Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3437506 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 8, 1969
Filing dateDec 28, 1964
Priority dateDec 28, 1964
Publication numberUS 3437506 A, US 3437506A, US-A-3437506, US3437506 A, US3437506A
InventorsEdward E Falberg
Original AssigneeJoanna Western Mills Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bookbinding tape
US 3437506 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 8, 1959 E. E. FALBERG 3,437,506

sooxsmnme TAPE Filed Dec. 28, 1964 FIG. 5

INVENTOR EDWARD E. FALBERG BY Wm,

fim y ATTORNEYS United tates Fatent 3,437,506 BOOKBINDING TAPE Edward E. Falherg, Naperville, Ill., assignor to Joanna Western Mills Company, Chicago, Ill. Filed Dec. 28, 1964, Ser. No. 421,462 Int. Cl. B42c 9/00 US. Cl. 11744 2 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE Bookbinding tape comprising an elongated fabric tape with three longitudinal stripes of heat-scalable adhesive thereon, one stripe being located centrally on one side of the tape and having a width approximately equal to the thickness of the pages of the book being bound, and the other two stripes of adhesive being located on the reverse side of the tape adjacent the edges thereon. This tape has uncoated portions between the stripes of adhesive to serve as hinges for the cover of the resulting book.

This application relates to an improved bookbinding tape. More particularly, this application relates to a bookbinding tape having stripes of adhesive on both sides thereof so arranged so that the tape can be used to securely bind a gathering of signatures to the cover in a one-step operation.

In the conventional bookbinding operation, signatures, that is, a number of groups of folded sheets which eventually become pages of the book, are gathered or assembled in sequence for binding. The folds of the signatures are notched and the edges of the folds are coated with an animal glue. Cloth is applied to the glue and trimmed. The gathering of signatures is then rounded and may or may not be stitched or stapled together. In inexpensive books the stitching or stapling is omitted. Then the case or cover is applied with animal glue. Ordinarily an end sheet is glued to the cloth binding and affixed to the inside surfaces of the cover.

The conventional book binding procedure is relatively complicated and expensive in that it involves the several distinct steps. Furthermore, books so bound are not always as strong as they might be, particularly when stitch ing or stapling of the gathering of signatures is omitted. As is well known, it is relatively simple to break the binding of a book with careless handling. Consequently, there has long been a need for an improved method and material for bookbinding.

It is an object of this invention to provide a bookbinding tape which simplifies and improves the binding of a gathering of signatures into the case or cover of a book. It is a further object of this invention to provide an improved bookbinding tape comprising tape coated on both sides with stripes of adhesive so positioned that a gathering of signatures may be bound into a case or cover in a single operation. A further object is to provide a bookbinding tape of the type described which provides improved strength and flexibility to bound books. These and other objects are apparent from and are achieved in accordance with the following disclosure taken in conjunction with the attached drawing wherein:

FIGURE 1 is a plan view of a bookbinding tape showing the adhesive distributed in stripes running longitudinally on both sides of the tape adjacent the edges thereof;

FIGURE 2 is a cross sectional view of the improved bookbinding tape take along the line 2-2 of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 3 is a perspective view of a piece of my bookbinding tape showing the three stripes of adhesive;

FIGURE 4 is a cross sectional view of a gathering of ice signatures showing my bookbinding tape applied thereto; and

FIGURE 5 is a cross sectional view of a book with the case or cover affixed to the gathering of signatures by means of my bookbinding tape.

As shown in FIGURES 1 and 3, the bookbinding tape comprises a base of flexible material 11, preferably of woven material such as woven cotton tape, to which three stripes of heat-scalable adhesive coating are applied, two of the stripes 12 and 13 being on one side of the tape and the third stripe 14 being on the opposite side of the tape. The stripes of adhesive 12, 13 and 14 are so arranged that there are two areas 17 and 18 of the tape 11 which do not have adhesive on either side thereof. These areas allow for flexibility and operate as hinges in the final book.

The tape 11 is preferably a woven fabric of fiber such as cotton, rayon or synthetic fibers including nylon, polyester resins and polyacrylic resins. It also can be made of non-woven fabric which is known as spun bond in the trade. The tape can also be coated or saturated paper as well as plastic films of cellophane, vinyl resins, acrylic resins, polyester resins, polyamide resins and the like. When the tape 11 is of woven fabric, it is generally sized to aid in maintaining the adhesive in the areas to which it is applied. Two-way stretch fabrics may also be used. The ability to stretch along the spine of the book is not important but ability to stretch on a line to the spine is.

The adhesive which forms the stripes 12, 13 and 14 on the flexible tape 11 is a heat-scalable adhesive, preferably one which can be sealed at a temperature in the range from to 450 F. A suitable adhesive is one made of a vinyl plastic with paraflin wax admixed therein. A preferred adhesive is a tough, flexible copolymer of ethylene and vinyl acetate containing 60% or more of paraflin wax produced by dissolving the ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer in the melted wax. It is heat-sealable at 180-200 F. When heat is applied to stripes of this adhesive material, the wax melts and carries the copolymer with it into the interstices of the tape and the other materials to which the adhesive is applied. Other heatsealable materials such as synthetic rubber and rosin can also be used. Preferred commercial adhesives are Elvax adhesive of the Du Pont Company, which is a copolymer of ethylene and l020% vinyl acetate containing paraflin wax, Epolene adhesive of Eastman Chemical Products, Inc., which is a low molecular weight polyethylene adhesive and an adhesive made by Illinois Adhesive Company which is a low molecular weight polyethylenepar-affin wax combination which forms a particularly desirable heat-scalable adhesive.

In the preparation of the bookbinding tape which comprises this invention a fabric of suitable weight is striped on both sides with an adhesive as shown in FIGURE 2. The thickness of the stripes of adhesive is preferably approximately equal to the thickness of the tape. Generally the adhesive is applied in a film of 0.010.02 inch thick by a roller, knife or stencil, the stripes of adhesive being of appropriate width with respect to the width of the tape. In the bookbinding tape, the width of the center stripe of adhesive 14 is substantially equal to the thickness of the gathering of signatures (that is, the thickness of the pages of the book). It is desirable that the width be not less than the thickness of the gathering and it is generally advisable not to have it substantially exceed the width of the gathering because it represents a waste of adhesive without concomitant advantage. The edge stripes of adhesive 12 and 13 are of a width which provides adequate adhesion of the cover to the tape 11, usually about A to inch in width. Between the pairs of stripes 12 and 14 and 13 and 14 are two sections or areas of the tape 11 which are not coated with adhesive on either side. These sections act as hinges for the cover and are of a suitable width for hinges, usually about to inch.

In a typical 'bookbinding tape a woven cotton tape 1%,; inch wide was coated on one side with two stripes inch Wide and 0.01 to 0.015 inch thick adjacent the edge of the tape. At the same time a stripe of adhesive Vs inch wide was applied in the center part of the opposite side of the tape, leaving two areas 17 and 18 of uncoated tape about inch wide on each side of the center stripe of adhesive to serve as hinges in the book. The width of the areas 17 and 18 is chosen to conveniently fold around the gathering of signatures as shown in FIGURE 4.

As shown in FIGURE 4, the central stripe of adhesive 14 is applied to the folded edges of a gathering of signatures 16, the hinge areas 17 and 18 are folded around the gathering of signatures so that the stripes of adhesive 12 and 13 project outwardly from the gathering of signatures wrapped in the tape 11. Then, as shown in FIGURE 5, a cover or case 20 having hinges or flexible areas 21 and 22 and a spine 23 is positioned around the gathering of signatures encased in the tape 11 and the gathering, tape with adhesive and case or cover are then pressed with heat, preferably at about 180 F. The heat causes the stripes of adhesive .12 and 13 to seal the tape 11 to the cover of the book and at the same time to seal the stripe of adhesive 14 to the edges of the signatures and bind the latter to the tape 11. As a result, the signatures are bonded to the tape 11 which in turn is bonded to the case or cover 20 to form a complete binding for the resultant book.

The improved tape of this application provides a dry operation which only requires the application of heat to bind a book. The operation is much faster and more efficient than the conventional procedure. Bindings made in accordance with this application have the additional advantage of being waterproof.

I claim:

1. Bookbinding tape comprising an elongated fabric tape with three longitudinal stripes of heat-scalable adhesive thereon, one stripe being located centrally on one side of the tape and having a width substantially equal to the thickness of the pages of the book to be bound, and the other two stripes of adhesive being located on the other side of the tape adjacent the edges thereof, the width of the other two stripes of adhesive being such that two sections of said tape are uncoated on both sides, each defined between said centrally located stripe and one of said other two stripes thereby operating as hinges for the cover of the resulting book.

2. Bookbinding tape as defined by claim 1 wherein the stripes of adhesive have a thickness approximately equal to the thickness of the tape.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 855,322 5/1907 Maccallum 117l22 X 1,168,254 1/1916 Frisch et al 117-44 2,3 87,593 10/ 1945 Lesser. 2,523,860 9/1950 Budden. 2,984,342 5/1961 Smith 117-44 X 3,025,167 3/1962 Butler. 3,040,963 6/1962 Turpin.

WILLIAM D. MARTIN, Primary Examiner.

H. I. GWINNELL, Assistant Examiner.

US. Cl. X.R. 117-685, 122

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US855322 *Jan 18, 1907May 28, 1907James MaccallumFlexible back for paper pads and books.
US1168254 *Mar 9, 1914Jan 11, 1916Emil FrischSanitary wrapper for bread and the like.
US2387593 *Mar 10, 1942Oct 23, 1945Lesser OttoAdhesive unit
US2523860 *Apr 26, 1947Sep 26, 1950Florez Engineering Company IncAdhesive binding for books
US2984342 *Nov 24, 1958May 16, 1961Crown Zellerbach CorpHeat sealable label roll and method of making the same
US3025167 *Sep 19, 1960Mar 13, 1962American Can CoFood package
US3040963 *Aug 8, 1961Jun 26, 1962Pillsbury CoPackage
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3900642 *Dec 11, 1972Aug 19, 1975Marcel MichelBinding strip for book leaves
US4244069 *May 29, 1979Jan 13, 1981Xerox CorporationMethod and apparatus for binding sheets
US4441950 *Apr 27, 1983Apr 10, 1984Lolli Carla PUniversal file with inner gluing back for thermal gluing systems
US4471976 *Aug 6, 1981Sep 18, 1984Giulie Joe DHeat activated binding and filing system
US4547000 *Apr 29, 1982Oct 15, 1985Pentti SallinenSoft-cover book block and method for the manufacture of same
US4678386 *Jul 17, 1986Jul 7, 1987Bind-O-Matic AbThermal sheet binding apparatus and a method for binding of loose sheets in a folder
US4800110 *Jul 6, 1987Jan 24, 1989Ducorday Gerard MHot melt glue binder
US4906156 *Jun 21, 1988Mar 6, 1990Axelrod Herbert RMethod of binding a book
US5006396 *Jul 25, 1988Apr 9, 1991Xerox CorporationMoisture proof thermally actuated binding tape for books
US5078424 *Oct 3, 1990Jan 7, 1992K-Flex, Inc.Tubular woven ribbon book binding
US5154447 *Sep 9, 1991Oct 13, 1992Tooker John CBinding for soft cover books
US5183294 *Jul 9, 1991Feb 2, 1993Kustannusosakeyhtio OtavaPre-assembled soft cover for a book, and method of making the same
US5306047 *Jun 12, 1992Apr 26, 1994Fuji Photo Film Co., Ltd.Booklet album of photographs and binding apparatus therefor
US5362188 *Jun 25, 1993Nov 8, 1994Tooker John CApparatus and method for applying adhesive for book binding and independent adhesive roller speed control
US5364215 *Sep 28, 1992Nov 15, 1994Norfin, Inc.Method and apparatus for preparing book covers
US5417797 *Jun 29, 1993May 23, 1995Tooker; John C.Apparatus and method for applying adhesive for book binding
US5456496 *Jun 20, 1994Oct 10, 1995K-Flex, Inc.Lay-flat book binding
US5496253 *May 4, 1994Mar 5, 1996Norfin International, Inc.Method and apparatus for forming bookbinding strips
US5538570 *Apr 25, 1994Jul 23, 1996Tooker; John C.Apparatus and method for applying adhesive for book binding and independent adhesive roller speed control
US5611949 *May 16, 1996Mar 18, 1997Norfin International, Inc.Method and apparatus for laser cutting separate items carried on a continuously moving web
US5779423 *Aug 15, 1996Jul 14, 1998Bermingham; John F.Soft cover book and method of making same
US5836615 *May 10, 1995Nov 17, 1998Elliot, Deceased; MichaelBook construction with releasable adhesive
US6036229 *Feb 23, 1998Mar 14, 2000Unibind (Cyprus) LimitedFile binder
US7326019May 11, 2004Feb 5, 2008Monolith Gmbh BurosystemeMethod for binding a sheet stack into a binder, binding apparatus for carrying out that method, and a binder suitable therefor
US8807904Nov 17, 2011Aug 19, 2014Unibind LimitedMethod for binding a bundle of loose leaves or the like and end leaf applied thereby
US8904932 *Jul 26, 2012Dec 9, 2014Eastman Kodak CompanyProducing bound document having inner cover sheet
US20050008459 *May 11, 2004Jan 13, 2005Bernd LoiblMethod for binding a sheet stack into a binder, binding apparatus for carrying out that method, and a binder suitable therefor
US20060029487 *Aug 3, 2005Feb 9, 2006Bernd LoiblMethod for binding a sheet stack into a binder, and binding apparatus for carrying out that method
US20060067807 *Sep 21, 2005Mar 30, 2006Bernd LoiblMethod for binding a sheet stack into a binder, and binding apparatus for carrying out that method
US20090263211 *Oct 2, 2006Oct 22, 2009Guido PelemanMethod for Binding a Bundle of Loose Leaves or the Like and Binding Element, End Leaf or Cover Applied Thereby
US20100176583 *Jul 15, 2010Eric Stanley ReiterBook with flexible slanted spine
US20140028009 *Jul 26, 2012Jan 30, 2014Brian J. KwartaBound document having printed cover sheet
US20140030044 *Jul 26, 2012Jan 30, 2014Brian J. KwartaProducing bound document having inner cover sheet
CN101405148BMar 14, 2007Jun 9, 2010尤尼宾德有限公司Method for thermally binding a bundle of loose leaves and binding element applied thereby
DE2936674A1 *Sep 11, 1979Nov 13, 1980Kustannus Oy OtavaPapiereinband mit weichem deckel und verfahren zu dessen herstellung
DE3447702A1 *Dec 28, 1984Jul 10, 1986Hesselmann Planatolwerk HThermoplastisch wirkendes klebeelement und verfahren zu seiner herstellung und verwendung
DE102004037806B4 *Aug 3, 2004Jan 15, 2015Swedex Gmbh & Co. KgVerfahren zum Einbinden eines Blattstapels in einen Einband sowie Bindevorrichtung zur Durchführung dieses Verfahrens
EP0478849A1 *Oct 1, 1990Apr 8, 1992Kustannusosakeyhtio OtavaA pre-assembled soft-cover for a book and a method of manufacturing the same.
EP0535809A1 *Sep 8, 1992Apr 7, 1993John Cleven TookerBinding for soft cover books
EP1623841A2Jul 27, 2005Feb 8, 2006Swedex GmbH & Co. KGProcess for binding a stack of sheets in a cover of a book and binding device for carrying out this process
EP1637343A1Sep 14, 2005Mar 22, 2006Monolith GmbH BürosystemeProcess for binding a sheet block in a cover and binding device to execute the process
WO1982003824A1 *Apr 29, 1982Nov 11, 1982Pentti SallinenSoft-cover book block and method for the manufacture of same
WO1992005964A1 *Sep 26, 1991Apr 16, 1992Kustannusosakeyhtiö OtavaMethod for manufacturing a soft-cover paperback book, book manufactured according to that method, and a preassembled soft-cover therefor
WO2007107830A1 *Mar 14, 2007Sep 27, 2007Unibind LimitedMethod for thermally binding a bundle of loose leaves and binding element applied thereby
Classifications
U.S. Classification428/190, 412/8, 428/195.1, 412/900, 412/36, 281/21.1, 428/347
International ClassificationB42D3/00
Cooperative ClassificationY10S412/90, B42D3/002
European ClassificationB42D3/00B