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Publication numberUS3437022 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 8, 1969
Filing dateOct 4, 1965
Priority dateOct 4, 1965
Publication numberUS 3437022 A, US 3437022A, US-A-3437022, US3437022 A, US3437022A
InventorsHamonds Nathan Jr
Original AssigneeHamonds Nathan Jr
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cross-sectional determinant
US 3437022 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 8, 1969 N. HAMoNDs, .1R 3,437,022

. CROSS-SECTIONAL DETERMINANT Filed oct. 4, 1965 sheetl of 4 72 ATTORNEY April 8, 1969 N. HAMoNDs, JR 3,437,022

CROSS-SECTIONAL DETERMINANT Filed Oct. 4, 1965 Sheet z of 4 INVENTOR ATTORNEY April 3, 1969 N. HAMoNDs, JR 3,437,022

CROSS-SECTIONAL DETERMINANT Filed oct. 4. 1965 Sheet .Nw @MWI INVENTOR PI 8, 1969 N. HAMoNDs, JR 3,437,022

CROSS-SECTIONAL DETERMINANT Filed oct. 4, 1965 Izaj 37' I y. 37

sheet 4 of4 ATTORNEY Y. y IN VENTOR United States Patent O 3,437,022 CROSS-SECTIONAL DETERMINANT Nathan Harnonds, Jr., 5221 Onaknoll Ave., Los Angeles, Calif. 90043 Filed ct. 4, 1965, Ser. No. 492,769 Int. Cl. G03b 29/00 U.S. Cl. 95-12 14 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLDSUlRE A housing for positioning adjacent an elongate object in various positions along the length thereof and in spaced relations thereto. The housing has an arcuate inner wall formed with a multiple of minute apertures through which light rays are radially projected from an illuminating element interiorally of the housing which rays are impinged in spaced relation to each other on the surface of the object. The object is then photographed to thereby portray the rays with their outer ends terminating at the point of their abutment on the surface of the encircled object, whereby a line drawn to connect the terminals of the portrayed rays will deiine the surface portion of the object abutted by the rays.

This invention relates to and has as its primary object the provision of a device for determining the cross-section of objects having an irregular longitudinal and circumferential contour such as drift Wood, manzanita branches and the like and whereby patterns may be produced of the cross-section at various points along the length thereof to facilitate location of the center of the object at the determined cross-section and plotting of the course of drill holes to be formed longitudinally of the object for the reception of electrical conduits when utilizing the object as a lamp standard.

With the foregoing general object in View together with such other objects and advantages as may subsequently appear, the invention resides in the parts and in the construction, arrangement and combination of parts hereinafter described and claimed and illustrated by way of example in :the accompanying drawing in which:

FIG. 1 is a view in side elevation of an object having various longitudinal crooks and bends with irregular cross sections laterally offset relative to each other throughout the length thereof, such as is incident to a piece of drift wood or a portion of the trunk or branch of a tree or shrub;

FIG. 2 is an isometric view showing the invention as applied and depicting the device in its preferred embodiment;

FIG. 3 is a horizontal section and plan view of the base portion of the device as seen on the line 3 3 of FIG. 2;

FIG.'4 is a detail in section and elevation taken on the line 4 4 of FIG. 3 as seen inthe direction of the arrows;

FIG. 5 is a detail in section and elevation taken on the line 5 5 of FIG. 3;

FIG. 6 is a detail in section taken on the line 6 6 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 7 is a view in horizontal section partly 1n plan as seen on the line 7 7 of FIG. 8;

FIG. 8 is a view in section and elevation taken on the line 8 8 of FIG. 7 depicting the preferred form of the invention; wherein light rays projected against the surface of an object are photographed to produce an image of a portion of the sectional contour of the object;

FIG. 9 is a diagram of the photographed image produced by the device shown in FIG. 8 as modied to depict a portion of the sectional contour of the object;

FIG. l0 is a diagram showing the manner in which a series of segmental views are joined to produce an image of the circumferential contour of the image;

FIG. l1 is a diagram in plan depicting the mode of superimposing patterns of adjacent cross sections of the object in the determined lateral off-set relation of their respective centers;

FIG. l2 is a fanciful isometric view of the superimposed patterns of FIG, ll in their assumed laterally off-set and vertically spaced relation to each other in determining the course of a straight line leading through the centers of the sections of the objects defined in said patterns;

FIG. 13 is an isometric View depicting a modified form of the invention in which a multiple of cameras are employed to produce in a single operation the series of images as shown in FIG. 10;

FIG. 14 is a plan View partly in section depicting a modified form of the invention; and

FIG. 15 is a view in section and elevation taken on the line 15 15 of FIG. 14 with parts removed.

Referring to the drawings more specifically A indicates an elongate object having an irregular generally cylindrical contour of various sections and various crooks and bends along the length thereof, such as is incident to driftwood, and the trunks and branches of trees, and B indicates generally a base on which the object A is rigidly mounted in an upright position for purposes of the invention. The base B includes a demountable top panel 15 on which the lower end of the object A previously attened is seated and rigidly secured as by a screw 16 passed through the panel 15 centrally thereof. The invention primarily resides in a device including a housing C which in its preferred form is annular and is adapted to be positioned horizontally in encircling spaced relation to lthe object A as indicated in FIGS. 2, 7 and 8.

Means are provided for supporting the housing C in fixed relation to the object A at various points along the length thereof, here shown as embodying a pair of parallel standards 17 17 extending vertically from opposite sides of the base B and connected to diametrically opposed side portions of the housing C by bars 18-18. The bars are rigidly connected at their inner ends to couplings 19 19 rigidly attached to the housing C and have their outer ends connected to sleeves 20 20 slidably mounted on the standards 17 17 for positioning at various points along the length of the standards to dispose the housing C in various positions along the length of the object A. Set screws w are provided on the sleeves 20 20 to iiX the latter relative to the standards 17 17.

Either one or both of the standards 17 17 is provided along the length thereof with graduations D designating a scale of lineal measurement preferably in inches and fractions thereof leading upward from the plane of the surface of the panel 15 whereby the distance of the housing C from the base B in its various xed positions on the standards 17 17 relative thereto may be indicated and noted. Such positions usually comprise a series thereof progressing upwardly along the length of the object A at successive crooks or bends therein as indicated in FIG. 1 by the broken lines a-a, b-b, c-c, d-d and e-e.

The lower ends of the standards 17-17 are affixed to the ends of a cross 'bar 21 extending horizontally through the base B which is hollow and has opposed side walls h-h having elongate horizontal slots -z' through which the end portions of the cross bar 21 project.

Means are provided for shifting the cross bar 21 laterally and longitudinally whereby the housing C may be moved diametrically back and forth in the direction of the lengths of the tie rods 1'8-#18 or be moved in either direction diametrically thereof at right angles to the rods 18--18 whereby the housing C may be adjusted to space its interior in substantially uniform relation to the circumferential surfa-ce of the object A at various selected points along the length thereof.

The means here shown in FIGS 3-4 for shifting the cross bar 21 longitudinally embodies a threaded shaft 22 paralleling the bar 21 engaging an internally threaded sleeve 23 on a bracket 24 affixed to the bar 21 and projecting laterally therefrom. The shaft 22 has a beveled gear 25 affixed thereon which meshes with a companion gear 26 on a revoluble shaft 27 journalled on the side walls k--k of the base B, one end of which shaft is passed through one of the side walls k and is fitted with a hand crank m by means of which the shaft 27 may be rotated to drive the gears 26-25 and shaft 22 to rotate the latter and thereby cause the bar 21 to move longitudinally in either direction ac-cording to the direction of rotation of the hand crank m'.

Means are provided for manually shifing the bar 21 laterally here shown as embodying a sleeve 28 through which the bar 21 is longitudinally slidable. Extending transversely through the sleeve at one side thereof in screw engagement therewith is a threaded shaft 29 journalled on the side walls k-k and having one end portion thereof extending through one of the side walls k and fitted Wiht a hand crank n by which the shaft 29 may be rotated to advance the sleeve 28 longitudinally of the shaft 29 and thereby move the cross bar 21 laterally in either direction according to the direction of rotation or the hand crank n.

As a means for determining the position in which the bar 21 and the housing C thereon are brought to rest to thereby enable recording such positions, the bar 21 is provided along each end portion of the length thereof with a series of graduations rr which are designated and readable in conjunction with the lower longitudinal margin of the openings z' in the base side walls h-'h to indicate the longitudinal position of the bar 21 relative to either side of the center of the base represented by the screw 16.

`Graduations s-s are provided on the outer face of at least one of the side walls h and extending along a margin of the slot therein with which the bar 21 is readable from opposite sides of the center of the base B to designate its transverse position to either side of a line x extended across the top surface of the base B in alignment with the center of the screw 16; the line x paralleling the bar 21.

In carrying out the invention the housing is provided with an internal annular channel 32 bordered by a cylindrical inner wall 30 the inner periphery of which is designed to be positioned in encirclement of the object A in spaced relation thereto; the object A extending longitudinally through the axis of the wall 30. Leading through said inner Wall 30 is a multiple of spaced apart longitudinally elongated needle-like apertures 31 arranged in a row extending throughout the perimeter of the wall 3) and extending in radial relation to the axis of the wall 30 whereby adjacent apertures converege relative to each other from said channel toward the inner periphery of the wall 30. Mounted in the channel 32 and encircling the wall 30 i's an annular illuminating element 33 from which light rays are directed through the convergent apertures 31 from the outer side of the wall 30 and directed from the inner side of the wall 30 radially thereof toward the axis of said wall so that the rays eminating from said apertures will impinge on the opposed portion of the surface of the object A. The adjacent apertures 31 are preferably spaced apart 1() degrees or thereabouts. The light rays thus produced are photographed in a dark room either in groups or their entirety as will be later described, and the lamp housing C may be segmental with its inner wall arcuate, instead of being circumferential, as will be set forth hereinafter.

In the form of the invention shown in FIGS. 2, 7 and 8, the housing C is covered on substantially three-fourths of its inner periphery with an `opaque arcuate shield 34 overlying the inner ends of three-fourths of the radial apertures 31 thereby blocking the passage of light rays therethrough and confining the emitted rays to one-fourth of the apertures as indicated in doted lines in FIG. 7.

The shield 34 has a horizontally projecting outwardly extending flange 35 on its upper margin which overlies and slidably seats on the upper side of the housing C comprising a demountable panel u forming a closure for the channel 32.

Erected on the flange 35 is a frame-work 36 according a support for a conventional box-type camera 37 arranged with its lens aperture presented toward the gap between the ends of the shield 34 so that on opening the camera shutter exposed of the light rays eminating form the apertures 31 may be effected.

The illuminating element 33 comprises a conventional flourescent tube to which controlled electrical current is supplied through conductors v in the usual manner.

In the operation of the above described form of the invention, the object A is demountably rigidly aflixed to the cover panel 15 centrally thereof as by means of the screw 16 as shown in FIG. 2, and the panel applied to the side walls h-'h and k-k of the base B, whereupon the housing C is positioned in encircling relation to the object A by applying the sleeves 20-20 to the standards 17-17 and lowering the housing C to a position encircling the desired portion of the object A the crosssection of which is to be delineated, whereupon the sleeves are clamped to the standards by the set screws w. Shifting of the housing C laterally to center the object A relative thereto is effected by the manipulation of the handles m-n. The element 33 is then illuminated and the radiating rays t photographed in a dark room.

The resultant photograph will portray the converging rays t as indicated in FIG. 9, the outer ends of which will terminate at their point of abutment on the surface of the object A. A line drawn to connect the terminals of the portrayed rays will define the surface portion of the object abutted by the rays.

The shield 34 is then moved to a series of successive determined circumferential positions on the housing C and photographs taken of the series of rays exposed in each position, resulting in a series of photographs which when trimmed and united in their order as shown in FIG. l0, a line z drawn on the photograph connecting the terminals yof the radiating rays will delineate the cross section contour of the object A at the point encompassed by the housing C when producing such series.

As a means for facilitating proper positioning of the shield 34, the ange 35 is provided on its outer portion with a downwardly projecting pointed finger 38 at each end thereof and the outer side wall of the housing is provided with pointed embossments 39 ararnged to align with the fingers 38, there being an embossement 39 at each quarter interval around the circumference of the housing and being readily detectable by the operators sense of feel, enables adjustment in the dark of the shield and camera to the desired series of circumferential positions around the object A.

In thus producing images of various sections of the object A it is desirable to produce the images in successive order beginning with one adjacent the lower end of the object and progressing upwardly throughout the length of the object so as to produce images of the sections of the various crooks and bends in their order as indicated by the broken lines a-a, b-b, c-c, d-d and e-e in FIG. 1.

The above described construction calls for the taking of four photographs to produce an image of a particular cross-section of the object with each one reproducing a one-fourth or quarter portion fo the perimeter of the object A. However, it is manifest that the device may be constructed and operated to require the taking of either a lesser yor greater number of sections to define the circumference of the object depending on the size thereof. For example, in some instances it may be necessary to take a series of eight photographs and to unite same in the manner indicated in FIG. to properly delineate the circumference of an object.

In order to determine the desired angular relation of the center of one depicted cross-section of the object A relative to that of an adjacent depicted crosssection, being the cross-sections at adjacent pronounced bends in the length of the object A such as indicated by the broken lines a-a and b-b etc. of FIG. l, measurements are noted, for example, of the position of the bar 21 both longitudinally and transversely relative to the margin and center of base B when the housing C is disposed to produce sectional image on the line a-a, followed by noting measurements of the position of the bar 21 relative to the base B when the housing is disposed in producing a sectional image on the line b-b. Such measurements, are noted at each position of the housing along the length of the object and are taken by yreading the scales r-r to deter-mine the position of the bar 21 longitudinally, and by reading the `scales s-s' to determine the position of the bar 21 transversely. Location of the bar 21 horizontally determines the position of the center of the object. It is also necessary to note the distance between the adjacent positions at which the housing is brought to rest along the length of the object A, which is determined by taking readings of the scale D in conjunction with the adjacent sleeve 20.

In the modified form of the invention shown in FIG. 13 the shield 34 is dispensed with and a series of camera-s 37 are equally spaced apart upon a circ-ular Iframe 36 supported on standards 38 erected directly on an annular housing C', complementary to the housing C of FIG. 7, adjustably supported on standards 17-17'; the cameras 37 being arranged so that they may be utilized to collectively produce a series of photographs of a number of successive groups of rays eminating from apertures 31 to thereby produce a series of photographs indicating the complete cross-section of the object A in a single operation without having to dispose the cameras in a series of successive positions.

In the modified form of the invention shown in FIGS. 14 and l5 the housing C is segmental and mounted for movement to various positions on a circular track 40 carried on a platform 41 supported on sleeves 20' mounted for vertical adjustment on parallel standards 17"-17. The housing C has an inner wall 30 formed with radial apertures 31 leading from a recess 32' in the housing containing an illuminating element 33' whereby a series of converging light rays t" may be directed against the surface of an object A encompassed by the platform 40 and to which object the is presented. A camera 37 is mounted on standards 38' erected on the housing C and arranged to photograph the light rays t in the fashion employed with the construction shown in FIGS. 2, 7 and 8 to provide an image of a portion of the circumference of the object A like that shown in FIG. 9. The carriage or housing C" is moved to various positions around the circular track 40 and the lca-mera 37 operated in each position to produce apertured wall of the housing C.

6 a series of images complementary to that shown in FIG. 10.

Where a series of successive photographs are produced to define a particular section of the object A the initial photograph is taken of the group of rays wherein the center fray is aligned or substantially so with the mark x on the base B, which photograph is marked with a line x corresponding in position with the mark x, and where a series of photographs are taken in a single operation as by the device shown in FIG. 13, the photograph of the group of rays opposite the line x is similarly marked with a line x. This is done so that in super-imposing tracings of the several section images, as later described, the tracings may be readily disposed in their proper positions relative to each other.

The photographs produced by the described devices will ordinarily be less than full size and accordingly an enlargement is made thereof so as to produce a photographed image which is to scale. Tracings 45 shown in FIGS. l1 and l2 are then made of the enlargements on which the surface contour of the deiined section is delineated by a line z drawn to connect the terminals of the rays t land a point z' marked on the resultant figure to indicate the center or approximate center thereof. A diagram is made in plan of the base B to scale on which is superimposed the tracing 45, of the initial cross-section a-a of the object A, on which is drawn line x; the tracing being positioned with the line x registering with the line x on the base and with the mark z' on the tracing located centrally of the base. The tracing 45' of the succeeding sectional image taken on the line b-b is then imposed on the tracing 45 and positioned thereon in accordance with the readings of the scales r-r and s-s' relating to -section b-b whereby the center z of the image on tracing 45' will be odset relative to the center of the image z on the tracing 45 as indicated in FIG. 11 wherein the arrow E denotes the distance between the centers of the object A at the sections a-a and b-b in the direction of the length of the bar 21, and the arrow F denotes the distance between such centers in the direction extending transversely of the bar 21. The horizontal angular relation of the centers zz' is determined by a line G extended therebetween as indicated in FIG. 11.

The horizontal oli-set relation of the centers z-z of adjacent sections being thus determined and the distance of their vertical separation being indicated by reading the isc-ale D, represented by the arrow H in FIG. 12, the angle of a center line I leading through the spaced centers z-z as indicated in FIG. 12 may be calculated and determined with the aid of a protractor in a conventional maner. The line J designates the course to be taken by a drill in connecting the centers of the sections a-a and bgb as indicated by the line I in FIG. 1, which drilling operation is elfected on detaching the object A lfrom the base B and rigidly clamping it in a vise in a position wherein a drill m-ay be directed along the course of line J from a side of the object A.

In like manner the center lines are determined and drilling operations effected between the several plotted sections along the length of the object A with the bore formed between adjacent sections uniting with the bores leading between succeeding sections.

I claim:

1. In a device for determining the cross section and centers of an object having an irregular longitudinal and circumferential contour, the combination of a housing embodying an arcuate inner side wall having a row of minute spaced apart apertures extending therethrough in radial relation to the axis of said arcuate wall, and an illuminating element within said housing arranged to direct rays of light outwardly through said apertures toward the axis of said wall so as to impinge said rays on the surface of an object to which said apertured sidewall is presented whereby photographing such rays will produce images indicating the circumferential surface portion of the object against which the rays are impinged.

2. The combination called for in claim 1 together with a camera mounted on said housing arranged to directly photograph said rays.

3. The combination called for in claim 1 together with means for rigidly mounting the subject object in axial relation to the inner side wall of said housing.

4. The combination called for in claim 3 together with means for adjusting said housing horizontally and vertically relative to the mounted object.

5. The combination called for in claim 1 together with a base embodying means for rigidly mounting an elongate object in longitudinal relation to said base, and means for mounting said housing on said base for vertical and horizontal movement relative thereto and to the object thereon.

6. in a device for determining the cross-section of an object having an irregular longitudinal and circumferential contour, an annular housing adapted to encircle the object in spaced relation thereto, said housing embodying a continuous cylindrical inner wall having a circumferential row of minute spaced apart apertures extending therethrough in radial relation to the axis of said cylindrical wall; and an illuminating element encased in said housing surrounding said inner wall so as to direct light rays outwardly through said apertures in the direction of the axis of said wall against the surface of the object, whereby photographing such rays will produce images defining the circumferential contour of the object.

7. In a device for determining the cross-section of an object having an irregular longitudinal and circumferential contour, an annular housing adapted to encircle the object in spaced relation thereto, said housing embodying a continuous inner wall having a row of minute spaced apart radially extending apertures; an illuminating element encased in said housing arranged to direct light rays outwardly through said apertures so as to impinge on the surface of the object, whereby photographing such rays will produce images defining the circumferential contour of the object, a turnable shield overlying a portion of the apertures inner periphery of said housing whereby a portion of said apertures will be covered to prevent the emission of light therefrom and a selected portion of said apertures will be open to the passage of light rays therethrough, and a camera mounted on said shield and arranged to photograph the rays emitted from said aper-tures.

'8. A Cros-section determinant comprising:

(a) a housing provided with an internal channel:

(b) lan arcuate inner side wall on said housing bordering said channel having a multiple of spaced apart apertu-res leading therethrough in radial relation to the `axis of said arcuate wall; said apertures being arranged in a row leading along said Wall, and

(c) an illuminating element in said channel for directing light rays through and from said apertures toward the axis of said Wall.

9. The structure called for in claim 8 together with a means for directly photographing the light rays emanating from said apertures, comprising a camera, having a lens aperture and means mounting said camera with the lens aperture thereof presented toward the exterior of said arcuate inner side wall in spaced relation thereto.

`10. In a cross-section determinant, the combination comprisnig:

I(a) an annular housing provided with a continuous internal channel:

`(b) an annular inner side wall on said housing bordering said channel having a multiple of spaced apart minute apertures leading therethrough in radial relation to the axis of said annular side wall; said apertures being arranged in a row extending throughout the circumference of said wall;

(c) an annular illuminating element in said channel adapted to direct light rays through and from said apertures in the direction of the axis of said annular wall;

(d) means for covering and shielding a selected group of said apertures;

(e) means for directly photographing light rays emanating from the uncovered apertures comprising a camera having a lens aperture;

|(f) means mount-ing said camera with the lens aperture thereof presented toward the uncovered apertures in spaced relation thereto;

|(g) means for rigidly mounting an elongated object for encirclement by said annular housing;

(h) means for mounting said housing for positioning at various points longitudinally of an object encircled thereby; and

l(i) means for adjusting said housing transversely of an object encircled thereby.

11. The combination called for in claim 10 wherein the mounting of said housing comprises:

(j) a pair of parallel standards arranged on opposite sides of the housing,

=(k) connections leading from diametrically opposed portions of said housing slidably attached to said standards; and

(l) means supporting said standards for collective lateral `movement to various positions.

12. In a device for determining the cross-section and centers of an object having an irregular longitudinal and circumferential contour, the combination of a housing embodying an arcuate inner side wall having a row of minute spaced apart apertures extending there-through in radial relation to the axis of said arcuate wall, an illuminating element within said housing arranged to direct rays of light outwardly through said apertures toward the axis of said wall so as to impinge said rays on the surface of an object to which said apertured side wall is presented whereby photographing such rays will produce images indicating the circumferential surface portion of the object against which the rays are impinged, together with a base embodying means for rigidly mounting an elongate object in longitudinal relation to said base, means for mounting said housing on said base for vertical and horizontal movement relative thereto and to the object thereon, and means embodied in said mounting for measuring the vertical and horizontal positions of said housing relative to said base.

13.l In a device for determining the cross-section of an object having an irregular longitudinal and circumferential contour, an annular housing adapted to encircle the object in spaced relation thereto, said housing embodying a continuous cylindrical inner wall having a circumferential row of minute spaced apart apertures extending therethrough in radial relation to the axis of said cylindrical wall, an illuminating element encased in said housing surrounding said inner wall so as to direct light rays outwardly through said apertures in the direction of the axis of said wall against the surface of the object, and a turnable shield overlying a portion of the apertured inner periphery of said housing whereby a portion of said apertures will be covered to prevent the emission of light therefrom and a selected portion of said apertures will be open to the passage of light rays therethrough.

14. A cross-section determinant comprising:

(a) a housing provided with an internal channel;

(b) an arcuate inner side wall on said housing bordering said channel having a multiple of spaced apart apertures leading therethrough in radial relation to the axis of said arcuate Wall; said apertures being arranged in a row leading along said wall;

(c) an illuminating element in said channel for directing light rays through and from said apertures toward the axis of said wall;

(d) means for covering and shielding a selected group 2,501,405 3/ 1950 Noel 24U- 1.3

of said apertures; and 2,737,080 3/1956 Motty 88-24 (e) means for directly photographing the light rays '2,747,463 5/1-956 Biggs 8'8-24 emanating from the uncoveredapertures. 2,761,959 9/1956 Kunins 240-3.1

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 5 [NORTON AN-SHER, Primary Examiner.

R. M. SHEER, Assistant Examiner.

Morioka 88-24

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US1736012 *Oct 6, 1927Nov 19, 1929John ParcellIlluminating means for photographic cabinets
US2350796 *Nov 20, 1940Jun 6, 1944Isao MoriokaProcess for plastically reproducing objects
US2501405 *Sep 7, 1945Mar 21, 1950Gen ElectricPhotographic lamp unit
US2737080 *Mar 10, 1953Mar 6, 1956Genevoise Instr PhysiqueOptical device for examining the cross-section of parts having an intricate outline
US2747463 *Dec 6, 1951May 29, 1956Power Jets Res & Dev LtdOptical inspection device
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4236795 *Jan 18, 1979Dec 2, 1980H. George BrennanPrecision photographic documentation apparatus
US4279513 *Apr 2, 1979Jul 21, 1981Sangamo Weston, Inc.Optical inspection system for large parts and for multiple measurements
US4406544 *Feb 17, 1981Sep 27, 1983Unitika, Ltd.Method and apparatus for measuring human body or the like
US5448363 *Aug 9, 1993Sep 5, 1995Hager; HorstFood sorting by reflection of periodically scanned laser beam
US5903781 *May 14, 1998May 11, 1999Huber; DanielApparatus for photographically recording three-dimensional objects
US6549726 *Jul 17, 2001Apr 15, 2003Roger F. HuebnerControlled environment photo studio
DE102005038535A1 *Aug 16, 2005Feb 22, 2007Hans-Walter Oude-AustMethod for symmetrical illuminating and projecting strips on free formed surfaces, involves utilizing cylindrical external hollow body, particularly external wall and laminar light source, e.g. electroluminescence film
Classifications
U.S. Classification396/5, 356/606, 362/16, 356/389, 362/5, 396/155
International ClassificationG01B11/28, G01B11/25, G01B11/24, G01B5/00
Cooperative ClassificationG01B5/0035, G01B11/2518, G01B11/28
European ClassificationG01B5/00T, G01B11/25F, G01B11/28