Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3438803 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 15, 1969
Filing dateMay 18, 1965
Priority dateMay 18, 1965
Publication numberUS 3438803 A, US 3438803A, US-A-3438803, US3438803 A, US3438803A
InventorsEdward H Alten, Roger D Dubble
Original AssigneeAnchor Hocking Glass Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method and means for vapor coating
US 3438803 A
Abstract  available in
Images(8)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 15, 1969 R, D, BUBBLE ETAL 3,438,803

METHOD AND MEANS FOR VAPOR COATING Sheet Of8 Filed May 18. 1965 INVENTOR-s Ebeee 0 008846 BY @k/APD /7! 442-0) 77WJ7M ATTQIPIYCY April 15, 1969 R. D. DUBB LE ET METHOD AND MEANS FOR VAPOR COATING a of 8 Sheet Filed May 18 1965 m em T April 15, 1969 R. o. DUBBLE ET AL 3,438,803

METHOD AND MEANS FOR VAPOR COATING Filed May 18, 1965 Sheet Q of 8 x: [:i INVENTORS H R366? 0. 005346 I. l BY bW IQD AL 757) WW0? MM April 15,1969 R. D. BUBBLE ETAL 3,438,803

METHOD AND MEANS FOR VAPOR COATING Sheet 6: of 8 Filed May 18, 1965 INVENTORS W0 066a? BY [OWAQD 40f April 15, 1969 R. D. DUBBLE ET 3,438,803

1 METHOD AND MEANS FOR VAPOR COATING Filed May 18, 1965 Sheet 12 of 8 INVENTORS @066 0 1.906646 BY ow/ 0 6. 44 7 6 AFTOWE) April 15, 1969 1 U B ET AL 3,438,803

METHOD AND MEANS FOR VAPOR COATING Filed May 18, 1965 Sheet 7 INVENTORS R065 0. 006545 BY mp0 Au-ay Sheet of 8 A ril 15, 1969 R. o. DUBBLE ET AL METHOD AND MEANS FOR VAPOR COATING Filed May 18, 1965 Aim-7 BY few/219p f/ ALTE/Y United States Patent 0 U.S. Cl. 117106 9 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A method and related apparatus for coating articles by exposing hot surfaces of the articles to a vapor, causing the vapor to pyrolize on the surfaces. The vapor is formed by bubbling a gas or gas mixture such as air through a liquid source of vapor. A preferred bubbler has a bubbling chamber including a vertical bubbler tube connected to the liquid source. A second tube within the bubbler tube has a closed top and a gas outlet in its side walls intermediate its bottom and a closed top which releases the bubbling gas into the bubbler tube. The heated articles, such as glass containers, are carried in an upright and spaced arrangement on a moving conveyor through a coating tunnel. Vapor nozzles are positioned in the tunnel adjacent arcuate vapor directing surfaces which form a cylindrical vapor pattern so that the axes of the moving containers are generally parallel to the axis of the vapor pattern.

The present application related to a method and means for generating a vapor and for applying the vapor to articles and more particularly to a method and means particularly adapted for applying a coating in the form of a pyrolyzed vapor on glass containers.

It has been found that the strength and scratch resistance of glass articles such as containers are increased by the formation of a coating on the outer surface of the containers. This vapor coating is advantageously formed by the exposure of hot container surfaces to the vapors of certain metallo-organic compounds where the vapors pyrolyze as they contact the hot surfaces of the glass and form thin metal oxide coatings on the glass surfaces.

The present invention provides an improved vaporizing apparatus and method and a cooperating vapor applying apparatus and method for forming a uniform coating of this type on containers and particularly for uniformly applying such coatings to closely spaced glass containers being moved at relatively high speeds past the coating I device by a conveyor. The method and means of the invention generate the vapor in a predetermined and controlled concentration and with a substantial flow and direct the vapors thus formed by a novel distribution and application device forming coatings having a uniform thickness and a complete coverage of pre-determined container surfaces.

Accordingly, an object of the present invention is to provide a new method and means for applying coatings to containers.

Another object of the present invention is to provide an improved method and means for vaporizing a liquid.

Another object of the present invention is to provide an improved method and means for forming a vapor with a substantial and controlled flow and for directing the vapor uniformly over a series of moving articles.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a reliable and easily controlled method and means for forming a vapor with a pre-determined concentration and flow rate.

Another object of the present invention is to provide an improved vapor generating and applying means adaptable for being contained in a compact and portable cabinet.

Other and further objects of the invention will be obvious upon an understanding of the illustrative embodiment about to be described, or will be indicated in the appended claims, and various advantages not referred to herein will occur to one skilled in the art upon employment of the invention in practice.

A preferred embodiment of the invention has been chosen for purposes of illustration and description and is shown in the accompanying drawings, forming a part of the specification, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view partially cut away illustraing a preferred embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 2 is a side elevational view of a preferred embodiment of the vaporizing and vapor applying apparatus;

FIG. 3 is a top plan view partially cut away of the apparatus of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged detailed sectional view of the vaporizing chamber;

FIG. 5 is an enlarged sectional view of the bubbler tube of the vaporizing chamber taken along line 5-5 of FIG 4;

FIGS. 6 and 7 are horizontal sectional views of the vaporizing chamber taken along lines 6-6 and 77 on FIGS. 5 and 4 respectively;

FIG. 8 is a horizontal sectional view of the vapor dispenser taken along line -88 on FIG. 2;

FIG. 9 is a vertical sectional view of the vapor dispenser taken along line 9-9 on FIG. 8;

FIG. 10 is a perspective view partially cut away of the vapor dispenser; and

FIG. 11 is a flow diagram illustrating the operation of the improved vaporizing and dispersing apparatus and method.

The process and the apparatus will now be described generally with particular reference to FIGS. 1 and 11.

FIG. 1 illustrates the general arrangement of the vaporizing and dispenser apparatus. The apparatus is arranged as illustrated to apply the coating to a series of glass containers 1 being conveyed on a suitable conveyor 2 at relatively high speed through a vapor dispenser indicated generally at 3 and which is supplied with vapor from the vaporizer 4.

As will now be more fully described, the vapor is generated from a liquid source of the particular vapor to be applied. This liquid is first vaporized and is then mixed with suitable quantities of a diluting inert carrier gas such as dry air or nitrogen or CO and is passed to the vapor dispenser 3. The final coatings applied to ,the articles such as glass containers are metal oxides resulting from the pyrolyzing or reduction of vapors of compounds such as terta-isopropyl titanate, tin tetrachloride, titanium tetra-chloride, zirconium tetrachloride, germanium tetrachloride, vanadium tetrachloride or other vapor sources depending upon the particular coating desired. Where a titanium dioxide coating is applied tetraisopropyl titanate is the preferred compound used as the vapor source.

The vaporizer 4 will now be described with reference to FIGS. 1 thru 3 and the flow diagram FIG. 11. The particular compound to be vaporized is stored in liquid form in the storage tank 5 within the cabinet 6. An outlet conduit 7 feeds this liquid by gravity to the vaporizing chamber 9, which will be described in detail below, and which generates a substantially saturated vapor. Dry air is supplied at inlet -8 and has its pressure regulated 'by the regulator 10 and then is passed through a flow meter 11 and a flow control valve 12 through conduit 23 to the vaporizing chamber 9. The air acts as a pump and carrier in the chamber 9 to form a saturated air vapor mixture which passes from the top of the vaporizing chamber 9 through a dilution nozzle or venturi mixer 13 and the conduit 14 to a vapor distributing manifold 15. Warm air is also supplied to the venturi mixer 13 from the regulator through a flow meter 16 and a fiow control valve 17 and finally through a thermostatically controlled air heater 18. The warm air from conduit 41 mixes with the saturated air vapor mixture passing from the top of the vaporizing chamber 9 to provide a diluted air vapor mixture for delivery to the vapor dispenser 3.

The air heater 18 is thermostatically controlled to raise the diluting air temperature so that it reaches the venturi mixer 13 at a higher temperature than that of the air vapor mixture passing out of the vaporizing chamber 9 thereby reducing the vapor concentration well below saturation to prevent condensation of the vapor in the distributing conduits, the manifold 15, or the dispenser 3. A thermostatically controlled heater 24 is used on tank 5 to keep the temperature of the tank 5 above the freezing point of the liquid to be vaporized. A thermostatically controlled heater 25 is used in the vaporizing chamber 9 to keep the temperature of the particular liquid being vaporized well above room temperature to facilitate the vaporizing action but preferably below the boiling point of the liquid.

The vapor distributing manifold divides the air vapor mixture into two streams fed by conduits 18 and 19 to two vertical vapor applying nozzles 20 and 21 on opposite sides of the vapor dispenser 3 as will be described below.

The containers such as the container 1 illustrated are preferably passed through the dispenser 3 after being formed and prior to being annealed so that the container walls have a high temperature to pyrolyze the vapor being used to form the coating. The vapor pyrolyzes and decomposes upon the hot container surfaces to leave a thin metal oxide coating such as a titanium dioxide coating where tetra-isopropyl titanate is being vaporized. Such a coating has been demonstrated to provide scratch resisting and strengthening characteristics for glass containers.

As best seen in FIG. 1, the vaporizer 4 and the vapor dispenser 3 comprise a unitary and movable unit mounted on rollers 22 so that the complete vaporizer and dispenser unit may be moved into operative coating relationship with a regular forming machine output conveyor such as conveyor 2. The unit is thus particularly adaptable for use with a regular forming machine output line with little or no change in the arrangement of the forming machine output conveyor.

The construction and operation of the vaporizing chamher 9 will now be described with particular reference to FIGS. 4 thru 7.

As described above, the liquid to be vaporized is supplied from the storage tank 5 through an inlet conduit 7 to the vaporizing chamber 9. As best seen in FIG. 4, the conduit 7 communicates with a hollow bubbler tube and the liquid 31 rises upwardly in the bubbler tube 30 through its lower open end 32 until the level of the liquid 31 within the bubbler tube 30 equals the liquid level of the supply tank 5.

As best seen in FIG. 5, the bubbler tube 30 has a center air pipe 32 having its lower end isolated from the liquid within the vaporizing chamber and connected through an air inlet-33 to the air conduit 23. In the embodiment of the air supply as best illustrated in FIG. 4, the air inlet conduit 23 is first wound down the outside of the vaporizing chamber in the form of a helical section 34 within insulation 35 so that the air is pre-heated to the approximate temperature of the liquid 31 within the vaporizing chamber 9. Alternatively the vaporizing air may be pre-heated by being passed through a heat exchanger mounted in the diluting air line 41 beyond the heater 18. The air may be admited to the top of pipe 32 and the bottom closed.

The vaporizing air passes upwardly through the air pipe 32 and enters into the liquid 31 between the air pipe 32 and the outer bubbler tube 30 through an air outlet 36 best illustrated in FIGS. 5 and 6. The preferred form of the outlet 36 comprises a narrow slot with an upwardly tapered groove 37 similar to an organ pipe opening permitting the air to pass outwardly in the form of bubbles in the liquid 31 which rise to the top of the bubbler tube 30 and wherein each individual air bubble accumulates or is saturated with vapor from the liquid 31 within the bubbler tube 30 as it rises through the liquid. The bubbling action results in a combined vapor forming and a liquid pumping action wherein the vapor passes upwardly to the venturi mixer 13 at the top of the vaporizing chamber 9 while unvaporized liquid is carried by the bubbles over the top 38 of the bubbler tube '30 so that liquid accumulates inside the vaporizing chamber 9.

The liquid 31 rises in the bottom of the vaporizing chamber 9 until it reaches the top of an overflow pipe 39 which returns the excess liquid to the lower open end of the bubbler tube 30 and insures that the top of the bubbler tube 30 remains above the accumulated liquid and free to operate in the above described manner.

While the exact concentration of the vapors of the various metallo-organic compounds used have not been found to be critical, it is preferable that the vapor leaving the vaporizing chamber 9 be below the saturation point to prevent condensation of the vapors on the various portions of the vapor distribution and dispensing system.

Higher concentrations approaching saturation are less practical as indicated due to their tendency to condense before they are decomposed upon the hot surface of the containers 1 being coated. A trap 40' to remove liquid either carried into exit 40 by the bubbling action or condensing in the adjacent line is preferably included with a drain 7 for returning the liquid to the feed line 7 (FIGS. 1 and 11).

In order to obtain suitable concentrations as discussed above, an air mixing venturi 13 is included in the vapor transmission line. A convenient position for ths venturi is, as illustrated, just beyond the trap 40' of the vaporizing chamber 9. The substantially saturated vapor is mixed at the mixing venturi 13 with dry warm air as described above supplied through the air supply conduit 41 from heater 18 so that the final air vapor mixture passing from the mixer outlet 42 has the desired vapor concentration.

The air vapor mixture now passes through the conduit 14 to the manifold 15 which divides the flow into two conduits 44 and 45 directing the mixture to the two nozzles 20 and 21 on opposite sides of the vapor dispenser.

The preferred embodiment of the vapor dispenser will now be described with particular reference to FIGS. 8 thru 10.

In general, the dispenser includes a partially enclosed passageway or fuming tunnel having adjustably spaced side walls 46 and 47 and an adjustable cover 48. In order to provide for an adjustable Width for the tunnel, the side walls 46 and 47 are mounted on lateral mounting flanges 49 and 50 adjustably attached to frame members 51 and 52 by the bolts 54 and 55 and slots 56 and 57 best illustrated in FIG. 9. The cover 48 also is adjusted for varying container widths and heights as it is formed of two separate sections 58 and 59 having overlapped bottom portions adjustably connected by the clamps 60 best seen in FIGS. 9 and 10 and being adjustably mounted for varying heights by clamps 61.

Each of the side walls 46 and 47 includes a vapor nozzle structure for providing a preferred vapor flow pattern at the central portion of the tunnel as well as a preferred exhaust system at their opposite ends which serves to reduce the entry of air into the tunnels and to exhaust excess vapor as will now be more fully described.

The vertical nozzles 20 and 21 are provided at oppo site sides of the tunnel and the are attached to flange members 62 and 63 extending along the tops and outwardly of each of the side walls 46 and 47. The nozzles 20 and 21 each comprise telescoping hollow tubes 64 and 65 with a relatively narrow vertical slot 66 in the outer tube 65 positioned adjacent to the side walls of the moving containers 1. The effective height of each of the slots 66 is made adjustable to correspond generally to the height of the container side walls to be coated by having the slot 66 in the outer tube 65 extend the maximum height of the tunnel and by having a series of steps such as 67 and 68 as illustrated in FIG. 9 in the inner tube 64. By rotatably mounting the inner cylinder 64 a step of pre-determined position is placed adjacent the outer slot 66 to determine the exposed communicating portion of the outer slot 66. The adjustment is controlled by the circular knobs 69 at the tops of the inner tubes 64 slidably mounted on the outer tubes 65.

It has been found that the more uniform and better controlled vapor deposition and coating action is obtained by providing a fiow pattern along the surfaces being coated. For cylindrical jars, a generally cylindrical flow at the mid-portion of the tunnel is preferred to cause the vapor to flow around the entire circumference of the jars as illustrated by the arrows 70 in FIG. 8. Such a flow is obtained by the arcuate back wall members 71 provided at each side of the tunnel and by spacing the nozzles 20 and 21 longitudinally of the tunnel and on opposite sides of the tunnel as illustrated. While two nozzles 20 and 21 are illustrated, a single nozzle may also be used for certain container sizes by eliminating one nozzle or by closing one off as by closing valve 44 (FIG. 1). The back wall members 71 and the adjacent wall structure are preferably insulated as illustrated to maintain a high temperature at the center of the tunnel to thereby prevent condensation of vapor and an accumulation of such condensed vapor within the tunnel.

In order to limit the entrance of air into the ends of the tunnel and to prevent the escape of vapor from the opposite ends of the tunnel, an exhaust system is provided including four outlets 75 positioned at opposite ends and on opposite sides of the tunnel as illustrated. Thi system includes an exhaust fan 76 and drive motor 77 as illustrated in FIG. 1 which are coupled through an exhaust manifold 78 to four vertical exhaust conduits 79. The conduits 79 communicate with the exhaust outlets 75 in the tunnel. The exhaust outlets 75 preferably have inclined back walls 80 best illustrated in FIG. 8 to form a curtainlike stream of air adjacent the tunnel ends to give the desired result of limiting air passage through the tunnel and at the same time to exhaust excess vapor from the tunnel to prevent an excessive pressure build up of the vapor air mixture within the tunnel.

It will be seen that an improved vaporizing and dispensing method and apparatus have been disclosed particularly adapted for producing and dispensing a vapor of pre-determined concentration and at high flow rates. The cooperating vapor dispensing is particularly useful for applying the vapor rapidly as well as uniformly to moving articles such as heated glass containers. The method and apparatus are capable of continuous operation with a consistent vapor concentration with a minimum of adjustment and supervision. They are thus particularly suited for use in high speed continuous vapor coating operations where large numbers of articles such as glass containers are continuously formed and coated. The vaporizing method described is applicable for providing protective coatings on glass containers or similar articles without interfering with the normal processes of article forming and annealing and with little or no re-arrangement of the article handling lines and with no reduction in the output rates of the forming and the annealing equipment.

Having thus described our invention, we claim:

1. A method of dispensing a vapor for decomposition on cylindrical surface portions of hot glass containers moving along a conveyor to form a uniformly thick coating thereon which comprises the steps of directing the vapor in a sheet like flow from nozzle means positioned on a side of the conveyor and generally normal to the conveyor direction and thereafter along arcuate flow directors positioned opposite one another on both sides of the conveyor thereby forming a generally cylindrical flow pattern, moving the hot containers from a forming machine into said cylindrical vapor flow pattern with the cylindrical axis of the containers being normal to said conveyor surface and generally parallel to and passing in close proximity to the axis of the cylindrical flow pattern.

2. The method as claimed in claim 1 which further comprises the step of exhausting the excess vapor from spaced points on the path of the moving containers and on opposite sides of the cylindrical flow pattern.

3. .A vapor dispenser for directing a gas vapor against the side walls of generally cylindrical and moving containers comprising a conveyor, a tunnel means including a pair of spaced side walls and a top wall, nozzle means positioned on the side of the tunnel and having an elongated vapor outlet generally perpendicular to the direction of the moving containers, arcuately curved vapor directing means positioned opposite one another adjacent said walls on both sides of the conveyor and said directing means being positioned for directing the vapor from the nozzle outlet into a generally cylindrical flow pattern whose cylindrical axis is perpendicular to the conveyor surface.

4. A vaporizer comprising the combination of a liquid storage chamber, a generally vertical bubbler tube within said chamber having an open top and having its interior communicating with a source of liquid, and a second hollow tube within said bubbler tube having a closed top and having its interior coupled to a gas supply conduit and having a gas outlet in its side walls.

5. A vaporizer comprising the combination of a liquid storage chamber, a generally vertical bubbler tube within said chamber having an open top and having its interior communicating with a source of liquid, a second hollow tube within said bubbler tube having its interior coupled to a gas supply conduit and having a gas outlet in its side walls, a third generally vertical hollow tube in said chamber having an opening adjacent its upper end and having its lower end in communication with the interior of said ibubbler tube, and a vapor outlet at the top of said chamber.

6. A vaporizer comprising the combination of a liquid storage chamber, a generally vertical bubbler tube within said chamber having an open top, means to supply a liquid to said bubbler tube between vertically spaced height limits, a second hollow tube within said bubbler tube having its interior coupled to a gas supply conduit, and having a gas outlet in its side walls intermediate said height limits, and a vapor outlet at the top of said chamber.

7. A vaporizer comprising the combination of a liquid storage chamber, a generally vertical bubbler tube within said chamber having an open top, means for supplying a liquid to said bubbler tube between vertically spaced height limits, a second hollow tube within said bubbler tube having its interior coupled to a gas supply conduit and having a gas outlet in its side walls, a third hollow overflow tube in said chamber vertically disposed and having an open top and having its bottom in communication with the interior of said bubbler tube, a vapor outlet for said chamber including a trap for liquid, and means for diluting the vapor with a gas.

8. A vapor dispenser for directing a gas vapor against the side walls of a generally cylindrical container comprising a conveyor, :a tunnel means including a pair of spaced side walls and a top wall, a pair of vapor nozzles positioned on opposite sides of the tunnel and having elongated vapor outlets, said nozzles being spaced from another longitudinally of said tunnel, and arcuately curved vapor directing means adjacent each of said nozzles positioned to cooperate in directing the vapor from the pair of nozzle outlets into a generally cylindrical flow pattern 7 surrounding containers passing through said tunnel on said conveyor.

9. A vapor dispenser for directing a gas vapor against the side Walls of a generally cylindrical container comprising a conveyor, a tunnel means including a pair of spaced side walls and a top wall, a pair of vapor nozzles positioned on opposite sides of the tunnel and having elo-ngated vapor outlets, said nozzles being spaced from one another longitudinally of said tunnel and conveyor, arcuately curved vapor directing means adjacent each of said nozzles positioned to cooperate in directing the vapor from the pair of nozzle outlets into a generally cylindrical flow pattern surrounding containers passing through said tunnel on said conveyor, and exhaust means at opposite ends of said tunnel.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,404,709 1/1922 Allbright 261-121 X 8 1,575,292 3/1926 Tyler 261-121 2,026,086 12/1935 Farncomb. 2,152,046 3/1939 Gustafsson et al. 239298 2,723,921 11/1955 Starkey 11793.4 X 2,759,848 8/1956 Sullivan 117107.2 X 2,894,858 7/1959 Lytle. 3,075,861 1/1963 Bennett. 3,291,631 12/1966 Smith. 3,306,768 2/1967 Peterson.

ALFRED L. LEAVITT, Primary Examiner.

A. GOLIAN, Assistant Examiner.

US. Cl. X.R.

ll7l05.3, 124; 1l8-48, 314, 315, 324, 326; 26ll21

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1404709 *Nov 5, 1919Jan 24, 1922Allbright William BHydrogenating apparatus
US1575292 *Apr 30, 1925Mar 2, 1926Daniel C TylerAir washer
US2026086 *Mar 27, 1933Dec 31, 1935Corning Glass WorksBlue coated ceramic article and method and means for producing it
US2152046 *Apr 4, 1938Mar 28, 1939Binks Mfg CoAir nozzle for flat spraying appliances
US2723921 *Jun 10, 1950Nov 15, 1955Ransburg Electro Coating CorpElectrostatic coating
US2759848 *Dec 28, 1954Aug 21, 1956Bell Telephone Labor IncDeposition of metal films from carbonyls
US2894858 *Dec 1, 1950Jul 14, 1959Pittsburgh Plate Glass CoMethod of producing transparent electroconductive articles
US3075861 *Oct 27, 1959Jan 29, 1963Willard H BennettMethod and apparatus for producing electrically conducting coatings on vitreous substances
US3291631 *Feb 1, 1963Dec 13, 1966Neirad Ind IncTechnique for coating articles using streams of particles in laminar flow
US3306768 *Jan 8, 1964Feb 28, 1967Motorola IncMethod of forming thin oxide films
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3516811 *Oct 4, 1966Jun 23, 1970Indian Head IncMethod of and apparatus for coating glassware retaining its heat of formation
US3645778 *Jan 6, 1969Feb 29, 1972Owens Illinois IncMetal oxide coatings on glass
US3658304 *May 11, 1970Apr 25, 1972Anchor Hocking CorpMeans for vapor coating
US3688737 *Nov 4, 1969Sep 5, 1972Glass Container Mfg Inst IncVapor deposition apparatus including air mask
US3850679 *Dec 15, 1972Nov 26, 1974Ppg Industries IncChemical vapor deposition of coatings
US3852098 *Dec 15, 1972Dec 3, 1974Ppg Industries IncMethod for increasing rate of coating using vaporized reactants
US3876410 *Nov 24, 1972Apr 8, 1975Ball Brothers Co IncMethod of applying durable lubricous coatings on glass containers
US3907534 *Oct 3, 1974Sep 23, 1975Platmanufaktur AbMethod and apparatus for making surface treated glass containers
US3933457 *May 21, 1974Jan 20, 1976Ball CorporationTo form metal oxide coating
US3934063 *May 31, 1974Jan 20, 1976Anchor Hocking CorporationFlame masking of glass articles for metal oxide film deposition
US3942469 *Jan 14, 1975Mar 9, 1976Ppg Industries, Inc.Vapor deposition nozzle
US3951100 *Sep 18, 1974Apr 20, 1976Ppg Industries, Inc.Chemical vapor deposition of coatings
US3952118 *Oct 17, 1974Apr 20, 1976Dart Industries Inc.Method for hot-end coating of glass containers
US3970037 *Dec 17, 1974Jul 20, 1976Ppg Industries, Inc.Coating composition vaporizer
US3974322 *Dec 17, 1973Aug 10, 1976Lidia Emelianovna DrabkinaRadioactive source
US3996035 *Oct 1, 1975Dec 7, 1976Ppg Industries, Inc.Coating and heat strengthening glass sheets
US4120682 *Dec 5, 1977Oct 17, 1978Institut National Du VerreInstallation for superficially treating the outer surfaces of bottles
US4158343 *Sep 5, 1978Jun 19, 1979Nordson CorporationCoater
US4340408 *Apr 23, 1981Jul 20, 1982National Research Development CorporationHigh silica glass
US4414917 *Jan 3, 1983Nov 15, 1983Industrial Cleaning And Coating, Inc.System for selectively treating cables and the like
US4431692 *Aug 3, 1981Feb 14, 1984Owens-Illinois, Inc.Process for making glass surfaces abrasion-resistant and article produced thereby
US4529627 *Jul 18, 1983Jul 16, 1985Veba-Glas AgMethod of coating of glass articles with titanium oxide
US4615916 *Jun 25, 1984Oct 7, 1986Owens-Illinois, Inc.Heated, compressed air propelling tin or titanium halide vapors across bottles in side to side direction forming metal oxide
US4976764 *Sep 14, 1989Dec 11, 1990Hoya CorporationOxidation; press molding
US5599369 *Apr 29, 1994Feb 4, 1997Owens-Brockway Glass Container Inc.Hood for metal-oxide vapor coating glass containers
US5938853 *Jan 8, 1997Aug 17, 1999Corning IncorporatedFor use in producing preforms which can be used to produce optical or acoustic waveguide fibers either directly or through intermediate production of core cane, silicon dioxide
US20110094444 *Mar 11, 2009Apr 28, 2011Juergen HaasPainting station comprising a measuring cell for measuring the layer thickness
DE3303154A1 *Jan 31, 1983Aug 11, 1983Ppg Industries IncVerfahren zur chemischen abscheidung von vanadinoxidfilmen aus der dampfphase und mit vanadinoxidfilmen ueberzogene gegenstaende
EP0719575A2 *Dec 6, 1995Jul 3, 1996Corning IncorporatedVertical vaporizer for halide-free, silicon-containing compounds
Classifications
U.S. Classification427/255.13, 118/726, 65/60.5, 118/326, 65/60.51, 65/30.1, 261/121.1, 118/315, 118/324, 118/314
International ClassificationC23C16/453, C03C17/245, C03C17/23, C23C16/448
Cooperative ClassificationC03C17/245, C23C16/453, C03C2217/229, C03C2218/152, C03C2217/212, C23C16/4482
European ClassificationC03C17/245, C23C16/453, C23C16/448B2
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Sep 28, 1988ASAssignment
Owner name: ANCHOR GLASS CONTAINER CORPORATION
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.;REEL/FRAME:005033/0508
Effective date: 19880923
Jan 1, 1988AS06Security interest
Owner name: ANCHOR GLASS CONTAINER CORPORATION
Owner name: WELLS FARGO BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION
Effective date: 19870813
Jan 1, 1988ASAssignment
Owner name: WELLS FARGO BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:ANCHOR GLASS CONTAINER CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:005296/0486
Effective date: 19870813
Oct 19, 1987ASAssignment
Owner name: WELLS FARGO BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:ANCHOR GLASS CONTAINER CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:004852/0567
Effective date: 19870813
Apr 29, 1985ASAssignment
Owner name: MANUFACTURERS HANOVER LEASING CORPORATION A NY CO
Free format text: AMENDMENT 2 TO COLLATERAL ASSIGNMENT;ASSIGNOR:ANCHOR GLASS CONTAINER CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:004398/0863
Effective date: 19850315
Aug 2, 1983ASAssignment
Owner name: MANUFACTURERS HANOVER LEASING CORPORATION, A NY CO
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:ANCHOR GLASS CONTAINER CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:004164/0327
Effective date: 19830623
Jun 30, 1983ASAssignment
Owner name: GENERAL ELECTRIC CREDIT CORPORATION 260 LONG RIDGE
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:ANCHOR GLASS CONTAINER CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:004148/0310
Effective date: 19830623