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Publication numberUS3445092 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 20, 1969
Filing dateFeb 28, 1968
Priority dateFeb 28, 1968
Publication numberUS 3445092 A, US 3445092A, US-A-3445092, US3445092 A, US3445092A
InventorsFierle Edward J, Melville William R Jr
Original AssigneeBausch & Lomb
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ultrasonic cleaning device
US 3445092 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 20, 1969 E. J. FIERLE ETAL 3,445,092

ULTRASONIC CLEANING DEVICE Filed Feb. 28. 1968 Sheet of 2 EDWARD ,J. FIERLE WILLIAM R. MEL LE, JR.

INV TORS ATTORNEY y 0, 1969 E. J. FIERLE ETAL ULTRASONIC CLEANING DEVICE 2 a Z J & t N 8 h I S L j j K I/ j 3 I.. n u fi d fiw F 4 .1. I II/ I I I) ll I II m v/O 1 4 w C m e F M w M m n m l w FIG. 4

EDWARD J. FIERLE WILLIAM R. MELVILLE, JR.

INVENTORS dd ATTORNEY United States Patent 3,445,092 ULTRASONIC CLEANING DEVICE Edward J. Fierle, Penfield, and William R. Melville, Jr.,

Scottsville, N.Y., assignors to Bausch 8i Lomb Incorporated, Rochester, N.Y., a corporation of New York Filed Feb. 28, 1968, Ser. No. 708,981 Int. Cl. B01f /26; B08b 3/04 U.S. Cl. 259-116 6 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE Background of the invention This invention relates to an improved ultrasonic cleaning device such as is useable for cleaning household articles. It is also useful for cleaning dentures.

Small ultrasonic cleaning devices for household articles are shown in U.S. Patent 3,113,761 granted Dec. 10, 1963 to P. M. Platzman and U.S. Patent 3,151,846 granted Oct. 6, 1964 to P. D. George. The devices according to the aforementioned patents are useable for cleaning small household articles such as rings, brushes, and also for cleaning dentures. The prior art ultrasonic cleaning devices show a common feature in that the transducer for the ultrasonic unit is either embedded in the fluid reservoir or intimately attached thereto. This tends to make a bulky cleaning device and makes cleaning of the fluid receptacle diflicult.

Summary of the invention In order to avoid the above-mentioned problem and, to more generally provide an improved ultrasonic cleaning device we have devised an improved small ultrasonic cleaning device.

The present invention provides for a fluid reservoir readily separable from the ultrasonic transducer and electronics case.

Accordingly it is the primary object of this invention to provide a more readily accessible fluid reservoir in an ultrasonic cleaning device.

It is a further object of this invention to provide an ultrasonic cleaning device without the transducer being embedded in or affixed to the fluid reservoir.

It is another object of this invention to provide an ultrasonic cleaning device that can be rapidly and easily cleaned.

Brief description of the drawings FIGURE 1 is a perspective exploded drawing of one embodiment of the present invention.

FIGURE 2 is a perspective view of the device of the instant invention in operating position.

FIGURE 3 is an elevational view partially in section of one embodiment of the present invention in operating position.

FIGURE 4 is a partial cross-section view of the transducer of the instant invention.

Description of the preferred embodiments Referring to the drawings and in particular to FIG- URE 1, number shows a fluid reservoir cylindrical in shape. Reservoir 10 has a generally flat bottom 12 and 3,445,092 Patented May 20, 1969 vertical walls 14. The top surface 16 of reservoir 10 is finished to a smooth configuration.

Number 18 designates generally the case containing the necessary electronics and the ultrasonic transducer. The case 18 contains a generally frusto-conical top portion wherein is housed the electrics for the ultrasonic generator (not shown). The top portion 20 is fitted with the necessary on-oif switch 22, electrical feedthrough 24 and electrical cord 26. Formed as an integral part of portion 20 of the case is the bottom flange 28 of a diameter equal to or larger than the outside diameter of fluid receptacle 10. Depending from the bottom of flange 28 is cylindrical ring 30, and a combination transducer cover and cover 32 for the electronics case 18. As with bottom plate 28 the cylindrical ring 30 can be formed as an integral part of the top case 18. The transducer cover 32 can be formed from the same material as case 18. It is necessary that the bottom of flange 28 and surface 16 form a water barrier when the unit is in operating position. The diameter of ring 30 is less than the inside diameter of the fluid reservoir 10. This can be seen in FIGURE 3 wherein the ring 30 stands apart from vertical wall 14 of bottom reservoir 10.

While the transducer cover 32 can be formed as an integral part of the cover plate 32 it may be formed of a metal such as stainless steel. This is shown in FIG- URE 4 where the transducer case is designated 34 and contains therein suitable ceramic material 36 and conducting means 38. In this manner the transducer case can be formed separately and thereafter attached to an electronics case 42, this is then placed inside case 18 and cover plate 34 sealed to flange 18 by conventional bonding techniques in order to hermetically seal the electronics.

In operation, the article to be cleaned is placed at the bottom 12 of container 10 and the container is filled with a suitable cleaning fluid designated 40 in FIGURE 3. The top member 18 is then placed upon the receptacle 10, the cord plugged into a suitable outlet and the ultrasonic unit energized by switch 22. After the prescribed cleaning time has elapsed the electronics are switched off, the top 18 removed and the article extracted from the reservoir 10.

With this device the reservoir 10 is of necessity shallow in depth and can be readily placed under a household water faucet to be rinsed and otherwise cleaned. There being no protrusions in the bottom of the reservoir it may be readily cleaned using normal household cleaning devices. In addition the bottom portion 283032 of the top member 18 may also be readily cleaned since there are no sharp or narrow recesses to trap residue from the cleaning fluids.

It is also possible to manufacture the device of the instant invention without depending ring 30 since the weight of the electronics case will make a fluid seal between members 18 and 10.

We have found it desirable to fabricate the electronics case and fluid receiving reservoir of commercial plastic materials. However, it may be desirable to use other materials such as aluminum, steel, etc. and we do not wish to be limited to any particular materials.

While the invention has been disclosed by reference to a preferred embodiment, it should be understood that it may be modified or embodied in other forms without departing from the spirit and scope of the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A household cleaning device comprising:

a generally cylindrical article and fluid receiving tank having a flat bottom with an open top;

a generally frusto-conical upper housing with an open flanged end;

said flange being equal to or larger in diameter than the diameter of the tank;

a downwardly projecting annulus smaller in diameter than said tank depending from said flange;

an ultrasonic transducer mounted within said annulus;

electrical means for exciting said transducer mounted within said upper housing and connected to said transducer;

means for sealing said transducer and said electrical means to said upper housing, and

means for supplying electrical energy to said electrical means.

2. A household cleaning device comprising:

a generally cylindrical article and fluid receiving tank having a generally flat bottom with an open top;

a generally flat cover equal to or larger in diameter than said tank;

said cover containing a downwardly projecting annulus of smaller diameter than said tank with generally vertical sides;

mounted within said annulus an ultrasonic transducer;

electrical means for producing excitation of said transducer electrically connected to said transducer;

an electrically insulated shield over said electrical means sealably attached to said cover; and

hermetically sealed feed-through means in said shield for introducing electrical energy to said electrical means.

3. The device of claim 1 wherein the tank and cover are fabricated of stainless steel.

4. The device of claim 1 wherein the tank and cover are fabricated from rigid durable plastic.

5. The device of claim 2 wherein the cover is generally curvilinear in cross-section and fabricated from a thin flexible non-corroding plastic.

6. An ultrasonic household cleaning device comprising:

a generally cylindrical article and fluid receiving tank having a flat bottom with an open top;

a generally flat cover equal to or larger in diameter than said tank;

an ultrasonic transducer mounted on the bottom side of said cover and projecting downwardly therefrom; an ultrasonic generator mounted on top of said cover; means connecting said generator to said transducer; an electrically non-conducting shield covering said generator and sealably attached to said cover, and hermetically sealed means in said shield for directing electrical energy to said generator.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,113,761 12/1963 Platzman 25972 3,151,846 10/1964 George 25972 X 3,399,869 9/1968 Loria 259-114 ROBERT W. JENKINS, Primary Examiner.

US. Cl. X.R.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3113761 *Jul 26, 1961Dec 10, 1963Ultrasonic Ind IncUltrasonic tank housing
US3151846 *Sep 21, 1962Oct 6, 1964George Peter DVibratory device for cleaning dentures and the like
US3399869 *Aug 31, 1967Sep 3, 1968Jerome SuhreLiquid agitating device
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3595532 *Feb 12, 1969Jul 27, 1971Shick Electric IncUltrasonic cleaner
US3957252 *Jun 17, 1974May 18, 1976Storz-Endoskop GmbhApparatus for cleaning medical instruments
US4401131 *May 15, 1981Aug 30, 1983Gca CorporationApparatus for cleaning semiconductor wafers
US6866051 *Sep 26, 2002Mar 15, 2005Lam Research CorporationMegasonic substrate processing module
US7518288Aug 16, 2007Apr 14, 2009Akrion Technologies, Inc.System for megasonic processing of an article
US7938131Jul 23, 2007May 10, 2011Akrion Systems, LlcApparatus for ejecting fluid onto a substrate and system and method incorporating the same
US8257505Oct 11, 2011Sep 4, 2012Akrion Systems, LlcMethod for megasonic processing of an article
US8327861Dec 19, 2006Dec 11, 2012Lam Research CorporationMegasonic precision cleaning of semiconductor process equipment components and parts
US8343287May 10, 2011Jan 1, 2013Akrion Systems LlcApparatus for ejecting fluid onto a substrate and system and method incorporating the same
US8771427Sep 4, 2012Jul 8, 2014Akrion Systems, LlcMethod of manufacturing integrated circuit devices
US20030106566 *May 30, 2002Jun 12, 2003Pacific International Stg, Inc.Method and apparatus for cleaning substrates
US20080006292 *Aug 16, 2007Jan 10, 2008Bran Mario ESystem for megasonic processing of an article
US20080142055 *Dec 19, 2006Jun 19, 2008Lam Research, Corp.Megasonic precision cleaning of semiconductor process equipment components and parts
US20080178911 *Jul 23, 2007Jul 31, 2008Christopher HahnApparatus for ejecting fluid onto a substrate and system and method incorporating the same
US20110214700 *May 10, 2011Sep 8, 2011Christopher HahnApparatus for ejecting fluid onto a substrate and system and method of incorporating the same
EP0988363A1 *Jun 12, 1998Mar 29, 2000Henryk P. JakubowskiMethods and solutions for cleaning dentures
EP0988363A4 *Jun 12, 1998Jun 19, 2002Henryk P JakubowskiMethods and solutions for cleaning dentures
Classifications
U.S. Classification366/118, 134/184
International ClassificationB08B3/12
Cooperative ClassificationB08B3/12
European ClassificationB08B3/12