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Publication numberUS3435581 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 1, 1969
Filing dateJul 5, 1966
Priority dateJul 9, 1965
Also published asDE1534692A1, DE1534692B2, DE1534692C3
Publication numberUS 3435581 A, US 3435581A, US-A-3435581, US3435581 A, US3435581A
InventorsAhlqvist Karl
Original AssigneeAhlqvist Karl
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Insulated wall construction for buildings
US 3435581 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 1, 1969 K. AHLQVIsf I Q 3, 8

' INSULATED WALL CONSTRUCTION Foa BUILDINGS Filed July 5, 1966 United States Patent 3,435,581 INSULATED WALL CONSTRUCTION FOR BUILDINGS Karl Ahlqvist, Strandvagen 55, Sollentuna, Sweden Filed July 5, 1966, Ser. No. 562,752

Claims priority, application Sweden, July 9, 1965,

9,070/65 Int. Cl. E04b 2/32, 1/62 US. Cl. 52405 7 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A plurality of blocks are provided, each having inwardly etxending flanges along the vertical side edges thereof. Each flange has in its outer face a recess extending vertically thereof, the recesses of facing flanges of adjacent blocks receiving a locking-rail. A clamping bolt extends throughout the facing flanges and the associated locking-rail to secure adjacent blocks to one another. The locking-rail extends a substantial distance inwardly of the innermost edges of the associated flanges. Insulating elements are fitted within the space between the flanges of each block, these insulating elements also extending a substantial distance inwardly of the innermost edges of the flanges of the associated block.

The present invention relates to a wall construction for buildings which comprises slab shaped rectangular blocks forming an outer shell, the blocks being assembled together by means of flanges facing inwards towards the body of the building and extending along the vertical side edges of the bloclcs, the flanges forming supporting elements, the outerface of each flange having a longitudinal recess or cavity extending a distance inwards from the outer edge, the recess receiving a lockingrail fitted between two blocks and against two facing flanges, the locking-rail forming an anchor for means securing the rectangular blocks, the recess being such that a joint exists between the inner edge of the flange and the recess.

This type of wall construction is previously known. It presents, however, the disadvantage that the components contained therein are diflicult to assemble at the building site and therefore skilled tradesmen are required.

This disadvantage can be avoided, according to the invention, if the locking-rail projects a distance beyond the flanges and other, inner insulation, forming blocks or slabs, is directly fitted in the space between adjacent locking-rails.

According to one embodiment of the present invention, the locking-rail is penetrated by a bolt clamping the flanges together, and according to another embodiment of the invention, the joint between the outer faces of the flanges is sealed with sealing agent.

According to one embodiment of the invention, a second joint is provided between the locking-rail at the face of the locking-rail facing outwards from the body of the building and the limiting surface of the recess of two facing flanges. The second joint can also be filled entirely or partially with sealing medium.

According to one embodiment of the invention, an insulating air channel is provided between the inner surface of the outer shell and the other inner insulation forming the block or slab.

According to one embodiment of the inveniton, the inner surface of the outer shell is coated with a moisture preventing layer.

One embodiment of the invention will be more closely described whilst referring to the appended drawing, where FIG. 1 shows the wall design in a perspective view, whilst FIG. 2 shows the same wall design in section.

The numeral 1 in the drawing indicates a slab shaped block which is provided with flanges 2. The block can be produced of concrete, asbestos cement, artificial stone or other material which can form a strong and suitable outer protection against damage and weather for the more susceptible insulating components of the body of the building. Between the flanges 2 of the block 1, the flanges forming supporting elements, insulating blocks or slabs 3 are titted, according to any number of intermediary spaces between flanges. The thickness of the block 3 varies in relation to the material used and the desired heat value and sound insulation of the wall.

The blocks or slabs 3 could be comprised of glass wool, mineral wool, plastic, paper etc. with a surface layer of chips, paper, wallpaper sheets or the like. An air channel 4 is situated between the surface of the slab shaped block 1 facing the body of the building and the insulating block 3, in so doing the heat insulation is further improved. The inner surface of the slab shaped block can be coated with a layer serving as a moisture preventive e.g., asphalt.

The outer faces of the flanges 2 are provide with recesses or cavities which extend along the longitude of the flanges. These receive half the length of of a locking-rail 6 which is suitably produced from wood. The depth' of the recess 5 is so arranged that a channel 7 is formed between the raised parts of the flanges 2, the channel being sealed with the help of a sealing agent. A joint 8 is also arranged between the face of the locking-rail facing outwards from the body of the building and the bearing surfaces of the recess, the joint 8 being filled with a sealing agent. Both the slab shaped blocks are secured over the flanges with the help of a clamping bolt, one of the nuts being indicated by the numeral 9. As is apparent from the figure, the locking-rail 6 extends a distance beyond the edges of the flanges 2 in the direction of the body of the building. -In so doing, a closed space is formed in which the insulating block or slab 3 is placed. A sheet 10 can be arranged on the inner surface wall construction. This sheet is fastened in a suitable way, e.g., nailed to the locking-rail surface that faces the body of the building.

In the above wall design a very reliable and durable wall construction is obtained and provides the exceptional advantage of allowing simple dismantling of the elements. included without these elements being subjected to damage. The construction provides exceptional sound insulation and effective protection against flank-transmisson.

The Wall constuction accoding to the invention can be utilized both as an inner wall and an outer wall construction.

What I claim is:

1. A wall construction for buildings comprising a plurality of slab shaped rectangular blocks forming an outer shell, said blocks each defining an outwardly facing surface and an inwardly facing surface, said blocks each having inwardly extending flanges formed along the vertical side edges thereof, each flange having in its outer face a recess extending vertically of the flange and from the innermost edge of the flange to a recess defining surface spaced from and substantially parallel with the outwardly facing surface of the associated block, the recesses of facing flanges of adjacent blocks receiving a lockingrail, means associated with said facing flanges and the associated locking-rail for securing adjacent blocks to one another to hold the blocks in assembled relationship, a channel being defined between spaced outer portions of the outer faces of the facing flanges of adjacent blocks, said locking-rail extending a substantial distance inwardly of the innermost edges of the associated flanges, insulating elements fitted within the space between the flanges of each of said blocks, said insulating elements also extending a substantial distance inwardly of the innermost edges of the flanges of the associated block to provide good heat and sound insulation and effective protection against flank-transmission, a space being defined between the outwardly facing surface of said locking-rail and said recess defining surfaces which define the outermost portion of the recesses of the associated facing flanges, said space being substantially filled with a sealing agent therewithin and in engagement with said outwardly facing surface of the locking-rail and said recess defining surfaces to bridge said channel and provide a seal at the inner end of said channel.

2. Apparatus as defined in claim 1 wherein said securing means comprises a clamping bolt, said locking-rail and the associated facing flanges having aligned holes formed therethrough for receiving said clamping bolt.

3. Apparatus as defined in claim 1 wherein said channel has a sealing agent disposed therewithin to seal the channel.

4. Apparatus as defined in claim 1 wherein an insulating air channel is defined between the outwardly facing portion of said insulating element and the inwardly facing surface of the associated block.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,964,131 6/1934 Nelson et a1. 52375 X 2,047,109 7/1936 Nagel 52405 2,249,073 7/1941 Williamson 52-405 X 2,704,935 3/1955 Uddenborg 52-375 FOREIGN PATENTS 606,523 3/ 1926 France.

ALFRED C. CERHAM, Primary Examiner.

US. Cl. X.R. 52-407, 375, 479

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1964131 *Jan 20, 1932Jun 26, 1934Nelson Buell CBuilding construction
US2047109 *Dec 16, 1935Jul 7, 1936Nagel George EPrecast insulated concrete deck slab
US2249073 *Dec 7, 1938Jul 15, 1941American Cyanamid & Chem CorpCombination plaster base and insulating block
US2704935 *Apr 26, 1949Mar 29, 1955Uddenborg Johan RBuilding sections
FR606523A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3567162 *Dec 9, 1968Mar 2, 1971Boeing CoFire stop insulation
US4296798 *Nov 13, 1978Oct 27, 1981Horst SchrammIntegrated house
US4735022 *Jul 13, 1984Apr 5, 1988National Concrete Masonry AssociationConcrete masonry block and stud wall construction system
US4815243 *Jul 20, 1987Mar 28, 1989National Concrete Masonry AssociationConcrete masonry block and stud wall construction systems
US4856244 *Jun 1, 1987Aug 15, 1989Clapp Guy CTilt-wall concrete panel and method of fabricating buildings therewith
US5493836 *Dec 20, 1993Feb 27, 1996Lopez-Munoz; HumbertoBuilding system based upon preformed modules
US5581969 *Oct 13, 1994Dec 10, 1996Kelleher; Stephen L.Prefabricated building element
US5794386 *Jul 2, 1996Aug 18, 1998Suba Cooperation Gesellschaft Fur Bauforschung Und Franchising MbhRoof panel for sloped roofs
US5956911 *Jul 28, 1995Sep 28, 1999Kistner Concrete Products, Inc.Insulated pre-formed wall panels
US6280669Jul 22, 1998Aug 28, 2001Kistner Concrete Products, Inc.Method for making insulated pre-formed wall panels for attachment to like insulated pre-formed wall panels
US6338231Mar 13, 2000Jan 15, 2002Fast Built Panels, Inc.Prefabricated concrete wall panel system and method
US7083147 *Mar 11, 2004Aug 1, 2006The Boeing CompanyModularized insulation, systems, apparatus, and methods
US7278608 *Jun 27, 2005Oct 9, 2007Johns ManvilleReinforced insulation product and system suitable for use in an aircraft
US7367527 *Aug 23, 2005May 6, 2008Johns ManvilleReinforced insulation product and system suitable for use in an aircraft
US7374132 *Aug 23, 2005May 20, 2008Johns ManvilleInsulation product and system suitable for use in an aircraft
US7946092Oct 26, 2009May 24, 2011Veerhuis Beheer, B.V.Method of constructing a building, such building, and wall and floor elements for use therein
US8590242 *Mar 3, 2010Nov 26, 2013Thomas J. OgorchockInsulated concrete wall
US8640416 *Oct 19, 2011Feb 4, 2014Bernard Ted CULLENSliding and locking energy-efficient wall assembly
US20120151859 *Oct 19, 2011Jun 21, 2012Cullen Bernard TedSliding and locking energy-efficient wall assembly
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/405.1, 52/479, 52/375
International ClassificationE04B1/04, E04B1/02
Cooperative ClassificationE04B1/04
European ClassificationE04B1/04