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Publication numberUS3433690 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 18, 1969
Filing dateMay 25, 1965
Priority dateMay 25, 1965
Also published asDE1997476U
Publication numberUS 3433690 A, US 3433690A, US-A-3433690, US3433690 A, US3433690A
InventorsFred K Barns
Original AssigneeGoodrich Co B F
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Butt splicer for sheet material
US 3433690 A
Abstract  available in
Images(10)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 18, 1969 F. K. BARNS BUTT SPLICER FOR SHEET MATERIAL Sheet Filed May 25, 1965 INVENTOR. FRED KBARNS BY .ATTY.

March 18, 1969 F K. BARNS 3,433,690

BUTT SPLICER FOR SHEET MATERIAL Filed May 25, 1965 Sheet 2 of lO INVENTOR. FRED K. BARNS F. K. BARNS March 18, 1969 BUTT SPLICER FOR SHEET MATERIAL Sheet of 10 Filed May 25, 1965 KHHH HHHHHH FIG.4

ATTY.

March 18, 1969 F. K. BARNS 3,433,690

BUTT SPLICER FOR SHEET MATERIAL Filed May 25, 1965 INVENTOR.

FRED K. BARNS ATTY:

March 18, 1969 F. K. BARNS BUTT SFLICER FOR SHEET MATERIAL Sheetiof 10 Filed May 25, 1965 v S m u u l M n M Q WK w 4 w R 3 W 9Q mm 93 av mm MK 2 L ATTY;

Sheet 6 of 10 March 18, 1969 F. K. BARNS BUTT SPLICER FOR SHEET MATERIAL Filed hiay 25, 1965 s. v N miiwfl \QQ QQ mm w I MB lull! l I |ll||-..|| M n mm @a n3 K 3 5 i 3 6Q m3 FUf m2 mm m a a mu v Q ml+ mm b on w A? 2 5 v C QM. m QM MN mil w Ami mi Wm @i 2W 5 um mm March 18, 1969 F. K. BARNS BUTT SPLICER FOR SHEET MATERIAL Sheet Filed May 25, 1965 INVENTOR. FRED K. BARNS ATTY.

F. K. BARNS BUTT SPLICER FOR SHEET MATERIAL March 18, 1969 Sheet M of 10 Filed May 25, 1965 b 3 2m G a 61 m1 H W llii: X m w /6 F C a W Y a a 5 3w INVENTOR. FRED KBARNS ATTYZ United States Patent 3,433,690 BUTT SPLICER FOR SHEET MATERIAL Fred K. Barns, Akron, Ohio, assignor to The BAH. Goodrich Company, New York, N .Y., a corporation of New York Filed May 25, 1965, Ser. No. 458,708 US. Cl. 156-457 14 Claims Int. Cl. B6511 69/06 ABSTRACT OF DISCLOSURE This invention relates to the splicing of sections or panels of adhesive material and more particularly to the method and apparatus for the butt splicing of thin panel sections of bias-cut unvulcanized rubber coated cord fabric. Such spliced sections of cord fabric are used in the manufacture of pneumatic tires. The term butt splicing as used herein means the adhering of an edge of one section of coated cord fabric to the adjoining edge of another section of coated cord fabric without overlapping the margin of the spliced edges.

The present invention is an improvement on the overlapping of splices as well as an improvement on butt splicing of coated cord fabric wherein an overhead device with intermeshing Splicing shoes cooperate with resiliently mounted slidable supports beneath the edge margins of the cord fabric such that as the shoes intermesh the margins of the adjacent sections of cord fabric are forced into abutting contact for mutual adherence.

In lap splicing the operation was largely a manual operation because of the necessity for aligning margins of stock pieces with precision, and because the relatively thin coated cord presented problems in handling. The thickness of such fabric was in the order of about .030 inch while the width was approximately 5 feet or more along the overlapping margins. Freshly calendered bias cut rubber coated cord fabric normally tends to adhere readily to itself by merely touching two surfaces together. Accordingly, the handling of such stock required precise manipulation, and the splicing required extreme care.

The splicing method and apparatus of the prior art of which this is an improvement encountered certain difficulties in the effectiveness of the splice, releasing of the stock fro-m the splicing equipment, and manipulation of the spliced section.

It has been discovered that by providing positively driven intermeshing splicing means operative on the top and bottom portions of the marginal edges a more effective splice is made, minimizing cord displacement and distortion. Such effected splice is stronger and accurately controlled. Heretofore, at best, the top surfaces only were pressured into contact and reliance was made on resiliently biased follow-up shoes beneath the bottom surfaces to follow up the action initiated by the upper shoes. Such resiliency was not fully responsive nor consistent in its action. It was further found that it was possible in certain instances to control the action and movement of the lower shoes to a greater or lesser extent than that of the upper shoes to achieve certain specific results in the splice. Such control varies with condition of stock, size, thread count and thickness of stock. Heretofore, the

tacky surface tended to adhere to the lower shoes despite their oppositely acting bias on alternating shoes. The present invention effectively overcomes this by positively moving alternating shoes in opposite directions assuring positive release from the tacky surface. In addition, the present invention effectively strips the butt spliced sections of the forward and rearward spliced sections by operating an overhead stripper on the trailing edge of the forward section thereby facilitating the advancing of the spliced sections to position the rearwardly disposed section for the next splice. Engagement by the stripper of the leading edge of the rearwardly disposed section, as was previously done, predisposed the splice to being torn as the stock was advanced after the splicing was completed.

It is an object of this invention to provide a new and improved butt splicing apparatus which effectively splices adjoining margins of coated cord fabric.

Another object of thisinvention is to provide a more effective butt splice between coated cord fabric panels.

A further object of this invention is to provide a new and improved method of butt splicing adjoining edges of coated cord fabric without overlapping the marginal edges.

A further object of this invention is to provide a novel means for effecting a splice on adjoining edges of adjacent rubber coated cord fabric which positively transfers rubber between adjoining upper surfaces as well as between adjoining lower surfaces.

A further object of this invention is to provide a novel splicing apparatus which has means for controlling the amount of transfer of elastomeric material between marginal edges of adjoining panels being spliced.

A further object of this invention is to provide means for effectively and efficiently stripping tacky coated cord fabric from a splicing apparatus to facilitate removal of such stock in preparation for the next splicing operation without disturbing the splice.

A further object of this invention is to provide a new and improved method for butt splicing rubber coated cord fabric which transfers bonding material between upper surfaces as well as lower surfaces of adjacent marginal edges.

A further object of this invention is to provide a novel splicing means for effecting a butt splicing operation on adjacent edges While positively transferring rubber between adjacent upper and lower surfaces with means for adjusting the splicing angle of the splicing means without effecting the consistency of the splice.

These and other objects and advantages of the invention will hereinafter more fully appear. In the accompanying drawings there is shown for purposes of illustration one form which the invention may assume in practice.

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is an elevational view of the splicing apparatus showing a few of the splicing heads;

FIG. 2 is a plan view of the splicing apparatus with the splicing heads omitted;

FIG. 3 is a cross sectional view of a complete splicing head in its position when the splicing mechanism is in retracted position;

FIG. 4 is a side elevational view of a splicing head showing the splicing shoe;

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary cross sectional view of the cord fabric showing a portion of the lower surface of the upper splicing shoe, and the upper portion of the lower splicing head;

FIG. 6 is a view of the margin-engaging surface of the splicing shoes, taken along the line 6--6 of FIG. 3;

FIG. 7 is an elevational view of the splicing head;

FIG. 8 is a cross sectional view of the splicing head taken along line 8--8 of FIG. 4;

FIG. 9 is a cross sectional view of the splicing head taken along the line 9-9 of FIG. 3;

FIG. 10 is an enlarged elevational view of the splicing apparatus showing the apron with a portion broken away to more clearly disclose the actuating means for the lower splicing head with the rack and pinion omitted for clarity reasons. (The rack and pinion are shown in FIG. 1.);

FIG. 11 is a plan view of the upper splicing head;

FIG. 12 is a fragmentary side elevational view of the splicing apparatus showing the means for adjusting the angle of the upper and lower splicing heads;

FIG. 13 is a cross sectional view of the actuating means for the lower splicing heads taken along the line 13-13 of FIG. 14;

FIG. 14 is an enlarged plan view showing a portion of the means for compensating for the length of stroke of the actuating means for the lower splicing shoes taken along the line 14-14 of FIG. 12;

FIG. 15 is a plan view of a portion of the apron showing the recess for the stripper plate with one recess housing the annular stripper disc and another recess housing the stripper disc and retaining key;

FIG. 16 is a plan view of the srtipper disc;

FIG. 17 is a cross sectional view of the stripper disc taken along line 1717 of FIG. 18;

FIG. 18 is a plan view of the adjustable stripper plate with the stripper disc shown in phantom lines;

FIG. 19 is a plan View of the lower splicing shoes, plate and disc;

FIG. 20 is a cross sectional elevational view of the adjusting means and the lower splicing shoes;

FIG. 21 is a perspective view of a nut which is pivotally connected to the stripper plate;

FIG. 22 is a schematic view showing the positioning of fabric pieces after splicing prior to pre-positioning for the next splice; and

FIGS. 23a, 23b and 230 are schematic plan views illustrating successive stages in the splicing of the coated fabric.

Referring to FIGS. 1, 10 and 22, a butt splicing mechanism 10 (hereinafter referred to as the splicer) having a table 11 is positioned between the delivery end of a stock feed conveyor 12 (see FIG. 22) and the receiving end of a stock take-off conveyor 14. A piece of bias-cut weftless rubber coated cord fabric 15 is advanced by the feed conveyor 12 to a receiving apron 16 positioned immediately ahead of the splicer 10 so that the fabn'c 15 may be positioned by the apron 16 with the leading edge 17 within the splicer closely adjacent to the trailing edge 18 of the preceding panel of fabric 15s. Then as hereinafter explained, the splicer 10 operates automatically to butt splice edge 17 to the edge 18. As soon as the splice is completed, takeoff conveyor 14 advances the resulting spliced strip or panel of fabric 15s forwardly through the splicer over a guide plate 19 (FIGS. 2 and 22) to reposition the trailing edge of the spliced panel fabric 15s so that another fabric panel may be spliced to the end of the spliced strip. The continuous spliced strip of fabric 15s may be fed after it is spliced directly to a tire building machine or for storage onto suitable reels. The means for driving the conveyor are not shown in detail since such apparatus are old and well known in the art.

Each piece of bias cut fabric 15 (FIGS. 6 and 23a) is deilvered to apron 16 with its cut edges 20 (the edges at which the cord ends are exposed) parallel to the travel direction of the feed conveyor 12, and with its cords parallel to the leading edge 17 and trailing edge 18. The oblique splicing axis XX (FIG. 23a) is parallel to the edges 17 and 18. The conveyors 12 and 14 as well as apron 16 and guide plate 19 include guide rails at one side against which one of the bias-cut edges 20 of the fabric is positioned as it is moved toward and away from the splicer 10.

The splicer 10 includes a base frame 21 (FIGS. 1 and 2) which is pivotally mounted on and secured to a bed plate 22. Base frame 21 supports a pair of spaced vertically extending columns 23, the upper ends of which are interconnected by a tie bar 24. The columns 23 support at its intermediate portion the horizontally extending table 11. Mounted for movement on columns 23 between the base frame 21 and the table 11 is a lower movable member or platen 27, and mounted for movement between table 11 and the tie bar 24 is an upper movable member or upper platen 28. Members 27 and 28 are interconnected by a pair of spaced tie bars 29 to provide simultaneous reciprocal movement therebetween. To maintain lower member 27 and upper member 28 in alignment with the columns 23 and to assure free slidable movement along such columns 23, tie bars 29 are provided with a horizontally extending shaft 31 suitably journalled thereon at its end portions. Shaft 31 has keyed closely adjacent its ends spur gears 32, which gears 32 mesh with vertically extending racks 33 secured to the columns 23. Splicer 10 is angularly adjustable about the bed plate 22 to accommodate fabric pieces which are bias cut at different angles. Such adjustment is made by pivoting the base frame 21 about its geometric center or pivot means 35 which is intermediate to columns 23 on the bed plate 22. The splicer 10 is secured at the desired angle of adjustment by tightening bolts 38 which extend through arcuate openings 39 at the opposite end portions of the base frame 21 and which bolts are threaded into bores on the bed plate 22. The movable upper member 28 is of generally rectangular shape as shown in FIG. 1 and includes an upper rail 40 from which the several splicing heads 41 are suspended. Each splicing head 41 includes an inverted U-shaped frame (FIG. 3) having a pair of depending parallel leg members 43. Each member 43 pivotally supports an inverted T-shaped shoe supporting bar 45 by a pair of upper pivot link members 46 and a pair of lower pivot link members 47. Link members 46 and 47 provide a parallelogram type of linkage between the movable shoe bar 45 and stationary member 43 in a manner to be more fully described. The lower end of each bar 45 has a horizontally extending portion to which is secured serrated splicing shoes 50. As shown in FIG. 6, each splicing shoe 50 is shaped in its plan view like a parallelogram and includes a heel portion 51 having a series of fiat teeth 52 which project transversely to the opposite edges of the fabric and which are intermeshed along the splicing axis X with corresponding teeth 52 on the oppositely disposed splicing shoe 50. When the splicing heads 41 are in retracted position, preferably the teeth of each set of shoes 50 are intermeshed sufliciently so that the tip of each tooth 52 extends across the gap between the opposing edges 17 and 18 of the fabric pieces 15 and 15s positioned under the shoes 50. The teeth 52 of the splicing shoes are parallel to the cut edges 20 of the fabric sheet or panels. The soles 51 or bottom fabric engaging surfaces of the serrated shoes are coplanar and are adapted to engage and confine substantially the entire surface area of the margins of opposing edges 17 and 18 of the fabric pieces 15 and 15s against the underlying serrated surfaces or shoes which are to be described.

Although only one splicing head 41 has been described, it will be understood that the upper rail 40 carries a group of splicing heads 41 that are identical in construction and function. The several splicing heads 41 are arranged with their splicing shoes 50 closely adjacent to each other in a pattern such that their splicing axis X is coincident with the splice to be effected on the adjoining panels.

A hydraulic cylinder 55 is mounted between movable bars 45 of splicing head 41 to bias such bars 45 into their retracted position as shown in FIG. 2. The cylinder 55 is suitably mounted on one shoe bar 45 while a piston 56 is mounted on the other shoe bar 45 in such a manner that the movement of the pairs of bars 45 toward each other effect a compression on the fluid within the cylinder 55 by the piston 56. Sufiicient pressure is maintained within the hydraulic cylinder 55 to maintain an outward bias on the respective bars 45 to position such bars 45 against adjustable stop screws 58 which are threaded through the leg members 43 to engage the vertical shoe supporting bars 45. The screws 58 may be adjusted to regulate the clearance between the respective shoes 50 and the table 11 and thereby regulate the extent of meshing engagement of the teeth 52 of each set of shoes with the teeth 52 of corresponding intermeshing shoes. Also, the screws 58 may be adjusted against the bars 45 to raise the shoes 50 of one or more heads an appreciable distance above the table 11 and thereby render these heads 41 inactive during the splicing action. This is necessary in those instances where the fabric is narrower and requires only a certain number of splicing heads.

Mounted on the base frame 21 are a pair of hydraulic power cylinders 60 which house pistons 62. The pistons 62 are operatively connected to the lower movable member or platen 27 by piston rods 61. Energization of the head end of hydraulic cylinder 60 effects an upward movement to the lower member 27 and a similar upward movement to the upper member 28 and the splicing heads 41. Energization of the rod end of hydraulic member 60 effects a downward movement to the upper and lower members 27 and 28 as well as the splicing head 41 bringing the soles 51 of the splicing shoes 50 into engagement with the opposing margins of the fabric pieces and 15s supported on the table 11. Further downward movement of the splicing head 41 presses the splicing shoes 50 firmly against the margins and urges the vertical legs 43 of each U-shaped bracket downwardly relative to their vertical shoe supporting bars 45. Since the downward movement of bars 45 is blocked, continued downward movement of splicing head 41 effects a horizontal movement to the bars 45 and the shoes 50. The resulting pivotal movement of the link members 46 and 47 thereby urges the opposing shoes 50 and the supporting bars 45 laterally toward each other while at the same time maintaining these bars parallel to each other. This movement of the bars 45 in turn moves the opposing splicing shoes 50 together into coplanar relationship bringing their respective serrated teeth 52 into mterrneshing relationship until they are meshed to theinmaximum depth. Since the opposing margins are maintained under vertical confining force of the shoes 50, the margins are displaced coplanarly toward each other with the movement of the splicing shoes because of the frictional engagement of the shoes with the margins until the opposing edges 17 and 18 are forcefully butted together.

A rigid tie bar 63 extends horizontally between the legs 43 through slots 63a in the bars 45 to provide adequate reinforcement between such legs 43. To complement such splicing actions, pairs of lower splicing shoes in the table 11 are similarly movable and are hereinafter described. The respective splicing heads 41 are mounted on the upper rail 40 for pivotal movement about a shaft 64 which extends vertically upwardly from the upper end portion of the U-shaped frame. Such pivot shaft 64 is suitably journalled in the upper rail 40. An angle bracket 65 (FIGS. 11 and 3) is suitably mounted on the forward portion of each of the splicing heads 41, which bracket 65 has a forwardly extending bifurcated portion 66. Mounted on the forward portion of the upper rail 40 is a pair of brackets 68 which journal a laterally extending threaded shaft 69. Threadedly mounted for movement on the threaded shaft 69 is a plurality of nuts 70 (see FIG. 21). Nut 70 is recessed at the upper and lower portions wherein each recessed portion has a pair of oppositely disposed arcuately shaped surfaces 71 which provide a positive contact with the bifurcated portion 66 6 of the angle bracket 65. Rotation of the threaded shaft 69 effects linear adjustment of the respective nuts 70 which in turn pivot the splicing heads 41 about their pivot shaft 64 to effect an adjustment in the angle of splice between the serrated teeth 52 on the respective splicing shoes 50.

A handwheel 72 and a sprocket 73 are keyed to one end of threaded shaft 69 which effects the rotation of the threaded shaft 69. Suitably secured to one end of the splicing head 41 is a hydraulic cylinder 75 which has its piston rod 76 connected by a bracket 77 to a horizontally extending stripper plate 78. Stripper plate 78 is operated by a hydraulic cylinder 75 to insure freeing of the spliced fabric from the splicing shoes upon retraction of the splicing head 41 from the stock.

As best seen in FIGS. 4 and 8, an adjustable bracket 79 is slotted at one end as at 80 to receive a threaded stud 81 which stud 81 secures the bracket 79 and its upper portion 79 to the leg member 43 on the splicing head 41. The other end portion of bracket 79 suitably rotatably receives one end of a threaded shaft 82. Threaded shaft 82 is threadedly received by a bracket 83 which is secured to the other leg member 43. Such bracket 83 rotatably journals a threaded nut 84 which through rotation effects linear adjustment of the threaded shaft 82 and the bracket 79. After such adjustment the bracket 79 is locked in its adjusted position by threaded stud 81. Mounted on the upper portion 79 of bracket 79 is photosensing mechanism 85 which aids in the alignment of marginal edges 17 and 18 of the panel stock in a manner to be described.

Table 11 has a plurality of bores 86 which receive pivot blocks 87. Each block 87 is recessed as at 87a along its outer upper periphery and has a bore 88 extending centrally therethrough. In addition, each pivot block 87 has a pair of laterally spaced apertures 8989. Secured to pivot block 87 for rotatable adjustment therewith is a parallelogram-shaped stripping plate 90, which plate 90 has a pair of laterally spaced apertures 91-91 in alignment with the apertures 8989 in block 87. To accommodate the rotation of pivot block 87 and plate 90 on Table 11 such table is dovetailed as at 92 (FIG. 15) to receive a key 94. Note FIG. 15 discloses the bore 86 on the far left with a pivot block 87 without a key 94 while the central bore 86 discloses a block 87 and a key 94. The forward edge of each key 94 projects into the recess 87a of pivot block 87 such that with stripper plate 90 secured to the block 87, the key 94 prevents the removal of such block and plate While permitting their rotation. The one end portion of stripper plate 90 has a rearwardly extending projection 95 which is bifurcated to receive the arcuately shaped recesses of a nut 96 as shown in FIG. 18. Nut 96 is similar in construction and function to nut 70 previously described.

Slidably mounted on each stripper plate 90 is a pair of opposed shoes 100 and 101 (FIGS. 19 and 20) similar in construction to the splicing shoes 50 described above except for the means for actuating such shoes. Such splicing shoes 100 and 101 include a forwardly projecting series of flat teeth 102 and 103, respectively, which intermesh along the splicing axis X in a similar manner to the teeth 52 of the splicing shoes 50. Such teeth 102 and 103 are preferably set so they intermesh sufficiently such that the tips of each of the teeth 102 and 103 extend against the gap between the opposing edges 17 and 18 of the fabric pieces 15 and 15s. Splicing shoe 100 has a downwardly eXtending projection 105 which extends through one pair of slots 91 and 89 of the stripper plate 90 and the pivot block 87. The lower end of such downwardly extending projection 105 has a horizontally extending rack 106 which meshes with a spur gear 108. In a similar manner, splicing shoe 101 has a downwardly extending projection 109 which extends through the other pair of apertures 91 and 89 of the stripper plate 90 and the pivot block 87. The downwardly extending portion 109 has a horizontally extending rack 110 which meshes with the spur gear 108. Rotation of spur gear 108 imparts a reciprocal movement in opposite directions to the respective splicing shoes 100 and 101 via their downwardly extending portions 105 and 109 and their racks 106 and 110. Spur gear 108 is keyed to a shaft 112 that is journalled for rotation in the bore 88 of pivot block 86. Secured to one end .of gear 108 is a bevel gear 115 which meshes with a bevel gear 116 keyed to a shaft 117. Rotation of shaft 117 thereby imparts a recriprocal movement to the respective splicing shoes 100 and 101.

Shaft 117 (FIGS. 10, 19 and 20) has keyed to one end thereof a spur gear 120 which meshes with a rack 121 mounted on a vertically extending rod 122 which rod 122 is connected to the lower movable member 27 for movement therewith in a manner to be described.

The lower end portion of rod 122 (FIGS. 12, 13 and 14) is threaded as at 123 and received by a sleeve 124 which sleeve 124 has a smooth hollow bore 125. Sleeve 124 is externally threaded as at 126 for threaded engagement by an internally threaded gear 127. Gear 127 in turn meshes with gear 128 on shaft 129 to which a sprocket 130 is keyed. Gear 127 is rotatably journalled on lower movable member 27 by a pair of spacers 131 and 132 to insure simultaneous linear movement of member 27 and gear 127. A pair of spaced split nuts 135 and 136 are mounted on opposed end portions of the threaded section 123 of rod 122. As lower movable member 27 is moved downwardly as viewed in FIG. 13, by the pressurization of the rod end of hydraulic cylinder 60, gear 127 and sleeve 124 move downwardly therewith, with sleeve 124 sliding relative to stationary threaded shaft 123. Such movement continues until the lower end 137 of sleeve 124 abuttingly engages nut 136 thereby moving nut 136 and threaded shaft 122 linearly along therewith. Such continued movement causes rack 121 to move downwardly therewith rotating gear 120 and shaft 117. Rotation of shaft 117 in turn rotates bevel gears 116 and 115, imparting a linear intermeshing action between respective splicing shoes 100 and 101.

As mentioned hereinbefore, handwheel 72 and sprocket 73 are keyed to one end of shaft 69. Sprocket 73 is in alignment with sprocket 130 on shaft 128. A sprocket chain 140 is trained about both sprockets 73 and 130 to insure simultaneous rotation therebetween.

The other end of threaded shaft 69 has a sprocket 141 keyed thereto and in alignment with a sprocket 142 on threaded shaft 143. A sprocket chain 145 is trained about sprockets 141 and 142 to transfer rotational movement therebetween for adjusting the splicing angle.

From the foregoing, it will be evident that as soon as a new fabric piece 15s is spliced to the trailing edge 18 of the preceding fabric strip, the resulting spliced strip is fed by the conveyor 14 to either a tire building machine or to a wind-up mechanism, until the trailing edge 18 of the strip is positioned on the splicing table 11 as shown in FIG. 23a. Simultaneously with such action a new piece of fabric 15 is delivered onto the apron 16 by the conveyor 12, and then positioned with its leading edge 17 adjacent the splicing axis XX on the table 11 as controlled by the photosensing mechanism 85 in a manner well understood in the art.

The rod end of hydraulic cylinders 60 are then pressurized to move the lower platen 27 and the upper platen 28 in a downward direction as viewed in FIGS. 1 and 10. The splicing heads 41 on the upper platen '28 are brought downward into working engagement with the margins of the fabrics to be spliced which rest on the splicing shoes 100 and 101 of table 11. Such downward movement of splicing head 41 effects initial engagement of the soles 51 of the splicing shoes 50 with the opposing margins of the fabric plies 15 and 15s.

Further downward movement of the splicing head 41 presses the splicing shoes 50 firmly against the margins and urges the vertical legs 43 downwardly relative to the respective adjacent vertical bars 45 which are moved laterally toward each other along with the splicing shoes 50. Such resulting lateral movement of bars 45 compresses the fluid in cylinder 55 while horizontal coplanar intermeshing of the serrated teeth 52 on the splicing shoes 50 effects the opposing margins of the fabric into abutting relationship while simultaneously transferring small narrow layers of the rubber material from one margin across the junction of the abutting edges to the other margin to further amalgamate the marginal edges.

Simultaneously with the splicing action of the upper splicing heads 41, the lower set of splicing shoes 100 and 101 effect a similar splicing action on the bottom surface of the fabric. Such action is effected by the downward movement of the lower platen 27 and sleeve 124. After a predetermined movement of platen 27 and sleeve 124, the lower end portion of sleeve 124 engages stop nut 136 and thereafter carries rod 122 along therewith, which action rotates gear 120. The spacing of stop nuts 136 from the lower end portion 137 of sleeve 124 determines the length of stroke that the upper platen 28 and the splicing heads 41 may travel before the splicing action by the splicing shoes 100 and 101 is effected. Rotation of gear 120 imparts a rotation to shaft 117 and bevel gears 115 and 116 which in turn rotates spur gear 108. Gear 108 imparts a linear motion to the racks 106 and 110 in opposite directions, which actions are transferred to the respective splicing shoes 100 and 101 as an intermeshing splicing action between their complementary teeth. Such splicing action of shoes 100 and 101 is accomplished in timed relationship to the splicing action by the splicing shoes 50 of splicing head 41.

When the teeth of the respective splicing shoes 50, 100 and 101 are fully meshed, the splicing action is complete. Thereafter the head end of hydraulic cylinder 60 is pressurized with the accompanying release of pressure on the rod end of hydraulic cylinder 60 effecting an upward movement to platens 27 and 28 relieving the confining pressures exerted by the upper splicing shoes 50 and the lower splicing shoes 100 and 101. With the upward movement of platen 28, the splicing shoes 50 are biased apart through the biasing action of hydraulic cylinders 55 in timed relationship to the energization of hylraulic cylinder which moves the stripper plate 78 into contact with the trailing edge of the forward fabric section which has just been spliced thereby freeing the spliced fabric for movement over the table 11. Upon release of the fabric by the splicing shoes 50, and 101, the stripper plate 78 is withdrawn from contact with the fabric section through retraction of the stripper plate 78 by the pressurization of of the rod end of hydraulic cylinder 75 simultaneously with the advancing of the spliced fabric strip to position the fabric sections for the succeeding splice. Such time movement is accomplished through suitable limit switches, and relays in cooperation with the photosensing mechanism 85.

The angular adjustment of the splicing axis for the upper and lower splicing shoes is effected by manual rotation of the handwheel 72 which rotates shaft 69, shaft 143 and shaft 128 (FIG. 12). Rotation of shaft 69 moves axially nuts 70 (FIG. 11) thereby pivoting the respective splicing heads 41 about their shaft 64 via their bracket connection 68 to such nuts '70. Rotation of shaft 143 is effected via the chain connection 145 to sprocket 141 which sprocket 134 is keyed to shaft 69. Such rotation moves nuts 96 axially thereby pivoting stripping plate 90, the splicing shoes 100 and 101 mounted thereon via the rearwardly extending projection 95.

With the rotation of the respective splicing shoes 100 and 101, downwardly extending projections 105 and 109 are similarly moved which imparts a rotation to gear 108 via racks 106 and 110. Rotation of spur gear 108 rotates gears and 116 along with shaft 117 which in turn rotates gear 120 and moves rack 121 and rod 122 downwardly as viewed in FIGS. 12 and 13. Such movement changes the spacing between the sleeve 124 and the stop nut 136 which in turn effects the timing action of shoes 100 and 101 as compared to the shoes 50. To compensate and correct the change in spacing between the nut 136 9 and sleeve 124, rotation of handwheel 72 rotates sprocket 130 via chain 140 which in turn rotates shaft 128 and the gear 127. Such rotation of gear 127 rotates threaded sleeve 124 and moves such sleeve 124 linearly by the same distance that rod 122 is moved linearly by the abovedescribed angular adjustment of the splicing shoes 100 and 101. If desired, the timing of the pick-up sleeve 124 on nut 136 and rod 122 may be adjusted through the adjustment of nut 136 on the rod 122, which action could delay or advance the splicing action by the shoes 100 and 101 relative to the splicing shoes 50.

Obviously many modifications and variations of the present invention are possible in light of the above teachings. It is therefore to be understood, that within the scope of the appended claims, the invention may be practiced otherwise than as specifically described.

I claim:

1. An apparatus for butt splicing the leading edge of a strip of material to the trailing edge of an adjacent strip of material comprising, a base frame, a support table mounted on said frame, said table having a plurality of pairs of oppositely disposed shoes movable into intermeshing engagement across the transverse splicing axis lying between such leading and trailing edges, gear means on said table operatively connected tosaid shoes for moving said shoes into and out of intermeshing engagement, a lower platen mounted on said frame for movement toward and away from said table, hydraulic power operated meaans mounted on said frame operatively connected to said lower platen for reciprocating said lower platen to and from said table, actuating means mounted on said lower platen operatively connected to said gear means for actuating said gear means to move said shoes into and out of intermeshing engagement, an upper platen mounted on said frame operatively connected to said lower platen for movement toward and away from said table, said upper platen having a plurality of splicing heads cooperative with said splicing shoes on said table for effecting a splice of the leading and trailing edge of adjacent material along said transverse splicing axis.

2. An apparatus for butt splicing as set forth in claim 1 wherein said actuating means include a first gear rotatably journalled on said lower platen for movement therewith, said first gear being operatively connected to a sprocket gear, said first gear being internally threadedly connected to a threaded sleeve, said sleeve having a hollow central bore, a vertically extending rod having a lower threaded portion and a rack on the upper end portion, said rack portion meshing with said gear means on said table for actuating said shoes on said table upon relative movement thereto, said lower threaded portion of said rod slidably passing through said central bore of said sleeve, a pair of nuts mounted on spaced portions of said threaded portion of said rod, said nuts mounted on spaced portions of said threaded portion for selective engagement with the upper or lower portion of said sleeve upon relative movement therebetween whereby adjustment of said spaced nuts adjust the timing of the actuation of said gear means on said table by said actuating means upon predetermined movement of said lower platen.

3. An apparatus for butt splicing as set forth in claim 2 wherein said base frame is adjustably mounted about a vertical pivot means, each of said pairs of oppositely disposed shoes are slidably mounted on a plate, each of said plates having a rearwardly extending arm with a bifurcated portion, each of said arms being pivotably connected to a nut received by a first transversely extended threaded shaft, whereby rotation of said threaded shaft pivots each of said plates and said splicing shoe connected thereto provides an angular adjustment of said splicing axis, each of said splicing heads having a forwardly extending arm bifurcated portion, each of said arms being pivotally connected to a nut received by a second transversely extending threaded shaft whereby rotation of said second threaded shaft pi'vots said splicing heads to provide angular adjustment of said splicing head, and means interconnecting said first and second shaft with said sprocket gear to provide simultaneous rotation upon rotation of any of said last mentioned shafts or gear to thereby provide simultaneous angular adjustment of said splicing heads and shoes.

4. An apparatus for butt splicing as set forth in claim 3 wherein said splicing heads have a plurality of spaced stripping means operative upon actuation to engage spaced portions of such sheet material lying on the trailing edge of said transversely extending splicing axis, and means for actuating said stripping means in timed relationship to the upward movement of said splicing heads.

5. The method of splicing adjacent rubber coated cord fabric panels comprising the method of positioning a pair of panels closely adjacent to each other, exerting direct pressure on the upper and lower adjacent marginal edges of the adjacent panels, and moving said panels linearly towards the other of said panels into abutting engagement while maintaining said direct pressure on the upper and lower edges wherein portions of the upper and lower surface of rubberized material are transferred from one adjacent panel to the other adjacent panel.

6. The method of butt splicing margins of unvulcanized rubberized-covered cord fabric, which method comprises the positioning of fabric margins that have edges parallel to the lay of the cords with said margins in coplanar relationship and with opposing edges in adjacent parallel relationship, gripping the upper and lower marginal portions of said opposing edges and forcibly moving said adjacent edges horizontally into engagement with one another to squeeze said edges together into a single piece of material.

7. The method of butt splicing the edges of rubberized fabric comprising the steps of positioning the marginal edges of adjacent panels of such fabric closely adjacent to each other, clamping the upper and lower marginal edges of each panel along spaced alternating adjoining portions, moving the clamped marginal edges along a horizontal plane into abutting engagement to splice said adjacent panels together to form a single unitary piece of material.

8. The method of butt splicing the edges of rubberized fabric comprising the steps of positioning the marginal leading edge of a first panel of such fabric closely adjacent to the trailing edge of a second panel of such fabric, clamping the upper and lower surfaces of each panel along spaced alternating portions of adjacent leading and trailing edges, urging the marginal edges into horizontal abutting engagement, transferring alternating portions of rub- -ber covering from the upper and lower surfaces across the junction of the edges onto adjacent panels, releasing the clamping of the upper and lower surfaces simultaneously with the stripping of the trailing edge of the second panel'of such spliced panels to facilitate the linear movement of such panel, and moving such spliced first and second panel in a linear direction to bring such trailing edge of such first panel into the same position of alignment previously held by the trailing edge of the second panel.

9. The method of butt splicing the leading edge of a strip of material to the trailing edge of an adjacent strip of material comprising the method of positioning said leading edge and trailing edge on a support table with the edges opposite and parallel to each other; clamping said edges between oppositely disposed splicing shoes for movement along a horizontal extending plane; moving said oppositely disposed splicing shoes horizontaly into intermeshing relationship across a transverse splicing axis which lies parallel to said leading and trailing edges for engagement of said edges to effect a butt splice thereof, and stripping said splicing shoes from said spliced material facilitates the linear movement of such spliced panels.

10. An apparatus for butt splicing adjacent edges of sheet material comprising a base frame, support table mounted on said base frame, said table having lower splicing means, an upper vertically reciprocable member mounted on said base frame for reciprocable movement to and from said table, said upper member having upper splicing means, said lower splicing means cooperable with said upper splicing means upon actuation for forcibly clamping opposing marginal edges of sheet material and moving said clamped edges into abutting engagement, and means positively connected to said splicing means for controlled actuation thereof.

11. An apparatus for butt splicing adjacent edges of sheet material comprising, a base frame, a support table mounted on said base frame, said table having a plurality of oppositely disposed splicing shoes located in a horizontal plane movable into intermeshing engagement across a transverse axis, a movable support mounted on said base frame reciprocable toward and away from said support table, said movable support having splicing means operative upon predetermined movement of said movable support for cooperation with said splicing shoes to clamp and hold the adjacent edges of sheet material for horizontal movement therewith to butt splice the adjacent edges of said sheet material.

12. An apparatus for butt splicing the leading edge of a strip of material to the trailing edge of an adjacent strip of material comprising, a base frame, support table mounted on said base frame, said table having a plurality of oppositely disposed shoes movable into intermeshing engagement across a transverse splicing axis lying between such leading and trailing edges, a movable support mounted on said base frame for reciprocal movement to and from said support frame, splicing means on said movable support, said splicing means operative upon predetermined movement of said movable support for cooperation with said splicing shoes to clamp said leading and trailing edges for moving said leading and trailing edges toward each other to butt splice said adjacent edges of sheet material, said splicing means having a plurality of spaced stripping means operative upon actuation to engage spaced portions of such sheet material lying on the trailing edge of said transverse axis and means for actuating said stripping means in timed relationship to the movement of said splicing means.

13. An apparatus for butt splicing as set forth in claim 12 wherein adjusting means are operatively interconnected between said splicing shoes and said splicing means for adjusting the splicing angle of said splicing means and shoes to thereby vary the transverse axis relative to the longitudinal center line of such stripping material passing therethrough.

14. An apparatus for butt splicing adjacent edges of sheet material comprising a base frame, a support table mounted on said base frame for receiving the leading edge of a strip of material for butt splicing onto the trailing edge of an adjacent strip of material resting thereon, a plurality of splicing shoes movably mounted on said frame for cooperative working with splicing shoes on said table, means operatively connected to said shoes for actuating said splicing shoes to perform a splicing action across an axis defining a transverse splicing axis which axis lies between such leading and trailing edge, and stripping means operative in timed relationship after said splicing action on the trailing edge of said splicing axis to facilitate the removal of such sheet material without interference to the affected splice.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,956,615 10/1960 Hasselquist 156502 3,130,100 4/1964 Hasselquist 156-157 3,325,328 6/1967 Henley 156157 3,355,343 11/1967 Beck 156-304 DOUGLAS 1. DRUMMOND, Primary Examiner.

US. Cl. X.R. 156304, 502

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CGRRECTION Patent No. 3,433,690 March 18, 196.

Fred K. Barns It is certified that error appears in the above identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

Colunm 9, line 29, "meaans" should read means Column 11, line 9 "positively should read operatively Signed and sealed this 31st day of March 1970.

(SEAL) Attest:

Edward M. Fletcher, Jr.

Attesting Officer Commissioner of Patents WILLIAM E. SCHUYLER, JR.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2956615 *Apr 17, 1958Oct 18, 1960Goodrich Co B FStock stripper for splicer heads
US3130100 *Jul 17, 1956Apr 21, 1964Goodrich Co B FMethod and apparatus for butt splicing sheet material
US3325328 *Oct 21, 1963Jun 13, 1967Gen Tire & Rubber CoMethod of and apparatus for butt splicing coated fabric
US3355343 *Dec 30, 1963Nov 28, 1967Gen Tire & Rubber CoMethod and apparatus for butt splicing coated fabric
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3885596 *Jul 5, 1973May 27, 1975Alexeff Snyder EtsFabric splice apparatus
US3962022 *Jul 1, 1974Jun 8, 1976Industrie Pirelli S.P.A.Method and apparatus for producing a continuous band of rubberized fabric having transversal reinforcing metal elements
US4017352 *May 26, 1976Apr 12, 1977The Goodyear Tire & Rubber CompanyApparatus used in the application of white sidewall to a tire
US4025384 *Dec 22, 1975May 24, 1977Bridgestone Tire Company LimitedApparatus for splicing rubber coated cord fabric sections
US4054475 *Jan 7, 1976Oct 18, 1977Industrie Pirelli S.P.A.Method for producing a continuous band of rubberized fabric having transversal reinforcing metal elements
US4087308 *Apr 14, 1976May 2, 1978The Steelastic CompanyApparatus and method for making reinforced elastomeric fabric
US4231836 *Feb 2, 1979Nov 4, 1980Gislaved AbSystem for automatic joining and rolling up of cord strips
US4466531 *Jun 11, 1982Aug 21, 1984The Steelastic CompanyApparatus for making elastomeric fabric
US4765862 *Feb 13, 1987Aug 23, 1988Bridgestone CorporationApparatus for joining the ends of belt-shaped materials
US7073552Dec 20, 2002Jul 11, 2006The Goodyear Tire & Rubber CompanyTire preparation ply manufacturing apparatus and method
US8685199Jun 14, 2006Apr 1, 2014The Goodyear Tire & Rubber CompanyTire preparation ply manufacturing apparatus and method
US20040118513 *Dec 20, 2002Jun 24, 2004The Steelastic Company LlcTire preparation ply manufacturing apparatus and method
US20060219358 *Jun 14, 2006Oct 5, 2006The Goodyear Tire And Rubber CompanyTire preparation ply manufacturing apparatus and method
US20100115740 *Aug 2, 2005May 13, 2010Changsheng GuoPassenger conveyor handrail splicing technique
EP0443771A2 *Feb 13, 1991Aug 28, 1991Bridgestone CorporationMethod and apparatus for correcting cut edge position
EP0443771A3 *Feb 13, 1991Dec 18, 1991Bridgestone CorporationMethod and apparatus for correcting cut edge position
Classifications
U.S. Classification156/157, 156/907, 156/304.7, 156/502
International ClassificationB29C65/00
Cooperative ClassificationB29C66/1142, B29C65/00, Y10S156/907, B29L2030/003, B29K2021/00, B29D2030/424, B29C66/43
European ClassificationB29C65/00, B29C66/43, B29C66/1142
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Dec 15, 1992ASAssignment
Owner name: UNIROYAL GOODRICH TIRE COMPANY, THE, OHIO
Free format text: PARTIAL RELEASE;ASSIGNOR:MICHELIN FINANCE (PAYS-BAS) B.V.;REEL/FRAME:006401/0055
Effective date: 19911231
Jul 31, 1992ASAssignment
Owner name: MICHELIN FINANCE (PAYS-BAS)
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF CHICAGO, THE;REEL/FRAME:006169/0591
Effective date: 19911209
Jun 23, 1988ASAssignment
Owner name: FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF CHICAGO, THE
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:UNIROYAL GOODRICH TIRE COMPANY, THE;REEL/FRAME:005004/0169
Effective date: 19880623