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Publication numberUS3435546 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 1, 1969
Filing dateJul 25, 1966
Priority dateJul 25, 1966
Publication numberUS 3435546 A, US 3435546A, US-A-3435546, US3435546 A, US3435546A
InventorsIverson Noel S
Original AssigneeNew Ulm Mfg Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Precision road grader with tiltable frame
US 3435546 A
Images(4)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

A ril 1-, 1969 N. s. IVERSON PRECISION ROAD GRADER WITH TILTABLE FRAME Filed July 25. 1966 Sheet I I NVENTOR. as. S. Ivensozv BY AT TORNEY April 1, 1969 N. s. IVERSON PRECISION ROAD GRADER WITH TILTABLE FRAME Filed July 25, 1966 z of 4 She'et Q mm Qm Nw INVENTOR. NOEL S. I VERSON ATTORNEYS A ril 1, .1969 N. s. IVERSON PRECISION'ROAD GRADER WITH TILTABLE FRAME M 4 Ms M NH do 3 W 1; m s a L Q% vm E w mN w w y M m m AT TORNEYS Apnl 1, 1969 N. s. IVERSON rnncrsxou ROAD GRADER wma TILTABLE FRAME Filed July 25, 1966 Sheet 4 I NVENTOR.

NOEL S. I vsnsolv AT TORNEYS United States Patent 3,435,546 PRECISION ROAD GRADER WITH TILTABLE FRAME Noel S. Iverson, New Ulm, Minn., assignor to New Ulm Manufacturing Company, New Ulm, Minn., a corporation of Minnesota Filed July 25, 1966, Scr. No. 567,524 Int. Cl. E021? 3/ 76; A01b 63/104, 65/00 US. Cl. 37-408 8 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A rigid frame having mold boards fixed thereto, ground engaging wheels at its front and rear ends, and wheel mounting means, pivotally secured to the front and rear ends of the frame and operable to raise and lower the frame relative to the wheels and pivotally tilt the frame relative to the wheels on an axis extending longitudinally of the frame.

Briefly stated this invention involves an elongated and extremely rigid generally rectangular frame having pairs of supporting wheels at its opposite ends, the frame being supported for generally vertical movements relative to the wheels and for tilting movements relative to the wheels on a generally horizontal axis extending generally longitudinally of the frame. A plurality of mold boards are fixed to the frame for common vertical and tilting movements therewith. A vertically disposed longitudinally extending plate-like gate is mounted to one side of the frame forwardly of the rearmost mold board for movements toward and away from engagement with said rearmost mold board. The frame is fabricated from rigid steel plates welded together to provide top and bottom walls and spaced side walls, the top walls forming parts of a deck upon which an operator may move about. This invention further includes means mounting the pair of Wheels at one end of the frame for movements toward and away from each other transversely of the frame, and means for imparting transverse movements to the wheels of said pair, whereby to vary the tread width as said one end of the frame. The mold boards each comprise a plurality of mold board sections, some of which underlie the frame, others being removably secured to the frame in end-to-end relation to the underlying sections.

Machines, such as land levelers and road graders heretofore produced, have relied upon their own weight to maintain the ground working element thereof at a predetermined level whereby to cut down high spots and fill in low areas in the ground, such as a roadway, traversed thereby. With machines of relatively light weight, rigidity of support of the ground working blades or elements is lost to a great extent, resulting in uneven operation and necessitating repeated smoothing operations on the roadway. Other equipment, having sufiicient weight and rigidity to enable the grading operation to be completed with a single passage over the roadway, is usually so heavy and cumbersome as to be diificult to transport from one region to another.

One of the objects of this invention is the provision of a road grader having means whereby the weight thereof may be quickly and easily increased to provide extreme stability in operation, and as easily reduced for ease in transport.

Another object of this invention is the provision of a road grader in which the effective width may be increased for road grading purposes and decreased to a minimum for safe highway transport.

Another object of this invention is the provision of a road grader having means for controlling discharge of lCC road material from the mold boards, whereby to facilitate leveling of high and lower areas in a road bed.

Still, another object of this invention is the provision of a road grader which will control the grade and slope of a road with a high degree of accuracy.

The above, and still further highly important objects and advantages of this invention will become apparent from the following detailed specification, appended claims and attached drawings.

Referring to the drawings, in which like reference characters indicate like parts throughout the several views:

FIG. 1 is a view in top plan of a road grader produced in accordance with this invention, some parts being broken away;

FIG. 2 is a view in side elevation, some parts being broken away and some parts being shown in section;

FIG. 3 is a view in rear elevation;

FIG. 4 is a view in bottom plan, some parts being broken away and some parts being shown in section;

FIG. 5 is a view in front elevation, some parts being broken away;

FIG. 6 is an enlarged transverse section taken substantially on the line 66 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 7 is an enlarged fragmentary detail in section, taken substantially on the line 77 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 8 is an enlarged fragmentary view in bottom plan, as seen from the line 88 of FIG. 6; and

FIG. 9 is an enlarged fragmentary section taken substantially on the line 9-9 of FIG. 2.

In the embodiment of the invention illustrated, an elongated generally rectangular rigid frame is indicated in its entirety by the reference numeral 1. The frame 1 is preferably made from heavy sheets or plates of metal, such as steel, welded together to provide top walls 2, 3, 4 and 5, side walls 6, 7, 8 and 9, front end walls 10 and rear end walls 11, and bottom walls 12, 13, 14 and 15. The top and bottom walls 4 and 14 are connected by front and rear wall portions 1 6 and 17 that are welded at their opposite ends to the adjacent side walls 8 and 9, and the top and bottom walls 5 and 15 are likewise connected by front and rear wall portions 18 and 19 that are likewise welded at their opposite ends to the adjacent side walls 8 and 9. A pair of transverse partitions 20 and 21 are welded within the spaces defined by the walls 6, 8, 10 and 11 and Walls 7, 9, 10 and 11 respectively, the various walls and partitions cooperating to define liquid tight ballast chambers 22, 23, 24, 25, 26 and 27, see particularly FIG. 4. Each of the ballast chambers 2227 is independent of the others thereof, and is provided with an individual liquid inlet opening 28, see FIG. 1. Similarly, each ballast chamber 22-27 is provided in its bottom wall with an individual drain opening 29, the openings 28 and 29 being normally closed by convention means, such as removable pipe plugs or the like, not shown.

With reference to FIGS. 1 and 4, it will be seen that the front and rear wall portions 16 and 19 respectively are longitudinally inwardly spaced from their adjacent end walls 10 and 11, and that the wall portions 17 and 18 are disposed in longitudinally spaced relationship. Intermediate the walls 17 and 18, a plurality of cross bars 30 extend between the side walls 8 and 9, and support a deck portion or grill 31 substantially at the common level of the top walls 25, the top walls and grill 31 providing a deck for the operator. The deck further supports various equipment, such as an operators seat 32, a control console 33, an engine 34, a pump 35 coupled to the engine 34, a fluid reservoir 36, a tool box 37 and coils of wire or the like 38. A deck portion 39 extends rearwardly of the frame 1 and terminates in steps by means of which the operator gains access to the top of the frame 1. A handrail 41, encompassing the work area above the frame 1, is supported in upwardly spaced relation thereto by spaced legs or the like 42.

The frame 1 is supported above the ground for generally vertical movements and for tilting movements on a generally horizontal axis extending longitudinally of the frame 1 by front and rear pairs of pneumatic tire equipped wheels 43 and 44 respectively. The front wheels 43 are journalled on opposite ends of a transverse axle 45 that is rigidly connected to an elongated draft member 46 fragmentarily shown, but of conventional structure adapted to be connected to a prime mover, such as a tractor or truck, not shown. A bellcrank 47 is journalled at its intermediate portion on a generally horizontally disposed transverse shaft 48 that is bolted or otherwise rigidly secured at its opposite ends to mounting pads 49 welded or otherwise rigidly secured to the front end portions of the side Walls 8 and 9, see FIGS. 1, 4 and 5. The bellcrank 47 comprises a lever arm 50 that extends generally forwardly from the shaft 48 and is secured at its outer end to a conventional fifth wheel 51 that is pivotally mounted to the draft bar or tongue 46, as indicated at 52, on a generally horizontal axis extending longitudinally of the frame 1. The bellcrank 47 further includes generally upwardly extending lever arms 53 that are pivotally connected at their outer ends to a pair of plunger rods 54 that are axially movable in cooperating fluid pressure cylinders 55 which in turn are pivotally connected to mounting brackets 56 extending upwardly from the top wall 4 of the frame 1. The cylinders 55 may be assumed to be operatively connected in hydraulic circuitry including the pump 35 and control valves, not shown, but mounted in the operating console 33, the cylinders 55 being operative to pivotally move the bell crack 47 about the axis of the shaft 48 to raise and lower the front end of the frame 1 relative to the adjacent wheels 43.

A second bellcrank 57 has its intermediate portion journalled on a generally horizontally disposed transverse shaft 58 which, like the shaft 48 has its opposite ends rigidly secured to a pair of mounting pads 59 that are welded or otherwise rigidly secured to the frame sidewalls 8 and 9 adjacent the rear end walls 11. A generally horizontally disposed arm portion 60 of the bell crank 57 extends rearwardly from the shaft 58 and terminates at its rear end portion in a shaft 61 on which is journalled a bearing 62 rigidly secured to the longitudinally central portion of the transverse axle housing 63. A pair of axially aligned wheel axles 64 are axially slidably mounted in the axle housing 63, each of the axles 64 journalling a different one of the rear wheels 44. It will be noted that the axis of the bell crank shaft 61 is generally horizontally disposed and extends generally longitudinally of the frame 1, like the axis of the pivotal connection 52..

The bell crank 57 further includes a depending bifurcated lever arm portion 57a, to the lower end portion of which is pivotally connected one end of a tie rod or bar 57b, the tie rod 57b extending forwardly and upwardly between the frame walls 17 and 18 and through an opening 570 in the grill 31, the front end of the tie rod 57b being connected to a turnbuckle 57d which in turn is operatively coupled to the upper ends of the lever arms 53. The arrangement is such that, when the bell crank 47 is operated by the fluid pressure cylinders 55 in a direction to raise the front end portion of the frame 1, the tie rod 57b will move the bell crank 57 in a direction to raise the rear end portion of the frame 1 a like amount. Adjustment of the turnbuckle 57d will impart raising or lowering movements of the rear end portion of the frame 1 relative to the front end thereof, as desired.

Means for tilting the frame 1 with respect to the wheels 43 and 44 about the substantially aligned axes of the pivot connection 52 and shaft 61 comprises a fluid pressure cylinder 65 pivotally connected at one end to a pair of brackets 66 welded to the axle housing 63, and a cooperating plunger rod 67 axially slidably mounted in the cylinder 65 and pivotally connected to an arm 68 projecting laterally outwardly from the bell crank 57, see particularly FIG. 6. The cylinder 65 is operatively connected to the pump 35 by conventional conduit means, not shown, and controlled by valve means, not shown, but which may be assumed to be disposed in the control console 33.

The axially slidable mounting of the axles 64 in the axle housing 63 permits the rear wheels to be moved axially toward and away from each other to provide a relatively narrow base of support for the frame 1 and parts carried thereby, for highway travel, or to provide a relatively wide base of support for the frame 1 and parts carried thereby during the grading operation. For the purpose of imparting such movements to the rear wheels 44, I provide a pair of fluid pressure cylinders 69 disposed in parallel relationship to the common axis of the axles 64 and connected at their inner ends to the axle housing as indicated at 70, see particularly FIG. 8. The cylinders 69 are provided with cooperating axially outwardly extending piston-equipped plunger rods 71 that are each attached at their outer ends to a different one of the axles 64, by means of brackets or the like 72, see FIGS. 3, 6 and 8. The cylinders 69 are connected for common operation by conduits 73 and 74 which may be assumed to be operatively connected to the pump 35 and control means in the console 33. Means for releasably locking the axles 64 in different positions of axial movement thereof, comprises a pair of tubular members 75 Welded or otherwise secured to the axle housing 63 in parallel relationship to the axles 64, and anchoring rods or bars 76 slidably mounted in the tubular member 75 and having outer ends rigidly secured to respective ones of the axles 64 by anchoring lugs 77, see particularly FIG. 7. Each of the tubular members 75 is provided with a plurality of axially spaced transverse openings 78 that are alignable with a transverse opening 79 in the respective one of the anchoring rods '76. Anchoring pins, not shown, extend through aligned pairs of openings 78 and 79 to rigidly hold the axles 64 against axial movement in the axle housing 63.

A plurality of cooperating mold boards are anchored to and depend from the frame 1, comprising front, intermediate and rear mold boards 80, 81 and 82 respectively. Each of the mold boards are disposed at oblique angles to the longitudinal dimension of the machine and to the adjacent mold board, as shown in FIGS. 1 and 4. The intermediate mold board 81, comprises a pair of mold board sections 83 and 84, the former of which is bolted or otherwise rigidly secured to a pair of brackets 85 that are welded to the underside of the frame 1, the mold board section 84 being disposed in end-to-end relationship with the section 83, and bolted or otherwise releasably secured to a bracket 86 welded to the bottom wall 13 and sidewall 7 of the frame 1. As shown, the intermediate mold board section 84 extends laterally outwardly beyond the plane of the sidewall 7 and is secured adjacent its outer end to a brace bar 87 that is removably secured to a mounting bracket 88 welded to the bottom wall 13, see FIGS. 2 and 4. The rear mold board 82 comprises a plurality of mold board sections 89, 90 and 91, disposed in end-to-end relationship, the section 89 being disposed in rearwardly spaced relation to the mold board section 83 and rigidly anchored to a pair of mounting brackets 92 that are welded to the bottom walls 12 and 13 of the frame 1. The mold board section 90 is bolted or otherwise releasably secured to a bracket 93 welded to the adjacent sidewall 6 and bottom wall 12 of the frame 1 and braced adjacent its outer end by a brace arm or bar 94 that is removably secured to a mounting bracket 95 welded to the bottom wall 12, see FIG. 4. The mold board section 91 is bolted or otherwise releasably secured to a bracket 96 similar to the bracket 93 but welded to the bottom wall 13 and side wall 7 of the frame 1 adjacent the rear end thereof. The front mold board 80 is disposed substantially evenly with the mold board section 84, but at the opposite side of the frame 1 thereof, and has its inner end portion bolted or otherwise releasably secured to a pair of mounting brackets 97 and 98 welded to the bottom wall 12 of the frame 1. The mold board 80 projects generally laterally outwardly from the adjacent side wall 6 of the frame 1 and is braced at its outer end portion by a rigid tie bar 99 having its opposite endportions secured to the outer end portions of the mold board 80 and mold board section 90.

The mold boards 80 and 81 are provided along their lower edges with toothed digging blades 100, the several mold board sections 89, 90 and 91 being provided along their lower edges with smooth edged scraping blades 101. During forward progress of the machine over a road to be graded, the teeth 100 dig into and break up the surface of the road, the mold boards 80 and 81 guiding the broken up surface particles generally laterally of the machine. and toward the mold board section 90 of the mold board 82, the mold board 82 distributing the material uniformly over the width of the area covered by the mold board 82 during its movement over the roadway. By proper manipulation of the controls within the console 33 to raise or lower the frame 1 and parts carried thereby, relative to the wheels 43 and 44, the depth of cut made by the blades in the road bed can be controlled with a high degree of accuracy. Further, by adjustment of the turnbuckle 57d, the elevation of the rear mold board 82 relative to the mold boards 80 and 81, may be accurately controlled, this being done by raising or lowering the rear end of the frame 1 relative to the rear wheels 44.

When it is desired to move material from a high spot or area in the road and transport the same for deposit in a hollow or lower area, I provide means, now to be described, for confining material forwardly of the rear mold board 82 and against movement of the same toward the outer end of the rear mold board section 91. A vertically disposed support frame 102 comprises an elongated platelike member 102 extending longitudinally of the frame 1 adjacent the side wall 7 thereof, a plurality of vertically extending stiffening ribs 104 welded to the platelike member 103 and a pair of vertically spaced parallel guide rails 105 welded to the ribs 104 and platelike member 103, and extending longitudinallly of the frame 1. The platelike member 103 and ribs 104 are welded to the bottom wall 13, and are braced by a pair of angularly disposed struts 106, see particularly FIGS. 4 and 9. A vertically disposed platelike gate 107 extends longtiudinally of the frame 1 adjacent the support frame 102, and is provided with bearing members 108 and 109 that engage the guide rails 105 for movements with the gate 107 longitudinally of the frame 1 and toward and away from engagement of the rear end 110 of the gate 107 with the rear mold board section 91. Means for imparting movements to the gate 107 longitudinally of the frame 1 comprises a fluid pressure cylinder 111 rigidly secured to the platelike member 103 by means of a bracket 112, and a cooperating piston equipped plunger rod 113 axially movable in the cylinder 111 and having an outer end secured to a lug or bracket 114 welded to the gate 107. The cylinder 111 may be assumed to be connected in a fluid circuit by suitable conduit means, not shown, but including the pump 35, reservoir 36, and control means, not shown, but contained within the control console 33. By controlling the opening between the rear end 110 of the gate 107 and the rear mold board 82, the spread of gravel or road material over the surface traversed by the machine can be accurately controlled without the necessity for changing the angular relationship of the rear mold board 82 relative to the direction of travel of the machine. If desired, the grader of this invention may be automatically controlled by suitable control mechanism, including a sensing element 115 that is mounted, by means of a vertical adjustment mechanism 116 carried by a transverse boom 117 having its inner end mounted in a transverse socket 118, the boom 117 being further supported by angularly disposed arms or tie rods 119 that are releasably secured at their inward ends to mounting ears or the like 120 on the frame 1. With reference to FIGS. 1 and 4, it will be seen that another socket 118 and a second pair of ears 120 are disposed at the opposite side of the frame 1, so that the boom 117 and parts carried thereby may be selectively mounted at either side of the frame 1. The sensing element 115 is adapted to engage a length of taut wire or cable 121 stretched along the roadway at a predetermined height, it being assumed that the sensing element 115 controls operation of the cylinders 55 for maintaining a given elevation of the several mold boards. The specific mechanism for automatically controlling the height or elevation of the mold boards, as well as that for controlling the operation of the tilting cylinder 65 do not in and of themselves comprise the instant invention, hence, for the sake of brevity, more detailed showing and description thereof is omitted.

By filling the various ballast chambers 2227 with liquid, such as water, suflicient weight is imparted to the machine to enable the same to quickly and etficiently provide a smooth and even surface to a road made from extremely heavy material and in a highly deteriorated condition, requiring a cut of maximum depth. In practice, I have been able to control the accuracy of grade within plus or minus one-eighth inch and an accuracy of slope control within plus or minus one-eighth of one percent. The ballast chambers are of such size that filling of the same with Water increases the weight of the machine by 30,000 pounds, which makes the machine highly stable during the road grading operation. When the road is completely graded, and it is desired to move the machine to a distant point for further operation, draining of the ballast tanks is a simple operation, whereby to effectively lighten the machine for road transport. By removing the boom 117 and parts carried thereby, as well as the mold board and mold board sections and 101, and operating the cylinders 69 to move the rear wheels 44 to their laterally inwardly retracted positions, the machine becomes sufliciently narrow to be towed or otherwise moved along the highway with relative safety. When arriving at a destination for further grading operation, it is a simple matter to refill the ballast chambers with water and remount the mold board sections and control means, if required.

While I have showed and described a commercial embodiment of my precision grading machine, it will be understood that the same is capable of modification without departure from the spirit and scope of the invention, as defined in the claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A precision road grader comprising:

(a) an elongated, generally rectangular rigid frame,

(b) front and rear pairs of ground-engaging wheels at the front and rear ends respectively of said frame,

(c) front and rear wheel mounting means pivotally mounted on the front and rear ends respectively of said frame on generally horizontal axes transversely of the frame mounting said pairs of wheels for generally vertical movements of said frame relative to said pair of wheels and for tilting movements of said frame relative to said pairs of wheels on a common generally horizontal axis extending longitudinally of said frame,

(d) a plurality of ground-engaging mold boards underlying said frame,

(e) means fixedly mounting said mold boards on said frame for common generally vertical and tilting movements with said frame relative to said wheels,

(f) means between said front and rear ends respectively of said frame and said front and rear wheel mounting means for imparting pivotal movement to said wheel mounting means to generally vertically move said frame relative to said front and rear pairs of wheels,

(g) and independent means mounted between said frame and one of said wheel mounting means for imparting said tilting movements to the frame relative to said pairs of wheels.

2. The road grader defined in claim v1 in which said frame comprises, top and bottom walls, sidewalls and spaced partitions cooperating to provide a plurality of liquid tight ballast chambers at opposite sides and adjacent the front and rear ends of said frame, each of said chambers having an inlet and a drain outlet.

3. The road grader defined in claim 1 in which said mold boards comprise front, intermediate and rear mold boards each disposed at an oblique angle to an adjacent mold board and to the longitudinal dimension of said frame, characterized by a generally vertical disposed platelike gate extending longitudinally of said frame, means mounting said gate at one side of said frame between said intermediate and rear mold boards for movements longitudinally of said frame toward and away from engagement with said rear mold board, and means for imparting said movements to said gate.

4. The road grader defined in claim 1 in which said wheel mounting means comprises a pair of bell cranks having intermediate portions pivotally mounted on the front and rear ends respectively of the frame on said generally horizontal axes extending transversely of the frame, each pair of Wheels being operatively connected to a different one of said bell cranks for bodily tilting movements generally on said longitudinally extending axis, and a longitudinally adjustable tie member having opposite ends secured each to a different one of said bell cranks.

5. The road grader defined in claim 1 in which said wheel mounting means includes a pair of bell cranks having intermediate portions pivotally mounted on the front and rear ends of the frame respectively on said generally horizontal parallel axes extending transversely of the frame, characterized by a transverse axle housing operatively connected to one of said bell cranks and a pair of transverse axles mounted in said axle housing for axial sliding movements and each connected to a different one of the wheels of the adjacent pair of wheels, and means for imparting axial movements to said axles in opposite directions relative to each other to vary the distance between the wheels of said adjacent pair transversely of said frame.

6. The road grader defined in claim 5 in which said means for imparting tilting movements to the frame comprises a fluid pressure operated motor connected to said one the bell cranks and to said axle housing and operative to vary the angular displacement between the axes of said axles and the axis of pivotal movement of said one of the bell cranks.

7. The road grader defined in claim 5 characterized by means connecting the other of said bell cranks to its adjacent pair of wheels for common steering movements of its adjacent wheels relative to said frame.

8. The road grader defined in claim 7 in which said last mentioned means includes a normally transverse horizontal axle for said last-mentioned pair of wheels, and a fifth wheel operatively connecting said transverse horizontal axle to said other bell crank.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 661,294 11/1900 Reynolds 172-611 1,216,779 2/1917 Dankel et al 37-108 1,592,690 7/1926 Wilson 37-50 2,124,466 7/1938 Le Bleu 172-611 2,186,059 1/1940 Baker 37-108 2,681,231 6/ 4 Kondracki 280-34 2,763,944 9/1956 Magee et a1. 37-42 3,156,313 11/1964 Peterson 280-34 ROBERT E. PULFREY, Primary Examiner.

EUGENE H. EICKHOLT, Assistant Examiner.

US. Cl. X.R.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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US1216779 *Mar 12, 1913Feb 20, 1917William J DankelGrader or excavating-machine.
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3598027 *Feb 5, 1969Aug 10, 1971Cmi CorpMethod of road construction
US3610341 *Apr 1, 1969Oct 5, 1971Cmi CorpMotor-grader control system
US3736987 *Nov 22, 1971Jun 5, 1973Caterpillar Tractor CoOutrigger boom for earthworking vehicles
US3757870 *Aug 30, 1971Sep 11, 1973Westinghouse Air Brake CoBlade position control apparatus
US3799272 *May 16, 1972Mar 26, 1974Watson DSix and eight row cultivator and planter frame
US3946506 *Sep 27, 1973Mar 30, 1976Cmi CorporationTrimmer type road construction apparatus with pivotally connected conveyor
US4063375 *Feb 23, 1976Dec 20, 1977Unit Rig & Equipment Co.Conveyor folding and moldboard operation for excavating and loading systems
US4568219 *Jun 4, 1984Feb 4, 1986Logan Western Road, Inc.Road grader
US4700786 *Dec 16, 1985Oct 20, 1987Logan Western Road, Inc.Drag-type road grader
US4802293 *Nov 20, 1987Feb 7, 1989Smith Raymond HAdjustable earth-moving attachment for a vehicle
US4936392 *Nov 28, 1988Jun 26, 1990Kevin KitchinRoad shoulder grading attachment
US6021853 *Dec 14, 1998Feb 8, 2000Ralph H. AtkinsField finishing land plane having retractable sections for road safety during towing
US6283225 *Jan 4, 2000Sep 4, 2001Richard P. HermonsonGrader attachment for a skid steer vehicle
US6550811Jun 30, 2000Apr 22, 2003Caterpillar IncDual fuel tank system for an earthmoving vehicle
US6615929Mar 20, 2001Sep 9, 2003Savannah Smooth Roads, LlcMethod and apparatus for high speed grading
US7540103 *May 11, 2007Jun 2, 2009Broten James OBlade attachment device
Classifications
U.S. Classification37/381, 172/787, 172/611, 172/4.5, 172/780, 172/798
International ClassificationE02F3/76
Cooperative ClassificationE02F3/764
European ClassificationE02F3/76K2