricated much like the truss units 15, 16, 17 and 18.

Advantages and scope of the invention A prime advantage of the apparatus resides in the ability of the apparatus to effect load balancing while enabling the load to be selectively and stably manipulated between paired apparatus booms.

The positive control afforded by the individually operable hoists enables an engine to be rotated about its longitudinal axis so as to accommodate for differences in elevation of mounting connections. This ability to to tate the engine also facilitates engine movements in impeded areas.

The force moment balancing aspect of the invention, in conjunction with the force monitoring units, enables an operator to effect initial load stabilization and determine not only the extent of the total supported by the booms but also the extent to, which the load remains properly apportioned.

These features, in combination with the load straddling ability of the base units and the cantilever structure of the booms affords maximum load-handling versatility, and enables more jet engines of a Wide variety of aircraft to be effectively installed or removed.

The self-erecting and collapsing aspects of the apparatus promote not only ease of storage but also ease of transporting of the load-handling unit itself. With the booms and masts collapsed, the apparatus may be conveniently transported or moved from one location to the other. Indeed, the compact collapsed character of the unit enables it to be air-transported.

Of particular significance is the ease with which the apparatus may be collapsed without resorting to special tools or handling equipment. By employing conventional pin-type fastening elements between the bases and mast units at their pivot points of interconnection, and by employing conventional pin-type fastening means between the mast units and boom units at their respective pivot points of interconnection, the entire apparatus may be dissassembled into base, mast, and boom components and their related structural elements. This enables the entire apparatus to be readily disassembled, loaded as components on an aircraft for transportation to a re mote site, and reassembled for virtually immediate use.

A particular advantageous characteristic of the invention resides in the manner in which the twin booms may be employed either to support separate load-carrying beams or interconnected beams. With this versatility, the apparatus may be readily accommodated to diverse en gine lifting arrangements.

In describing the invention, reference has been made to preferred embodiments shown in the application drawings. However, those skilled in the engine-handling art may recognize additions, deletions, substitutions or other modifications which would fall within the purview of the invention as defined in the appended claims.

I claim:

1. An aircraft engine handling apparatus comprising:

a pair of horizontally spaced boom means;

aircraft engine supporting means carried by said boom means and including aircraft engine engaging means moveable transversely of said boom means; and

independently operable hoisting means extending from each of said boom means to said aircraft engine supporting means;

said aircraft engine engaging means including:

first, aircraft engine engaging means adapted to support one end portion of an aircraft engine,

second, aircraft engine engaging means adapted to support another end portion of said aircraft engine,

said first and second aircraft engine engaging means being operable to support said aircraft engine extending longitudinally between said pair of spaced booms; and

said aircraft engine supporting means including:

rail means supported by and extending transversely between said boom means, said rail means supporting said aircraft engine engaging means for movement therealong.

2. Aircraft engine handling apparatus comprising:

a pair of horizontally spaced base units disposed on opposite sides of a substantially unobstructed, generally horizontally extending passageway having at least one open end;

a pair of horizontally spaced boom means, each supported on one of said base units; aircraft engine supporting means carried by said boom means and including aircraft engine engaging means moveable transversely of said boom means; and hoisting means extending from said boom means to said aircraft engine supporting means; said boom units extending longitudinally of said passageway and said base units, said boom units being spaced transversely of said passageway, with said aircraft engine supporting means being operable to move an aircraft engine transversely of said passageway; said aircraft engine engaging means including:

first, aircraft engine engaging means adapted to support one end portion of an aircraft engine, second, aircraft engine engaging means adapted to support another end portion of said aircraft engine, said first and second aircraft engine engaging means being operable to support said aircraft engine extending longitudinally between said pair of spaced booms; and said aircraft engine supporting means including:

rail means supported by and extending transversely between said boom means, said rail means supporting said aircraft engine engaging means for movement therealong. 3. Aircraft engine handling apparatus comprising: a principal load beam having two spaced lifting points thereon; aircraft engine supporting means attached to said load beam; said aircraft engine supporting means including a principal trolley mounted on said principal load beam for movement between said lifting points;

a pair of spaced-apart booms;

hoisting means extending from each of said lifting points to one of said booms;

upright support means; and

means for securing each of said booms to said upright support means.

4. The apparatus according to claim 3 wherein:

said aircraft engine supporting means includes an auxiliary load beam supported by and extending transversely of said principal load beam; and

said auxiliary load beam includes two spaced aircraft engine lifting means.

5. The apparatus according to claim 4, further includan auxiliary trolley mounted on said auxiliary load beam for movement between said aircraft engine points thereon, and

connecting means joining said auxiliary trolley to said principal trolley.

6. A device for hoisting elongated aircraft engines comprising:

a first elongated, rigid, beam,

means for hoisting said first beam at two spaced points of attachment thereon,

a second elongated, rigid, beam;

means for supporting an elongated aircraft engine from two spaced points of attachment on said second beam; and

beam connecting means for connecting said first and second beams together in crossed, superimposed relation intermediate the spaced points of attachment on each of said beams;

said connecting means being operable to permit an aircraft engine to translate along the axis of either of said beams.

7. The device according to claim 6, wherein:

said beam connecting means includes a first trolley mounted for movement along said first beam and a 12 second trolley mounted for movement along said second beam, means for producing relative translational movement between said first beam and said first trolley, and means for producing relative translational movement between said second beam and said second trolley, said means for producing relative movement between each of said beams and their respective trolleys being operable independently of each other. 8. Aircraft engine handling apparatus comprising: a pair of horizontally spaced boom means; independently operable hoisting means extending from each of said boom means, said hoisting means being mutually spaced in one horizontal direction; and a pair of load beam means, each carried by one of said hoisting means with said load beam means extending transversely of said one direction; each said load beam means including a pair of aircraft engine engaging means and means for selectively adjusting the moments of force exerted by an aircraft engine carried by said load beam on said pair of aircraft engine engaging means; said pair of load beam means being connectable with spaced portions of an aircraft engine. 9. An aircraft engine handling apparatus comprising: a pair of horizontally displaced boom means;

aircraft engine supporting means including a pair of spaced aircraft engine engaging means and a pair of spaced lifting points; means for selectively adjusting the moments of force exerted by an aircraft engine on said aircraft engine engaging means; and independently operable first and second hoisting means, with each of said hoisting means extending from one of said boom means to one of said lifting points of said load supporting means; said first and second hoisting means being operable to induce relative vertical displacement between said lifting points. 10. Aircraft engine handling apparatus comprising: a pair of horizontally spaced boom means;

aircraft engine supporting means carried jointly by said boom means; and load apportioning means for selectively adjusting the portion of a load transmitted through said load supporting means to each of said boom means; said load apportioning means comprising rail means for selectively shifting said load supporting means between said booms; said aircraft engine supporting means including:

first aircraft engine engaging means adapted to support one end portion of an aircraft engine, second aircraft engine engaging means adapted to support another end portion of said aircraft engine, said first and second aircraft engine engaging means being adapted to support said aircraft engine with said engine extending longitudinally between said pair of spaced booms. 11. Aircraft engine handling apparatus comprising: a pair of boom means; a pair of load beam means; each said load beam means having a pair of spaced aircraft engine lifting connections and a force transmitting connection mounted moveably between said aircraft engine lifting connections; one of said beam means being supportable by its force transmitting connection from one of said boom means and alternately supportable jointly by said pair of boom means; the other of said beam means being supportable by its force transmitting connection from one of said boom means and alternately supportable by said force transmitting connection of said one beam means.

13 12. An aircraft engine handling apparatus comprising: a pair of horizontally spaced boom means; aircraft engine engaging means; aircraft engine moving means connecting said first aircraft engine engaging means with said boom means, said aircraft engine moving means including:

horizontally extending support means supporting said aircraft engine engaging means for horizontal translation while said boom means are fixedly positioned, and elevating means connecting said support means with said boom means for vertical translation, said aircraft engine engaging means being operable to support an elongate aircraft engine extending longitudinally of, and generally between said boom means.

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9/ 1952 Germany. 8/ 1937 Great Britain. 8/ 1953 Netherlands. 4/ 1965 France.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification254/281, 294/81.3, 294/86.4, 212/901, 212/345, 414/626, 212/299, 212/262
International ClassificationB66C23/00, B66C1/10, B66C19/02, B66D3/04
Cooperative ClassificationB66D3/04, B66C23/00, B66C2700/03, B66C1/10, Y10S212/901, B66C19/02, B66D2700/028, B66C23/485
European ClassificationB66C23/00, B66D3/04, B66C23/48B, B66C1/10, B66C19/02