Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3439368 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 22, 1969
Filing dateJan 3, 1967
Priority dateJan 3, 1967
Publication numberUS 3439368 A, US 3439368A, US-A-3439368, US3439368 A, US3439368A
InventorsMyers Robert R
Original AssigneeMyers Robert R
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Swimming pool cleaner
US 3439368 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 22, 1969 R. R. MYERS SWIMMING POOL CLEANER Sheet 054 Filed Jan.

April 2,1969 R. R. MYERS 3,439,368

SWIMMING POOL CLEANER 'Filed Jan. 5, 196? Sheet 3 of 4 HEEL,

April 2, 1969 R. R. MYERS 3,439,368

SWIMMING POOL CLEANER lqlv/IXII hwavroe Aom er A. MVEPS United States Patent 3,439,368 SWIMMING POOL CLEANER Robert R. Myers, 904 NE. 2nd St., Boca Raton, Fla. 33432 Filed Jan. 3, 1967, Ser. No. 606,663 Int. Cl. E0411 3/20; A471 /00 US. Cl. 1.7 14 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A machine for cleaning the bottom and the surface of swimming pools wherein the machine is movable along the bottom and is provided with a guidance control system which will change the direction of travel a predetermined amount as the machine encounters obstructions to the side or front such as the sidewalls of the pool. The machine may be of a crawler type and has a transmission for automatically controlling the forward and reverse rotation of the drive wheels whereby one or both drive wheels may be operating in the same direction at the same time. Sensing means for actuating the transmission are provided and are adjustable to assure that the machine will clean the maximum area of the pool but prevent it from being overturned.

The applicant has disclosed in previously filed applications earlier models of cleaning machines for swimming pools. For example, in application Ser. No. 419,136 filed Dec. 17, 1964, and now Patent No. 3,321,787 cleaning brushes were provided for contact with the bottom of the pool and served to help propel the machine. In patent application Ser. No. 477,389, now Patent No. 3,324,492 among other structural improvements the guidance system was changed to include an idler wheel for contacting obstructions to change the direction of travel of the machine over the bottom of the pool.

The machine of this invention involves positive control of the guidance system upon encountering an obstruction at either the front or the side of the machine. The sensing elements at opposite front corners of the machine will be actuated by lateral or frontal forces and are coupled directly to transmission means for reversing the direction of one or more of the drive wheels. The drive wheels upon being rotated rearwardly may be set to return to their forward rotational movement after being rotated a predetermined time in reverse whereby the machine is turned a predetermined number of degrees from its original line of travel to thereby move around an obstruction. The number of degrees the machine turns upon one or more of the sensing elements being actuated may be varied as desired. If both of the sensing elements on the front of the machine are actuated the machine will then operate in reverse for a predetermined time. The machine having sensing elements at opposite front corners of the frame has the sensing elements coupled to diagonally opposite rearward drive wheels to thereby facilitate movement away from or around obstructions particularly to the side of the machine. The actuating lever which operates the transmission means to cause it to turn the drive wheels in a reverse direction is at the same time moved into operative engagement with the continuously rotating drive shaft for the drive wheels and through cooperating threads on the lever and drive shaft the lever returns the transmission to its forward drive position.

These and other features and advantages of this invention will become readily apparent to those skilled in the art upon reference to the following description when taken into consideration with the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a fragmentary perspective view of the swimming pool cleaner in use in a filled pool;

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of the cleaner machine only;

FIG. 3 is a top plan View of the cleaner machine in various positions relative to obstructions;

FIG. 4 is a side elevation cross-sectional view of the cleaner machine taken along line 44 in FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 is a cross-sectional view of the cleaner machine taken along line 5-5 inFIG. 3;

FIG. 6 is a end cross-sectional view taken along line 66 in FIG. 4;

FIG. 7 is a cross-sectional view taken along line 7-7 in FIG. 5

FIG. 8 is a top plan view with the housing removed;

FIG. 9 is an enlarged fragmentary view of the drive shaft in relationship to the transmission lever and drive wheel;

FIG. 10 is an enlarged side elevation fragmentary view taken along line 1010 in FIG. 9;

FIG. 11 is a crosssectional View along line 1111 in FIG. 10;

FIG. 12 is a cross-sectional view of a transmission unit associated with one of the drive wheels taken along line 1212 in FIG. 9;

FIG. 13 is a cross-sectional view taken along line 1313 in FIG. 9;

FIG. 14 is a fragmentary side elevation view of an alternate wheel transmission unit having a driving dog internally mounted and spring biased into engagement with a spur gear;

FIG. 15 is a cross-sectional view taken along line 1515 in FIG. 14; and

FIG. 16 is a cross-sectional view similar to FIG. 15 but showing the driving dog disengaged from the spur gear when the drive wheel is being operated in a reverse direction.

The cleaner machine of this invention is referred to generally in FIG. 2 by the reference numeral 10 and is illustrated in FIG. 1 on the bottom 12 of a swimming pool 14 filled with water 16.

A plastic or the like housing 18 encloses the machine and extending externally from the machine 10 is a cleaner bag 20 and a water conduit 22 connected to a flotation unit 24 at the top of the water 16. Electrical power is supplied through lead wires 25 supported by the floatation unit 24 having supplemental smaller units 26. The floatation unit 24 for cleaning the water at the top surface and holding the lead wires 25 are more fully disclosed and described in applicants co-pending patent application, Ser. No. 477,389 filed Aug. 5, 1965.

Referring now to FIG. 8 it is seen that a frame is formed by a motor base 28 having a motor 30 mounted thereon connected directly to a chopper assembly 32 (-FIG. 5) having curved radial blades 34 (-FIG. 7), and thence to a pump assembly 36 having an outlet conduit 38. The chopper assembly 32 is mounted in a chamber 40 in communication with the pump through an opening 42 which in turn is in communication with the outlet conduit 38 which is connected to the cleaner bag 20.

As seen in 'FIG. 2 the cleaner bag 20 has a sleeve portion 44 telescopically mounted on the outlet conduit 38 and is locked thereto by a thumb screw 46. A handle member 48 is locked by a set screw (not shown) to the surface water inlet conduit 40 and in turn receives the water conduit 22 which is held by set screws carried by the handle member 48 which are not shown.

Referring again to FIG. 5, a drive shaft 50 extending rearwardly from the motor 30 drives the chopper assem- 3 bly 32 and the pump 36 and then extends into a gear box 52 which includes a worm 54 in engagement with a worm gear 56 mounted on a transversely extending drive shaft 58.

The drive shaft 58 is coupled through its outwardly extending portions 60 and 62 to rear drive wheels 64 and 66 respectively (FIG. 8). Each of the drive wheels 64 and 66 include a forward and reverse drive transmission 68 shown specifically in FIGS. 12 and 13.

The drive wheels and transmissions 68 are identical except that they face in opposite directions and include a sprocket gear 66 (FIG. 12) keyed to the drive shaft portion 60 and in turn intermeshed with a plurality of spur gears 70 which are in engagement on the inner side of an outer ring gear 72 which forms the wheels 64. Each of t e spur gears 70 are rotatably mounted on shafts 74 affixed to an outer plane 76 (FIG. 13). The inner ends of the spur gear shafts 74 are movably received in arcuate slots 78 formed in an inner plate 80. A driving dog 82 (FIGS. 11 and 12) carried on a shaft 84 aflixed to the inner plate is biased into engagement with a spur gear 70 by a tension spring 86 (FIG. 10) mounted on the inner face of the inner plate 80 and being anchored to a pin 88 aflixed to the inner plate and connected at its opposite end to the shaft 74 of the spur gear 70 in engaging the driving dog 82.

Accordingly, as the driving shaft 58 is rotated and the end portion 60 turns the inner sprocket gear 66 the rotational movement is transmitted directly through the spur gears 70 which are prevented from rotating by the driving dog 82, to the ring gear 72 which then causes the Wheels 64 to rotate in the forward direction as indicated by the dash line arrows in FIG. 12. The dash line arrows further indicate in FIG. 12 the rotational movement of the spur gears 70 with the sprocket gear 66 when the wheel 64 is being driven forwardly.

The manner in which the drive wheels are reversed will now be described.

Referring to FIG. 8 for example it is seen that a pair of sensing members 90 are longitudinally adjustably positioned at the opposite forward corners 92 of the machine 10 and include roller element 94 exposed to the front and the longitudinal sides of the machine housing 18. A set screw 96 permits longitudinal adjustment of the sensing members 90 on an elongated shaft 98 which extends diagonally across the machine frame 28 to adjacent the rear wheels 64 and 66. As seen in FIG. 5, a guide block 100 is mounted on the frame 28 at the forward end for the rods 98 and they are guided at their rearward ends by aligned openings in the walls 102 of a floor vacuum inlet opening 103.

The rearward ends of the rods 98 are engageable with pivotal lever arms 104 and 106 (FIG. 8) which in turn actuate the wheel transmission units 68.

The lever arm 104 as illustrated in FIGS. 9 and 10 is pivotally mounted in a horizontal plane on a pin 110 and is movable in a vertical plane against the action of a spring 111. An abutment shoulder 114 is provided adjacent the pin 110 for engagement with the inner end of the rod 98 which when actuated tends to pivot the arm 104 outwardly toward the wheel 64. A series of stop pins 112 are mounted on the inner plate 80 for engagement with a roller pin element 116 on the outer end of the lever 104 and parallel thereto.

As seen in FIG. 10, the arm 104 extends under the drive shaft 50 and has a threaded portion 118 for engagement with threads 120 on the outer shaft end 60. The threads of these two members are designed to move the arm 104 outwardly away from the stop pins 112 upon their being engaged as shown by the solid and dash line positions in FIG. 9 of the arm 104. It is thus appreciated that upon the sensing element 94 moving the rod 98 against the abutment shoulder 114 the locking arm 104 is pivoted inwardly into engagement with the stop pin 112 which causes the arm to pivot upwardly for the threaded portion 118 to engage the threaded shaft portion 60 and thus as the shaft continues this rotation the arm is then threaded outwardly again. When the stop pin 112 has engaged the roller 116 on the lock arm 104 the spur gear 70 moves on its shaft 74 in the slot 78 away from the driving dog 82 and thereupon begins rotation about its axis extending through the shaft 74 which in turn causes the ring gear 72 to reverse its direction of rotation as seen by the solid line arrow in FIG. 12. The rotation of the spur gears 70 are also indicated by the solid line arrows in FIG. 12. It is appreciated that when the arm 104 is out of engagement with the stop pins 112 the tension spring 86 will cause the driving dog 82 to re-engage the spur gear 70 and thus return the driving wheels to their forward direction of rotation.

The traction for the machine 110 is provided by a tread belt 122 which extends around the wheels 64 and 66 and over idler adjustment pulleys 124 (FIG. 10) forwardly around front wheel 126 which are driven by the tread belt 122.

Thus then it is seen that debris on the bottom 12 (FIG. 5) of the pool will be sucked in through the inlet opening 104 and closed by a flexible rubber sealing sleeve 130 in frictional engagement with the bottom pool surface 12, and/or liquid may enter from the top through the inlet 40 at any desired level in the water 16 such as at the surface as shown in FIG. 1. The chopper blade members 34 Will pulverize large debris such that the pump 36 can easily discharge it out through the outlet conduit 38 into the screen bag 20. The bag is porous and thus the water is returned to the pool.

The sensing members 90 may be set at any distance forwardly of the front end of the machine 10 such that they will engage wall surfaces or 142 as shown in FIG. 3 as desired. For example, the machine maybe permitted to climb a curved wall a distance less than that which would cause the machine to overturn.

It is understood that for example as viewed in FIG. 8, when the lower sensing element 90 is actuated the driving wheel 64 will be reversed on the opposite side of the machine and consequently the forward end will be turned away from the obstruction engaging the sensing element 90. A similar reaction will occur when the upper sensing element is actuated as viewed in FIG. 8 from the top of the machine. It has been found that this facilitates the movement of the machine around obstructions. The amount of turning that occurs during each operation may be selectively varied but preferably is 90 degrees. The length of the threads 120 on the drive shaft portions 60, as well as for example the length of the stop pins 112 may be varied to accomplish this end.

An alternate embodiment of the means for biasing the driving dog into engagement with the spur gear 70 is illustrated in FIGS. 1416 and includes a pair of expansion springs anchored to a transversely extending member 152 between the sprocket gear 66 and the ring gear 70. The anchoring member 152 for the expansion springs 150 is affixed to the outer plate 76 while the driving dog 82A is afifixed to the inner plate 80 and thus when the rotation of the inner plate 80 is stopped by the arm 104 engaging the stop pin 112 the outer plate 76 tend to rotate forwardly away carrying with it the spur gear 70 normally engaging the driving dog 82A as seen in FIGS. 15 and 16 as well as FIG. 14. This arrangement shown in these figures has among other advantages the advantage of being enclosed such that it will not collect debris and the like from the pool.

Some changes may be made in the construction and arrangement of my swimming pool cleaner without departing from the real spirit and purpose of my invention, and it is my intention to cover by my claims, any modified forms of structure or use of mechanical equivalents which may be reasonably included within their scope.

I claim:

1. A pool cleaner machine, comprising,

a frame,

a pool cleaning means operatively connected to said frame,

a support engaging drive wheel on said frame,

a power means,

a transmission means coupling said power means to said drive wheel, said transmission means selectively operable for driving said wheel frontwardly and rearwardly,

a direction sensing means operatively coupled to said transmision,

said power means normally driving said drive wheel forwardly through said transmission means and said sensing means upon being actuated thereby causing said transmission means to drive said drive wheel rearwardly,

a second drive wheel being provided on said frame,

' said first and second drive wheels being spaced apart and positioned adjacent opposite sides of said frame,

a second direction sensing means in spaced apart relationship adjacent one end of said frame,

said transmission means coupling said power means to said second drive wheel and operable to selectively individually reverse the direction of rotation of said drive wheels, said first sensing means operatively connected through said transmission to said first drive wheel and said second sensing means operatively connected through said transmission to said second drive wheel whereby at times said drive wheels may each be rotating forwardly and at other times each of said drive wheels will be rotating in opposite directions relative to each other and thereby causing said machine to change the direction of its line of travel,

and a control means limiting individually the duration of reverse drive of said drive wheels.

2. A pool cleaner machine, comprising,

a frame,

a pool cleaning means operatively connected to said frame,

a support engaging drive wheel on said frame,

a power means,

a transmission means coupling said power means to said drive Wheel, said transmission means selectively operable for driving said wheel frontwardly and rearwardly,

a direction sensing means operatively coupled to said transmission,

said power means normally driving said drive wheel forwardly through said transmission means and said sensing means upon being actuated thereby causing said transmission means to drive said drive wheel rearwardly,

said transmission including a stop pin on said wheel, an actuating lever on said frame movable into and out of engagement with said stop pin, said direction sensing means being movable into engagement with said actuating lever, and a drive shaft extending from said power means to said transmission, said lever extending across said drive shaft and having a threaded portion for engagement with a threaded portion on said drive shaft, said lever being movable into engagement with said stop pin by said sensing means and said threaded portion on said lever being movable into engagement with said shaft threaded portion by said stop pin as said wheel is rotated, and said lever being moved out of engagement with said stop pin by said shaft rotating and threading said lever outwardly from said wheel whereby said transmission returns to a forward drive.

3. The structure of claim 1 wherein said control means and transmission include a stop pin on each of said wheels, an actuating lever on said frame adjacent each of said wheels movable into and out of engagement with said stop pin, each of said direction sensing means being movable into engagement with one of said actuating levers, and a drive shaft extending from said power means, said levers extending across said drive shaft and having a threaded portion for engagement with a threaded portion on said drive shaft, said levers being movable into engagement with said stop pins by said respective sensing means and said threaded portions on said levers being movable into engagement with said shaft threaded portion by said stop pin as said wheels are rotated, said levers being moved out of engagement with said stop pin by said shaft rotating and threading said levers outwardly from said wheels whereby said transmission returns to a forward drive.

4. The structure of claim 3 wherein said transmission includes a drive gear for each wheel fixed to said drive shaft, a plurality of spur gears disposed between and in engagement with a said drive gear and a ring gear, an inner side wall over said spur gears and carrying said stop pin, said spur gears being rotatably mounted on shafts extending through slots formed in said sidewall, a driving dog normally spring biased into engagement with one of said spur gears whereby said ring gear rotates as a unit with said wheel forwardly and rotates with said drive gear until said actuating lever engages said stop pin and thereby stops rotation of said spur gears around said drive gear whereby said spur gears rotate about their own axis and turn said ring gear and said wheel in the opposite reverse direction.

5. A pool cleaner machine, comprising,

a frame,

a pool cleaning means operatively connected to said frame,

a support engaging drive wheel on said frame,

a power means,

a transmission means coupling said power means to said drive wheel, said transmission means selectively operable for driving said wheel frontwardly and rearwardly,

a direction sensing means operatively coupled to said transmission,

said power means normally driving said drive wheel forwardly through said transmission means and said sensing means upon being actuated thereby causing said transmission means to drive said drive wheel rearwardly,

a control means is provided for limiting the duration of rearward drive by said transmission means,

and a second drive wheel on said frame and in spaced relation to said first wheel, a second. direction sensing means on said frame in spaced relation to said first sensing means, said first and second sensing means being located at opposite front corners of said frame and means operatively coupling said sensing elements to diagonally opposite wheels located rearwardly of said sensing elements, whereby actuation of one of said sensing elements causes the diagonally opposite wheel to rotate in reverse and actuation of the other sensing element causes the other driving wheel to rotate in a reverse direction.

6. The structure of claim 5 and a pump is carried on said frame, said plump having an inlet opening exposed under said frame adjacent the supporting surface and an outlet connected to a filter unit.

7. The structure of claim 6 wherein a second inlet opening is connected to said pump through an elongated tube, said inlet opening being in the outer free end of said tube, and flotation means for holding said inlet end of said tube adjacent the surface of a swimming pool.

8. The structure of claim 5 wherein a second pair of wheels are positioned between said drive wheels and said sensing elements and a tread belt extends around one Wheel of each pair on each side of said frame.

9. The structure of claim 6 wherein said pump includes a pumping chamber and a debris conditioning chamber in communication with each other and said inlet opening being in communication with said outlet opening through said conditioning chamber and then said pumping chamber, shredding members rotatably positioned in said conditioning chamber.

10. A pool cleaner machine, comprising,

a frame having front and rear ends and a pair of driving wheels at its rear end,

a pump on said frame and having inlet and outlet openings,

at power means coupled to a drive shaft extending between said pair of driving wheels, and said power means being coupled to said pump,

a transmission means associated with each of said drive wheels and connected to said drive shaft for rotating said drive wheels selectively forwardly and rearwardly,

a sensing element at each forward corner of said frame,

an actuating lever pivotally connected to said frame adjacent each of said drive wheels and extending towards said adjacent drive wheel across said drive shaft,

each of said transmission means having an inner plate rotatable on said shaft with the adjacent wheel when said wheel is rotated forwardly,

a stop means on each of said plates spaced radially outwardly from the plates axis of rotation.

said levers and drive shaft having mating threaded portions,

each of said sensing elements engageable with one of said levers to pivot said lever towards said adjacent plate upon said sensing element being actuated for said pin to engage said lever and stop rotation of said plate, said plate tending to rotate forwardly when said stop means engages said lever and thereby pivot said lever towards said shaft for said lever and shaft threaded portions to engage each other, said shaft being threaded to pivot said lever away from said plate and out of engagement with said stop means as said shaft is rotated, and

each of said transmission means including wheel reversing means for reversing said drive wheel rotation when said plate rotation is stopped by said lever.

11. The structure of claim 10 wherein each of said sensing elements are operatively connected to diagonally opposite drive wheels.

12. The structure of claim 10 wherein each of said transmission means includes a drive gear on said drive shaft, a plurality of spur gears engageable between a ring gear and said drive gear, said spur gears being mounted in shafts movable in arcuate slots formed in said plate, said spur gear shafts being fixed to a second plate rotatable on said drive shaft, a driving dog spring biased into engagement with one of said spur gears and being fixed to said inner plate whereby upon said the rotation of said inner plate being stopped said one spur gear rotates out of engagement with said driving dog against the action of said spring and thereby causes said ring gear to rotate in a reverse direction with said spur gears remaining stationary relative to said drive shaft and rotating relative to their respective shafts fixed to said second plate, and said wheels and associated ring gears being coupled to always rotate in a common direction.

13. The structure of claim 10 wherein said sensing elements are movable along axes extending forwardly and outwardly of said frame and the line of travel of said frame whereby said sensing elements are adapted to be actuated by obstructions positioned either to the front or side of said frame and its line of travel.

14. The structure of claim 10 wherein said sensing elements are adjustable longitudinally relative to the front end of said frame.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,923,954 2/1960 Babcock l5l.7 2,988,762 6/1961 Babcock l5l.7 3,254,355 6/1966 Shaw l5l.7

EDWARD L. ROBERTS, Primary Examiner.

US. Cl. X.R.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2923954 *Jul 5, 1955Feb 9, 1960 babcock
US2988762 *Feb 8, 1960Jun 20, 1961Hugh H BabcockSelf-steering submarine suction cleaner
US3254355 *Jan 22, 1965Jun 7, 1966Shaw James RSwimming pool cleaning device
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3676884 *Apr 14, 1970Jul 18, 1972Wulc Stanley SRandom motion suction cleaner
US3676885 *Mar 15, 1971Jul 18, 1972Wulc Stanley SRandom motion vehicle
US3688908 *Jan 28, 1971Sep 5, 1972Robert R MyersFilter device for a submergible swimming pool cleaner
US3859948 *Feb 28, 1973Jan 14, 1975Buonaprole FerruccioApparatus for cleaning hulls and other submerged surfaces
US3922991 *Jun 25, 1973Dec 2, 1975Woods John WApparatus for cleaning metallic surfaces
US4786334 *Aug 5, 1987Nov 22, 1988Nystroem MikaelSelf-propelled cleaner
US4962559 *Nov 16, 1988Oct 16, 1990Rainbow Lifegard Products, Inc.Submersible vacuum cleaner
US4967862 *Mar 13, 1989Nov 6, 1990Transitions Research CorporationTether-guided vehicle and method of controlling same
US5256207 *Oct 31, 1991Oct 26, 19933S Systemtechnik AgControl mechanism for driving gears or belts to correct back and forth movement across pool upon striking obstacle
US5740576 *Sep 19, 1996Apr 21, 1998Wattatec, L.P.Device for dislodging a submersible swimming pool cleaner
US5893188 *Oct 31, 1996Apr 13, 1999Letro Products, Inc.Automatic swimming pool cleaner
US5896610 *Apr 15, 1998Apr 27, 1999Sebor; PavelMethod for dislodging a submersible swimming pool cleaner
US5933899 *Jul 1, 1998Aug 10, 1999Letro Products, Inc.Low pressure automatic swimming pool cleaner
US6003184 *Feb 4, 1999Dec 21, 1999Letro Products, Inc.Automatic swimming pool cleaner
US6099091 *Jan 20, 1998Aug 8, 2000Letro Products, Inc.Traction enhanced wheel apparatus
US6409916 *Aug 3, 2000Jun 25, 2002Maytronics, Ltd.Filter element for pool-cleaning device
US6412133Jan 25, 1999Jul 2, 2002Aqua Products, Inc.Water jet reversing propulsion and directional controls for automated swimming pool cleaners
US6691362Jul 26, 2000Feb 17, 2004Sebor Family TrustDevice for dislodging a submersible pool cleaner
US6834410Dec 19, 2003Dec 28, 2004Pavel Sebor Family TrustDevice and method of assembling a submersible pool cleaner
US6854148May 26, 2000Feb 15, 2005PoolvernguegenFour-wheel-drive automatic swimming pool cleaner
US6984315 *Dec 16, 2003Jan 10, 2006Dolton Iii Edward GerardPool cleaning device
US7165284Mar 3, 2004Jan 23, 2007Aqua Products, Inc.Water jet reversing propulsion and directional controls for automated swimming pool cleaners
US7464429Jun 27, 2002Dec 16, 2008Pentair Water Pool And Spa, Inc.Automatic pool cleaner gear change mechanism
US7520282Jun 27, 2002Apr 21, 2009Pentair Water Pool And Spa, Inc.Undercarriage for automatic pool cleaner
US7827643Nov 29, 2006Nov 9, 2010Aqua Products, Inc.Automated swimming pool cleaner with stationary projecting pivot member
US7900308Apr 8, 2008Mar 8, 2011Aqua Products, IncWater jet reversing propulsion and directional controls for automated swimming pool cleaners
US8220096 *May 6, 2008Jul 17, 2012Goggles Cell LimitedPool cleaning vehicle having internal drive propulsion
US8307485Aug 19, 2011Nov 13, 2012Hayward Industries, Inc.Apparatus for facilitating maintenance of a pool cleaning device
US8343339Sep 16, 2008Jan 1, 2013Hayward Industries, Inc.Apparatus for facilitating maintenance of a pool cleaning device
US8434182Mar 26, 2008May 7, 2013Aqua Products, Inc.Pool cleaner with high pressure cleaning jets
US8756740 *Jun 21, 2012Jun 24, 2014Smartpool LlcPool cleaning vehicle having internal drive propulsion
US8784652Sep 24, 2010Jul 22, 2014PoolvergnuegenSwimming pool cleaner with a rigid debris canister
US8869337Nov 2, 2010Oct 28, 2014Hayward Industries, Inc.Pool cleaning device with adjustable buoyant element
US20120304403 *Jun 21, 2012Dec 6, 2012Hui Wing-KinPool Cleaning Vehicle Having Internal Drive Propulsion
EP0483677A2 *Oct 25, 1991May 6, 19923S Systemtechnik AgFunctioning method and cleaning device for swimming pools
EP0521208A1 *Jul 5, 1991Jan 7, 1993Sanford Fields CampbellPool cleaner
EP2275626A2 *May 17, 1999Jan 19, 2011Polaris Pools Systems, Inc.Suction powered pool cleaner
EP2292876A2 *May 17, 1999Mar 9, 2011Polaris Pools Systems, Inc.Suction powered pool cleaner
WO2001092664A1 *May 26, 2000Dec 6, 2001PoolvergnuegenFour-wheel-drive automatic swimming pool cleaner
WO2012009082A2 *Jun 14, 2011Jan 19, 2012Zodiac Pool Care EuropeAutomatic pool cleaners and components thereof
WO2014160421A1 *Mar 13, 2014Oct 2, 2014Pentair Water Pool And Spa, Inc.Alternating paddle mechanism for pool cleaner
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/1.7, 15/319
International ClassificationE04H4/16, E04H4/00
Cooperative ClassificationE04H4/1654
European ClassificationE04H4/16C
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Apr 8, 1981AS02Assignment of assignor's interest
Owner name: AQUA-VAC SYSTEMS INC., A CORP. OF FL.
Effective date: 19810311
Owner name: MYERS, HELEN (BAST)
Apr 8, 1981ASAssignment
Owner name: AQUA-VAC SYSTEMS INC., A CORP. OF FL.
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:MYERS, HELEN (BAST);REEL/FRAME:003847/0098
Effective date: 19810311
Owner name: AQUA-VAC SYSTEMS INC., A CORP. OF,FLORIDA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:MYERS, HELEN (BAST);REEL/FRAME:3847/98
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:MYERS, HELEN (BAST);REEL/FRAME:003847/0098
Owner name: AQUA-VAC SYSTEMS INC., A CORP. OF, FLORIDA