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Publication numberUS3434302 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 25, 1969
Filing dateSep 26, 1967
Priority dateSep 26, 1967
Publication numberUS 3434302 A, US 3434302A, US-A-3434302, US3434302 A, US3434302A
InventorsArthur M Stoner
Original AssigneeConnecticut Bank & Trust Co Of, Glacier Ware Inc, Richard C Schneider, Roger L Paquin
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bottle chilling device
US 3434302 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 1969 A. M. STONER ETAL 3,434,302

BOTTLE CHILLING DEVICE Sheet Filed Sept. 26, 1967 E m w NMHm R mwww m N .6.4 T /M P A R 9 Hmm T06 n/a ARR March 25, 1969 A. M. STONER ETAL 3,434,302

BOTTLE CHILLING DEVICE Filed Sept. 26, 1967 Sheet 2 //V VENTOIP ARTHUR MSTONER RIGHA RD 6. SCHNEIDER ROGER L. PAOU/N March 25, 1969 STQNER T L 3,434,302

BOTTLE GHILLING DEVICE Sheet 2 of 5 Filed Sept. 26, 1967 M/VE/VTORS March 25, 1969 A. M. STONER ETAL BOTTLE CHILLING DEVICE s 1 R R mm m M 55 s 1 0mm N 5 R w 5 mm 0 vmnu T NTGO a W M m HME I s mwwww ARR 0 Filed Sept. 26, 1967 March 25, 1969 STONER ETAL 3,434,302

BOTTLE CHILLING DEVI CE Filed Sept. 26, 1967 Sheet 5 o f 5 I08 m9 I J [27 I I [03 I2 B0 uvvmrons /25 /3/ ART/1w? M STOMER /2/ a 12 RICHARD arson/mam L L ROGER L. mow /24 /22 I32 /23 ATTORNEYS United States Patent 01 iice 3,434,302 Patented Mar. 25, 1969 US. Cl. 62-457 27 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE The device chills a bottle and its contents while displaying the bottle and its label vertically. It has a pair of cold capsules containing freezable liquid, each having a cupped inner vertical bottle-engaging wall, an outer vertical arcuate wall, and arcuate vertical end walls. Support means hold a bottle and the two capsules vertically with the capsules nearly meeting at the rear of the bottle and with the label displayed at the front. A receptacle in the support means collects condensed moisture, and cam means enables the end walls of the capsules to swing the capsules toward and away from each other to accommodate different bottle sizes, while retaining them otherwise in approximately the same positions. A wedge or spring holds the bottle snugly against the inner arcuate walls of said capsules.

This application is a continuation-in-part of application Ser. No. 596,255, filed Nov. 22, 1966 and now abandoned.

This invention relates to a bottle-cooling device.

Our new device maintains the temperature of wines and the like when they are served in a restaurant. Our device is placed on the table and a bottle of wine, previously cooled to the correct temperature in a special refrigerator, is then placed in our device.

One object of the invention is to maintain the temperature of the wine at approximately the same temperature as that of the special refrigerator in which it is stored prior to serving (about 37 F.). After the bottle has been opened and part of the contents poured into glasses, the partially filled bottle is returned to our cooler to maintain the temperature until the remainder of the contents of the bottle is consumed.

Another object of the invention is to accomplish this cooling while at the same time conveniently displaying the label.

A further object is to provide a cooling device more convenient to use than is the conventional wine cooling bucket, where the bottle is buried in cracked ice both prior to serving, and, by present practice, after part of the contents of the bottle are poured off. However, when a bottle is removed from cracked ice for the first servin the cavity in the ice from which the bottle was removed disappears, and it is, to say the least, not convenient to re-bury the bottle in the cracked ice, though that would have to be done for efliciently maintaining the temperature of the bottles contents.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a bottle cooling device that is more compact, more convenient to store, and less costly than the conventional ice :bucket. Our new device is small enough so that it can be used on crowded restaurant tables, in contrast to the relatively large ice buckets now in common use that frequently cannot be placed on a small restaurant table.

Another disadvantage of conventional ice buckets is that the general effect with ice is messy, and that the label tends to get washed off either by the melting ice or by condensed moisture. 'It is quite desirable to retain the label in place, and this is done by our new device.

The present invention is intended to provide an improved way of keeping bottles cool while displaying their labels. It employs a novel type of cold capsule which contains a liquid that can be frozen and, when frozen, can then be used for an hour or more to keep the contents of the bottle cool without any other refrigeration. Two such capsules are used with each bottle in a short holder that retains contact of the bottle with its chilling capsules, collects the small amount of moisture of condensation, and enhances the display of the bottles label.

An important feature of the invention is its adaptability to various sizes of bottles. Bottles come in many sizes and to tailor them exactly to one bottle would greatly limit the utility of the device. In the present invention, adaptability to bottles of various sizes is achieved in a novel and significant manner, utilizing a novel cam structure.

In a preferred form of the invention the cold capsules are supported by a holder which incorporates in a single molding a moisture-collecting receptacle and the cam structure. Moreover, with the addition of a short base pedestal, the holders are compactly stackable for storage.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will appear from the following description of some preferred embodiments.

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a view in perspective of a bottle being simultaneously cooled and displayed by a device embodying the principles of the present invention.

FIG. 2 is a fragmentary view in elevation and in section of a portion of the bottle and the bottle cooling and displaying apparatus of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a view in elevation and partly in section of one of the two chilling capsules of FIGS. 1 and 2.

FIG. 4 is a bottom plan view of one of the cooling capsules of FIGS. 1, 2, and 3.

FIG. 5 is a top plan view of the device of FIG. 1 with the bottle removed but all the other elements left in position.

FIG. 6 is a view in side elevation and in section taken along the line 6-6 in FIG. 5.

FIG. 7 is a view similar to FIG. 5 with the chilling capsules removed. The view is also turned with respect to FIG. 5, in order to show its relationship to FIG. 8 more clearly.

FIG. 8 is a view in section taken along the line 8-8 in FIG. 7.

FIG. 9 is a view similar to FIG. 6 of a modified form of device, but with the cooling capsules removed.

FIG. 10 is a view in perspective of the FIG. 9 device with most of the vertical wall broken away and shown in section to reveal the interior structure.

FIG. 11 is a top plan view of the FIG. 9 device.

FIG. 12 is a horizontal sectional view of another modi- 3 fied form of device, generally like that of FIG. 9 but incorporating a spring to hold a bottle in place.

FIG. 13 is a view like FIG. 12 of the same device with a bigger bottle.

FIG. 14 is a view in perspective of a modified form of unit for holding the cooling capsules.

FIG. 15 is a top plan view of the unit of FIG. 14.

FIG. 16 is a view in elevation and in section taken along the line 16-16 of FIG. 15.

FIG. 17 is a fragmentary view in section, similar to FIG. 16 but showing a modified form of pedestal.

FIG. 18 is a view inside elevation of a stack of the units of FIG. 14, a portion of the stack being broken away and shown in section to show how the members of the stack nest.

The invention comprises an assembly for cooling a bottle while holding it in a vertical position and while collecting any dripping moisture due to condensation. It is adaptable to many sizes of bottles, and while the cooling capsule cannot on that account generally attain complete contact with the entire wall of the bottle, closeness is obtained with a considerable portion thereof.

One form of this invention shown in FIGS. 1 through 8 comprises a metal body member 10, a cam base 11, and a pair of cold capsules 12 and 13, which are substantially idential to each other. The device holds a bottle 14 vertically and in close contact with the two capsules 12 and 13, while displaying the label 15 prominently. Yet about two-thirds of the bottle periphery below the neck is sub ject to the cooling action of the capsules 12 and 13.

The body 10 holds the other elements 11, 12, 13, and 14 in their proper positions and serves a decorative function as well. Preferably, the body 10 is a receptacle of aluminum, brass, other metal, or plastic. Its bottom wall 16 may have a central opening 17 (FIGS. 6 and 8) for ease in washing and may be provided with a series of small openings 18 disposed around a circle, used for attaching the cam base 11 thereto, as described later. The bottom wall may also provide an outer and lower recessed rim portion '20 providing the actual contact with a table or other supporting surface. A short upstanding generally vertical wall 2.1 leads to a step 22, which is radially outset to a substantially vertical main wall portion 23. Both of the wall portions 21 and 23 may, and preferably do, slightly diverge from the vertical for ease of manufacture, preferably between about two and five degrees. The wall 23 is preferably low at the front portion 24, to insure display of the label 15, and then curves upwardly in a pleasing fashion along a rim 25 to a higher rear wall 26, which gives the height needed for proper support of the capsules 12 and 13.

The cam base 11 may be injection molded from plastic and provides a shallow, cup-like, moisture-collecting receptacle having a solid bottom wall 31 and an upturned lip 32. The receptacle 30 stands on a plurality of legs or studs 33, which preferably are hollow and overlie the openings 18 through the bottom wall 16 of the body 10. Screws or rivets 34 may be inserted from below to secure the cam-base legs or studs 33 tightly to the bottom wall 16. Other means of fastening may, of course, be used. The receptacle 30 is relatively shallow but is suflficient to collect the moisture of condensation, which is all the moisture it will be called upon to collect, especially since it is shaped to provide a pair of wells 35 and 36 which approach and even may join into each other at the rear and in which the capsules 12 and 13 rest. The wells 35 and 36 are defined by the outer wall 32 and by a specially shaped inner wall 37. The arcuate outer wall 32 has substantially the outer peripheral shape as the wall 23 and may fit relatively snugly into it. Each inner wall 37 is provided with end cam portions 38 and 39 which are part of the same are and each may have for strength purposes only, a pair of arcuate convex portions 40 and 41 meeting at a point 42.

The cam base .11 also has a raised front wall portion 44 with a flat, preferably inclined surface 45 to support a name plate 46, which may identify the displayer. An inclined wedgelike member 47 extends down preferably at about 45 to a flat portion 48 above the wells 35 and 36. The smallest size of bottle 14 may rest on the portion 48, but all other bottles do not touch the portion 48 but rest on the wedge 47 and bear against the cold capsules 12 and 13. The wedge 47 enables the various sizes of bottles to be inserted and still make the desired contact with the cold capsules. In place of the wedge 47, or in addition to it, if desired, a coil spring may be used in FIGS. 12 and 13.

The two cold capsules 12 and 13 are identical, each comprising a hollow body 50, preferably of plastic, having a filler plug 51 in a bottom wall 52, through which the hollow body 50 is filled with a suitable cooling liquid 53, such as a water solution of glycerin or other well known cooling solutions, which can be frozen at a temperature somewhat below the freezing point of water. Its generally vertical walls comprise a pair of arcuate end walls 54 and 55, an outer arcuate wall 56, and an inner generally arcuate wall 57. The end walls 54 and 55 are of the same arcuate radius as the earns 38 and 39, meeting the inner and outer walls 57, 56 by a curve. The outer wall 56 is provided at a convenient distance above the bottom wall 52 with a projection 58 which goes out to a very small radius portion 59, practically an angle, that engages the wall portion 26 of the body. The inner generally arcuate wall 57 preferably comprises two arcuate portions 57a and 5712 meeting at an angle at a groove 60. The top wall 61 may be constructed as shown, so that the body 50 fully encloses the liquid 53. Preferably the liquid 53 is frozen when the capsule 12 or 13 is lying with its inner arcuate wall 57 down, so that the resultant ice hugs the wall 57 when in use, for this is where the ice is needed. This also means that part of the outer arcuate wall 56, particularly the projection 58 as well as some more, will have an air space until the cold solid melts, for the liquid 53 does not, of course, completely fill the body 50.

The cam base 11 is inserted into the body 10 and fastened by its screws or rivets 34 to the studs 33, being set so that its wedge 47 is centered with respect to the short front wall 24 of the body 10 and so that the partition between the two wells 35 and 36 is directly in back at the high point of the body 10. The cold capsules 12 and 13 are inserted with their bases 52 resting in the wells .35 and 36 and with their arcuate end walls 54 and 55 respectively engaging the earns 38 and 39, which are (as said before) part of the same are. The walls 40 and 41 touch the capsule wall 57 only at extreme positions of the capsule along the cam. Then when a bottle 14 is inserted, it bears against the capsules 12 and 13, making two line contacts with each capsule 12, 13, and also rests on the wedge 47 of the cam base 11. The line contacts are made with the cold capsules, because the cold capsules 12 and 13 are free to pivot about the outer projection 59. The walls 54 and 55 are always in contact with their cams 38 and 39. This enables the cold capsules 12 and 13 to adjust themselves to the size of the bottle 14 until each capsule achieves its two line contacts. The remainder of the capsule 12, 13 while not in actual contact with the bottle 14, is very close to it and is sutficiently close to give the needed type of cooling action. Of course, if an actual standard size of bottle is available, it is possible to design the capsules 12, 13 to make full contact with it over the entire inner surface 57 of the capsule, but this is generally not feasible, because even for a given manufacturer of a beverage, his bottle sizes vary somewhat in tolerance. Hence, it is not usually wise to limit the device so that it could hold only one size. The invention makes it possible to hold a wide variety of bottle sizes and obtain the proper cooling action. The swinging action and the cam shape enable the capsules to retain their proper position while properly engaging the bottle.

The forms of the invention shown in FIGS. 9 through 13 comprise a single plastic member 70 which in one molding unites the functions of the body and cam base 11. It has a solid bottom wall 71, a bottom support rim 72 beneath the bottom wall 71, and a solid side wall 73 somewhat like the wall 23. The bottom wall 71 is shaped to provide a pair of wells 75 and 76 generally like the wells and 36. An integral raised portion 74 in its center provides a pair of arcuate cam walls 77 and 78 which are spaced from, curve oppositely to, and are of generally the same radius as the side Wall 73. (The strengthening portions and 41 may be present if desired.) In the form shown in FIGS. 9 through 11, there is a wedge 79 like the wedge 47.

In the form of the invention shown in FIGS. 12 and 13, a coil spring 80 extends between posts 81 and 82 and holds the bottle 14a or 14b firmly in contact with capsules 83 and 84.

The capsules 83 and 84 are like the capsules 12 and 13, except that they do not have the recess 60. As in FIGS. l-8, so in these forms of FIGS. 9 through 13, the earns 77 and 78 act on the end walls 54 and 55 of the capsules 83, 84, which pivot about the projection 59. The effectiveness of their adaptability is shown in FIGS. 12 and 13.

A preferred form of the invention, shown in FIGS. 14 through 18, comprises a molded plastic unit 100 which in one molding unites the functions of the body 10, the cam base 11, and the wedge-shaped cam 47. The unit 100 has solid flat bottom wells 101 and 102 divided by an integral raised portion 103 that provides a pair of arcuate cam walls 104 and 105. The walls 104 and 105 are spaced from, curve oppositely to, and are of generally the same radius as a cylindrical wall 106, which coop erates with the wells 101 and 102 and the portion 103 to provide the moisture-containing receptacle. The cylindrical wall 106 preferably slightly diverges from the vertical for ease of manufacture, preferably between about two and five degrees and is preferably low at a front portion 107, to insure display of the bottles label 15, and then curves upwardly in a pleasing fashion along a rim 108 to a higher rear wall 109, which gives the height needed for proper support of the capsules 12 and 13.

The portion 108 provides a raised generally fiat, preferably slightly inclined surface or front platform 110 to support a name plate like the plate 46, which may identify the displayer. An inclined wedge-like member 111 extends down preferably at about and then blends into a generally concave portion 112 above the wells 101 and 102.

A narrow portion 113- of the portion 103 separates the wells 101 and 102 and connects the concave portion 112 with a raised portion or rear platform 114 at the rear having an upward projection 115, used when stacking the units 100, as explained below. The front platform 110 and rear platform 114 are on the same horizontal level and are diametrically opposite each other.

In use, the capsules 12 and 13 are put into the unit 100 exactly as they are used in FIGS. 1 and 2, and the bottle 14 is put in the same way too.

The units 100 are preferably made to be compactly stackable, and their stacking is improved by providing a pedestal 120 on the bottom, as shown in FIGS. 16 and 18. The pedestal 120 is metal, such as stainless steel, having a generally cylindrical wall 121, slightly tapering, and a bottom wall 122 which has an upwardly recessed central portion 123 surrounded by and above a base rim 124. The wall 121 has an outturned flange 125, which urges a gasket 126 against a shelf 127 on the inner side of the lower edge 128 of the wall 106. The unit 100 is provided with a depending central cylindrical socket 130 which is provided with internal threads, and a screw 131 is inserted through an opening 132 in the metal recessed Wall portion 123 of the pedestal 120 and screwed into the socket 128 to hold the pedestal 120 and gasket 126 in correct position.

Instead of the metal pedestal 120, a plastic pedestal 140 of FIG. 17 may be used. The pedestal 140 has a side wall 141, slightly tapering out from a base rim 142 that surrounds an upwardly recessed lower Wall 143. Attachment is again the same, though the device is made somewhat differently because of the nature of the plastic, and in this instance no gasket is needed, an upper flange 144 seating directly against the shelf 127, the flange 144 providing the necessary seating.

Whichever pedestal 120 or 140 is used, the stackability is enhanced, as shown in FIG. 18, for the rim 124 (or 142) rests on the platforms and 1114 of the lower unit 100, and the upwardly recessed bottom wall po-rtions 123 (or 143) rest on the projection 115, which is the same height above the rear platform 114 as the wall portion 123 is above the rim 124. The recessing of the wall 123 (or 143) and dependency of the rim 124 (or 142) therefrom, prevents sidewise movement, and the gentle upward tapering helps too. A number of the units 100 can be stacked and held ready for use and unstacked one by one, as required.

The pedestal or assures that successive units will nest without turning over or rolling and gives excellent alignment.

To those skilled in the art to which this invention relates, many changes in construction and widely differing embodiments and applications of the invention will suggest themselves without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention. The disclosures and the description herein are purely illustrative and are not intended to be in any sense limiting.

We claim:

1. A device for chilling a bottle and the contents thereof while displaying the bottle and its label vertically, including in combination:

a pair of cold capsules containing freezable liquid having a cupped inner vertical bottle-engaging wall, an outer vertical arcuate wall, and arcuate vertical end walls,

support means for holding a said bottle and said capsule vertically with the capsules nearly meeting at the rear of the bottle and with the label displayed at the front,

receptacle means in said support means to collect condensed moisture,

cam means in said support means for enabling said capsules to swing toward and away from each other to accommodate different bottle sizes while retaining them otherwise in approximately the same positions, and

Capsule-retaining means in said support means for holding said bottle snugly against said inner arcuate walls of said capsules.

2. The device of claim 1 wherein the cam means for each said capsule comprises means engaging said arcuate end walls along opposite end portions of the same are, to which said end walls also conform.

3. The device of claim 2 having strengthening means for said cam means comprising projections in between said opposite end portions interrupting said are but located out of engagement with said capsule at all except extreme positions thereof.

4. The device of claim 1 wherein said inner wall of said capsule comprises two arcs meeting at an angle, to assure two line contacts for each bottle size within limits of the device.

5. The device of claim 1 wherein said support means is made of a single piece incorporating said receptacle means, said cam means, and capsule-retaining means.

6. The device of claim 1 wherein said support means comprises two separate members, a body member including a first part of said capsule-retaining means and a cam-base member fitting in and supported by said body member and incorporating said receptacle means and said cam means and a second part of said capsule-retaining means.

7. The device of claim 1 wherein said capsule-retaining means includes a high rear wall in engagement with the outer vertical wall of said capsule.

8. The device of claim 7 wherein said outer vertical capsule wall includes a central projection bearing against said high rear wall and forming a sliding pivot therewith cooperating with said cam means.

9. The device of claim 7 wherein said capsule-retaining means includes a low-front wall and an incline leading therefrom down and toward the center of said device.

10. The device of claim 7 wherein said capsule-retaining means includes a low front wall and a spring stretched chordally thereacross.

11. A device for simultaneously displaying a bottle and chilling its contents, including in combination:

a body member having a generally vertical wall that is low in front and high in the rear,

a cam base in said body member providing a pair of moisture-collecting, capsule-supporting wells having an outer wall conforming to said body wall and an inner cam comprising a pair of concave arcuate portions lying along the same are at opposite ends thereof where said outer wall and said cam meet, said cam base also having a front wall and an inclined wedge leading down from said front wall to a flat portion, and

a pair of chilling capsules resting in and extending up from said walls, comprising hollow members with a generally flat bottom wall, a generally arcuate inner vertical wall, and an arcuate outer vertical wall joined by short vertical arcuate end walls, and a top wall, said capsules containing a freezable coolant liquid, said outer Wall having a projection at about the center of its arc and spaced above said bottom wall for engaging the wall of said body, said end walls engaging said cam at said two portions thereof.

12. The device of claim 11 having said cam base provided with strengthening means in between said concave portions of said cam extending outwardly of the said arc.

13. The device of claim 11 wherein said inner wall of said capsule comprises two arcs meeting at a groove.

14. The device of claim 11 having an arcuate generally horizontal name plate surmounting the low front wall portion.

15. A unit employed in connection with a pair of cold capsules for chilling a bottle and the contents thereof while displaying the bottle and its label vertically, each said cold capsule containing freezable liquid and having a cupped inner vertical bottle-engaging wall, an outer vertical arcuate wall, and arcuate vertical end walls, said unit comprising a unitary molded article providing in portions thereof,

support means for holding a said bottle and said capsule vertically with the capsules nearly meeting at the rear of the bottle and with the label displayed at the front,

receptacle means in said support means to collect condensed moisture,

cam means in said support means for enabling said capsules to swing toward and away from each other to accommodate different bottle sizes while retaining them otherwise in approximately the same positions, and

capsule-retaining means in said support means for holding said lbottle snugly against said inner arcuate walls of said capsules.

16. The unit of claim 15 wherein the cam means for each said capsule comprises means engaging said arcuate end walls along opposite end portions of the same arc, to which said end walls also conform.

17. The unit of claim 15 wherein said capsule-retaining means includes 1 high rear wall in engagement with the outer vertical wall of said capsule and a low-front Wall and an incline leading therefrom down and toward the center of said unit.

18. The unit of claim 17 having a rear platform diametrically opposite said low front wall and a front platform adjacent said low front wall, said rear and front platforms being on the same level, said unit having set in bottom pedestal having a lower rim adapted to rest on the said platforms of another identical unit for stacking said units compactly.

19. The unit of claim 18 wherein said pedestal has an upwardly recessed bottom wall and in which there is a projection at the fore of said rear platform of exactly the same height above the rear platform as the height of recess of the bottom wall above said lower rim, for aligning stacked said units.

20. The unit of claim 18 wherein said pedestal is a separate member from said unit joined to its lower end.

21. A- unit for use with a pair of chilling capsules for simultaneously displaying a bottle and chilling its contents, each said chilling capsule comprising hollow members with a generally flat bottom wall, a generally arcuate inner vertical wall, and an arcuate outer vertical wall joined by short vertical arcuate end walls, and a top wall, said capsule containing a freezable coolant liquid, including in combination:

a unitary molded body member having a generally vertical wall that is low in front and high in the rear and a cam base in said body member providing a pair of moisture-collecting, capsule-supporting wells having an outer wall conforming to said body wall and an inner cam engaged by the end walls of said capsules, comprising a pair of concave arcuate portions lying along the same are at opposite ends thereof where said outer wall and said cam meet, said cam base also having a front wall and an inclined wedge leading down from the top of said front wall to a low portion.

22. The unit of claim 21 arranged for compact stacking of identical said units and having a horizontal front platform adjacent the upper edge of said front wall and a horizontal rear platform adjacent said rear wall and on the same level as said front platform and a lower edge of said vertical wall, and a pedestal secured to said unit in engagement with and supporting said lower edge of said vertical wall and set in radially from said vertical wall and having a lower rim adapted to rest on the platforms of a lower said identical unit during stacking.

23. The unit of claim 22 wherein said pedestal has a recessed lower wall spaced in from and above said lower rim and wherein said unit has a projection spaced in from one of said platforms and the same distance thereabove as the recessed lower wall is above said lower rim.

24. A device for chilling a bottle and its contents and comprising cooling capsule means contoured to embrace a bottle, and supporting base means for the capsule means and the bottle, the supporting base means including a raised bearing surface engaging the bottle, the bearing surface being inclined in an upward direction and away from the capsule means for continuously urging the bottle int-o engagement therewith.

25. The device of claim 24 wherein the supporting base means is recessed providing capsule receptacle means, and wherein the capsule means comprises a pair of substantially identical cooling capsules supported by the supporting base means and movable within its receptacle means to adjust the position of the capsules in accordance with the size of the bottle upon positioning the bottle on the inclined bearing surface.

26. The device of claim 24 wherein the capsule means is adapted to receive a refrigerant solution therein and is bodily removable from the supporting base means to be chilled before use.

27. The device of claim 25 wherein the supporting base means has a generally circular configuration, where- 3,269,144 8/ 1966 Poris 62-457 in the *bearing surface extends radially inwardly and 3,282,068 11/1966 Cain 62--45 7 downwardly toward a central portion of the supporting 3,302,428 2/1967 Stoner et a1. 62-457 base means, and wherein the receptacle means has a pair 3,365,911 1/1968 Stoner et al. 62-457 of end walls adjacent the bearing surface providing ex- 5 treme limit positions for the cooling capsules. ROBERT Primary Examiner.

MANUEL ANTONAKAS, Assistant Examiner.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS CL 3,205,678 9/1965 Stoner 62-457 10 62530; 16546 80

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Referenced by
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Classifications
U.S. Classification62/457.4, 62/457.8, 62/530, 165/46, 165/80.5
International ClassificationF25D3/00, F25D31/00
Cooperative ClassificationF25D31/006, F25D2303/0843, F25D3/00, F25D2303/08222, F25D2331/803, F25D2303/0822, F25D2331/809
European ClassificationF25D3/00, F25D31/00H