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Publication numberUS3438571 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 15, 1969
Filing dateFeb 25, 1966
Priority dateMar 8, 1965
Also published asDE1532672A1
Publication numberUS 3438571 A, US 3438571A, US-A-3438571, US3438571 A, US3438571A
InventorsMurkes Jakob, Nilson Carl-Goran
Original AssigneeAlfa Laval Ab
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Centrifugal separator
US 3438571 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Apnl 15, 1969 J. MURKES ET CENTRIFUGAL SEPARATOR I of 5 Sheet Filed Feb. 25. 1966 Q it 2 70 k0 b lfurkgs Car! Gd'ron M'Zsan jaw;

April 15, 1969 J MURKES ET AL 3,438,571

CENTRIFUGAL SEPARATOR Filed Feb. 25, 1966 Sheet 2 of 5 In van or Jakob HurkeS April 15, 1969 MURKES ET AL CENTRIFUGAL SEPARATOR Sheet Filed Feb. 25, 1966 Inventor Jakob Nurkes Carl G'ron M'lson April 15, 1969 MURKES ET AL CENTRIFUGAL SEPARATOR Sheet 5' ors Filed Feb. 25, 1966 In ven to Jakob Nurkes COrl- 60"!0/1 Mlsan United States Patent U.S. Cl. 233-2 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A centrifugal rotor is provided with an inlet for a mixture of two liquids to be separated and has a separating chamber including an outer peripheral portion and a main separating space, the rotor defining a completely open feed passage from the inlet to the peripheral portion of the separating chamber. The rotor also defines first and second flow paths leading from the outer portion of the open feed passage or from the peripheral portion of the separating chamber to respective outlets for the two separated liquids, these outlets being spaced radially inward from the aforesaid peripheral portion, the first flow path including the main space of the separating chamber. A porous body is inserted in one of these flow paths, preferably the first, and is of either the type operable to coalesce droplets of one of the liquids passing therethrough or the type operable to block the passage of one of the liquids. The open feed passage from the inlet allows any solids in the feed mixture to pass directly to the peripheral portion of the separating chamber and thus avoid clogging of the porous body.

The present invention relates to a centrifugal separator for the separation of two liquids from each other.

In the separation of a liquid mixture, such as Water droplets in oil or oil droplets in water, it is often desirable that one of the separated liquids (for example, the oil) is freed a high degree from contamination by the other liquid. If the droplets are of a very small size, it is difficult to reach the desired separation efficiency, even in a centrifugal separator.

According to the present invention, it is possible to obtain a considerably improved separation result if a porous body is inserted in the flow path to or through the separator, said porous body being of such a kind known per se that, upon passage of a liquid mixture through the body, droplets of one of the liquids will coalesce, or of such a kind known per se that only the continuous liquid phase passes through the body. The latter case implies that the liquid droplets are separated from the continuous liquid phase. In order to obtain a satisfactory separation result, it is advantageous if the droplets can be caused to coalesce prior to their admittance to the separator or after they have been entrained in the rotation of the separator because, as known, large droplets are separated more rapidly from a liquid than small droplets. Accordingly, a coalescing, porous body may be inserted in the stationary inlet of the separator.

Since the entrainment in the rotation of the separator of the liquid fed into the separator causes a certain fragmentation of the droplets, it may be desirable to insert said body in the distributor, more particularly at a certain distance inside said distributor, where a rotational speed has already been imparted to the liquid. It is thus preferable to use a substantially tubular or ringshaped, coalescing, porous body, which is coaxial with the axis of rotation of the separator and surrounds the periphery of the distributor, that is, is located where the "ice liquid is already rotating at substantially full speed, whereupon it is fed into the separation chamber proper. Alternatively, a liquid-separating, porous body may be provided which separates a part of one of the liquids so that it never flows into the separation chamber, while the rest of the liquid mixture passes through the body and flows into the separation chamber. It is also possible to use a combination of a coalescing and liquid-separating body, so that the liquid mixture first passes through the coalescing body and thereafter through the liquid-separating body, or conversely. In the former case, a space is preferably provided between both bodies, from which space the liquid which does not flow through the second porous body, considered in the direction of flow, is conveyed to a corresponding outlet.

The invention is also applicable to a separator with a set of discs which, as well as the distributor, is provided with distribution holes. In that case, coalescing, porous bodies may be inserted in the distribution holes, these bodies being preferably in the form of tubes which extend axially through the holes; or a coalescing, porous body may be arranged axially, so that it obturates the distribution holes in the distributor. Alternatively, it is also possible to arrange a liquid separating, porous body so that it obturates the distribution holes or to arrange a combination of a coalescing and a liquid-separating body in the same manner.

Finally, in order to eliminate the last traces of heavy liquid from a separated, cleaned light-weight liquid, or conversely, it is possible to arrange, near the outlet for one of the liquids from the rotor or separation chamber, a substantially tubular or ring-shaped liquid'separating, orous body which is coaxial with the axis of rotation of the separator.

The invention is described more in detail below, referonce being made to the attached drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a vertical sectional view of a centrifugal separator embodying the invention in one form, and

FIGS. 2 through 9 are vertical sectional views of parts of centrifugal separators embodying other forms of the invention.

In FIG. 1, reference numeral 1 designates the rotor of the separator and 2 the vertical spindle carrying the rotor. Reference numeral 3 designates the hood of the rotor and 4 the lock ring which fastens the hood to the rotor. The liquid mixture to be separated is fed in through a stationary pipe 5. The rotor is provided with a distributor 6 with wings 7 and a set of discs 8 with a top disc 9. The distributor and the disc set are provided with vertically aligned distribution holes 10. Heavy liquid is discharged through an overflow 11 and light-weight liquid through an overflow 12.

The feed pipe 5 is provided with a coalescing plug 13. The latter may be made of felted glass fibers in which the pores cons'itute, for example, to of the volume of the plug. Instead of a plug, it is possible to use a tubular body with a closed bottom end, the walls of the tube being preferably corrugated in order to constitute a large through-flow area for the liquid mixture passing through it.

In FIG. 2, a coalescing body 14 of the same kind as that shown in FIG. 1 is located in the distributor 6 instead of the pipe 5. The body 14 therefore differs from the body 13 only by its larger diameter.

We have shown in FIG. 3 a number of coalescing bodies 15 of the same material as the body 13 according to FIG. 1. The bodies 15 are inserted in the channels formed between the wings 7 and of which there may be eight in number, which lead from the center of the distributor 6 to its periphery, there being a body in each channel. The bodies 15 cover the through-flow area in each channel so that the whole liquid mixture supplied to the separator must pass through the bodies.

In FIG. 4, which shows the right-hand part of a partial section through a rotor, a tubular or ring-shaped porous body 16 is provided. This body may be of a coalescing or liquid-separating type or a combination of both types. If the body is of the liquid-separating type, it may be constituted by a fine-mesh wire cloth (width of mesh, 5 to 70a, for instance), the wires of which are preferably fixed in relation to each other by sintering. In this embodiment, the distributor 6 is not provided with any distribution holes and therefore the liquid mixture is compelled to stream radially inwards from the space outside the body 16. The liquid separating by the body 16, if the latter is of the liquid-separating type, is supposed to be the heavier one and therefore moves radially outwards.

In FIG. 5, we have shown the right-hand part of a partial section through a rotor with tubes 17 of coalescing material inserted in the distribution holes of the disc set 8.

In FIG. 6, which shows the right-hand part of a partial section through a rotor, coalescing and liquid-separating bodies 18 and 20 are arranged at the underside of the distributor 6, these bodies having the shape of conical discs. The liquid mixture passes first through the coalescing body 18 and thereafter enters an interspace 19 between said body and the liquid-separating body 20. The liquid which does not pass through the body 20, and which in this case is supposed to be the heavy liquid phase, moves outwards to the outer edge of the body 20 while the liquid which has passed through the body 20 moves upwards in the disc set through the distribution holes 10.

As illustrated in FIG. 7, which shows the right-hand part of a partial section through a rotor, a plate 21 of coalescing material is arranged at the underside of each distribution hole in the distributor 6. A slot 22 is arranged between each plate 21 and the distribution hole, and a plate 23 of liquid-separating material is inserted in each distribution hole. This embodiment operates in principle in the same way as the embodiment according to FIG. 6.

The liquid-separating body shown in FIG. 8 is a largesized tube 24 inserted close within the inner edges of the disc set 8. The tube 24 separates small droplets of heavy liquid which move out into the separation chamber through the disc set 8 while the light-weight liquid passes through the tube 24 and reaches its outlet 12. Conversely, it is possible to arrange a similar tube of a still larger diameter at the outer edge of the top disc 9, which tube prevents droplets of light-weight liquid from being entrained by the heavy liquid passing to the outlet 11.

A modification of the embodiment according to FIG. 8 is shown in FIG. 9. In this modification, the liquid-separating body has the shape of a ring 25 inserted in the neck of the top disc 9, that is, just ahead the overflow 12 for the light-weight liquid. The ring 25 operates in the same way as the tube 24 in the embodiment according to FIG. 8.

We claim:

1-. In a centrifugal separator for continuously separating two liquids from each other, the combination of a rotor having an inlet for said liquids and having a sepa rating chamber including an outer peripheral portion and a main separating space, the rotor also having two permanently open outlets for the respective separated liquids and spaced radially inward from said outer portion of the separating chamber, said rotor defining completely open feed passages from said inlet to said outer portion, said open feed passages having a radially outer portion opening into said outer portion of the separating chamber, the

rotor also defining first and second flow paths leading from at least one of said outer portions of the feed passages and separating chamber to the respective outlets, said first flow path including said main space of the separating chamber, and a porous body inserted in one of said how paths in position to permit free flow of solids from said inlet to said outer portion of the separating chamber.

2. The combination according to claim 1, in which said porous body is of the type operable to coalesce droplets of one of said liquids passing therethrough.

3. The combination according to claim 1, in which said porous body is of the type operable to block the passage of one of said liquids therethrough.

4. The combination according to claim 1, in which the rotor includes a distributor partly defining said open fee-d passage, said porous body being a tubular member coaxial with the rotor axis and surrounding the periphery of the distributor.

5. The combination according to claim 1, in which the rotor includes a distributor partly defining said open feed passage, and a set of discs in said main space of the chamber, said distributor and disc set having distribution holes in which said porous body is located.

6. The combination according to claim 1, in which the rotor includes a distributor partly defining said open feed passage, and a set of discs in said main space of the chamber, said distributor and disc set having distribution holes in which said porous body is located, said body being a tube extending through said holes substantially parallel to the rotor axis and being of the type operable to coalesce droplets of one of said liquids passing from said holes to said chamber.

7. The combination according to claim 1, in which the rotor includes a distributor partly defining said open feed passage, and a set of discs in said main space of the chamber, said distributor and disc set having distribution holes, said porous body covering a distribution hole in the distributor.

8. The combination according to claim 1, in which said porous body is inserted in said first flow path. a

9. The combination according to claim 1, in which said first flow path includes an annular space located radially inwardly from said main space of the separating chamber, said porous body being a tubular member inserted in said annular space.

19. The combination according to claim 1, in which said porous body is of the type operable to coalesce droplets of one of said liquids passing therethrough, the combination comprising also a second porous body of the type operable to block the passage of one of said liquids therethrough, said second body being inserted in said one flow path downstream from the first porous body and defining therewith a passage leading to said peripheral portion of the separating chamber.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,614,357 l/1927 Gamper 233-2 2,594,445 4/1952 Keith 233-2 FOREIGN PATENTS 1,362,722 4/1964 France.

262,902 12/ 1926 Great Britain. 335,466 9/1930 Great Britain. 915,879 l/ 1963 Great Britain.

HENRY T. KLINKSIEK, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1614357 *Feb 19, 1926Jan 11, 1927Robert GamperCentrifugal separator
US2594445 *Oct 23, 1946Apr 29, 1952Sharples CorpCentrifugal machine and process
FR1362722A * Title not available
GB262902A * Title not available
GB335466A * Title not available
GB915879A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5052996 *Sep 27, 1989Oct 1, 1991Alfa-Laval Separation AbCentrifugal separator
US6869389 *May 5, 2001Mar 22, 2005Westfalia Separator AgCentrifuge with sieve and method for operating said centrifuge
US7708681Nov 3, 2005May 4, 2010Eni S.P.A.Continuous porous bed centrifuge
US20040029696 *May 5, 2001Feb 12, 2004Wilfried MackelCentrifuge with sieve and method for operating said centrifuge
US20090065424 *Feb 19, 2007Mar 12, 2009Jean-Denis RochatCircular centrifugation chamber for separation of blood
US20090139921 *Nov 3, 2005Jun 4, 2009Eni S.P.A.Continuous porous bed centrifuge
WO2006048299A1 *Nov 3, 2005May 11, 2006Eni S.P.A.Continuous porous bed centrifuge
WO2006107192A2 *Apr 4, 2006Oct 12, 2006Rowe Parsons International B.V.Device and method for separation of a fluid and more in particular an emulsion
WO2006107192A3 *Apr 4, 2006Nov 23, 2006Rowe Parsons Internat B VDevice and method for separation of a fluid and more in particular an emulsion
Classifications
U.S. Classification494/36, 494/70
International ClassificationB04B1/08, B04B1/00
Cooperative ClassificationB04B1/08
European ClassificationB04B1/08