Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3434717 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 25, 1969
Filing dateAug 26, 1966
Priority dateAug 26, 1966
Publication numberUS 3434717 A, US 3434717A, US-A-3434717, US3434717 A, US3434717A
InventorsArthur Schwartz
Original AssigneeArthur Schwartz
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Water gun target
US 3434717 A
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 25, 1969 A. SCHWARTZ WATER GUN TARGET Filed Aug. 26. 1966 INVENTOR ARTHUR SCHWARTZ ATTORNEYS United States Patent Office 3,434,717 Patented Mar. 25, 1969 3,434,717 WATER GUN TARGET Arthur Schwartz, 660 Americana Drive,

Annapolis, Md. 21403 Filed Aug. 26, 1966, Ser. No. 575,305 Int. Cl. A63b 71/04, 65/12; A63h /04 US. Cl. 273-101 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A water gun target including a water receiving and collecting means, a target of foamed plastic material having at least one planar face having apertures therein, the panel being of such construction so as to emit a distinct sound when struck by a stream of water. There is target means disposed in at least some of the apertures and a water deflecting means behind the target and extending beyond the edges of the target to deflect the water into the water receiving and collecting means.

This invention relates to targets, and more particularly to targets to be used with water guns.

It is an object of this invention to provide a target which is particularly adapted for use with toy water guns.

It is another object of the invention to provide a target which, when used with a water gun, will include means to collect the excess water which hits the target.

It is still another object to provide a target which will give an indication when it is struck by water. This is necessary because water does not leave a permanent mark on a target in the same manner as does a rifle shell, a dart or the like. Therefore a different type of indicating means is desirable to indicate when a spray of water hits the target.

Another object of the invention is to provide a water deflecting portion on the back of the target which will deflect the water which passes through apertures in the target into the water receiving and collecting area.

It is also an object to construct the water deflecting portion large enough so that if the target is missed by a small degree, the water will not hit a wall behind the target or otherwise go beyond the back of the target.

It is still another object of the invention to construct the target of a foamed plastic material such as polystyrene or polyurethane. The use of such foamed plastic has a number of advantages. A rather large target can be made which is very light in weight and inexpensive. Further, when the water hits the foamed material, it gives a splat sound which is very appealing to children.

Summary In general, the invention includes a target portion positioned within a water receiving and collecting portion. The target is provided with at least one aperture having a movable member at least partially obstructing the aperture. Behind the aperture and to the sides of the target portion is a deflecting portion which will deflect the water which comes through the aperture and by the edge of the target into the water receiving and collecting portion.

Various means may be provided to indicate that the movable member has been struck. It can rotate or pivot, or it can energize a switch which will turn on a light. If the movable portion rotates, or if it is universally movable, as attached by a thread, each side of the movable member can be a different color so that it will be readily apparent as it is turned or flipped over to the back side.

The above and other objects and advantages of the invention will readily become apparent from the following detailed description, taken together with the drawings wherein:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of one form of the target;

FIG. 2 is a side elevation view taken in cross-section along lines 2-2 in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a front elevation view of another form of the target;

FIG. 4 is a side elevation view taken in cross-section through lines 4--4 in FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 is a detail of one form of the movable member and switch means;

FIG. 6 is a partial side elevation taken in cross-section view of another embodiment of the invention utilizing a thread and pin.

Detailed description of the embodiment of FIGURES 1 and 2 Referring now to FIGS. 1 and 2, a target seen generally at 10 includes a target portion 12 which is positioned in a water receiving and collecting portion. 14. In the bottom of the water receiving and collecting portion may be situated an opening 16 having a plug 18 therein. Aflixed to the back of the water receiving and collecting portion and behind the target 12 is located a water deflecting portion 20.

The target portion 12 includes a plurality of apertures 22 which have positioned therein movable members 24 which at least partially obstruct the aperture 22. The movable members 24 are pivotally mounted on pin-type axes 26. The axes 26 may be positioned within rotary bearings 28 for easy rotation.

The entire device may be made of any suitable material; however, it has been found that particularly the target portion is best made of a foamed plastic such as foamed polystyrene. This gives off a splat noise when the water strikes the target. Naturally, the entire structure may be made of foamed polystyrene. There is no deterioration of the material when it becomes wet and it is light and inexpensive. Also, the Water receiving and collecting portion should be water-tight and of a water impervious material. The whole target may be positioned against a wall or, if desired, small weights can be put in the water receiving and collecting portion to help maintain the device upright.

In operation it will be seen that the water pistol can be aimed at the target and when the water hits one of the movable members 24 it will rotate. The water hitting the front of target 12 will run down into the water collecting portion 14. Also the water going through the apertures 22 will hit the water deflecting portion 20 in the rear, and it will also run down into the trough 14.

A water projecting means in the form of a gun 30 may be connected to trough 14 by means of a conduit 32.

Detailed description 0 the embodiments of FIGURES 3, 4, and 5 Referring now to FIGS. 3-5 a water gun target is seen generally indicated at 100. The target includes a target portion 112 and a trough or water receiving and collecting portion 114. There is included a water deflecting portion 120, and apertures 122 located in the target portion, all substantially identical to that described with regard to FIGS. 1 and 2.

The movable members are indicated at 124. It will be seen that they pivot on a plurality of wires 126. Wires 126 all connect to leads 128 which in turn connect to a common wire 130. Wire 130 is connected to one terminal of a pair of batteries 132. The other terminal of the batteries is connected to a wire 134 which runs to a common line 136. Line 136 is in turn connected to a plurality of light bulbs 138. The second terminal of the 3 light bulbs 138 is connected to a plurality of lines 140 which lead to and terminate just behind the obstructing movable members 124. The movable members 124 may be of copper or other conductive material, or coated with conductive material.

It will be seen that when the water hits members 124 they will move back and complete the circuit to light the lights.

Referring to the detail of FIG. 5, a suitable spring forked type contact 142 is included on the rear portion of the movable member 124. When the water hits the movable member 124, the member will pivot toward the rearward direction. The forked member will engage itself onto the contact 140. This in turn will energize the light, and due to the frictional engagement of 140 and 142 the light will remain lit until the movable member is pulled away. In this manner one can successively attempt to light all of the lights.

In operation, it will be seen that current will flow from batteries 132 through lights 138 by means of lines 134 and 136. From lights 138 the current will then flow by means of line 140 to the movable member 124, through the movable member 124 to line 128 and 130 and then to the other terminal of battery 132.

Detailed description of FIGURES 6 and 7 Referring now to FIG. 6, a target portion is seen at 212 having an aperture 222 therein. Positioned on the rear of the target portion 212 is a pin or the like 214. Attached to the pin is a thread or thin wire 216, which in turn is connected to a movable member 224. The movable member will swing and universally pivot and rotate on the thread when it is hit by a stream of water.

While the invention has been described it will be understood that it is capable of further modifications and this application is intended to cover any variations, uses, or adaptations of the invention following in general, the principles of the invention and including such departures from the present disclosure as come within knowledge or customary practice in the art to which the invention pertains, and as may be applied to the essential features hereinbefore set forth and as fall within the scope of the invention or the limits of the appended claims.

Having thus described my invention What I claim is:

1. A water gun target comprising:

(a) a water receiving and collecting means having front and rear portions,

(b) a target panel consisting of a self-sustaining piece of foamed plastic having at least one planar face with apertures therein, said panel being of such construction to emit a distinct sound when struck by a stream of water, and positioned at least proximate said water receiving and collecting means between said front and rear portions,

(c) target means disposed in at least one of said ap- 'ertures,

(d) a water deflecting means behind the entire area of said target for directing water into said water receiving and collecting means, said water deflecting portion extending a substantial distance above and to the sides of said target whereby water missing the target as well as water shot through said apertures will be deflected into said water receiving and collecting means.

2. A water gun target as defined in claim 1 wherein said target means comprising a movable member at least partially obstructing said aperture.

3. A water gun target as defined in claim 2 wherein said movable member rotates on a vertical axis passing through said target portion.

4. A Water gun target as defined in claim 2 wherein said movable member is freely movable universally with respect to said aperture.

5. A water gun target as defined in claim 2 wherein said movable member pivots toward and away from said aperture.

*6. A water gun target as defined in claim 2 including:

(a) an electric light on said target,

(1)) a source of electrical potential having one pole connected to said light and having the other pole connected to a switch cooperating with said movable member, and

(c) said switch connected to said light.

7. A water gun target as defined in claim 6 including means to keep said light energized when said switch is closed.

8. A target as defined in claim 1 including a drain opening in said water receiving and collecting portion.

9. A water gun target as defined in claim 1 including means for projecting water at said target.

10. A water gun target as defined in claim 9 including means for connecting said water receiving and collecting portion to said water projecting means.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,666,336 4/1928 Mallard. 1,720,707 7/ 1929 Woodard. 2,752,156 6/1956 Washburn 273101 2,759,731 8/1956 Quinn 273-101 2,777,695 1/1957 *Cohn. 2,818,259 12/ 1957 Arenson. 3,082,005 3/1963 Kron 273-1022 X 3,138,382 6/1964 Barker et al. 273-102 X 3,336,030 8/1967 Martell et al. 273-101 3,342,492 9/1967 Barrett 273 -101 X 3,362,713 1/1968 Miller 273--101 X ANTON O. OECHSLE, Primary Examiner.

M. R. PAGE, Assistant Examiner.

U.S. Cl. X.R.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1666336 *Jul 10, 1926Apr 17, 1928Mallard Logan LToy target game
US1720707 *Feb 16, 1928Jul 16, 1929Woodard Everett HGame
US2752156 *Dec 31, 1953Jun 26, 1956Washburn Alfred FSprinkler toy
US2759731 *Jul 22, 1954Aug 21, 1956Harold E QuinnWater gun and target
US2777695 *Oct 4, 1955Jan 15, 1957Cohn Inc TTarget game
US2818259 *Aug 23, 1954Dec 31, 1957Childlore CompanyDart and target board therefor
US3082005 *Aug 22, 1960Mar 19, 1963Saul KronGolf game
US3138382 *Apr 7, 1961Jun 23, 1964Comet CorpBlank twistable to form a blowgun dart
US3336030 *Jan 17, 1966Aug 15, 1967Internat Exhibits IncGun and target with inflatable indicator
US3342492 *Nov 30, 1964Sep 19, 1967Internat Exhibits IncWater gun target with displaceable element
US3362713 *Jun 23, 1964Jan 9, 1968Water Launching IncWater gun target system
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4077629 *Jan 31, 1977Mar 7, 1978Lawrence Peska Associates, Inc.Sea battle game apparatus
US4248436 *Aug 21, 1979Feb 3, 1981Corrigan Malcolm JBubble target amusement device
US5411269 *Sep 15, 1993May 2, 1995Thomas; KeithElectronic fluid sensing actuating target apparatus
US5549303 *Jul 3, 1995Aug 27, 1996Kastner; Thomas J.Liquid-shooting target game
US5823849 *Feb 28, 1997Oct 20, 1998Elliot A. RudellCircuit with intermittent sensing of liquid contact, and game method
US5865438 *Dec 9, 1994Feb 2, 1999Zilliox; KentCombined water pistol and target for water catch game
US6734833Oct 31, 2000May 11, 2004Dennis M. BartosikDynamic illuminated display
US6845982 *Feb 25, 2003Jan 25, 2005Impaxx, Inc.Liquid reactive materials and method for using same in games and other applications
US6966557 *Dec 3, 2004Nov 22, 2005Dissolve, LlcLiquid reactive materials and method for using same in games and other applications
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/349, 273/381, 273/375, 273/DIG.800
International ClassificationF41J7/04, F41J5/04, A63F9/02
Cooperative ClassificationA63F2250/0407, F41J5/04, A63F2250/205, A63F2009/2451, Y10S273/08, F41J7/04, A63F9/0243, A63F2009/247, A63F2250/0428
European ClassificationA63F9/02B3, F41J5/04, F41J7/04