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Publication numberUS3435602 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 1, 1969
Filing dateMay 20, 1965
Priority dateMay 20, 1965
Publication numberUS 3435602 A, US 3435602A, US-A-3435602, US3435602 A, US3435602A
InventorsSheets Chester R
Original AssigneeOkonite Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Strand wrapping machine
US 3435602 A
Images(8)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 1, 1969 c. SHEETS STRAND WRAPPING MACHINE Filed May 20, 1965 sheet 2 of8 INVENTOR 0/5575 2. 57/55/5 BY L ATTORNEY C. R. SHEETS STRAND Wl=ll .I-}IN(: MACHINE April 1 1969 Sheet Filed may 20. 1965 INVENTOR (f/F5751? Z. El/ffTS BY J ATTORNEY April 1, 1969 c. R, s H -rs 7 3,435,602

swam) WRAPPING momma 7 Filed May 2o, 1965 I Sheet of a INVENTOR CHEF/2 2. 5/1557'5 ATTORNEY April 1, 1969 c. R. SHEETS STRAND WRAPPING MACHINE Sheet 6 Of8 Filed May 20, 1965 Has I ATTORNEY Filed May 20,. 1965 Sheet April 1, 1969 c. R. SHEETS r 3,435,602 STRAND WRAPPING MACHINE I INVENTOR 0/5572! 1?. 51:51-75 ATTORNEY April 1, 1969 c. R. SHEETS 3,435,602

' STRAND WRAPPING MACHINE Filed May 20, 1965 Sheet 6 are FIG: 9

. INVENTOR I 671F575? 1?. 5 /55/15 ATTORNEY United States Patent 3,435,602 STRAND WRAPPING MACHINE Chester R. Sheets, East Paterson, NJ., assignor, by mesne assignments, to the Okonite Company, Passaic, N.J., a corporation of Delaware Filed May 20, 1965, Ser. No. 457,303 Int. Cl. D02g 3/36 US. CI. 57-15 20 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE Method and apparatus for helically wrapping an axially moving strand by orbiting a plurality of covering tape spools about said strand while each tape is withdrawn from its spool by .a capstan driven at least as fast as the tape is applied to the strand so as to deliver the tape to a point substantially free of tension so that a tensioning means can subsequently apply the desired tension to the tape free of varying condition at the supply spool.

This invention relates to apparatus and methods for the application of a tape or tapes to an elongate strand. More particularly, the invention relates to apparatus and methods for winding a plurality of tapes in helical fashion about an electrical conductor, as, for example, in the manufacture of paper-insulated, high-voltage electrical cable.

In the manufacture of such cable, it is a common practice to advance the cable lengthwise along a path. A plurality of taping heads are disposed successively along the path, and a plurality of tapes are applied, by winding them about the conductor, at each of the taping heads. The tapes may be of the same material, such as paper, or of different materials. For example, paper, plastic, metallized plastic, and metal tapes may be applied where needed to meet a particular cable specification. Accordingly, it should be understood that when paper tape is referred to herein, it is not intended to exclude the use of tapes of other materials.

It has long been recognized that it is desirable, in the manufacture of paper-insulated, high-voltage electrical cable, to apply the paper tapes with uniform tension, and with accurate overlay and gap spacing. The term overlay refers to the amount of displacement of a paper tape with respect to the preceding tape lying directly beneath it. The term gap spacing refers to the distance between adjacent tape windings that are not overlaid.

The tension used for a particular tape, that is Wound about a cable, may or may not be the same as the tension used in a preceding or following tape that is wound about the same cable. The selection of the correct tension for each tape is made on the basis of long experience and manufacturing know-how. After a particular tension has been selected for a tape, the selected tension should be maintained at a substantially constant value.

One of the problems that has been encountered in manufacturing operations, of the type to which the present invention pertains, is that the tension, at which the tape from a particular tape supply reel is applied, may vary as the diameter of the tape supply on the reel varies. Although various mechanical techniques have been proposed for solving the problem of providing for a constant tension value in a given tape, none of these has been completely satisfactory, Partly as a result, relatively small supply reels of paper are employed, so that the effects of changes in diameter are less marked. As a result, a substantial and often major part of the life of a taping machine is spent in down time to permit the replacement of tape supply reels. Since a taping machine is a major capital investment, the proportion of down time is highly significant as a cost factor.

Another manufacturing problem is that it is extremely ditficult, and in most cases impossible, to obtain synchronism between the operations of successive taping heads on a single taping machine. Consequently, it has been a common practice to treat each taping head as a unit, performing an isolated, unitary operation, rather than as a part of a large machine that performs several coordinated steps.

One object of the present invention is to provide apparatus and methods for the application of tape to an elongate strand at a selected, essentially constant tension value.

Another object of the invention is to provide efiicient apparatus and methods for the application of tapes to elongate strands, such as, for example, the application of paper and other tapes in helical windings about an electrical conductor.

A more specific o biect of the invention is to provide practical, efiicient apparatus and methods for winding tapes about electrical conductors for the manufacture of insulated cable, with improved control over tape tension, overlay, and gap spacing.

Still another object of the invention is to provide an eflicient, multiple-head taping machine in which the several heads can be operated in a coordinated and synchronized fashion.

Other objects of the invention will be apparent hereinafter from the specification and from the recital of the appended claims.

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a diagrammatic plan view of a taping machine that is constructed in accordance with, and that operates in accordance with, one preferred embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a fragmentary part side elevation, part section, partly broken away, and on an enlarged scale, of a single taping head, with the drum support bracket and drum sector removed, better to show the construction of the head;

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary part section, part front elevation of a taping head, with the drum sectors removed, showing the location of the tape supply reels in phantom;

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary section on an enlarged scale, taken on the line 4-4 of FIG. 3, looking in the direction of the arrows, with a fragmentary section of the drum sector added;

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary part elevation, part section, on a smaller scale, of a single drum sector that is loaded with tape supply reels, taken on the line 5-5 of FIG. 6, looking in the direction of the arrows, with the cylindrical shoe section of the drum sector omitted for ease and clarity of illustration;

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary section taken on the line 6-6 of FIG. 5, looking in the direction of the arrows, with a tape supply reel shown in phantom;

FIG. 7 is a fragmentary view, on an enlarged scale, taken on the line 7-7 of FIG, 6, looking in the direction of the arrows;

FIG. 8 is a fragmentary axial section, on an enlarged scale, showing the manner in which the tape supply reels are mounted on thelr shaft;

FIG. 9 is a schematic diagram illustrating the operation of a single taping head, in a machine that is constructed in accordance with one preferred embodiment of the present invention, showing three tape supply reels (or banks of supply reels) mounted on the head, the direction of rotary movement of the tape reels about the conductor being indicated by the direction of the arrows, and also showing, in phantom, a second position for one of the supply reels through which it would move during operation;

FIG. is a fragmentary imaginative side elevation, on a small scale, showing a plurality of paper supply reels and their respective orientations relative to the conductor to which the tapes are being applied;

FIG. 11 is a top plan view of FIG. 10;

FIG. 1 is a fragmentary elevation, on an enlarged scale, of a section of tape-wrapped conductor, with a short length of the bare conductor extended at one end, to show the thickness of the applied tape wrappings, and with some of the tape winding shown in their respective application positions; and

FIG. 13 is a section, on an enlarged scale, taken on the line 13-13 of FIG. 6, looking in the direction of the arrows.

Referring now in detail to the drawings, and particularly to FIG. 1, the numeral 20 denotes the center line of the taping machine, and also the path that the conductor will follow as it is advanced through the taping machine. A tensioning device 21 is disposed at the input or back end of the taping machine, and a second tension ing and advancing device 22 is disposed at the output or front end of the machine. These two devices 21, 22 advance the cable at selected rates of advancement through the taping machine, and maintain it at a desired degree of tautness.

In the working path through which the conductor is advanced, between these two tensioning devices 21, 22, there are a plurality of work stations, at each of which one or more tapes can be applied to the conductor. Two of the devices for applying tape about the conductor, hereafter referred to as taping heads, in accordance with the present invention, are identified in FIG. 1 by the numerals 24 and 25, respectively.

The taping heads, that are illustrated in the drawings, are each provided with means for applying nine separate tapes about a conductor from three different, angularly spaced supply locations on each head. However, not all of these supply locations need be used; and more than the number shown can be used, if desired, by appropriate modifications to the head.

Referring now particularly to FIG. 2, each of the taping heads is substantially the same in its construction and mode of operation as the illustrated taping head 24. An A-frame 26 provides the supporting structure for each taping head 24. The upper end of each A-frame is formed as a clamp, with a lower portion 28 and an upper portion 29, that are removably secured together by bolts 30. These upper and lower portions 29 and 28, respectively, are so formed as to provide, therebetween, as assembled, a generally cylindrical bore.

A box-like frame 31 is detachably secured to the rear face of the cylindrical segment 28 of the A-frarne, by a plurality of bolts 32. This frame 31 is formed with a pair of elongate slots 34, only one of which can be seen in FIG. 2, within which a pair of roller axles 35 can be adjustably positioned by nuts 36. A pair of rollers 38 are freely rotatably mounted on the axles 35, for guid ing the conductor 40 through the working path between the back and front tensioning devices 21 and 22, respectively. The rollers 38 are mounted for rotation about horizontal axes. A similar pair of rollers (not shown) are mounted in the frame 31, adjustably secured in place by the nuts 41, for rotation about vertical axes, for additional guidance of the conductor.

The upper and lower portions 29 and 28 of the A-frame 26 are formed, at their front ends, with forwardly projecting parts that assemble as a cylindrical collar 42. A large-diameter tubular shaft 44 is immovably clamped within the bore formed between the upper and lower portions 29, 28 of the A-frame and of the collar 42.

The spider A rotary structure generally referred to as a spider is mounted upon a generally sleeve-like rotary housing 51 4 which is mounted on the end of the shaft 44. Ball bearings 43 are interposed between the shaft 44 and the housing 51, at each end of the housing, to permit rotation of the housing about the shaft. A sprocket 50 is secured to one end face of the housing 51, ,by a plurality of threaded fasteners 54. A chain 55 is engaged about the sprocket, 50 for driving it, as will be described presently.

A slip ring 45 is mounted for rotation about the shaft, 44 in radially spaced relation to the shaft, and in axially spaced relation to the sprocket 50. The slip ring 45 is secured to the sprocket, 50 for rotation upon rotation of the sprocket, by a plurality of securing brackets that are generally designated by the numeral 73. A brush 46 is mounted on a bracket 48 that is secured to the front face of the A-frame 26. This brush 46 is disposed for operative engagement with the slip ring 45. A lead 49 is connected to the brush 46, for a purpose to be described presently.

The housing 51 is formed with three central, angularlyspaced, similar openings 56. A drive gear 58 is secured to the shaft 44 in position so that it is exposed and accessible through these three openings 56, for a purpose to be described presently.

The three, symmetrically disposed opening 56 in the rotary housing 51 divide the housing into three, axially extending lands or segments 59. The three openings 56 extend axially over a central portion of the rotary housing 51 only, so that at each end of the housing, there are a pair of generally cylindrical end portions, On the rear end portion of housing 51, three blocks 53 are mounted in fixed, equiangularly spaced positions relative to the housing. Only one of these blocks 53 can be seen in FIG. 2. Each of these blocks 53 is formed with a threaded bore that extends through the block, lengthwise of the taping head 24. A threaded stud 57 is engaged in this bore, for a purpose to be described presently. A handle 63 is secured to the rear end of this stud 57.

With added reference to FIG. 3, each of the segments 59 is formed with a radially outwardly extending arm 60 that serves as a mounting bracket. Each mounting bracket 60 is formed with an axially-extending groove 61. A slide 62 is mounted on the arm 60, and is formed with a tongue that engages and that can slide in the groove 61. The slide 62 is also formed with a pair of axially-extending slots 65, and a pair of bolts 66 are disposed to project through these slots and thread into bores in the arm 60, for adjustably securing each slide 62 on its respective arm.

A scale 200 is secured to the surface of the housing 51, and a pointer 201 is secured to the lower edge of the slide 62, for registry with the indicia on the scale 200.

Each of the slides 62 is also formed at its outer end with an angled supporting shelf 68. As is best shown in FIG. 2, this shelf 68 is formed, in its radially outwardly exposed face, with a threaded recess 67, a large clearance hole 69, and a threaded bore 70, for purposes to be described presently.

A drum support bracket 71 (FIGS. 3 and 4) is mounted on the shelf 68 of each slide. 62. Each of the three drum support brackets 71 is similarly constructed. Thus, each drum support bracket 71 is formed with a base portion 72 that seat on and is supported by the shelf 68. The base portion 72 is formed with an arcuate slot 74 (FIG. 4), and a bolt 75 (FIGS. 3 and 4) projects through this slot and threads into the bore 70 of the shelf, to adjustably secure the bracket 71 on the shelf 68.

Referring now particularly to FIG. 4, a block 76 is secured to the shelf 68 by a stud (not shown) that threads into the bore 67 in the shelf. The block 576 is secured to the stud in such fashion as to permit the block to rotate in a plane parallel to the shelf 68. The block 76 is formed at its upper end with a transverse, threaded bore. A block 78 is rigidly secured to the upper face of the drum support bracket 72, and it is formed with a smooth bore with which the threaded bore of the block 76 can be aligned. A heavy, threaded stud 79 is threaded through the bore of the block 76, and is passed through the smooth bore of the block 78 on the drum support bracket 72. A handle 82 is secured to the free end of the stud 79. A pair of rotary stop rings, 80 and 81, respectively, are secured to the stud 79 on either side of the block 78, to limit relative movement between the stud and this block. A scale 84 is secured to the surface of the shelf 68, and a pointer 85 is secured to the surface of the drum support bracket 71, for cooperative action and registration with the scale 84.

The drum support bracket 71 is formed with an upstanding front web portion 86 that is braced by a pair of gussets 88. The front web 86 is formed with an upstanding, rearwardly-facing boss 89, and with a smooth bore 90 through this boss. The front web 86 of the drum support bracket 71 is also formed with a forwardly-projecting boss 91, that has a substantially larger diameter than the rearwardly-projecting boss 89, and that is generally concentric therewith. This web 86 is also formed with a plurality of threaded bores 92 (FIGS. 3, 4, and in the boss 91, and with a pair of smaller, triangularly-located bosses 94 and 95 (FIGS. 4 and 6) that are also formed with threaded bores 96 and 98, respectively. In addition, as is best shown in FIG. 4, the web 86 is formed with a small pair of threaded bores 99, for a purpose to be described presently.

The drum sector Referring now particularly to FIGS. 4, 5, and 6, a radially-extending web portion 100 of a drum sector 101 is secured to the front web portion 86 of the drum support bracket 71. The web portion 100 of the drum sector is formed with a plurality of boss portions 102, 104 (FIG. 4) that contact the boss portions 91, 94, and 95, respectively, of the drum support bracket 71, and that are secured to the drum support bracket by a plurality of threaded fasteners 105; the fasteners pass through smooth bores in the bosses of the drum sector 1011 and thread into bores 92, 96, and 98 in the drum support bracket.

The web 100 of the drum sector .101. is formed 'with a bore 106 and a counter-bore 108, both of which are coaxial with the bore 90 in the boss 89 of the drum support bracket 71. One end of a shaft 109 is seated in the bore 90 of the drum support bracket 71, and projects therethrough. A nut 110 is threaded on the end of the shaft 109, to secure it firmly to the drum support bracket 71. The shaft 109 is formed with an enlarged diameter portion 111 that provides a rear shoulder that bears against the front face of the boss 91 of the drum support bracket, about the bore 90. This enlarged diameter portion 111 further engages the bore .106 of the drum sector.

A spacer ring 112 (FIGS. 4, 5, and 8) is mounted about the rear end of the shaft 109, abutting the front shoulder that is formed by the enlarged diameter portion 111 of the shaft 109. The shaft 109 is formed with a flat or keyway 1:14 that extends axially and forwardly from beneath the spacer ring 112, tothe front end of the shaft. A washer 115 is installed over the shaft 109, with a protruding portion thereof engaging the key way 114, and abutted against the spacer 1.12. A pair of space, confronting rings that together provide a tape roll support 116 are mounted on the shaft 109, a first one of the pair being adjacent the washer 115. These rings are recessed on their front and rear faces respectively, and thrust washers 118 are engaged in these recesses. The rear thrust washer 11-8 bears against the washer 115. A roll or pad -R1 of tape T-l is mounted on the roll support 116, on shoulders that are provided by confronting recess portions thereof. A spacer ring 119, that is preferably formed from a disc of pressed board, is also mounted in the tape roll support 116, contacting the front face of the tape roll R1.

A spacer ring 120 is mounted on the shaft 109, abutting the front thrust Washer 118. The remainder of the axial extent of the shaft 109 is taken up with a similar arrangement of washers 115, tape roll supports :116, and thrust washers 118, all designated by like numerals to those already employed for similar parts. Two additional tape rolls, R2 and R-3, are mounted on the shaft 109 in this fashion. The free end of the shaft 109 is threaded, and as is best shown in FRIG. 8, a ball bearing assembly 121 is mounted over the shaft free end and abutting the front washer .115. The cylindrical rear end 122 of a clamp nut 124 is engaged over the ball bearing assembly 121, with the rear, ring-shaped face of the nut disposed to engage against the confronting face of the washer 115.

Each of the tape roll supports 116 is mounted for rotation about the shaft 109. To place a desired friction drag on the paper roll supports 116, however, such that their freedom to rotate about the shaft is controlled, the clamping nut 124 may be tightened against the front washer 115, by turning it on the threaded end of the shaft 109. The force that is exerted against the front washer is transmitted through the array of washers 115, thrust washers 1-18, and spacers 120, that are disposed along the shaft 109, to exert a force against each tape roll support 116 and thus, through friction, to resist the rotation of the tape rolls R-l, R-2, R3.

A bracket 125 (FIG. 5) is secured tothe rear face of the drum sector 101. This bracket 125 is formed with a pair of downwardly depending, front and back web portions 126. These web portions 126 are formed with three pairs of aligned recesses within which three spaced pairs of ball bearing assemblies 128 are respectively disposed. The stub shafts 129 of the three rollers 130 are respectively journalled in a pair of these ball bearing assemblies 128. These stub shafts 129 are secured in place by nuts 131 that thread on ends of these shafts that project through openings in the rear web portion 126 of the bracket 125.

The three rollers 130 are arranged in such fashion that their axes are parallel and disposed at the points of a triangle, as is best shown in FIG. 6. Each of these rollers 130 is formed, intermediate its two ends, with a gear 132 that intermeshes with a similar gear on the adjacent roller, in the manner shown in FIGS. 5, 6 and 9. These gears are matched so that each roller moves at the same speed as each other roller.

A tape aligning stud 134 (FIG. 6) is mounted adjacent the rollers 130, with its lengthwise axis disposed parallel to the axes of the rollers. 'Dhis stud 134 is disposed in such fashion that tape from the rollers 130 will pass beneath it, as will be explained in greater detail presently.

The tension mechanism The drum sector 101 is also formed with a shoe portion 135 that generally has the shape of a section of a cylindrical surface, and that has an angular extent of al-- most 90 (FIG. 6). The upper end of this shoe 135 is disposed to receive the tapes from beneath the guide stud 134. The shoe 135 is formed with a recess 136 about /3 of the way down its arcuate extent, and a guide stud 138 is disposed in this recess. This guide stud 138 is formed with alternating recessed portions 137 and projecting portions 139 (FIG. 13) as is the tape aligning stud 134, to provide guide channels for guiding the tape as it moves during operation of the device.

As is shown in FIGS. 6 and 13, the guide stud 138 extends between a bracket 140, that is secured along the proximate side of the shoe 135, and a flange 153 that extends along the opposite side of the shoe. The stud 138 is secured in place by a pair of set screws 157 that are threaded bores in the bracket 140 and in the flange 153, respectively. To adjust the angular position of the stud 138, or to remove it, one or both of the set screws 157 is eased off.

The guide stud 138 is preferably formed, as shown, with three sets of recessed portions 137, 137a, and 1375, respectively. Each set consists of three rectangular flats or recessed portions that are aligned axially of the stud 138, and each set is angularly spaced about the stud from each other set. Moreover, although the recessed portions in a particular set, such as the three recessed portions 137, are identical in size and shape, and in elevation relative to the surface of the drum shoe 135, they differ in size from the recessed portions of each other set, and also in relative axial position on the stud, all as shown in FIG. 13. This permits the stud to be rotated so as to bring a desired set of recessed portions into operating position, thereby to accommodate paper strips of different widths.

The two guide studs 134, 138 and a third stud 161 (to be described) play an important role in achieving accurate overlay and gap spacing of the paper strips. They are designed so their respective recessed portions, of a particular size, are aligned when in the operating position.

The bracket 140, that extends along one side of the shoe 135, is formed with a raised housing portion 141 at its upper end. A cam 142 is journalled in this housing (FIG. 6), and is formed with a part that projects a very short distance out of the housing, over the surface of the shoe 135. The cam member 142 is formed with an eccentric, projecting shaft 144, that extends substantially across the entire axial extent of the shoe 135, and that is spaced somewhat above the top surface thereof. Three separate spring steel strips 145 (FIGS. 6 and 7) are secured to the shaft 144 by angularly adjustable rings 143 that are held in place by set screws 147. These strips 145 are disposed in axially spaced relation to each other along the length of the shaft 144, and in position to permit the strips to bear against the tapes T1, T2, T-3 from the three supply reels R-l, R2, R3, respectively, as the tapes are moved during operation of the device through their respective separate paths as defined by the recesses or guide channels in the guide studs 134 and 138.

A lever 146, that has a ball 148 at its end for convenience in gripping, is secured to the cam member 142, to facilitate adjustments in the angular position of the cam. The cam 142 is so positioned relative to the surface of the shoe 135 that frictional forces tend to hold it in its operating position, as shown in FIG. 6, against the forces exerted by the spring steel strips 145 that tend to rotate it in a counterclockwise direction.

As further shown in FIG. 7, the bracket 140 is formed at its lower end with a pillow block 149, and a shaft 150 is journalled in this block. This shaft 150 has a short extension projecting from the block 149 on which a crank arm 151 is secured for rotation with the shaft. An operating lever 152 is secured to the crank arm 151, to permit its rotation between an operating and an at rest position, and a gripping knob or ball 154 is mounted on the end of the operating lever. An arm 155 is secured to and adjacent the distal end of the crank arm 151. This arm 155 is in the form of a bar that extends forwardly and substantially over the entire axial extent of the shoe 135. The cam 155 is provided with three downwardly projecting fingers 156, that are disposed for registry against the three spring steel strips 145, respectively, in the operating position of the device shown in FIG. 6.

A pair of guide studs 158 are disposed on a downwardly projecting extension 159 of the drum sector (FIG. 6), in position to receive the tapes as they leave the surface of the shoe 135, to guide them in their path. A roller 160 is disposed adjacent the studs 158, as a guide for the tapes, before they pass through recesses or channels in a tape aligning stud 161 that is mounted at the lower end of a drum sector extension 159.

A follower arm 162 is pivotally mounted at one of its ends, by a pivot 164, on the drum sector 101. A follower roller 165 is mounted at the other end of the follower arm 162, and is disposed to ride on the surface of the tape roll R1. A coil spring 166 is interposed between the follower arm 162 and a remote part of the drum sector 101, constantly to urge the roller 165 against the surface of the tape roll R-1. A contact arm 168 is mounted intermediate the ends of the follower arm, and is disposed to trip the operating lever 169 of a microswitch 170 that is mounted on the drum sector 101, when the tape supply has diminished to the point where the roll should be replaced. The microswitch 170 is connected, in a manner not shown, to the slip ring 45 (FIG. 2), and through the brush 46 and lead 49, in a circuit that can shut off the main drive whenever a tape roll is exhausted and should be replaced.

The drive mechanism The drive mechanism is shown schematically in FIG. 9 as it applies to a single taping head. A single electric motor 171 is connected through a drive shaft 172 to a series of sprockets 174, of which there is one for each taping head. A chain 175 is wound around the sprocket 174 and around a driven sprocket (not shown), to drive a shaft 176 on which a sprocket 178 is secured. The drive chain 55 (FIGS. 2 and 9) is engaged about the sprocket 178, to transmit motion through the sprocket 50 to the rotary housing 51.

To rotate the spider 52 and to drive the three drum sectors 101 about the cable 40 so as to apply tape to the cable, the electric motor 171 is operated to drive the motor shaft 172 and to transmit motion, through the sprockets and chains just described, to rotate the sprocket 50 and with it the rotary housing 51, which causes the three drums 101 to rotate.

Upon rotation of the housing 51, each of the three pinions 179 (FIGS. 3 and 9) is carried in an orbit around the fixed shaft 44, in engagement with the stationary gear 58. The orbiting pinions 179 are caused to rotate, and each of these pinions in turn engages a gear 180' that drives a gear 210 on the same shaft as bevel gear 181. Bevel gear 181 in turn drives a bevel gear 182 that is mounted on the end of a shaft 184, on the opposite end of which another gear 185 is mounted. The gear 185 is disposed to engage a bevel gear 186 that is mounted at one end of a shaft 188, at the end of which a gear 189 is disposed in driving engagement with a bevel gear 190, that in turn is in operative engagement through gear 211 with the gear 132 of one of the three driven rollers 130.

Operation In setting up the machine for a production run, full rolls of tape are inserted on each of the tape roll supports 116, by removing the clamping nut 124 and then re moving the necessary parts from the shaft 109 to permit loading. In placing a full roll of tape R-l on its support, the roller 165 on the follower arm 162 is moved out of the way and then replaced in its normal position, engaging the outer surface or periphery of the roll. Preferably, all three rolls of tape on a single drum sector 101 are replaced at once, so as to permit the use of a single follower arm 162 to signal the need for replacement of an empty roll.

Each individual tape T-l, T-2, T-3 is then threaded in the same manner, about the three rollers 130 in the man ner shown in FIGS. 6 and 7, so that each tape follows a generally U-shaped path, with the center roller being disposed at the bottom part and inside of the U. Each tape is then threaded under the tape aligning stud 134, and then beneath its respective spring steel strip 145. In order to thread a tape beneath a steel strip 145, the lever 152 is moved in a clockwise direction from the position shown in FIG. 6, to release the pressure on the free ends of all three of the strips. The lever 146 is then rotated in a counterclockwise direction from the position shown in FIG. 6, to provide an unobstructed path through which a tape may be led. Each tape is then passed through the appropriate channel or recess in the upper or outer surface of the guide stud 138, over the surface of the shoe 135, between the studs 158, under the roller 160, and through the appropriate recess or channel in the surface of the guide stud 161.

To prepare for operations, the free end of each tape is secured to the cable 40. The operating levers 152 and 146 are moved to the positions shown in FIG. 6, so that mild pressure is applied by each of the fingers 156 against the upper surfaces of the steel strips 145, to hold the strips in place. The angular position of each strip 145 is adjusted on the shaft 144, to apply -a selected pressure to the tape against which it bears. Since each strip is independently adjustable with respect to the shaft 144 through rings 143, the pressure that is applied by each to its tapes can be different, if desired.

The drag that is applied to each tape comprises two components. The first component is adjustable, and is applied by a respective one of the spring steel strips 145. The second component is substantially constant in value, and is derived from the frictional forces that are generated as the tape travels over the surface of the shoe 135.

In order to permit a selected, constant tension to be applied to a tape by the combined effects of the steel spring strips 145 and the travel over the shoe 135, the tape is delivered to the shoe, for travel under the steel strips, free from tension. This is accomplished in the following manner.

The clamp nut 124 is turned to apply sufficient pressure to the opposite sides of the tape roll supports 116 to provide a frictional drag that will prevent rotation of a given tape roll support, and of the tape pad thereon, except when a sufiiciently great direct tension or pull is applied to the tape. This drag prevents free running of the tape when the machine is suddenly slowed or stopped, from operating speed.

The drive mechanism (FIG. 9) is designed so that the three rollers 130 are always driven at a speed that is in excess of the rate of use of tape. As a result, there is an intermittent slight accumulation of tape at the driven rollers 130, and adjacent the guide stud 134. As soon as any accumulation of tape develops, however, so that there is slack, the tape is disengaged from the rollers 130, and the pull on the tape, that causes it to be removed from its roll, stops, and advancement of the tape from the roll stops. Accordingly, the area of tape accumulation can be considered as a delivery point, and at this delivery point the tape is made available under no tension, by the action of the rollers 130. Tape is thus constantly made available, at the delivery point, free from tension, for advancement over the shoe and beneath the tensioning strips 145.

The next step in adjusting the machine for operation is to insure that the tape, as it is applied to the cable 40, is under the selected tension. In the manufacture of oilimpregnated, paper insulated, high voltage cable, it is usually desirable that all of the tapes that are applied about the cable, to build up the dielectric wall, be applied under substantially the same tension, such as, for example, some value within the range from about 2 lbs. to about 6 lbs.; this range is appropriate for paper tape having a width of about and a thickness on the order of 5 mils. In order to develop a selected or specified value of tension, the spring steel fingers 145 are rotated to bear against the respective tapes, and the arm 155 is swung into position so that the fingers 156 engage the upper surfaces of the respective steel strips 145 to hold them in place. By adjusting the pressure that is applied in this manner, desired tension values can be developed in the tapes.

The tape advancing mechanism of each taping head, then, comprises a tape supply reel from which tape is removed by positively operating withdrawal means that advance the tape to a delivery point at which the tape is available under no tension. As the machine is operated, the tape is continuously withdrawn from this delivery point as it is wound about the cable, and during its passage through a preselected working path between the delivery 10 point and the point of application to the cable, a specified and constant value of tension is applied.

One of the primary advantages of a taping machine, that is constructed in accordance with the present invention, is that the value of this tension is substantially uniform during the entire course of the taping operation. It does not vary as the diameter of the tape supply roll varies, as is usually the case in taping machines that have been available in the past.

Another advantage of a taping machine that is constructed in accordance with the present invention is that, since the tension in the tape is not affected by the diameter of the supply pad, a supply pad or roll of any diameter can be used. Accordingly, it is possible in using taping machines constructed in accordance with the present invention, to use larger diameter pads than have been feasible in the past. Moreover, the tension in the tape is not affected by centrifugal force, as has been the case in the past.

Still another advantage of machines that are constructed in accordance with the present invention is that the discs 119 have been found to cooperate with the frictional drag on the tape roll supports 116, to apply a drag force across the entire diameter of the pad. This is another feature of the invention that permits the use of supply pads of larger diameter than have been possible in the past. Preferably, the discs 119 are formed for flexibility, as by forming them with stamped-out apertures in angularly-spaced relation, radially spaced from their centers. When these discs are sufiiciently flexible, it has been found practicable to employ rolls of tape that are unevenly Wound, such as, for example, rolls that are known in the art dish rolls. This has not been possible in the past, and it has been necessary and customary, in the past, to rewind dished rolls and other irregularly wound rolls, in order to permit satisfactory application of the tapes.

At each taping head, there is the problem of obtaining desired amounts of overlay or gap spacing, between successive tape windings. As shown in FIG. 12 the three tapes T-l, T-Z and T-3 (from the three supply reels R-l, R-2, R-3 that are illustrated in FIG. 5) are applied about the cable 40 at a spacing, relative to each other, that is governed by the size of the spacer rings 120 between adjacent tape supports 116, and by the action of the guide studs and rollers. The same is true, of course, for the tapes from each of the three supply rolls R-1, R-Z, R-3 of each drum section 101, on a given taping head. However, as shown in FIG. 12, there is a potential problem of obtaining a desired relationship, whether it be gap spacing or overlay, between the three tapes T-l, T-2, and T-3 of one drum sector on a particular taping head, and the three tapes T-4, T-5, and T-6 from another drum sector on the same taping head. The relationship between these two sets of tapes is established in the following manner.

To adjust the angle at which the tapes from a given drum sector are applied, or, in other words, to adjust the gap spacing or overlay between the three tape windings from a first drum sector and the three tape windings from a second drum sector, as applied about the conductor, at a single taping head, the orientation of the axis of rotation of the reels on one of the drum sectors is adjusted relative to the axis of rotation of the reels on the other. To make this adjustment, the bolt 75 (FIG. 4) is eased off, in order to permit relative movement between the drum support bracket 71 and the slide '62. The handle 82 is then rotated in one direction or the other, depending upon the direction in which the axis of the tape roll supports 116 is to be adjusted. As the handle 82 is turned, the threaded stud 79 is rotated, and, because of its threaded engagement in the bore of the block 76 that is secured to the upper shelf portion 68 of the slide, the stops 80 and 81 on the lower end of the stud either pull or push against the block 78 on the drum support bracket 71, to cause the drum support bracket to move in the desired direction. The extent of the movement can be read on the scale 1 1 84, and after the desired adjustment has been made, the bolt 75 is again tightened, to hold the drum support bracket 71 in the desired, adjusted position.

The adjustment that has just been described, in the position of the drum support bracket 71, alters the orientation of the axis of the shaft 109 relative to the cable 40. Accordingly, the axes of rotation of the three tape supply rolls R-1, R-2, R3 are also adjusted to the same extent.

One of the other operating problems that is frequently encountered in practice is that of obtaining what is called synchronism between successive taping heads. This can be regarded as referring to the axial spacing of one set of tapes applied by a first taping head with respect to a second set of tapes applied by a second taping head. In order to adjust the axail spacing, that is to say, the spacing of one head relative to the other in position along the path through which the conductor is moved, the bolts 66 (FIG. 2) of one taping head are eased off, to permit relative movement between the slide 62 and the rotary housing 51. The handle 63 is then turned in the appropriate direction, to cause the threaded stud 57 to rotate in one direction or the other. Since the stud 57 is threaded through a bore in the block 53, its remote end will either push against the rear face of the slide, or become disengaged from the slide. The appropriate axial shifting of the slide is then caused to occur, and the extent of this shift can be measured on the scale 200 by observing the change in the position of the pointer 201. After the desired adjustment has been made, the bolts 66 are again tightened.

For optimum results, it is preferred that in a taping machine that is equipped with three drum sectors for each taping head, a particular color be assigned to each drum sector of each head. Thus, there could be a red, a white, and a blue drum sector at each taping head. Thereafter, in setting up the machine, it is necessary first to obtain the desired relative axial spacing between the three slides of the red, white, and blue drum sectors of a particular taping head. Then, to place the succeeding taping head in synchronism with the first, it is merely necessary to obtain the proper synchronisation between the red drum sectors on the first and second taping heads. The white and blue drum sectors of the second taping head will automatically be synchronized with the white and blue drum sectors of the first taping head, when they are axially positioned relative to their red drum sector in the same way that the white and blue drum sectors of the first taping head are positioned relative to their red drum sector.

Various modifications in the invention will occur to those that are skilled in the art. For example, the term spider has been employed herein to refer to the rotary structure at each head, that includes the three drum sectors and their respective associated tape supplies; and each drum sector has been referred to as being equipped with three tape reels. It will be understood, however, that each drum sector could be equipped with a smaller or greater number of reels, and that a smaller number of tapes could be applied from a particular drum sector than the particular maximum capacity of that drum sector for tape reels. Similarly, a greater or smaller number of drum sectors than three could be mounted on each spider.

While a particular kind of constant tension mechanism has been disclosed and is preferred, other mechanisms could also be used for this purpose, in cooperation with the means provided for delivering tape to the tension mechanism, free from tension.

Moreover, although the drive mechanism that is disclosed embodies a single motor that drives all of the operating taping heads simultaneously, in either direction, through an arrangement of shafting, chains and sprockets, and gear trains, a system of timing belts or the like may be employed to replace the chains and sprockets and some or all of the gear trains.

While the invention has been described by reference to the details of a preferred embodiment thereof, then, it is to be understood that such disclosure is intended in an illustrative, rather than in a limiting sense, and it is contemplated that various modifications in the construction and arrangement of the parts, and in the steps of the process, will readily occur to those skilled in the art, within the spirit of the invention and of the scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. Apparatus for applying tape about a strand, comprising:

a tape supply;

means for advancing the strand with respect to the tape supply at a given rate which establishes a tape consumption rate, when the tape is attached to the strand;

capstan means for pulling tape from the tape supply and for furnishing said tape to a delivery point intermediate the tape supply and the strand at a rate alternately equal to and greater than the tape consumption rate, to provide tape at the delivery point free from tension;

means for orbiting the delivery point about the strand;

means for guiding and advancing the tape from the delivery point to a point of application to the strand; and

means for applying a selected tension to the tape intermediate the delivery point and the point of application.

2. Apparatus in accordance with claim 1 wherein the means for applying a selected tension includes a cam adapted to exert a bearing load against the tape, said cam being adjustable with respect to its axis of rotation to apply a variable load to the tape, whereby a tension load imparted to the tape to overcome said bearing load is correspondingly variable.

3. Apparatus for applying tape about an electrical conductor comprising:

a tape supply;

a capstan apparatus for pulling tape from the supply and delivering the same to a delivery point, substantially free from tension at the delivery point;

guide means for guiding the tape from the delivery point to the point of application to the conductor;

means for moving said guide means in an orbit about the conductor, to wind the tape about the conductor; and

means for applying a predetermined tension to the tape intermediate the delivery point and the point of application, to apply the tape under tension.

4. Apparatus for winding tape in a generally helical 50 fashion about an electrical conductor to which one end of the tape is secured, comprising:

mean for moving the conductor lengthwise;

capstan means for delivering tape from a supply to a delivery point, substantially free from tension at the delivery point;

guide means for guiding the tape from the delivery point to the point of application to the conductor;

means for moving said guide means in an orbit about the conductor as the conductor moves lengthwise 60 such that the tape is wound about the conductor; and

means for applying a selected tension to the tape intermediate the delivery point and the point of application, to apply the tape under tension.

5. Apparatus for winding tape in a generally helical fashion about an electrical conductor to which one end of the tape is secured, at selected rate of use, comprising:

a tape supply;

means for resisting withdrawal of the tape from the pp y;

means for withdrawing tape from the supply against the opposition of said withdrawal-resisting means, at alternately the same and slightly greater than the same as the use rate, during use of the tape, to make tape available at a delivery point substantially free from tension;

guide means for guiding the tape from the delivery point to the point of application to the conductor;

means for moving said guide means in an orbit about the conductor, to wind the tape about the conductor; and

means for applying a predetermined tension to the tape intermediate the delivery point and the point of application, to apply the tape under tension.

6. Apparatus for winding tape in a generally helical [fashion about an electrical conductor to which one end of the tape is attached, at a selected rate of tape use, comprising:

means for moving the conductor lengthwise;

a tape supply;

means for resisting withdrawal of the tape from the pp y;

a capstan that can be engaged with the tape, and that is constantly driven to advance the tape to a delivery point at a raterthat is greater than the rate of use, to permit said withdrawal-resisting means to stop advancement of the tape by the capstan;

second guide means for guiding the tape from the delivery point to the point of application to the conductor;

means for moving said second guide means in an orbit about the conductor, to wind the tape about the conductor; and

means for applying a predetermined tension to the tape intermediate the delivery point and the point of application, to apply the tape under tension.

7. Apparatus for applying tape about a strand, comprising:

a head that is formed with means for guiding a strand in lengthwise movement relative thereto;

a spider that is mounted on the head for rotation about the lengthwise axis of the strand;

at least one tape supply reel that is mounted on said spider for revolution about the lengthwise axis of said strand upon rotation of the spider, and for rotary movement for dispensing tape;

means for adjusting the orientation of the axis of rotation of the tape supply reel;

a capstan apparatus for pulling tape from the supply and delivering the same to a delivery point, substantially free from tension at the delivery point;

means for guiding and advancing the tape from the delivery point to the point of application to the strand;and

means for applying a predetermined tension to the tape intermediate the delivery point and the point of application to the strand.

8. Apparatus for applying tape about a strand, comprising:

a head that is formed with means for guiding a strand in lengthwise movement relative thereto;

a spider that is mounted on the head for rotation about the lengthwise axis of the strand;

a plurality of tape supply reels mounted in angularly spaced relation to each other on said spider, for revolution about the lengthwise axis of said strand upon rotation of the spider, and for rotary movement for dispensing tape;

means for adjusting the axis of rotation of each of said tape supply reels;

a capstan apparatus for pulling tape from a respective supply reel and delivering the tape substantially free from tension at a respective delivery point;

guide means associated with each supply reel, for

revolving movement about the strand upon revolution of the supply reel, for guiding the tape from the delivery point to the point of application to the conductor; and

means for applying a predetermined tension to the tape intermediate the delivery point and the point of application, to apply the tape under tension.

9. Apparatus for winding tape in a generally helical fashion about an electrical conductor to which one end of the tape is secured, comprising:

means for moving and guiding an electrical conductor lengthwise along path;

a plurality of heads that are fixedly disposed respectively at a corresponding plurality of taping stations along said path;

a plurality of spiders, one of which is mounted on each of said heads, respectively, for rotation about the lengthwise axis of a conductor in its movement through said path;

means for adjusting the position along said path of each of said spiders on its respective head;

a plurality of tape supply reels mounted on each of said spiders and disposed angularly about a respective spider, the reels being mounted for revolution about the electrical conductor upon rotation of the spider, and for rotary movement for dispensing tape; plurality of capstan devices consisting of one for each of the angularly disposed tape supply reels, the devices being adapted to advance tape from each supply reel to a delivery point that is associated with each supply reel, substantially free from tension at the delivery point, and each of said capstan devices being mechanically driven through respective gear trains;

guide means associated with each supply reel and mounted for movement upon movement of the associated respective spider, for guiding the tape from the delivery point to the point of application to the conductor; and

means for applying a predetermined tension to the tape intermediate the delivery point and the point of application, to apply the tape under tension.

10. Apparatus for winding tape in a generally helical fashion about an electrical conductor to which one end of the tape is secured, at a selected rate of use, comprismg:

means1 for moving the conductor lengthwise along a a plurality of heads that are fixedly disposed respectively at a corresponding plurality of taping stations along the path;

means associated with each of said heads for guiding an electrical conduct-or in its movement along said path;

a plurality of spiders, one of which is mounted on each of said heads, respectively, for rotation about the conductor in its movement through said path;

a plurality of tape supply reels mounted in angularlyspaced relation to each other on each of said spiders, respectively, for revolution about the conductor upon rotation of the spider, and for rotary movement for dispensing tape;

means for adjusting the orientation of the axis of rotation of each tape supply reel;

means for adjusting the position along said path of each of said spiders on its respective head;

drag means for resisting the rotation of each of said supply reels, to resist the withdrawal of tape therefrom;

a capstan associated with each supply reel and that is mounted for revolution about the conductor upon rotation of the spider, and that is constantly driven to advance the tape at a rate that is greater than the rate of use;

means to guide the tape from each reel to engage the associated capstan for advancing the tape as the tape is used, and to disengage the capstan when the tape is advanced by the capstan at a rate that is greater that the rate of use, to permit said drag means to stop advancement of the tape from the reel;

guide means associated with each supply reel and mounted for revolution about the conductor upon rotation of the associated spider, for guiding the tape from the capstan to the point of application to the conductor; and

means for applying a predetermined constant tension to the tape intermediate the capstan and the point of application, to apply the tape under tension.

11. A process for applying tape about a strand, comprising:

restraining tape in a supply reel to prevent withdrawal thereof except under tension;

advancing the tape from the supply reel to an orbiting delivery point such that the tape is free from tension at the delivery point; advancing and guiding the tape from the delivery point to the point of application to the strand; and

applying a predetermined, substantially constant tension to the tape intermediate the delivery point and the point of application.

12. A process for applying tape about a strand, at a selected rate, comprising:

advancing tape from a supply to a delivery point which orbits the strand at an average rate that is greater than the rate of use, to provide tape at the delivery point free from tension;

interrupting the advancement of the tape to the delivery point when tape accumulates at the delivery point; advancing and guiding the tape from the delivery point to the point of application; and

applying a predetermined, substantially constant tension to the tape intermediate the delivery point and the point of application.

13. A process for applying tape about an elongate strand, at a selected rate, comprising:

constantly operating a drive member for the tape at a driving rate that is greater than the rate of use of the tape; operatively engaging the tape with said drive member to advance the tape from a supply to a delivery point at a rate that is greater than the rate of use, to provide tape at the delivery point free from tension; disengaging the tape from operative driving engagement with the drive member to interrupt the advancement of the tape to the delivery point when tape accumulates at the delivery point;

advancing and guiding the tape from the delivery point to the point of application; and

applying a predetermined, substantially constant tension to the tape intermediate the delivery point and the point of application.

14. A process for winding a tape helically about a strand to which one end of the tape is secured, comprising:

advancing the strand through a path in a lengthwise direction;

revolving a reel of tape about the strand as it is advanced through said path, and simultaneously permitting rotation of said reel to permit tape to be withdrawn therefrom;

restraining the tape in the supply reel to prevent withdrawal thereof except under tension;

advancing the tape from the supply reel to a delivery point such that the tape is free from tension at the delivery point; advancing and guiding the tape from the delivery'point to the point of application to the strand; and

applying a predetermined, substantially constant tension to the tape intermediate the delivery point and the point of application.

15. A process for winding tapes helically about an elongate electrical conductor, to which one end of each of said tapes is secured, at a plurality of different work stations, comprising:

advancing the conductor through a path in a lengthwise direction;

16 at a first work station along said path, revolving at least a first reel of tape about the conductor as it is advanced along said path, in an orbit at some preselected location along said path at said first work station, and simultaneously permitting said first reel to rotate to permit tape to be withdrawn therefrom; at a second work station that is spaced along said path from said first work station, revolving at least a second reel of tape about the conductor as it is advanced through said path, in an orbit at some preselected location along said path at said second work station, and simultaneously permitting said second reel to rotate to permit tape to be withdrawn therefrom; advancing each of said tapes from its respective supply reel to a delivery point that is associated with its supply reel, at a rate that is greater than the rate of use of the tape, to provide tape at the delivery point free from tension; interrupting the advancement of each tape to its delivery point when tape accumulates at the delivery point; advancing and guiding the tape from its delivery point to its point of application to the conductor; and applying a predetermined, substantially constant tension to the tape intermediate its delivery point and its point of application about the conductor. 16. Apparatus for applying tape about a strand comprising:

positively driven means for delivering tape from a supply to a delivery point, substantially free from tension at the delivery point; means distinct from said first-named means for advancing a strand lengthwise through a taping path; means for guiding the tape between the delivery point and the strand, for delivering the tape to the strand at a precise location along the length of said taping path; means for revolving said delivery point and tape about the strand and taping path, to wind the tape about the strand and to cause advancement of the tape through said guidance means, and means for applying a selected tension to the tape intermediate the delivery point and the point of application to the strand. 17. Apparatus for applying tape about a strand, comprising:

a head; first means for advancing the strand lengthwise through a taping path; a spider that is mounted on the head for rotation about said path; at least one tape supply reel that is mounted on said spider for revolution about said path upon rotation of the spider, and for rotary movement for dispensing tape; powered means distinct for delivering tape from the supply reel to a delivery point; means for guiding the tape between the delivery point and the strand, for delivering the tape to the strand at a precise location along the length of said taping path; means for rotating said spider about the strand and taping path, to wind the tape about the strand and to cause advancement of the tape through said guiding means, and means for adjusting the orientation of the axis of reel. rotation of the tape supply reel. 18. Apparatus for applying tape about a strand, comprising:

a head that is formed with means for guiding a strand in lengthwise movement relative thereto; means for advancing the strand lengthwise through a 17 taping path in cooperation with the guiding means of said head;

a spider that is mounted on the head for rotation about the taping path;

a plurality of tape supply reels that are mounted in angularly spaced relation to each other on said spider, for revolution about the taping path upon rotation of the spider, and for rotary movement for dispensing tape;

means for restraining the tape in a supply reel to prevent withdrawal thereof except under tension;

means for pulling tape from each of the supply reels and supplying the same at respective delivery points in a tension-free condition;

means for guiding the tape between a respective delivery point and the strand, for delivering the tape to the strand at a precise location along the length of said taping path;

means for rotating said spider about the strand and taping path, to wind the tapes about the strand and to cause advancement of the tapes through said guiding means;

means for applying a selected tension to each tape intermediate a respective delivery point and the point of application to the strand; 'and means for adjusting the orientation of the axis of rotation of each of said tape supply reels.

19. Apparatus for applying tape about a strand comprising:

first means for advancing a strand lengthwise through a taping path;

capstan means coordinated with said first means for delivering tape from a supply to a delivery point;

means for revolving said delivery point and tape about the strand and taping path, to wind the tape about the strand and to advance the tape from said delivery P means for guiding the tape between the delivery point and the strand through a guiding and tensioning zone; and

stud means disposed in said zone and formed with guide grooves for guiding each tape and causing it to track for delivery to the strand at a precise location along the length of said taping path.

20. Apparatus for applying tape about a strand, comprising:

a head that is formed with means for guiding a stand in lengthwise movement relative thereto;

means for advancing a strand lengthwise through a taping path in cooperation with the guiding means of said head;

a spider that is mounted on the head for rotation about said path;

a plurality of drums mounted on said spider for rotation therewith, each of said drums having a plurality of tape supply reels mounted in side-byside relationship and adapted for rotary movement for dispensing tape;

means for restraining the tape in a respective supply reel to prevent removal thereof except under tension;

means for pulling tape from each of said supply reels and delivering the same to a respective delivery point, free from tension at the delivery point;

means for rotating said spider and tape supply reels about the strand and taping path, to wind the tapes about the strand and to advance the tapes from said delivery points;

means mounted on the spider for guiding each tape between a respective delivery point and the strand through a guiding and tensioning zone;

stud means disposed in each zone and formed with guide grooves for guiding each tape and causing it to track for delivery to the strand at a precise location along the length of said taping path;

cam actuated means for applying an individually selected tension to each tape in a respective zone; and

means for adjusting the orientation of the axis of rotation of the spider about said taping path.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,782,381 10/ 1930 Dunsheath 57-15 2,158,547 5/1939 Lawson et al. 66132 2,909,890 10/1959 Sheets et al. 5715 3,093,330 6/1963 Schmidt 24245 3,137,985 6/1964 Bailey 57-13 3,236,039 2/1966 Fletcher et al. 5718 BILLY S. TAYLOR, Primary Examiner.

US. Cl. X.R.

3, 85, Dated April 1, 196

8.1. Cent .\0

IJVU'ACOL'(5) Chester R. Sheets in certified that error appcure in the above-identified patent that; aha; said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

Column 1, line 67, after "satisfactory" the comma should be a period.

Colwm 3, line 8, the numeral "1" should read l2 Column 5, line 61, the word "space," should read spaced, line 6 a comma should be inserted after "faces". Column 6, line 69, the word through should appear after "threaded". Column line 57, the word "cam" should read arm Column 10, line 32, the word as should appear after "art" line +7, the word "section" should read sector Column 12, line 66, the word a should appear after "at". Column 1 line 5, the word a should appear after "along". Column 16, lin 57, the words from said first means should appear after "distinct" line 69, the word reel." should be omitted. Column 18, line 1, the word "stand" should read strand SIGN ED AND SEALED MAR 2 41970 Attest: Edward M. Fletcher, Jr.

WILLIAM E. soeurmm .n Almsllng Offiwl Commissioner of Patent:

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1782381 *Apr 22, 1930Nov 18, 1930Henleys Telegraph Works Co LtdMeans for the application of insulating material in the form of strips to electric conductors
US2158547 *Apr 3, 1935May 16, 1939Hemphill CoYarn furnishing device
US2909890 *Mar 23, 1956Oct 27, 1959Okonite CoTaping apparatus
US3093330 *Apr 11, 1960Jun 11, 1963Morat Gmbh FranzFeeding mechanism for yarn winding and processing machines
US3137985 *Jul 2, 1962Jun 23, 1964Gen ElectricTaping head
US3236039 *Aug 27, 1962Feb 22, 1966Spectrol Electronics CorpContinuous winder
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4738734 *Jan 21, 1987Apr 19, 1988Kabelmetal Electro Gesellschaft Mit Beschrankter HaftungWinding metal tape around insulation and then separating by cuts
Classifications
U.S. Classification57/15, 156/53, 57/3
International ClassificationD07B7/14, D07B7/00
Cooperative ClassificationD07B7/14
European ClassificationD07B7/14