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Publication numberUS3435480 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 1, 1969
Filing dateSep 28, 1966
Priority dateSep 28, 1966
Publication numberUS 3435480 A, US 3435480A, US-A-3435480, US3435480 A, US3435480A
InventorsMann Fred A Jr
Original AssigneeMann Fred A Jr
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Floor mat
US 3435480 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 1, 1969 Y' A. MANN, JR l 35435380 FLOOR MAT Filed sept. 28, 1966 v g sheet of 2 52 v 42444 55 2456 5 5 4055 ZO l v l INVENTOR 'l V i l a FRED A.MANN',JE. Z5 54 i 50 Z2 @O BY l ATTORNEY April-1, 1969 F. A. MANN,A JR v v I 3,435,480v

FLOOR MAT '.riled'sept. 28.1966. sheet 2 @f2 A 'II'.IIAY."

V IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII ".5 lo INVENTOR.

. FRED A. MANN,JR.

ATTORNEY Y.

United States Patent O 3,435,480 FLOOR MAT Fred A. Mann, Jr., 504 N. Nottawa St., Sturgis, Mich. 49091 Filed Sept. 28, 1966, Ser. No. 582,747 Int. Cl. B431 2]/02; A47k 7/02 U.S. Cl. -215 8 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE This invention relates to improvements in oor mats and particularly to floor mats of the type disclosed in my prior Patent 3,234,577 dated Feb. l5, 1966- and 3,238,554, dated Mar. 8, 1966i.

One of the problems frequently encountered in the use of lightweight throw rugs or mats mounted upon carriers having parts overlapping the rug to hold the same extended for use in doorways or entryways of buildings is that the portions of the carrier overlapping the ends of the rug or mat to hold the mat fiat become hazards because of the possibility that a person walking thereover may pivot or release the same upon kicking it, and may trip or fall. Some constructions of mat holders or carriers are also subject to a pivotal movement or deforming of the parts thereof which overlie the margin of a mat when pressure is applied at certain parts thereof by a person walking thereon. Other constructions of this type have required the use of mats or rugs having a stiffening backing such as a latex backing. The use of rugs with such backing presents problems of cleaning the mat because of the tendency of the latex backing to ignite while drying, and because of the weight of the rug provided with such backing.

It is the primary object of this invention to provide a oor mat which meets and overcomes the foregoing limitations and objections to prior constructions.

A further object is to provide a oor mat of this type within which a thin flexible mat or rug such as a cotton rug having no backing may be mounted and held in place securely.

A further object is to provide a device of this character which has a low prole so as to present a minimum obstacle or obstruction in the path of persons walking thereon, while at the same time firmly anchoring the end portions of a rug overlapped thereby.

A further object is to provide a device of this character having pivoted rug clamps which normally maintain operative position overlapping and locking the ends of a rug, but which can be readily manipulated to pivot the same for release of a rug and insertion of a clean rug.

A further object is to provide a device of this character having a releasable rug anchoring marginal part so constructed and arranged that it cannot be accidentally released by walking thereon or ykicking there against.

A further object is to provide a device of this character having a novel arrangement of rug supporting base sheet and pivoted marginal clamping and retaining unit so constructed that any tendency to pull the rug from the retaining means increases the grip yor anchorage of the retaining unit upon lthe rug.

Other objects will be apparent from the following specifications.

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of my new oor mat.

Lnce

FIG. 2 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view taken on line 2 2 of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional View similar to FIG. 2, but illustrating a modified construction using different materials.

FIG. 4 is an enlarged fragmentary edge view illustrating the parts in open position and illustrating the manner in which a rug is mounted in and released from the carrier portion of the device, and illustrating a slight modification of the construction.

FIG. 5 is an edge View of the construction shown in FIG. 4 in its operative position.

FIG. `6 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view similar to FIG. 2 and illustrating another modification.

FIG. 7 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view similar to FIG. 2, but illustrating still another modification of the invention.

FIG. 8 is a fragmentary plan view of the construction illustrated in FIG. 7, with parts shown in section.

FIG. 9 is an enlarged fragmentary detail sectional view taken on line 9-9 of FIG. 8.

FIG. 10 is a fragmentary sectional view taken on line 10-10 of FIG. 8.

Referring to the drawings and particularly to FIGS. l-5 thereof, the numeral 20 designates a rug or mat such as a cottom or chenille rug which is of lightweight and readily cleanable. The rug 20 preferably has no backing, but if desired a latex-backed rug may be employed, in which instance it may be desirable to remove the backing from the end portions of the rug which are to be gripped or locked by the mounting structure or carrier to be described.

The carrier for the rug includes the thin base sheet 22, such as a thin sheet of rubber, synthetic rubber or synthetic resin material characterized by flexibility, resilience, resistance to wear or abrasion, and normal tendency to lie flat and retain its shape. I have found that a sheet of poly-vinyl resin of the thickness of 1A; inch or less provides a satisfactory base sheet. The base sheet 22 is preferably of the same width of the rug or mat 20, although the same may be either narrower or slightly wider than said rug.

A top clamp member 24 overlies and is secured to the end marginal portion to the base sheet 22 at each end thereof. Member 24 is characterised by a cross sectional conguration tapering from the midportion thereof to the opposite side edges thereof, and preferably has longitudinal shallow grooves or serrations in its upper surface to define a tread upon which users may walk with minimum risk of slipping thereon, and with minimum risk of tripping thereon in the event the toe of the users shoe contacts an edge of the clamp member. The top clamp member 24 is preferably formed as an extrusion of aluminum alloy or other suitable metal, although it may be formed of an extrusion of rubber, synthetic rubber or synthetic resin as illustrated in FIG. 3. The clamp member 24 may have an inset bottom base sheet engaging surface portion 26, as illustrated in FIG 2, and a toe portion 28 at its outer margin adapted to engage the floor or other surface and cooperating with the inset bottom surface 26 to provide a socket receiving the end portion of a base sheet 22. Alternatively, the base sheet 22 and the outer margin of the clamp plate 24 may be substantially flush as illustrated in FIG. 3. Serrations 30 or ribs may be formed in the bottom surface of the outer margin of part 24 which engages the base 22.

Intermediate the width of the top clamp member 24 is provided a longitudinal part cylindrical socket 32 having Ia reduced width mouth portion 34 open at its lower face.

The inner portion of the top clamp member 24 has a rated from the socket 32 by a rib portion or shoulder delining part 38 whose bottom surface is preferably upwardly offset or spaced from the top edge of the base sheet 22 in the operative position of the parts. The oliset of surface 36 from the bottom surface of the rib 38 is preferably equal to or slightly greater than the thickness of the rug or mat 20. If the offset of the surface 36 is greater than the thickness of the rug or rnat 20, the inner margin of the top clamp member 24 will preferably be provided with a downwardly projecting longitudinal toe portion or rib 4G adapted to bear against the top surface of the rug or mat 2t).

In some instances, it may be desirable to provide one or more decorative strips or indicia bearing strips upon the top surface of each clamp member 24. Such a strip 42 is preferably mounted upon the clamp member 24 by seating thereof within a shallow slot 44 which preferably has upwardly inwardly converging edges 46. The strip 42 may be retained in any suitable manner as by the use of cement or securing screws, or by peening of the ends of the member 24 at the slot 44.

The top clamp members 24 are Secured to the end portions of the base sheet 22. outwardly of the socket mouth 34 in any suitable manner, as by the use of cement or securing screws or other fasteners.

A bottom clamp member 50, preferably of thin plate material such as sheet metal, is carried by each top clamp member 24 A pivotal connection of the parts 24 and 50 extending lengthwise thereof is provided by a part cylindrical knuckle member 52 of a cross sectional dimension to have a snug rotatable tit in the socket 32 of the part 24. Knuckle member 52 is carried by a flange 54 bent upwardly from the bottom clamp member 50 to pass through the reduced width mouth 34 of the socket. The Width of the bottom clamp member 50 is slightly greater than the spacing between the socket 32 and the inner marginal edge of the part 24, so that the inner` edge of the bottom clamp member 50 projects beyond the edge of the top clamp member in the operative position of the parts -as illustrated in FIGS. 2, 3 and 5.

The bottom clamp member 50, preferably has a plurality of prongs, tines or other projections 56 of pointed character projecting upwardly therefrom and adapted to impale the rug or mat l at the marginal portion thereof which is overlapped by the inner marginal portion of the top clamp member 24 as illustrated in FIGS. 2 and 3. The extent to which the bottom clamp member 50 projects beyond the toe 40 of the top clamp member 24 is slight, but preferably is sufficient to provide a slight rib or raised portion 58 of the rug adjacent to the inner edge to the top clamp as seen in FIGS. l and 2. An alternative arrangement for providing a raised part of the rug alongside the edge of the top clamp member at 58 is illustrated in FIGS. 4 and 5 wherein a longitudinal shallow upward rib or corrugation is formed in the bottom clamp plate 50 over which the rug drapes at 58 as seen in FIG. 5. The rug is clamped at the toe portion 40 in addition to the anchorage thereof provided by the prongs 56.

It would be observed by reference to FIG, 4 that the mat 20 can be applied to the carrier rapidly and without the use of tools by simply manipulating the parts to the FIG. 4 position by a pull upon the inner marginal portion of each top clamp plate 24 in an upward and inward direction, iiexing the base sheet 22 and opening or separating the upper from the lower clamp plates. Thus, it will be seen that the pivot or joint knuckle at 52 permits gravitational tilting of the bottom clamp plate 50 with its free or inner edge bearing `against the top surface of the base sheet 22 while the inner marginal portion of the top clamp plate 24 is swung upwardly clear of the mat 20. This exposes the previously clamped margin of the mat 20 to permit its manipulation to free it from the prongs 56 and lift it from the carrier. Replacement of a clean mat or rug 20 is accomplished by positioning the clean rug 20 properly upon the base sheet 22 with its end marginal portions overlying the inner marginal portions of the top clamp plates 24. Thereupon the device can be manipulated to open-jaw position in FIG. 4 and the end marginal portions of the rug inserted between the upper clamp 24 and the lower clamp 50 and engaged or impaled by the pins 56. It will also be observed that as the parts are then permitted to return to normal or operative position, shown in FIG. 5, with the base sheet 22 fiat, a pull is exerted upon the rug 20. Consequently, when both ends of the rug have been anchored, the rug will be drawn taut and will be free of Wrinkles.

The location of the edge knuckle 52 intermediate the width of the upper clamp plate 24 is of importance to prevent accidental or undesired opening or tilting of the upper clamp part 24. Thus, it will be observed that if a user should kick against either the inner or the outer edge of the top clamp plate 24, this central position of the hinge prevents opening or swinging of the top clamp plate 24 toward open position. At the same time, the parts are compact so that the ends of the carrier present a low profile with minimum risk of tripping thereon by users. The taut condition of the rug upon insertion in the carrier insures that the rug will not wrinkle during use, even though it possesses no inherent rigidity, as in the case of a chenille rug having no backing. Also, it will fbe observed that any pull upon the rug tending to disengage it from the carrier acts to exert a downward pressure upon the rug at the toe or rib 40, thereby increasing the gripping or clamping action of the clamp 24 thereon.

It will be understood that the hinge parts may be held assembled as by peening the ends of the top clamp plate adjacent the socket 32. It will also be understood that the use of the impaling pins 56 is not limited to use upon the bottom clamp plate 5t), but that impaling pins may be provided upon the top part 24 which overlies the margin of the rug, which top plate impaling prongs can cooperate with the prongs 56 on the plate 50 or can be used instead of the pins S6. It will also be understood that the use of impaling pins is not essential and that serrations upon the clamping parts may be employed instead of impaling pins. Such serrated constructions are shown in FIGS. 6 and 7, wherein parts similar to those described above bear the same reference numerals. Thus, it will be observed that in FIG. 6, the bottom clamp member 50 is provided with one or more longitudinal shallow V-shaped ribs 62 or corrugations spaced inwardly of the corrugations 60 and of the inner margin of the top clamp plate 24. Thus, the parts cooperate in the FIG. 6 construction to flex the rug at 5S and effect a irm grip thereof by the cooperative action of the rug engaging parts 40, 60 and 62.

Another modification showing the use of anchoring serrations is illustrated in FIG. 7, wherein the bottom surface of the top clamp plate 24 is provided with a longitudinal groove 64 spaced slightly from its inner edge, and a complementary rib 66 is offset upwardly at a registering part of the bottom clamp member 50. The rug is clamped at 68 by the complementary groove 64 and rib 66 to effect a firm anchorage thereof between the clamping parts.

In some instances, it may be desired to provide a positive lock to prevent accidental or unintentional separation or opening or pivoting of the top clamp member 24 and the bottom clamp member 50, and the FIGS. 7, 8, 9 and 10 illustrate a locking construction to accomplish this purpose. Thus, one or more key ways, slots or grooves 70 are formed within the top clamp member 24 at each end thereof extending lengthwise and communicating with the socket 32. The end portion of the knuckle member 52 is provided with one or more slots or key ways or grooves 72, each of which registers with a key way 70 of the clamp member 24. When the top clamp 24 and the bottom clamp 50 are in operative rug clamping position, as seen in FIG. 7, a locking key 74 is slidable endwise in each pair of registering key ways 70, 72 as illustrated in FIGS. 7 and 9. In the preferred form, the locking keys 74 are arranged in pairs and mounted upon a ramp member 76. It will be apparent that insertion of the locking key 74 into the key way 70, 72 can be accomplished easily by manipulation of the ramp member 76, which member may be configured to provide a tapering contour at the end top clamp 24. Similarly, release of the clamping action can be accomplished easily by grasping and pulling upon the ramp 76 to withdraw the key member 74 from the key way 70, 72.

While the preferred embodiments of the invention have been illustrated and described, it Will be understood that changes of the construction may be made within the scope of the appended claims without departing from the spirit of the invention.

One such change entails the use of separate base sheets 22 associated with each clamping or anchoring device and underlying a part only of the length of the rug, rather than the full length of the rug as shown in FIG. 1.

I claim:

1. A oor mat comprising a exible mat adapted to be cleaned readily, a flexible shape retaining base sheet mounting said flexible mat thereon, an elongated substantially rigid top clamp member having an outer widthwise margin carried Iby and secured directly to said base sheet and having an inner widthwise marginal clamp portion overlying and engaging an end portion of said exible mat, a bottom clamp member interposed between said base sheet and the inner clamp portion of said top clamp member and underlying said flexible mat, and means pivotally connecting said bottom clamp member at its outer marginal portion to said top clamp member intermediate the width of said top clamp member along its entire length and spaced outwardly from said exible mat.

2. A oor mat as defined in claim 1, and means carried by one of said clamp members for impaling said exible mat.

3. A oor mat as defined in claim 1, wherein at least one of said clamp members has a clamping face interrupted by a ridge parallel to said pivot.

4. A lioor mat as defined in claim 1, wherein said top clamp member has a longitudinal socket open at its bottom and said bottom clamp member has a knuckle fitting and rockable in said socket, said socket and knuckle constituting said pivot connection means.

5. A floor mat as defined in claim 1, wherein said top clamp member has its greatest height at its longitudinal central portion and tapers toward its side edges, said bottom clamp member projecting beyond said top clamp member to dene a raised portion of said exi'ble mat adjacent the margin of said top clamp member.

6. A floor mat as defined in claim 1, wherein said bottom clamp member projects laterally relative to the adjacent margin of said top clamp member, and the projecting part of said bottom clamp member has a longitudinal upward ridged portion.

7. A floor mat as defined in claim 1, wherein said pivot means includes a longitudinal socket in one of said top and bottom clamp members rockably mounting a knuckle carried by the other of said members, key ways in said socketed member and knuckle registering in the operative position of said clamp members, and a locking key removably mounted in said key ways.

8. A fioor mat as defined in claim 1, wherein said pivot means constitute a longitudinal knuckle on one clamping member and a longitudinal knuckle-receiving socket in the other member, said knuckle and socketed member having slots registering in the operative position of said members, a key insertable in said slots and having a part extending transversely thereof for engagement with an end of said top clamp member.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,168,757 2/ 1965 Preston et al 15-217 3,234,577 2/1966 Mann 15-217 3,238,554 3/1966 Mann l5-217 FOREIGN PATENTS 22,686 12/ 1917 Denmark.

WALTER A. SCHEEL, Primary Examiner.

LEON G. MACHLIN, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3168757 *Jul 13, 1964Feb 9, 1965Means & Co F WNon-trip non-skid floor mat assembly and a mat holder therefor
US3234577 *Apr 12, 1963Feb 15, 1966Mann Jr Fred AFloor mat
US3238554 *Apr 12, 1963Mar 8, 1966Mann Jr Fred AFloor mat
DK22686A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4029834 *Dec 22, 1975Jun 14, 1977Construction Specialties, Inc.Floor mat with hinged rigid elongated rails
US4143194 *Mar 1, 1977Mar 6, 1979Arbrook, Inc.Disposable floor mat combination
US4381324 *Mar 9, 1982Apr 26, 1983Reese Enterprises, Inc.Coupling member for floor covering sections
US4415620 *Jun 6, 1980Nov 15, 1983Duskin Franchise Kabushiki KaishaMat base plate
US4564546 *Dec 24, 1984Jan 14, 1986Kimberly-Clark CorporationEasily releasable mat holder
US4663903 *Jun 27, 1986May 12, 1987Reese Enterprises, Inc.Floor covering structure
US4964187 *Jun 30, 1989Oct 23, 1990Dell Orto GianniModular element door mat
US4991900 *Oct 10, 1989Feb 12, 1991White A LeonFloor covering
US5018235 *Sep 12, 1989May 28, 1991Kimberly-Clark CorporationMat holder
US5190799 *May 9, 1991Mar 2, 1993Reese Enterprises, Inc.Floor covering with integral walking surface
US5350478 *Nov 5, 1992Sep 27, 1994Milliken Research CorporationMethod of manufacturing a washable, dirt binding nap mat having a rubber backing and nap free rubber edges
US6093469 *Aug 25, 1998Jul 25, 2000Callas; Michael T.Mat and method of making mat
US6258202Mar 6, 2000Jul 10, 2001Michael T. CallasMethod of making mat
US6505444Nov 10, 2000Jan 14, 2003Enterprises International, Inc.Free standing modular floor mat system
USRE32061 *Jun 11, 1984Jan 7, 1986Reese Enterprises, Inc.Coupling member for floor covering sections
EP0187987A1 *Dec 20, 1985Jul 23, 1986Kimberly-Clark CorporationEasily releasable mat holder
EP0359478A2 *Sep 8, 1989Mar 21, 1990Kimberly-Clark LimitedImprovements in and relating to a mat holder
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/215
International ClassificationA47G27/00, A47G27/04
Cooperative ClassificationA47G27/0406
European ClassificationA47G27/04B