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Publication numberUS3435549 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 1, 1969
Filing dateSep 1, 1967
Priority dateSep 1, 1967
Publication numberUS 3435549 A, US 3435549A, US-A-3435549, US3435549 A, US3435549A
InventorsKermode Alfred F
Original AssigneeKermode Alfred F
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pump type tubular magazine repeating firearm
US 3435549 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 1, 1969 A. F. KERMODE 3,435,549

PUMP TYPE TUBULAR MAGAZINE REPEATING FIREARM ATTORNEY.

PUMP TYPE TUBULAR MAGAZINE REPEATING FIREzfRM Filed sept. 11967 April l, 1969 A. F. KERMODE Sheet .2 of4 INVENTOR. ALFRED F. KERMODE V. C. MULLER ATTORNEY.

April 1, 1969 A. F. KERMODE 3,435,549

l PUMP TYPE TUBULAR MAGAZINE REPEATING FIRERM Filed Sept. 1, 1967 Sheet of4 es 22 ne ee 94 9o V// l/ y 84" yso INVENTOR. ALFRED F. KERMODE BY v V. C. MULLER ATTORNEY.

April 1, 1969 A. F. KERMODE 3,435,549

PUMP TYPE TUBULAR MAGAZINE REPEATING FIREARM Filedsept. 1, 1967v sheet 4 of 4 Q INVENTOR.

ALFRED F. KERMODE C) BY l; v. C. MULLER.

ATTORNEY.

United States Patent C) 3,435,549 PUMP TYPE TUBULAR MAGAZINE REPEATING FIREARM Alfred F. Kermode, 201 Cisco, Ridgecrest, Calif. 93555 Filed Sept. 1, 1967, Ser. No. 665,687 Int. Cl. Fil-1e 11/00; F41d 9/ 00; F4f 1/00 U.S. Cl. 42 17 15. Claims ABSTRACT F THE DISCLOSURE Tubular magazine hand held pump type repeating grenade thrower with relatively short receiver and action, resulting from short bolt and bolt locking mechranism.

The invention described herein may be manufactured and used by or for the Government of the United States of America for governmental purposes without the payment of any royalties thereon or therefor.

As exemplified by U.`S. Patent 2,315,753 to Long, gun type grenade throwers have been employed which project a grenade through a rifled barrel, the grenade being propelled by a suitable propellant contained within an expendable cartridge case. In this type of gun referred to, the overall length probably may approach a minimum since it is of a type resembling a hinged or break type single shot shotgun in which the cartridge is chambered manually and does not require 'a moveable bolt. In repeating guns, a moveable blot is required which necessitates lengthening the action by at least the length of an uniired cartridge to provide a space behind the chamber for receiving the round fed to the space from the magazine. Thus, in a conventional type sliding bolt gun, such as a military rifle, the space behind the chamber when the bolt lis open, and the total movement of the bolt slightly exceeds the length of an unired round. In this type of gun the major length of the bolt may move rearwardly out of the action and it is apparent that if such type of bolt were to remain enclosed within the action, when open, the length of the action would be approximately the length of the bolt plus the length of its movement, which would thus add to the overall length and weight of the gun.

One of the objects of this invention is to provide a sliding bolt gun in which the bolt is totally enclosed within the action, the bolt being shortened to approximately one half the length of the 'bolt for a conventional sliding bolt rifle.

Another object is to maintain the ejection port closed against entry of foreign matter, when the bolt is closed, by a sliding dust c-over, in contradistinction to a conventional bolt action rifle in which the bolt itself Aforms such a closure.

A further object is to provide a receiver having top and bottom portions which may be readily separated without tools t-o permit cleaning, inspect-ion, replacement of parts, and the like, which are normally encountered in its operation.

A further object is to provide a novel sliding bolt and oolt locking block.

A further object is to provide a mechanism for disconnecting the trigger from the ring pin sear in the event an operator inadvertently maintains the trigger depressed during reload-ing.

Still further objects, advantages, -and salient features Will become more 'apparent from the description to follow, the appended claims, and the accompanying drawing.

In the description of the gures and the detailed description to follow it will be assumed that the gun is shouldered on a users right shoulder and the axis of the barrel is horizontal; left Iand right, top and bottom, iront Patented Apr. 1, 1969 rice and rear, thus having their normal meanings as viewed from the rear of the gun.

FIG. 1 is an elevation of the subject of the invention as viewed from the left side, portions being broken away;

FIG. 2 is an elevation as viewed from the right side, portions being shown in section, generally at ya central vertical plane;

FIG. 2A is an elevation, like FIG. 2, showing another position of parts;

FIGS. 3, 3A and 3B are sections taken on line 3 3, FIG. 2A;

FIG. 4 is a section taken on line 4 4, FIG. 2A;

FIG. 5 is a section taken on line 5 5, FIG. 2;

FIG. 6 is ia section taken on line 6 6, FIG. 2;

FIG. 7 is a section taken on line 7 7, FIG. 5;

FIG. 8 is a side elevation taken on line 8 8, FIG. 5;

FIG. 8A is a side elevation, like FIG. 8, showing another position of parts;

FIG. 9 is an isometric detail of parts shown in FIGS. 5 to 8A;

FIG. 10 is a top plan as viewed from line 10-10, FIG. 2;

dFIG. l1 is a section taken on line 11 11, FIG. 10; :an

FIG. 12 is a section taken on line 12-12, FIG. 2.

Referring rst to FIGS. l and 2, the subject of the invention comprises a receiver 10 having a top portion 10T land a bottom portion 10B joined along a horizontal plane 12. A rifled barrel 14 (40 mm. bore) is threadedly afhxed at its rear end to the front end of the top receiver portion, and a stock 16 is aixed to its rear end. The top receiver portion carries a trigger 18, bolt 20 and dust cover 22, the -bolt and dust cover forming closures for ejection port 24. The bottom portion carries magazine tube 26 containing a magazine spring 28 which abuts a cup-shaped follower 30 at one end, its other end abutting a magazine closure plug 32. A tubular knurled slide handle 34 is moveable along the magazine, its rear end being rigidly aiiixed to a pair of slides 36R, 36L, disposed adjacent opposite sides of the magazine tube. A magazine band 38 is axed to the magazine tube, the bore in its top portion slideably receiving the barrel. The rear end of the bottom portion of the receiver also carries a moveable trigger guard 40 which is constructed in 1a manner to detachably lock together the top and bottom portions of the receiver. A sight bar 42 is pivotally attached to the top portion of the receiver by a screw 44, its forward end being swingable along 'a quadrant 46, portions of which are disposed on the top and bottom portions of the receiver. The quadrant is graduated for range and the sight bar may be provided with sights as desired, such as a peep sight at its rear end and a post sight at its front end. A spring urged friction plate (not shown) engages the quadrant to frictionally maintain the sight bar at -a desired range setting.

Bolt, biolt locking mechanism. and slides As best shown in FIG. 5, bolt 2()l is slideably carried by parallel bolt guide rails 52R, 52L secured to opposite walls of the top receiver portion, which engage grooves 54R, 54L, in the bolt. The rear ends of the rails are provided with cut-away portions 56R, 'S6-I.. (FIG. l2) for a length slightly in excess of the length of the bolt to permit assembly and disassembly of the bolt and the forward ends are provided with cut-away portions SSR, SSL (FIGS. 2 and 8A), surfaces 60R, 60L forming abutments for locking block 62. The front surface 64 of the locking block is arcuate in shape and pivotally engages a like surface in the bolt. The rear end of the locking block is provided with lateral projections or ears 66R, 66L which engage surfaces in the slides for raising or lowering the rear end of the locking block to lock or unlock the bolt.

3 Referring to FIGS. 8, 8A, each slide is provided with a camming surface 68 for raising an ear into locking position with a bolt rail, a surface 70 for blocking return movement of an ear to unlocked position, and a surface 72 for camming an ear downwardly to unlocked position.

It will now be assumed that the slides are moving forwardly to move the bolt t-oward closed or chambered position. Camming surface 68 (FIG. 8) is now engaging surface 73 on ear 66R, the forward arcuate end of the locking block moving the bolt forwardly. While this tends to cam the ear upwardly, it is blocked from such movement by the rail. When the bolt reaches closed position, however, the ear is now free to move upwardly into the cut- -out portion of the rail which cams an ear into locking position with abutment 60R, further slight movement of the slide moving surface 70 beneath the ear thus locking it against retrograde movement. This last portion of movement moves cocking abutment 74 on the slide away from cooking bar 76 so that it may move forward away from abutment 77 on the firing pin when the firing pin is released by the firing pin sear.

Referring now to FIGS. 5, 6 and 7, firing pin 80 comprises a tubular body 82, having a projection 84 at its trop, slideable in a groove 86 in which is disposed sear 88, pivoted on pin 90, and urged toward projection 84 by sear spring 92. As shown in FIG. 7, release surface 94 on the sear is engaged with a corresponding surface on the firing pin, maintaining the firing pin in cocked position, against the urge of tiring pin spring 96, contained within the firing pin, its rear end abutting a bolt buffer plunger 98, the purpose of which will be subsequently described. Referring to FIG. 5, the rear end of the sear is provided with a curved finger 100, the end of which carries a projection 102 which engages a corresponding projection 104 on trigger bar 106 which is pivoted to the left wall of the receiver by a screw 108 (FIG. 2). When the rear end of the trigger bar is moved downwardly by the trigger mechanism, to be described, the front end of the trigger Ibar moves upwardly, projection 104 on the trigger bar engaging projection 102 on the sear finger lifting the sear out of engagement with the firing pin.

An extractor 110 of generally conventional design is pivotally carried by the bolt and spring urged (not shown) so* that its forward hooked end 112 will cam over the rim of a cartridge as the bolt moves to locked position. A spring urged ejector 114, also of conventional design, is carried by the bolt which is moved rearwardly upon bolt closing. When the bolt is moved rearwardly and the fired cartridge clears the chamber, the ejector moves forwardly, rotating the cartridge relative to the bolt and from the front hook on the extractor, ejecting it through ejection port 24. The extractor and ejector thus operate in the same manner as in conventional bolt action rifles.

Dust cover 22 (FIGS. 5 and 7) is arcuate in cross section extending about 90 around the axis of the receiver, its upper edge, sliding in a groove 116 and its lower edge sliding along the top surface of the right bolt rail. Its forward end is provided with an ear 118 which may slide in a slot 120 in the bolt which terminates slightly ahead of the rear surface of the bolt, and its rear end is provided with a similar ear 122 which may move into a shallow recess 124 in the rear face of the bolt. When the bolt is at its rearward limit of travel it is telescoped within the dust cover. As the bolt moves forward by approximately its length it moves independent of the cover. When ear 118 engages the end o-f slot 120, the -bolt moves the cover with it thus closing that portion of the ejection port behind the bolt. In the rearward movement of the bolt, it moves approximately its length independent of the cover. The recess in the rear face of the bolt then engages ear 122 on the cover, the bolt and cover then moving together for the remainder of the rearward movement of the bolt.

4 Trigger The rear end of the upper receiver portion (FIGS. l and 2) terminates in an integral trigger frame 126 which is 'bedded in a slot (not shown) in the stock and secured to it by a st-ock draw bolt (not shown) which engages a threaded aperture 128. Trigger 18 is pivoted to the trigger frame by a pin and urged forwardly by a trigger spring 132. A safety actuator 134 is slidably mounted on the top of the `frame and is maintained in either safe or fire position by a detent spring 136. The safety actuator rotates a blocking lever 138, pivoted to the frame, the lower end of which may move to a position engaging abutment or to a position out of the path of the abutment. A-s shown in FIG. 2 the safety is in fire position. A latch 142 is pivoted t-o the forward end of the trigger by a pin 144 and is urged to a position abutting a stop pin 146 by a spring 148. Referring to FIG. 12, the rear end of trigger bar 106 is bent laterally, providing a linger 150 which is engaged by the latch. In the normal operation of the gun, the trigger should be released after firing a cartridge and during the reloading cycle. In this event, the latch is redundant and remains in the positionY shown in FIG. 2. In the event the operator maintains the trigger depressed during reloading, the latch becomes operative to disengage it from the trigger bar so that closing of the bolt will prevent interference between the projection 104 on the fro-nt end of the trigger bar and projection 102 on the sear finger, which interference could either damage these parts or operate the sear prematurely and unintentionally. A spring urged plunger 152, which urges the rear end of the trigger bar upwardly, moves the trigger bar to the position shown in FIG. 2 when the latch disengages finger 150'. Movement of the latch is effected by p-ivoted leaner 154, the upper end of which is in the path of movement of buffer 98, previously described, carried by the bolt. In the normal operation, with the trigger released during reloading, bulier 98 engages the leaner and rotates it to the dotted position shown in FIG. 2 in which projection 156 on the latch moves into cut-away 158 on the leaner. In the event the trigger is maintained depressed during reloading, as shown in FIG. 2A, projection 156 on the latch, is in the path of surface 160l on the leaner which rotates the latch counterclockwise about its pivot pin where it is disengaged from the trigger bar. The trigger bar plunger then rotates the trigger bar to its position wherein the trigger arm projection 104 may move to a position beneath the projection 102 on the sear finger. The position of parts is now as shown in FIG. 2A wherein the projection 156 is disposed behind the trigger bar finger 150. Upon release of the trigger, the latch moves to the normal position shown in FIG. 2.

Elevator mechanism The leaner 154, just referred to, is pivoted to the lower portion of the receiver by a pin 162 and is urged clockwise by spring 164. Its lower portion is formed as a generally rectangular open frame 166 surrounding elevator carrier 168 which is pivoted to the forward end of the frame by a pin 170. An actuator arm 172 is pivoted to the receiver by a pin 174 and is connected to the leaner by a pin and slot connection 176 and to the elevator carrier by another pin and slot connection 178. The pivot point of the actuator arm and the location of the pin and slot connections are so chosen to pivot the elevator carrier about its pivot pin and maintain the elevator in a generally horizontal position as it is moved to its upper position, as shown in FIG. 2A. The actuator arm thus serves as a substantially parallelogram mechanism for the carrier. The rear end of the carrier is provided with an upstanding arcuate lip 180 against which the rim of a cartridge abuts when it is fed to the carrier from the magazine. A pair of Telion buffers 182, one of which is shown, cushion the shock of the cartridge fed to the carrier, the butlers abutting the rear face of the cartridge at opposite sides of the central percussion primer carried by the cartridge.

Magazine feeding mechanism Referring now to FIGS. and 1l, the right wall of the lower receiver portion is cut away to receive an elevator release arm 190 and a primary cartridge stop arm 192 which are pivoted to the receiver by a pivot pin 194 and urged inwardly by conical springs 196, one of which is shown, the rear ends of the arms serving as stops to limit the movement. A latch projection 198 is disposed on the elevator release arm over which the forward end of the leaner frame 166 may ride and latch it in its upper position as shown in phantom in FIG. ll. When the upper end of the elevator release arm is cammed outwardly, the latch is released from the leaner frame and its spring returns to its lower position. The forward end of the primary stop is disposed in the path of cartridge rim 199 to arrest rearward movement of a cartridge 201, still in the magazine, and when its upper end is cammed laterally outward the rim is released for movement to a secondary cartridge stop, this movement being slightly in excess of the thickness of the cartridge rim. The secondary stop arm 200, shown in FIGS. 2 and 10, is pivoted to the left wall of the receiver in the same manner as the primary stop arm by a pin 195 and functions in like manner, its forward end arresting the cartridge after release by the primary stop at the position just described.

The sequential ymovement of the three arms, just described, is effected by movement of the bolt. Referring to FIG. 6, the lower right front corner of the bolt is cut away to form a Camming surface 202 which moves arms 190 and 192 laterally as it moves across their up. per ends 204, 206. The lower left front corner of the bolt differs slightly in that it is cut away to slideably receive a hook shaped cam 208, secured to the left slide, which engages the upper end 210 of the secondary stop arm as the bolt, slide and cam move as a unit across the upper end of the secondary stop arm.

Receiver and trigger guard As previously referred to, the receiver is formed as an upper or top portion 10T and a lower or bottom portion 10B, joined along plane 12. Referring now to FIGS. 5 and 10, each side of the lower portion of the receiver is provided with a longitudinally extending rectangular locking rail 212 spaced from plane 12 and each side of the top portion of the receiver is provided with a rectangular locking ledge 214 which slides between plane 12 and the adjacent locking rail. Each locking rail is provided with a cut-out 216 spaced from its rear end and the locking ledges are similarly cut-out at a similar spacing from their front ends. This forms a bayonet slide lock which permits the front ends of the ledges to pass laterally through the cut-outs 216 in the locking rails, joining the top and bottom receiver portions at plane 12. Longitudinal relative movement of the two parts then locks them together as they move toward their final position of assembly. When they are moved to such position, they are locked together against relative longitudinal movement by the trigger guard to now be described. Referring t0 FIGS. 3, 3A, 3B and 4, trigger guard 40 is connected to a disk shaped member 218 by a pivot pin 220, the disk shaped member being pivotally connected to the bottom portion of the receiver by a screw 222. Member 218 is provided with a attened portion 224 which will clear a groove 226 in locking lug 228 when rotated to the position shown in FIG. 3A, the circular portion locking it in the groove in other positions. The rear end of the trigger guard carries a attened pin 230, FIG. 4, which locks in a circular hole in stationary portion 232 of the trigger guard when rotated to the position shown in FIG. 4. When rotated 90 to this position the flattened portion may pass through a slot 234 in portion 232. A manually operated spring urged detent 236 engages two slots in the disk member preventing rotation at selected positions.

Starting with the position shown in FIG. 3, the disk is locked to the locking lug and the rear end of the trigger guard is locked to the stationary guard. The detent is also locked to the disk member, To unlock, the detent is depressed to permit the disk ymember and trigger guard to rotate. It is then rotated counterclockwise to the position shown in FIG. 3A. As will be apparent from FIG. 4 the flattened member may now pass through slot 234. After swinging the trigger guard around pivot pin 220 to the position shown in FIG. 3A the two parts of the receiver are unlocked and may be separated by relative longitudinal movement. The trigger guard has a third position as shown in FIG. 3B in which the receiver parts are still locked but the detent does not lock the disc member against rotation. In this position, the trigger guard is at the left side of the trigger leaving it accessible for operation in the event the operator is wearing heavy gloves or a mitten which would prevent access to the trigger in its normal position. If it is desired to return the trigger guard to the position of FIG. 3 it may be freely rotated without operation of the detent.

Disassembly With the gun inverted and the bolt in its forward `chambered position (with ring pin cocked) the trigger guard is rotated to the position shown in FIG. 3A, unlocking the receiver portions. They are then moved relatively until the rear portion of the ledge is aligned with the cut-out portion in the locking rails. During this movement, the slides disengage from the locking block. The two receiver portions are then moved laterally, separating same. The rear end of the locking block is then lifted to unlock it from the locking abutments on the bolt rails, permitting the block to be moved rearwardly. It is then moved to a position shortly behind closed position where the lateral ears on the locking block and the lateral cocking ears on the Vcooking bar will pass through the cutouts in ledges 212 of the top receiver portion. After removing these two parts, the bolt is moved to its rearward limit of motion at which point the bolt rails are cut away to permit the bolt to be lifted from the top portion of the receiver.

Sequence of operation (Live round in chamber and at least one live round in magazine. Bolt is locked, elevator is empty.)

(l) Fire-cooking bar is moved forward by firing pin.

(2) Short rearward movement of slide:

(a) moves cocking bar rearward (tending to cock ring pin),

(b) cams on slide disengage locking block-bolt now free to move.

(3) Camming surface on bolt next moves across end of secondary stop lever, releasing a round from magazine to elevator.

(4) When bolt -rnoves suicient distance for spent round to clear chamber, ejector ejects it through ejection port.

(5) As bolt approaches rear end of its travel, spring plunger on bolt engages leaner, moving elevator to its upper position where it is locked by elevator latch.

(6) Last movement of bolt cocks ring pin.

(7) Forward movement of bolt engages round on elevator moving it toward chambered position.

(8) When approaching chambered position bolt engages elevator latch, permitting elevator spring to lower it.

(9) Upon further movement of bolt it engages primary cartridge stop (right side), permitting a new round to move to secondary stop.

(l0) As bolt is completing travel, extractor snaps over rim of cartridge case and bolt moves to head spacing position. This cams locking block into locking position.

(1l) Final movement of slide (bolt now locked) moves cocking bar abutments on slides forward, permitting clearance for cocking bar to move forward when next round is fired.

Reloading When the last round has been expended, with the bolt open and the elevator raised, three rounds may be fed into the magazine from beneath the elevator (normally, the gun would be inverted for better accessibility to the magazine). If it is desired to chamber a fourth round, this may be achieved by placing it on the elevator and it will be chambered as the bolt is returned to closed position.

Utility and modification The invention, as originally designed, was intended for launching the conventional 40 mm. gun launched grenade. It will now be apparent, however, that the claimed features are applicable to launching other missiles such as bullets, shot, ares, and missiles containing chemicals. Also, the caliber may be larger or smaller than 40 mm. to accommodate the particular missile and the barrel may be either rilled or smooth bore, depending on whether or not spin stabilization is required.

Obviously many modifications and variations of the present invention are possible in the light of the above teachings.

What is claimed is:

1. A hand held gun comprising:

(a) a receiver having a cartridge ejection port,

(b) a barrel extending forwardly from the receiver,

(c) a tubular -magazine disposed beneath and parallel to the barrel for containing a plurality of axially aligned loaded cartridges,

(d) a. slide handle moveable along the magazine and connected to slides disposed within and at opposite sides of the receiver,

(e) a bolt slideably mounted in the receiver for rectilinear movement rearwardly from a forward shell chambered position,

(f) a locking block pivoted to the bolt adjacent its forward lower end for movement about a transverse axis,

(g) a transversely extending cooking bar slideably carried by the bolt,

(h) said slides having abut-ments engageable with ends of the cocking bar and cams engageable with camming surfaces on opposite lateral ends of the locking block, said cams adapted to pivot the locking block and lock it to the receiver when the bolt is moved to its forward position,

(i) an elevator for transferring a loaded cartridge from the rear end of the magazine to an elevated position for chambering in the barrel, said elevator being moved by the bolt when the bolt is moved toward its rearward position,

(j) a spring urged tiring pin carried by the bolt having an abutment engageable with the cooking bar and adapted to be moved to cocked position,

(k) a sear carried by the bolt engageable with the firing pin, and

(l) a trigger for releasing the sear.

2. A gun in accordance with claim 1 wherein:

(m) the length of the bolt is approximately one-half the length of the ejection port, and

(n) a slideable dust cover disposed rearwardly of the bolt having lost motion connections engageable with the bolt for closing the portion of the ejection port rearwardly of the bolt when the bolt is in its forward position and for permitting the bolt to telescope into the cover when the bolt moves to its rearward position.

3. A gun in accordance with claim 1 wherein:

(o) said receiver comprises a top portion and a bottom portion, having longitudinally slideable mating parts along opposite sides thereof for locking same together against transverse separation, and

(p) a locking member carrier by the lower portion,

mounted for rotation about a longitudinal axis, having means for locking same to the upper portion for preventing relative longitudinal movement between said top and bottom portions.

4. A gun in accordance with claim 3 including:

(q) a moveable trigger guard pivotally secured to said locking member for rotation about a transverse axis,

and

(r) a stationary trigger guard secured to the top receiver portion adapted to releasably secure the rear end of the moveable trigger guard to same.

5. A gun in accordance with claim 1 including:

(s) a trigger bar pivoted to the upper receiver portion having a forward end adapted to operate a linger on thel sear and a rear end adapted to be moved by the trigger, a spring for urging the trigger bar to a position wherein its forward end is in a normal position disposed out of the path of the sear linger, and

(t) a latch interconnecting the trigger and rear end of the trigger bar, operative to disconnect same from the trigger bar in the event the trigger is retained depressed when the bolt moves to its rear limit of travel during the reloading cycle, said latch adapted to re-engage the trigger bar when the trigger is released.

6. A gun in accordance with claim 5 including:

(u) a pivoted leaner for operating the elevator, upon movement of the bolt during a nal portion of its rearward movement, and an abutment on the leaner for engaging said latch and disconnecting it from the trigger bar in the event the trigger is retained depressed.

7. A gun in accordance with claim 1 including:

(v) a latch for latching the elevator in its elevated position, a primary cartridge stop and a secondary cartridge stop, the latch and stops each having a moveable portion disposed in the path of Amovement of the bolt and adapted to be moved in the desired sequence by movement of the bolt.

8. A gun in accordance with claim 1, including:

(w) a pivoted leaner for operating the elevator, upon movement of the bolt during a nal portion of its rearward movement, and

(x) Ia spring urged buffer carried by the rear end of the bolt adapted to engage the leaner for operating same.

9. A gun in accordance with claim 8 wherein:

(y) the spring urged tiring pin and the spring urged buffer are urged by opposite ends of a single coil spring.

10. A hand held gun comprising:

(a) a receiver having a cartridge ejection port,

(b) a barrel extending forwardly from the receiver,

(c) a tubular magazine disposed beneath and parallel to the barrel for containing a plurality of axially aligned loaded cartridges,

(id) a slide handle moveable along the magazine and connected to slides disposed within and at opposite sides of the receiver,

(e) a bolt slideably mounted in the receiver for rectilnear movement rearwardly from a forward shell chambered position, said bolt being of a length approximately one-half the length of the ejection port,

(f) a slidable dust cover disposed rearwardly of the bolt having lost motion connections engageable with the bolt for closing the portion of the ejection port rearwardly of the bolt when the bolt is in its forward position and for permitting the bolt to telescope into the cover when the bolt is moved to its rearward position,

(g) means operated by the slides for moving the lbolt and for locking it in its forward position, and

(h) an elevator for transferring a loaded cartridge from the rear end of the magazine to an elevated position for ohambering in the barrel.

11. A hand held gun including:

(a) a `first unit comprising a receiver top portion having a barrel extending forwardly therefrom, an ejection port, a closed rear end, and a bolt slidably carried thereby having a length approximately onehalf the length of the ejection port,

(b) a second unit comprising a receiver bottom portion having a tubular magazine extending forwardly therefrom for containing loaded cartridges, and an elevator for transferring a cartridge from the magazine to a position in the upper portion, for chambering in the barrel by forward movement of the bolt,

(c) said .receiver portions having longitudinall slideably mating parts along opposite sides thereof for locking sarne together against transverse separation, and

(d) locking means carried iby one of the portions engageable with the other portion for preventing relative longitudinal movement therebetween,

(e) the construction and arrangement being such that release of said locking means permits relative longitudinal movement between said portions for separating same into the two units.

12. A gun in accordance with claim 1.1 wherein said bolt is slidably carried by longitudinally extending rails disposed on opposite sides of the top portion, said rails being discontinuous at their rear ends for a distance at least equal to the length of the bolt, whereby the bolt may be removed laterally from the top portion after the units have been separated and the bolt is disposed at its rearward position.

i13. A gun in accordance with claim 11 including a leaner a'ixed to said elevator having an upper end projecting into said top portion and into the path of movement of the bolt, said slideable mating parts being cut away at spaced zones to permit the receiver portions to be moved laterally into engagement, with the leaner disposed behind the bolt, after which the receiver portions may be moved relatively to their locked position.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 846,591 3/ 1907 Mason 42-75 852,241 4/1907 Redfield 42-49 1,702,984 2/ 1929 Shelman 42-16 1,756,847 4/1930 Bourth 42-16 2,278,589 4/ 1942 Rutherford 42--17 2,302,059 11/ 1942 Roamer 42--16 2,863,246 12/1958 Lee 42-16 3,213,558 10/1965 Horsrud 42-17 3,336,691 8/1967 Allyn 42-75 BENJAMIN A. BORCHELT, Primary Examiner.

U.S. Cl. X.R. 42-75

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3604137 *Jun 17, 1969Sep 14, 1971Us ArmySighting system for a firearm-carried grenade launcher
US4156981 *Sep 9, 1977Jun 5, 1979Her Majesty The Queen In Right Of CanadaRevolver-type repeating gun
US5052144 *Nov 14, 1988Oct 1, 1991Ostor Pierre AGrenade launcher
US5239911 *Feb 13, 1992Aug 31, 1993Ostor Pierre AMultiple-round grenade launcher
US6591535Aug 24, 2001Jul 15, 2003Armalite, Inc.Light weight weapon operating system and cartridge feed
US20040025393 *Jul 15, 2003Feb 12, 2004Reynolds George L.Light weight weapon operating system and cartridge feed
US20060026885 *May 27, 2005Feb 9, 2006Macaluso TonyGrenade launcher and gun
US20080060245 *Nov 8, 2007Mar 13, 2008Mccormick Michael LModular trigger group for firearms and firearm having a modular trigger group
Classifications
U.S. Classification42/17, 42/75.3, 42/105
International ClassificationF41A9/18, F41A9/00, F41C7/02, F41C7/00
Cooperative ClassificationF41A9/18, F41C7/02
European ClassificationF41C7/02, F41A9/18