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Publication numberUS3437066 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 8, 1969
Filing dateFeb 11, 1966
Priority dateFeb 11, 1966
Also published asDE1506280B1
Publication numberUS 3437066 A, US 3437066A, US-A-3437066, US3437066 A, US3437066A
InventorsAlfred H Schwendtner
Original AssigneeLykes Enterprises Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Barge handling equipment
US 3437066 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 8, 1969 A. H. SCHWENDTNER 3,437,056

BARGE HANDLING EQUIPMENT Filed Feb. 11, 1966 Sheet of 3 FIG. 2

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April 8, 1969 A. H. SCHWENDTNER BARGE HANDLING EQUIPMENT Sheet Filed Feb. 11. 1966 INVENTOR ll I C Q G O O O Q 6 lliiiili:{11-2-}--1I}! illil w--- H 1.. IIIIXI l AL FEE H. 5CHWNDTNEE 72b My 5 4% BY "0 I M ATT RNEYS.

April 1969 A. H. SCHWENDTNER 3,437,066

BAHGE HANDLING EQUIPMENT Sheet :iled Feb. 11, 1966 1 t"; 7''",I 11111100,. III.

FIG. 5

ALFRED H. JCHW'A/DTNEE FIG. 6

BY )k%4d M 1" ambi- ATTORNEYS.

United States Patent US. Cl. 11443.5 6 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A method and apparatus for engaging free-floating barges and transporting them to storage aboard an oceangoing barge carrier and thereafter returning them from storage to a free-floating attitude. Dollies are used for transporting the barges from an elevator to a storage position within the carrier.

This invention is an improvement on the ocean-going barge carrier disclosed in pending US. application Ser. -No. 508,631, filed by Frank A. Nemec on Oct. 22, 1965, now Patent No. 3,318,276. It relates to equipment for handling the barges to be transported by the ocean-going barge carrier. More particularly, it describes devices which can be used to support barges from the time they are engaged from a free-floating attitude until they are released to a free-floating attitude. This supporting period of engagement includes the lifting of the barges for storage, their support during storage, the repositioning of the barges preparatory to unloading, and the unloading of the barges.

One of the objects of this invention is to provide a more eflicient and flexible method of handling the inland barges that are to be transported across an ocean.

Another object of this invention is to provide a method of handling barges that is more positive in controlling the position of the barges while they are being moved to and from storage.

A further object of this invention is to provide an apparatus that is effective to hold the stored barges in their positions of storage with a minimal amount of auxiliary securing means.

This invention is more clearly understood by reference to the attached drawings in which:

FIGURE 1 represents a vertical cross-section of the stern portion of an ocean-going barge carrier as described in US. application Ser. No. 508,631 except showing barge handling dollies instead of rollers.

FIGURE 2 represents a portion of the same vertical cross-section of the stern portion of an ocean-going barge carrier as shown in FIGURE 1 with the barge elevator platform raised to the level of the second deck.

FIGURE 3 represents a lateral cross-section of the stern portion of an ocean-going barge carrier showing the positioning of two barges in transport to storage.

FIGURE 4 represents an overhead view of two barge handling dollies connected in a train.

FIGURE 5 represents a side view of two large handling dollies connected in a train.

FIGURE 6 represents a cross-section view of a barge handling dolly in position for use.

Referring now to these drawings, I shall describe my invention with greater particularity. In FIGURE 1 a barge 1 is shown floating over a barge loading platform 2 which is connected to a series of hoists 3 by cables 4. When the barge 1 is in place over the platform 2, the hoists 3 are energized in unison to lift the platform 2 by means of cables 4 into engagement with the barge 1. The stern gate 5 can be lowered into an open position by cables 7 or hydraulic cylinders attached to lifts 6.

'ice

The barge 1 is then lifted by barge lifting platform 2 to a level substantially in a plane with one of the storage decks of the ocean-going barge carrier 8. This could be one of the three deck levels shown in FIGURE 1 and represented by the numbers 9, 10 and 11.

For example, in FIGURE 2 the platform 2 has raised the barge 1 by means of hoists 3 and cables 4 to the barge storage deck level 10. Each of the barge storage deck levels 9, 10 and 11 are equipped with dual trains of connected barge handling dollies. Such a train is numbered 12 in FIGURE 1. This train may be moved along the storage deck level out onto the barge lifting platform 2 on tracks to be described later when the barge lifting platform and the barge storage deck are on a level plane as shown in FIGURE 2.

FIGURE 3 represents the overhead view of deck 10 to which symmetrical sets of tracks and I-beams are fastened for support of the dollies and barges. One such track 20 supports one side of the dolly train 12 and runs approximately the entire length of the storage deck level. When the barge lifting platform 2 is raised by hoists 3 to the level of the barge storage deck 10, the rail 20 coincides with rail extension 21 on the barge lifting platform 2. In similar fashion, all the tracks and I-beams used on each of the barge storage decks coincide with their respective platform extensions. I-beam 22, for example, which may be used to support barge 1 for storage is complemented by a parallel I-beam to accommodate the other side of barge 1. And, as in the case of the tracks and other I-beams, once the barge lifting platform 2 is lifted to the level of the storage deck 10, the I-beam 22 coincides with extension I-beam 23 on the platform.

The individual dollies are constructed of strong metal in a rectangular shape having their frame members fastened together at right angles as shown in FIGURE 4. Lateral pieces 30 and 31 are fastened to transverse pieces 32 and 33 at a distance apart suflicient to allow two wheels 34 and 35 to be fastened, one fore and one aft, in the space remaining between them. Similarly, lateral pieces 36 and 37 are fastened to transverse pieces 32 and 33 so .that 'wheels 38 and 39 may be fastened, one fore and one aft, in the space remaining between them.

In the space remaining between lateral pieces 31 and 36 a platform is constructed consisting of transverse channels 40 and 41 shown in FIGURE 5 supported by the lower flanges 42 and 43 of channels 31 and 36, respectively, shown in FIGURE 6. The ends of upper channel 40 are fastened to the channels 31 and 36 so that the stress on the members may be distributed properly.

Fastened to channels 40 and 41 is hydraulic cylinder 45 shown in FIGURE 6 enclosing the lower portion of piston 46. The cylinder 45 may be dual acting in that piston 46 may be both raised and lowered by hydraulic pressure. This hydraulic fluid may be admitted through line 47 and permitted to exit through line 48 or vice versa as the movement of the piston reverses. Such a hydraulic system can be self-contained in the dollies by allowing the rotation of a wheel to turn a pump which will build up hydraulic pressure that can be stored in accumulators. The necessary valves then can be actuated by sonic or radial signals, releasing the fluid from the accumulators to drive piston 46 up or down as desired.

The I-beam 50 shown in FIGURE 6 runs substantially parallel to the tracks upon which the dolly wheels rest. The dollies are attached in tandem by a flexible coupling 49 shown in FIGURE 5. Such a coupling will allow very little increase or decrease in the distance between adja cent dollies. Thus, a train of many dollies does not substantially increase or decrease in length in its movements fore and aft on the tracks. The wheels of the dollies may be of any construction sufiicient to take the stress in- 3 volved, the ball bearing wheel 50 shown in cross-section view in FIGURE 6 being sufficient.

Two trains of dollies may be fastened together in tandem by a stiff member 60 shown in FIGURE 3. The member then can be fastened to a central cable or chain 61 which can be used to pull the stiff member 60 fore or aft across the bare storage deck to the extremes of the cable length defined by a pulley at each of the fore and aft extremes of the storage deck level. Arranging the stiff member connection at the forward end of the tandem trains of dollies allows the stiff member to be towed to its extreme position aft as shown in FIGURE 3 causing the tandem trains of dollies to extend out onto the barge lifting platform underneath barge 1 supported on I-beam extension 23 and its parallel counterpart I-beam.

Thus, a barge 1 can be floated over barge lifting platform 2. When in position, barge lifting platform 2 can be raised by cables 4 wound on hoists 3. Barge lifting platform 2 can be stopped at any desired storage deck level as, for instance, storage deck 10. A dual tandem train of dollies 12 can be then be rolled out under barge 1 on barge lifting platform 2 as shown in FIGURE 3. The hydraulic pistons of each of the dollies in dolly train 12 and it counterpart may be lifted simultaneously as shown in FIGURE 2 into engagement with barge 1. Barge 1 is thereby lifted up and out of engagement with I-beam 23 and its counterpart and is frictionally secure on the upper surfaces of the hydraulic cylinder pistons. The dual train of dollies may be pulled forward by its cable 63 until it is in the relative position shown by barge 62 in FIGURE 3. While supported by these dollies, the barge may be positioned at any desired point along the storage deck level track system fore or aft. When the desired storage position has been attained, the hydraulic cylinders are reversed in direction and the hydraulic pistons simultaneously are lowered. This lowers the barge onto the two parallel I-beams provided for its support. The dual trains of dollies then are free to be run aft and out onto the barge lifting platform to receive another barge for storage.

When loading is complete, the barge loading platform can be raised to its highest deck level position and secured there, with or without barges still stored on it. The gate 5 for the lower deck barge storage level can then be raised by lift 6 to its closed position. The ocean-going barge carrier is then ready for its sea voyage. Upon arriving at its destination, this process would be reversed until all the barges were off-loaded. The cycle would then be ready to be recommenced.

Having thus described my invention, it is obvious that many small alterations in both the method and apparatus described could be made without departure from my inventive concept. It should be understood that these commercial variations are part of my plan to accomplish the objective previously set forth.

I claim:

1. In a marine carrier of the type comprising a hull, a plurality of storage decks arranged one above the. other, each storage deck having at least one loading opening extending through the carrier hull at the level thereof, an elevator fastened to said hull and capable of submerging, receiving floating barges thereon, and lifting said barges to each respective storage deck level at the loading opening on said deck, the improved apparatus for engaging and positioning barges for storage comprising at least two parallel dolly rails fastened to at least one storage deck in parallel relation to at least two support rails fastened to that storage deck in such manner that a barge can overlie the dolly rails and the support rails at the same time, at least two parallel dolly rails fastened to the elevator in parallel relation to at least two support rails fastened to that elevator in such manner that the dolly rails fastened to the elevator are aligned with the dolly rails fastened to the storage deck and the support rails fastened to the elevator are aligned with the support rails fastened to the storage deck when the elevator surface is coplanar with the storage deck surface, at least one dolly having a frame, wheels fastened to the frame in such manner to enable them to ride on the two parallel dolly rails, lifting means fastened to and supported by the frame so that said lifting means is capable of receiving and supporting at least a portion of the load of the barge, and means to selectively tow the dolly aft from the storage deck onto the elevator and forward from the elevator onto the storage deck.

2. In a marine carrier of the type comprising a hull, a plurality of storage decks arranged one above the other, each storage deck having at least one loading opening extending through the carrier hull at the level thereof, an elevator fastened to said hull and capable of submerging, receiving floating barges thereon, and lifting said barges to each respective storage deck level at the loading opening on said deck, the improved apparatus for engaging and positioning barges for storage comprising at least two parallel dolly rails fastened to at least one storage deck in parallel relation, at least two parallel dolly rails fastened to the elevator in parallel relation in such manner that the dolly rails fastened to the elevator are aligned with the dolly rails fastened to the storage deck when the elevator surface is co-planar with the storage deck surface, at least one dolly having a frame, wheels fastened to the frame in such manner to enable them to ride on the two parallel dolly rails, lifting means fastened to and supported by the frame so that said lifting means is capable of receiving and supporting at least a portion of the load of the barge, and means to selectively tow the dolly aft from storage deck onto the elevator and forward from the elevator onto the storage deck.

3. In a marine carrier of the type comprising a hull, a plurality of storage decks arranged one above the other, each storage deck having at least one loading opening extending through the carrier hull at the level thereof, an elevator fastened to said hull and capable of submerging, receiving floating barges thereon, and lifting said barges to each respective storage deck level at the loading opening on said deck, the improved method of engaging and positioning a barge comprising floating the barge into position above at least two parallel support rails fastened onto the elevator, raising the elevator to engage the elevator support rails with the barge, raising the elevator supporting the barge to the level of a storage deck so that the rails fastened onto the elevator are aligned with similar rails fastened onto the storage deck, lifting the barge by dolly means from engagement with the elevator support rails, moving the barge onto the storage deck into position for storage, and lowering the barge by said dolly means into engagement with at least two storage deck support rails.

4. A method as described in claim 3 wherein lifting the barge from engagement with the elevator support rails is accomplished by raising at least one piston by at least one hydraulic cylinder fastened to and supported by the frame of a dolly having wheels fastened thereto in such manner to enable them to ride on at least two dolly rails fastened to the elevator in parallel relation to the elevator support rails and onto at least two dolly rails fastened to the storage deck in parallel relation to the storage deck support rails in such manner that the dolly rails fastened to the elevator are aligned With the dolly rails fastened to the storage deck when the elevator surface is co-planar with the storage deck surface.

5. A method as described in claim 3 wherein moving the barge onto the storage deck into position for storage is accomplished by towing at least one dolly used to lift the barge from engagement with the elevator support rails forward over at least two dolly rails fastened to the elevator in parallel relation to the elevator support rails onto at least two dolly rails fastened to the storage deck in parallel relation to the storage deck support rails in such manner that the dolly rails fastened to the elevator 5 are aligned with the dolly rails fastened to the storage deck when the elevator surface is co-planar with the storage deck surface.

6. A method described in claim 3 wherein lowering the barge into engagement with at least two storage deck support rails is accomplished by lowering at least one piston by at least one hydraulic cylinder fastened to and supported by the frame of a dolly having wheels fastened thereto in such manner to enable them to ride on at least two dolly rails fastened to the elevator in parallel relation to the elevator support rails and onto at least two dolly rails fastened to the storage deck in parallel relation to the storage deck support rails in such manner that the dolly rails fastened to the elevator are when the elevator surface is co-planar with the storage deck surface.

References Cited TRYGVE M. BLIX, Primary Examiner.

US. Cl. X.R.

aligned with the dolly rails fastened to the storage deck 15 21415 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE PATENT OFFICE Washington, D.C. 20231 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent No. 3,437,066 April 8, 1969 Alfred H. Schwendtner It is certified that error appears in the above identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

Column 3, line 21, cancel "be, first occurrence; line 24, cancel "and it counterpart".

Signed and sealed this 7th day of April 1970.

(SEAL) Attest:

Edward M. Fletcher, Jr.

Attesting Officer Commissioner of Patents WILLIAM E. SCHUYLER, JR.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2351478 *May 10, 1943Jun 13, 1944Thomas BoyleShip
US2370916 *Mar 17, 1942Mar 6, 1945Reedy Sr Walter WMother ship for watercrafts
US2398274 *Mar 30, 1944Apr 9, 1946Charles G AlbertDevice for launching and retrieving boats
US2831588 *May 3, 1954Apr 22, 1958Unibox Corp IncFreightage means
US3283926 *Oct 23, 1964Nov 8, 1966Talbot WaggonfabTransporting unit, especially for railway track sections
US3318276 *Oct 22, 1965May 9, 1967Lykes Bros Steamship CoOcean-going barge carrier
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4043285 *Feb 25, 1976Aug 23, 1977Nordstrom Immo RContainer ship
US4046092 *Mar 29, 1976Sep 6, 1977Toernqvist Bengt WilhelmShip's hull
US4067284 *Feb 9, 1976Jan 10, 1978Mitsubishi Jukogyo Kabushiki KaishaBarge-carrying ship
US4077350 *Jan 21, 1976Mar 7, 1978Mitsubishi Jukogyo Kabushiki KaishaBarge-carrying ship
US4138961 *Feb 23, 1977Feb 13, 1979The Broken Hill Proprietary Company LimitedVessel for carrying steel slabs
US5941192 *Jul 23, 1997Aug 24, 1999John H. TavoneShip borne lifts for tenders and methods for using same
US6953003 *Dec 18, 2003Oct 11, 2005The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The NavyWatercraft landing cradle
US8051790 *Jul 1, 2008Nov 8, 2011Vladislav Francis ColangeloLCAC lander, launcher and lifter
US20120145031 *May 7, 2010Jun 14, 2012David Scott WrightPayload Handling Apparatus and System
WO2000021826A1 *Oct 11, 1999Apr 20, 2000Tretec GmbhInstallation for unloading and loading ships using standardized platforms with the assistance of quick-docks and counterweights
WO2010002439A1 *Jun 25, 2009Jan 7, 2010Vladislav Francis ColangeloLcac lander, launcher and lifter
Classifications
U.S. Classification114/260, 414/137.1, 414/142.8, 414/281
International ClassificationB63B27/16
Cooperative ClassificationB63B27/36
European ClassificationB63B27/36