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Publication numberUS3442037 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 6, 1969
Filing dateApr 7, 1967
Priority dateApr 7, 1967
Also published asDE1611746A1
Publication numberUS 3442037 A, US 3442037A, US-A-3442037, US3442037 A, US3442037A
InventorsGrimm James J, Valihura Robert J
Original AssigneeGrimm James J, Valihura Robert J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Marking tag and method of making and attaching the same
US 3442037 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 1969 .1. J. GRIMM ET AL 3,442,037

MARKING TAG AND METHOD OF MAKING'AND ATTACHING THE SAME Filed April 7, 1967 FIG.

Sheet or? ulna I ma. 4 24 INVENTORS. JAMES J GRIMM ROBERT J. VALIHURA Um, 5%% 664mm AT'mRNEYs.

May 6, 1969 J. J. GRIMM ET AL 3,442,037

MARKING TAG AND METHOD OF MAKING AND ATTACHING THE SAME Filed April 7, 1967 Sheet 2 of 2 FIG. 8

FIG. l2

IN VENT OR 5'.

JAMES J. GRIMM ROBERT J. VALIHURA ATTORNEY-51 United States Patent US. Cl. 40-2 24 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A price tag secured to an article by a nondamaging fine wire. A strip of tearable sheet material is folded over an edge of the article to be marked and a fine wire is passed through the sheet near its inward edge, then through the article, then through the opposite side of the sheet, whereafter the wire is folded parallel to the article with the ends of the wire extending toward the edge of the article. A cover layer is placed over the wire and is secured to the tearable sheet material by an adhesive to anchor the ends of the wire therebetween. The tag is removed by pulling the sheet material away from the article so that the wire tears through the sheet to free one end of the wire, whereupon on continued pulling, the freed end of the wire is withdrawn from the article.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION In the past, there have been numerous devices available for marking and identifying articles which in one form or another were clipped, tied, bonded, pinned, stapled, or otherwise secured to the article. These prior known devices have been objectionable for one or more of the following reasons: (1) expensive, (2) damaging to the article, (3) difiicult to secure or release, (4) subject to surreptitous removal and insertion onto another article, (5) the existence of sharp edges which presented a safety problem, (6) or could not withstand vigorous agitation.

Accordingly, it is an object of the instant invention to provide a marking tag and a method of assembling and attaching the same which overcomes all of the disadvantages enumerated above.

SUMMARY The invention relates to a marking tag and a method of assemblying and attaching the same to an article to be marked. The tag includes a back-up layer of tearable Sheet material which is placed flat on both sides of the article to be marked, such as by folding a continuous layer over an edge of the article. A thread-like securing element is passed through the article, and is laid parallel thereto so that at least one of the ends of the element extends generally toward the edge of the article and overlays the back-up layer. A cover layer of material is then joined to the back-up layer to envelope the loose ends of the thread-like securing element between the layers. Removal of the tag is effected by pulling the edge of the joined layers toward the edge of the article so that the thread-like securing element tears through the back-up layer until an end of the element is freed. Continued pulling withdraws the freed securing element from the article and completes the separation of the tag.

In the preferred embodiment, the back-up layer is made of normal paper or a wet-strength paper and the securing element is made of a mono-filament wire which is passed through the back-up layer before being laid parallel to the article. The covering layer is preferably adhered to the back-up layer by a coating of pressure sensitive or heat scalable material which can either be placed initially on the back-up layer or the cover layer. Also, the

3,442,037 Patented May 6, 1969 back-up layer and the cover layer can either be integrally connected or can be comprised of separate sheets of material. The back-up layer and the cover layer can themselves be one continuous strip, or can be comprised of two separate sheets which are positioned on either side of the article to be marked.

The above described arrangement has the advantage of simplicity since no pins or staples, etc., are required to secure the tag to the article. There is also the very distinct advantage that the force which is applied to the securing element, i.e., the fine wire, is applied against the tearable back-up layer and not the article itself. Therefore, the securing element can be made of a high tensile strength wire to prevent inadvertent release since the release of the tag does not depend upon breakage of the securing element, as is common in previously known devices.

The instant marking tag also has the advantage that once it is removed from an article it is effectively destroyed and cannot be surreptitiously attached to another article, which is useful when the tag is used as a price tag. Thus, an unscrupulous customer cannot remove the price tag from a high priced article and substitute therefor a price tag from a cheaper article. Likewise, once the manufacturer of an article attaches a particular tag thereon, it cannot be removed and placed on another article by the merchant.

Additionally, the tag can readily be assembled with fly tags which are frequently used in dry cleaning and laundering operations to indicate special procedures which are to be performed on the particular garment.

The marking tags which have used threads in the past normally either required a scissors or another type of tool to cut the thread; or the tag was removed by breaking the thread against the fabric to which it was attached. The instant marking tag requires no tools for the removal and is not damaging to the fabric even though a fine wire is used as a securing element. Use of a fine wire also provides the advantage that its insertion through a fabric results in essentially no damage thereto by reason of its small diameter.

DRAWINGS Other objects, advantages and aspects of the invention will become apparent by reference to the following detailed description and drawings of the specific embodiment thereof wherein:

FIG. 1 is a schematic View of the preferred embodiment of the marking tag attached to the article;

FIG. 2 is an exploded schematic view of the individual parts of the marking tag shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a sectional view taken along line 3-3 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a sectional view similar to FIG. 3 showing the tag during an intermediate step of removal;

FIG. 5 is a sectional view similar to FIG. 3 showing the tag during the final stage of removal;

FIG. 6 is a schematic view of a second embodiment of the invention wherein the back-up layer and the cover layer are separate, continuous strips of material;

FIG. 7 is a cross-sectional view taken along line 7-7 of FIG. 6;

FIG. 8 is a schematic view of a third embodiment of the invention wherein the back-up and cover layers are comprised of one continuous strip of material;

FIG. 9 is a fourth embodiment of the invention wherein the cover layer is in the form of a tab which is secured to the back-up layer;

FIG. 10 is a fifth embodiment of the invention wherein the back-up layers and the cover layers comprise four separate sheets of material secured together.

FIG. 11 is a schematic view of a sixth embodiment of the invention wherein the back-up and cover layers are secured together on each side of the article and then the back-up layers are secured together to form a marking tag; and

FIG. 12 is a seventh embodiment of the invention similar to the embodiment shown in FIG. 11 except that the back-up and cover layers are subassembled along a lateral edge.

DECRIPTION OF THE INVENTION The pereferred embodiment of the marking tage is shown in FIGS. 15 wherein a marking tag 20 is attached to an article 21, such as a garment. In FIGS. 4 and 5, the marking tag 20 is shown in several stages during the removal of the tag from the article 21.

The tag 20 is comprised of a back-up layer 22 of sheet material, such as paper, plastic, etc. The back-up layer 22 is folded over the edge of the article 21 which is to be identified by the marking tag 20. In this embodiment, the back-up layer 22 is a continuous strip of material which is folded over the edge of the article 21 at approximately the midpoint of the sheet. a8

Passing through the back-up layer 22 and the article 21 therebetween is a securing element 23. The securing element 23 is a flexible thread like member which preferably is formed by a monofilament wire. A wire having a diameter of .003 inch and made of stainless steel is preferred. Such a wire will be referred to hereinafter by way of example and not by way of limitation. The wire 23 is passed through the upper fold of the back-up layer 22, then through the article 21 and then through the lower fold of the back-up layer 22, and, subsequently, is bent or folded parallel thereto so that the ends extend generally towards the edge of the article 21. The wire 23 may be inserted with the aid of a needle or in some cases, it is advantageous to use compressed air or other such means which does not require the aid of an article piercing instrument. In any event, the wire 23 can be made of high tensile strength material having a very small diameter so that there is substantially no damage to the article 21 due to the penetration of the wire.

In order to complete the assembly of the marking tag 20, cover layers of material 24 and 24' are adhered to the back-up layer 22 over the ends and a substantial part of the length wire 22 so as to envelope the wire between the back-up layer 22 and the cover layers 24 and 24.

In the preferred embodiment as a price tag, the cover layers 24 and 24 are paper; and the adherence between the back-up layer 22 and the cover layers 24 and 24' is effected by a pressure sensitive adhesive.

Where the tag is to be used as a laundry or dry cleaning tag, it is preferably that the cover layers 24 and 24 can be made of aluminum foil; and the adherence between the back-up layer 22 and the cover layers is effected by placing a heat sealable adhesive 25 on the inner side of the cover layers 24 and 24. In such case the tag is completed by subsequently applying heat to the assembled marking tag to effect the adherence of the various layers together. It is to be understood that the heat sealable adhesive 25 can be located on the back-up layer 22 instead of the cover layers 24 and 24.

In this embodiment, marking or indicia 26 is printed on the back-up layer 22 although, as is apparent, the indicia may also be placed on the cover layers 24 and 24.

The marking tag 20 is removed by grasping the inner ends of the back-up layer 22 and one of the cover layers, as shown in FIGS. 4 and 5. As the back-up and cover layers are pulled towards the edge of the article, the wire 23 tears through the back-up layer 22 until the end of the wire is free. Upon continued pulling of the back-up and cover layers, the wire 22 slides through the same opening through which it entered the article 21, thereby separating the marking tag from the article without any appreciable damage thereto. It should be apparent that since the pulling action which is required for the removal of the tag takes place against the back-up layer 22, and not the article itself, there is little or no damage done to the article. The removal of the tag does not depend on the wire 23 breaking under tensile stress, and therefore, the wire can be made quite strong so as to prevent inadvertent removal of the tag.

In FIGS. 6 and 7, there is shown a second embodiment of the invention and the method of assembling the same. In this embodiment there is shown a marking tag 30 which includes a back-up layer 31 and a cover layer 32. Both the back-up and the cover layers are continuous strips of material of substantially the same length and width. Thus, in this embodiment, the marking or indicia is printed on the cover layer 32 rather than on the backup layer 31 as in the first embodiment. The back-up and the cover layers can be made of the same types of materials described with reference to the first embodiment. A layer of adhesive 33 is provided on the cover layer 32 so that the cover layer and back-up layer can be joined to anchor a wire 34 therebetween. Removal of the tag from the article is effected in the same manner as shown in FIGS. 4 and 5-.

In a third embodiment, FIG. 8, there is shown a marking tag 40 attached to article 41. In this embodiment, the marking tag 40 is comprised of one continuous strip of material 42 which forms both the back-up layer and the .cover layer for both sides of the article. This is accomplished by folding the layer over on itself as shown at 43 after the insertion and bending of a wire 44 into the position as shown. Removal is effected in the same man ner as described hereinabove.

In FIG. 9 there is shown a fourth embodiment of a marking tag 50 attached to an article 51. In this embodiment, a cover layer 52 is formed as a tab which is integral with a back-up layer 53 and extends from a lateral edge thereof. After insertion of a wire 54, the cover layer 52 is folded over and adhered to the back-up layer 53 in the manner described hereinabove.

In FIG. 10 there is shown a fifth embodiment of a marking tag 60 which is secured to an article 61. The marking tag 60 includes two separate back-up layers 62 and 62' which are positioned, one on each side of the article 61, with the end portions of the layers 62 and 62' extending beyond the edge of the article 61. A wire 63 is passed through both the back-up layers 62 and 62' and through the article 61 and then bent over the backup layers until the end portions of the wire 63 are substantially parallel to the back-up layers 62 and 62' on opposite sides of the article 61. Two separate cover layers 64 and 64' are then joined, as by an adhesive not illustrated, to the back-up layers 62 and 62' such that the end portions of the wire 63 are firmly anchored between the layers. The end portions of the back-up layers 62 and 62' are then connected together, as by an adhesive not illustrated, to form the completed marking tag 60.

In this embodiment it is possible in the fabrication of the marking tag 60 to effect the joinder of the back-up layers 62 and 62 at the same time that the cover layers 64 and 64' are joined to their respective sides of the back-up layers 62 and 62'. Thus, if pressure or heat is used to effect both of the joinders, they may be done simultaneously with a single application of pressure or heat. It is to be understood that other methods of attaching the back-up layers 62 and 62 may be used, such as by stapling or stitching the two layers together.

In FIG. 11 there is shown a sixth embodiment of a marking tag 70 which is secured to an article 71. In this embodiment, a securing element 72 is first passed through the article 71. Thereafter, the respective ends of the securing element 72 are anchored between a first back-up layer 73 and cover layer 74 and a second back-up layer 73' and cover layer 74 by a heat sealable adhesive. The subassemblies of back-up and cover layers 73-74 and 7374' can be moved in the direction of the arrow so that they are flat on the article 71 and parallel thereto. A subsequent application of pressure or heat is effective to join the upper back-up layer 73 with the lower back-up layer 73 as described in the fifth embodiment, shown in FIG. 10, to complete the assembly of marking tag 70. It is to be understood that in the alternative, the subassemblies 73-74 and 73'74' can be joined at the same time that the upper and lower back-up layers 73 and 73' are joined.

In FIG. 12 there is shown a seventh embodiment of a marking tag 80 which is secured to an article 81. This embodiment is similar to the sixth embodiment shown in FIG. 11 except that the upper back-up layer 82 and cover layer 83 are subassembled along a lateral edge 84. The lower back-up layer 82 and cover layer 83, are similarly formed. A wire 85 passes directly through the article 81 and is then anchored between the various layers as decribed in the embodiment shown in FIG. 11.

In the embodiments shown in FIGS. 11 and 12, it should be noted that the securing elements 72 and 85, respectively, do not actually penetrate the back-up layers, as in the previous embodiments. However, removal of the tags is effected in the same manner as is shown in FIGS. 4 and 5. Thus, by pulling on one of the back-up and cover layer units, the wire is forced to tear through the back-up layer until an end of the Wire is exposed; whereafter on further pulling, the wire is completely withdrawn from the article. It should be appreciated that, as in the other embodiments, the force of the pulling action is essentially against the back-up layer and not the article itself; thus, the securing element can be made of wire or other high tensile strength material since removal of the tag is not dependent upon breakage of the securing element. Like- Wise, there is little or no damage done to the article itself, since the wire can be of very small diameter, and the article absorbs very little of the pulling action.

In the various embodiments, it should be appreciated that because of the simplicity of the marking tag, it lends itself to prefabrication at the time of attachment to the article, as opposed to prefabrication of the tag which is complete except for anchoring of the end portions of the securing element. It is to be understood that the scope of the invention of the novel marking tag is not limited by the particular manner in which the tag is assembled.

If the marking tag 20 is to be used to identify a garment during a laundering or dry cleaning operation, the backup layer is preferably made of wet-strength paper. Wetstrength paper as used herein is defined as any paper which is resistant to deterioration by fluids, for example, water and the various fluids used in dry cleaning operations. Various types of Wet strength paper are commercially available, for example, paper treated with melamine-formaldehyde.

The adhesive may be one of several which are commercially available such as G.T.100 made by G.T. Schjeldahl Co., that sold under the trademark Uformite (F-240) made by Rohm & Haas 00., used with that sold under the trademark Vinylite Vagh made by Union Carbide Corp.; that sold under the trademark Estane made by B. F. Goodrich Chemical Co.; or that sold under the trademark Surlyn (ID-1002) made by E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Co.

The cover layer instead of being normal paper or metal foil may be a plastic such as that sold under the trademark Mylar or Kapton both made by Du Pont or a paper such as that sold under the trademark Nomex, also made by Du Pout.

In the various embodiments described above, the joinder of the back-up layer and cover layer was described as being effected by a pressure sensitive or heat sealable adhesive. It is to be understood that other adhesives and physical attaching means can be used to effect the joinder of the various layers, and that the invention is not limited to pressure sensitive or heat sealable adhesives. Likewise, where an adhesive is used as a connecting means, it may be applied to the layers to be connected either prior to or during the fabrication of the marking tag.

The indicia used for marking the article should be placed on a visible surface of at least one of the layers of the material forming the marking tag. The indicia may be numerical, alphabetical, color codes or any combination of the same. The indicia may be placed on the tag prior to, during or after fabrication depending on convenience or preference.

It will be understood, of course, that while the forms of the invention herein shown and described constitute the preferred embodiments of the invention, it is not intended herein to illustrate all the possible equivalent forms or ramifications of the invention. It will also be understood that the words which are used are descriptive rather than limiting and various changes, such as in shape, relative size, and arrangement of components may be substituted without departing from the spirit or scope of the invention herein disclosed. Therefore, the invention is not limited to the particular embodiments and features described and shown, and comprises any modifications and equivalents within the scope of the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A marking tag which comprises:

a thread like securing element passing through an article, a portion of said securing element being laid parallel to the article on at least one side of the article so that at least one end thereof extends generally toward an edge of the article;

a back-up layer of tearable sheet material interposed between the article and the securing element on each side of the article;

a cover layer of sheet material superposed over each of the back-up layers to enclose the ends of the securing element therebetween;

means for joining the back-up layers: to their respective cover layers to anchor said portions of the securing element therebetween; and

means for joining the back-up and cover layers on one side with the back-up and cover layers on the other side along the edge of the article so that upon pulling of a back-up and cover layer toward the edge of the article the respective portion of the securing element tears through the back-up layer until the end of the securing element is freed, whereupon on continued pulling the securing element passes through the article and releases the tag.

2. A marking tag as recited in claim 1 wherein said back-up layer of sheet material is wet-strength paper.

3. A marking tag as recited in claim 1 wherein said thread like securing element is a fine wire.

4. A marking tag as recited in claim 1 wherein said cover layer is metal foil.

5. A marking tag as recited in claim 1 wherein said means for joining the back-up layers to the cover layers is a heat sealable adhesive.

6. A marking tag as recited in claim 1 wherein said means for joining the back-up and cover layers on one side with the back-up and cover layers on the other side is an integral surface of the back-up layers which folds over the edge of the article.

7. A marking tag as recited in claim 1 wherein said means for joining the back-up and cover layers on one side with the back-up and cover layers on the other side is an integral surface of the cover layers which folds over the edge of the article.

8. A marking tag which comprises:

a back-up layer of tearable sheet material superposed on each side of an article to be marked;

a thread-like securing element passing through the back-up layers and the article therebetween, at least one portion of said securing element being laid parallel to a back-up layer so that at least one end thereof extends generally toward an edge of the article;

a cover layer of sheet material superposed over each 7 of the back-up layers to enclose the ends of the securing element therebetween;

means for joining the back-up layers to their respective cover layers to anchor the securing elements therebetween; and

means for joining the back-up and cover layers on one side with the back-up and cover layers on the other side along the edge of the article so that upon pulling of a back-up and cover layer toward the edge of the article said portion of the securing element tears through the back-up layer until the end of the securing element is freed, whereupon on continued pulling the securing element passes through the article and releases the tag.

9. A marking tag as recited in claim 8 wherein said thread like securing element is a fine wire.

10. A marking tag as recited in claim 9 wherein said back-up layers wet strength paper.

11. A marking tag as recited in claim 10 wherein said cover layer is metal foil.

12. A marking tag as recited in claim 11 wherein said means for joining the back-up layers to the cover layers is a heat sealable adhesive.

13. A marking tag as recited in claim 12 wherein said means for joining the back-up and cover layers on one side with the back-up and cover layers on the other side is an integral surface of the back-up layers which folds over the edge of the article.

14. A marking tag as recited in claim 12 wherein said means for joining the back-up and cover layers on one side with the back-up and cover layers on the other side is an integral surface of the cover layers which folds over the edge of the article.

15. Method of assembling and securing a tag to an article, which comprises the steps of:

passing a thread-like securing element through the article to be tagged;

positioning the securing element on at least one side of the article so that it is parallel to the article and at least one end of the element extends generally toward an edge of the article;

anchoring the ends of the securing element on each side of the article between a back-up layer of tearable sheet material and a cover layer; and

joining the back-up and cover layers on one side with the back-up and cover layers on the other side at the edge of the article. 16. A method of assembling and securing a tag to an article, as recited in claim 15 wherein the ends of the securing element are anchored between the back-up and cover layers by heating the same to join the layers together with a heat scalable adhesive.

17. Method of assembling and securing a tag to an article as recited in claim 16 wherein the back-up and cover layers on one side are joined with the back-up and cover layers on the other side by a heat scalable adhesive during said heating step.

18. Method of assembling and securing a tag to an article, which comprises the steps of:

folding a back-up layer tearable sheet material over an edge of the article to be tagged so that the folds of the layer are superposed, one on each side of the article;

passing a thread-like securing element through the folds of the back-up layer and the article positioned therebetween;

bending the securing element on at least one side of the article so that the securing element is parallel to the back-up layer and at least one end of the element extends toward the edge of the article; and

adhering a cover layer over the folds of the back-up 8 layer and the securing element to envelope and anchor the securing element in place on the article.

19. Method of assembling and securing a tag to an article as recited in claim 18 wherein said cover layers are adhered to the back-up layers and the securing element by heating the same to join the layers together with a heat scalable adhesive.

20. Method of assembling and securing a tag to an article, which comprises the steps of:

superposing a back-up layer of tearable sheet material on each side of the article to be tagged;

passing a thread-like securing element through the backup layers and through the article positioned therebetween;

bending the securing element on at least one side of the article so that the securing element is parallel to the back-up layers and at least one end of the element extends toward an edge of the article;

folding a cover layer over the edge of the article so that surfaces of the cover layer are superposed over the back-up layers and the securing element is enveloped therehetween; and

adhering the back-up and cover layers together on each side of the article to anchor the securing element in place on the article.

21. Method of assembling and securing a tag to an article, as recited in claim 20 wherein said back-u and cover layers are adhered together by heating the same t join the layers together with a heat scalable adhesive.

22. Method of assembling and securing a tag to an article, which comprises the steps of:

superposing a back-up layer of tearable sheet material on each side of the article to be tagged;

passing a thread-like securing element through the back up layers and through the article positioned therebetween;

bending the securing element on at least one side of the article so that the securing element is parallel to the back-up layers and at least one end of the element extends toward an edge of the article;

adhering a cover layer over the back-up layers and the securing element on each side of the article to envelope and anchor the securing element in place on the article; and

joining the back-up and cover layers on one side with the back-up and cover layers on the other side at the edge of the article.

23. Method of assembling and securing a tag to an article, as recited in claim 22 wherein said cover layers are adhered to the back-up layers and the securing element by heating the same to join the layers together by a heat scalable adhesive.

24. Method of assembling and securing a tag to an article, as recited in claim 23 wherein the back-up and cover layers on one side are joined with the back-up and cover layers on the other side by a heat sealable adhesive during said heating step.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 703,698 7/ 1902 Fairchild 40-2 748,957 1/ 1904 Johnson. 1,471,284 10/1923 Rosenthal 40-20 1,571,792 2/1926 Canine 402 1,634,419 7/1927 Griesinger 4020 2,464,113 3/ 1949 Bernstein 40-20 X 2,665,509 1/1954 Flood 40-20 X EUGENE R. CAPOZIO, Primary Examiner. WENCESLAO I. CONTRERAS, Assistant Examiner,

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US703698 *Sep 16, 1901Jul 1, 1902Charles B FairchildTag.
US748957 *Oct 13, 1902Jan 5, 1904 Pin-ticket
US1471284 *Apr 12, 1922Oct 16, 1923Fred E KleinLaundry tag
US1571792 *Apr 19, 1921Feb 2, 1926Canine Chester WLaundry-marking tag
US1634419 *Nov 27, 1925Jul 5, 1927John GriesingerIdentification device
US2464113 *Jan 9, 1945Mar 8, 1949Leo BernsteinNonremovable garment tag having folded staple ends concealed
US2665509 *Aug 3, 1950Jan 12, 1954Dennison Mfg CoTicket strip
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
WO2005063499A1 *Dec 16, 2004Jul 14, 20053M Innovative Properties CoFastener for a display page
Classifications
U.S. Classification40/662, 40/638, 40/672
International ClassificationG09F3/14, G09F3/08
Cooperative ClassificationG09F3/14
European ClassificationG09F3/14