Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3445865 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 27, 1969
Filing dateMay 2, 1966
Priority dateMay 2, 1966
Publication numberUS 3445865 A, US 3445865A, US-A-3445865, US3445865 A, US3445865A
InventorsJoseph F Rumsey Jr
Original AssigneeJoseph F Rumsey Jr
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Combined ashtray and deodorant container
US 3445865 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 27, 1969 J. F. RUMSEY. JR

COMBINED ASHTRAY AND DEOD ORANT CONTAINER Filed May 2, 1966 TFLEE INVENTOB. (/QSEPH Fa PUMSFfiy/Q- flab-4 United States Patent 3,445,865 COMBINED ASHTRAY AND DEODORANT CONTAINER Joseph F. Rumsey, Jr., 1608 Elmhurst, Oklahoma City, Okla. 73120 Filed May 2, 1966, Ser. No. 546,851 Int. Cl. E03d 13/00 US. Cl. 4-109 1 Claim ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE This invention relates generally to improvements in combined ashtrays and deodorant containers. More particularly, but not by way of limitation, this invention relates to an improved ashtray and deodorant container for use in combination with urinals.

One problem that has been associated with urinals in the past has been the unpleasant odor emanating therefrom. Despite the use of better flushing systems and water traps, the odor persists.

In dry-type urinals, that is, in urinals wherein the water in the trap is disposed below the surface of the basin, a dry cake of effervescing deodorant material has been placed in the basin to alleviate the odor problem. In wet type urinals, that is, in urinals wherein the water in the basin stands above the surface of the basin, the dry deodorant cakes cannot be used. In such cases, the common practice has been to locate a deodorant container in the vicinity of the urinal. Generally, such containers are mounted on the wall. Wall mounted urinal containers have not proved entirely satisfactory.

An additional problem that has presented many maintenance difficulties has been the propensity of the users of the urinals to discard cigarette and cigar stubs therein. Since the stubs do not disintegrate readily, they have a tendency to clog the urinal and thus prevent its proper operation.

Generally, this invention provides an improved combined ashtray and deodorant container for urinals comprising: a hollow container having side walls and upper and lower end walls, an aperture extending through the lower end wall, and an enlarged opening extending through the upper end wall; an ashtray having an open top, connected side walls, and a bottom, the ashtray being sized to fit into and removably close the enlarged opening; and, control means connected with the lower end wall of the container in communication with the aperture to control the discharge of the deodorant from the container into the urinal.

One object of the invention is to provide an improved combined ashtray and deodorant container connectable with urinals that effectively delivers the deodorizing material into the urinal regardless of whether the urinal is of the wet or dry type.

A further object of the invention is to provide an improved combined ashtray and deodorant container that can be conveniently attached to urinals of the usual construction.

A further object of the invention is to provide an improved combined ashtray and deodorant container that can be attached to a urinal in a location wherein the ashtray is conveniently disposed for users of the urinal.

Still another object of the invention is to provide an improved combined ashtray and deodorant container wherein maintenance personnel removing the ashtray for emptying and cleaning can visually observe the level of deodorant in the container.

The foregoing and additional objects and advantages of the invention will become more apparent as the following detailed description is read in conjunction with the accompanying drawings wherein like reference characters denote like parts in all views and wherein:

FIG. 1 is a front elevation View of a wall-mounted urinal having a combined ashtray and deodorant container constructed in accordance with the invention mounted thereon;

FIG. 2 is a vertical cross-sectional view of the urinal and combined ashtray and deodorant container illustrated in FIG. 1, taken generally along the line 22 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged, fragmentary cross-sectional view of a portion of the urinal and combined ashtray and deodorant container of FIG. 1; and,

FIG. 4 is an enlarged, fragmentary cross-sectional view similar to FIG. 3, but illustrating another embodiment of combined ashtray and deodorant container also constructed in accordance with the invention attached to the urinal.

Embodiment of FIG. 1

Referring to the drawing and to FIG. 1 in particular, shown therein and generally designated by the reference character 10 is a vertical, wall-mounted urinal having a combined ashtray and deodorant container generally designated by the reference character 12 and constructed in accordance with the invention attached thereto. As shown therein, the urinal 10 includes a body 14 having a back or rear wall 16, vertically extending side walls 18 and 20 connected with the rear wall 16, a basin 22 located at the lower end thereof and an upper end or top Wall 24 connected with the rear wall 16 and with the side walls 18 and 20.

As shown most clearly in FIG. 2, a water inlet conduit 26 is operably connected with the top wall 24. A flush valve 28 is connected in fluid communication with the Water inlet conduit 26 and with a water supply conduit 30.

The top wall 24 of the urinal 10 includes a chamber 32 that communicates with the interior of the urinal 10 through a plurality of apertures 34. It will be noted that the apertures 34 are disposed adjacent the front surface of the rear wall 16 of the urinal 10 whereby Water discharged from the chamber 3 2 in the top wall 24 will flow along the front surface of the rear wall 16.

- The basin 22 of the urinal 10 includes a trap 36 that is generally filled with water to prevent the entrance of sewer gases into the area surrounding the urinal 10. It

Will be noted that the basin 22 also includes an integral screen portion 38 that includes perforations 40 whereby urine and flush Water discharged into the basin 22 will pass through the perforations 40, into the trap 36, and then through a sewer pipe 42 that is connected in fluid communication with the basin 22.

The combined ashtray and deodorant container 12 includes an upper end 44, a lower end 46, a front wall 48, a rear wall 50 (see FIG. 2), and a pair of side walls 52. A conduit generally designated by the reference character 54 is connected with the lower end 46 of the container 12.

As may be seen most clearly in FIG. 2, an opening 56 extends through the upper end 44 of the container 12. Removably disposed in the opening 56 is an ashtray 58 having an open top and being of generally rectangular configuration. The ashtray 58 removably closes the opening 56 and, when removed therefrom, exposes a deodorant and/ or sanitizing fluid 60 (see FIG. 2) located in the interior of the container 12.

Also shown in FIG. 2 is an elongated strap 62 that extends around the top wall 24 of the urinal to hold the rear wall 50 of the container 12 in abutting relationship with the front surface of the top wall 24. Each end 64- (only one is shown in 'FIG. 2) of the strap 62 is connected with the rear wall 50 of the container 12. The arrangement of the strap 62 in conjunction with the urinal 10 holds the container 12 in a position wherein the ashtray 58 is conveniently disposed for users of the urinal 10.

As shown in the enlarged, fragmentary cross-sectional View of FIG. 3, the conduit 54 is connected in fluid communication with an aperture 66 that extends through the lower end 46 of the container '12. The conduit '54 has the opposite end thereof formed into a nozzle 68. The nozzle 68 is disposed relatively close to the front surface of the rear wall 16 of the urinal 10 for reasons that become more apparent as the following description proceeds.

A restriction member 70 is disposed in the conduit 54 between the aperture 66 and the nozzle 68. The restriction member 70 has a small orifice '71 extending therethrough. While the restriction member 70 has been illustrated as a separate member, it will be obvious to those skilled in the art that the restriction member 70 may be formed as an integral part of the conduit 54.

With the container 12 mounted on the urinal 10 as clearly illustrated in FIG. 2, the deodorant and/or sanitizing fluid 60 gravitates through the aperture 66 into the conduit 54. Depending upon the size of the orifice 71 in the restriction member 70 and the viscosity of the fluid 60, the fluid may flow slowly through the conduit 54, dripping from the nozzle 68 into the basin 22. However, it is preferred that the orifice 71 in the restriction member 70 be sufliciently small to prevent gravity flow of the fluid 60 through the conduit 54. In this case, no fluid is discharged into the basin 22, except during the flushing operation as will be explained hereinafter.

In operation, the flush valve 28 is moved to a position wherein flush water passes through the conduit 26 into the chamber 32. The flush water is then discharged through the apertures 34 along the front surface of the rear wall 16 of the urinal 10.

As the flush water flows along the wall 16, it passes the nozzle 68, creating a relatively low pressure in the conduit 54 between the nozzle 68 and the restriction member 70. The low pressure area created induces the fluid 60 to flow through the orifice 71 in the restriction member 70 and outwardly through the nozzle 68 into the flush water flowing into the basin 22 of the urinal 10. Thus, the restriction member 70 meters the flow of fluid 60, whereby only a small quantity of the fluid 60 is discharged into the urinal 10. The quantity discharged depends on the size of the orifice 71. The amount of deodorant needed depends on the type of fluid 60 used and the quantity required to overcome the odor conditions existing surrounding the urinal 10.

Also as previously mentioned, one of the difficulties encountered in the maintenance of urinals has been the tendency of users thereof to dispose of cigarette or cigar stubs in the basin 22, thus plugging the apertures extending through the screen portion 38. It is believed that this problem is alleviated to a great extent due to the convenience of the ashtray 58.

Also, there has been a tendency for maintenance personnel to overlook the level of the fluid 60 in deodorant containers particularly if some small inconvenience is necessitated due to the location and/or construction of the container. As provided in this invention, maintenance personnel removing the ashtray 58 have an immediate visual indication of the level of deodorant 60 in the container \12. Thus, there is a greater tendency for the maintenance personnel to maintain the fluid level in the container 12, whereby eflicient and effective deodorization and/or sanitization of the urinal 10 is constantly provided.

Embodiment of FIG. 4

The enlarged, fragmentary cross-sectional view of FIG. 4 illustrates another embodiment of combined ashtray and deodorant container that is generally designated by the reference character and that is also constructed in accordance with the invention. As shown therein, the combined ashtray and deodorant container 100 is mounted on the previously described urinal 10.

The container 100 includes atop end 102, a bottom end 104, front and rear walls 106 and 108, respectively, and a pair of side walls 110. (Only one side wall 110 is illustrated in the cross-sectional view of FIG.4.)

The top end 102 of the container 100 includes an enlarged opening 112 that is sized to receive an ashtray 114. Mounted on the top end 102 is a plurality of suction cups 116 that are disposed in holding engagement with the lower surface of the top wall 24 of the urinal 10. It should also be pointed out that the tapered or sloped configuration of the lower end 104 is provided so that deodorant and/or sanitizing fluid 126 disposed in the container 100 will gravitate toward an aperture 118.

The aperture 118 extends through the bottom end 104 of the container 100. A metering valve 120 is connected with the lower end 104 of the container 100 in fluid communication with the aperture 118. As illustrated, the metering valve 120 includes an adjusting needle or screw 122 arranged to regulate the size of a flow passageway 124 extending through the valve 120.

The ashtray 114 has an open top for receiving ashes and the like. The ashtray 114 is sized to removably close the opening 112 in the container 100, whereby the level of the fluid 126 in the container 100 is immediately apparent upon removal of the ashtray 114 from the opening 112.

It should also be pointed out that the rear wall 108 of the container 100 is spaced from the front surface of the rear wall 16 of urinal 10 to permit the discharge of flush water through the apertures 34 between the container 100 and the rear wall 16 of the urinal 10. Thus, avoiding corrosion of the container 100.

A plurality of apertures 128 extend through the rear wall 108 of the container 100 to permit escape of deodorant fumes from the deodorant 126 in the event that an effervescing type material is utilized.

To utilize the container 100, the screw 122 is adjusted to permit the desired quantity of deodorant 126 to flow through the flow passageway 124. Preferably, the screw 122 is adjusted to a position wherein the deodorant 126 drips very slowly from the valve 120 into the basin 22 (see FIG. 2) of the urinal 10.

Manifestly, the ashtray 114 is located in a very convenient position when the container 100 is mounted as shown in FIG. 4. Thus, providing for the convenient disposition of cigarette and cigar stubs in the basin 22 of the urinal 10 to avoid clogging the apertures 40 in the screen portion 38 as previously discussed. Also, when the maintenance personnel remove the ashtray 114 for cleaning they can easily and immediately observe the level of deodorant 126 in the container 100, whereby the efiicient maintenance of the proper level of deodorizing chemical therein is encouraged.

While only two methods of attaching the containers 12 and 100 to the u-rinal 10 have been illustrated, it will be readily apparent to those skilled in the art that any suitable means of attachment may be utilized. Also, the precise construction of the containers 12 and 100 may be varied to suit the particular configuration of urinal upon which the containers are to be mounted.

It will also be understood that the embodiments described in detail hereinbefore are presented by way of example only and that many modifications and changes 6 can be made thereto without departing from the spirit of volatile liquid deodorant material therefrom and disthe invention or from the scope of the annexed claims. charging it into said basin; and

What I claim is: means in said conduit for controlling the rate of flow 1. Urinal appartus comprising: of liquid through said conduit.

wall mounted urinal basin means including a vertically extending rear wall, side walls, a basin at the 5 References Cited lower end thereof, a top wall and an open front; UNITED STATES PATENTS water inlet means connected to said top wall and operable to direct water against the rear wall of 487,979 12/1892 Bowe'rbank 4*220 said basin means; 500,734 7/1893 Bennett 4220 a hollow container having at least one side wall, an 515,210 2/1894 Graves 4 220 upper end wall, and an imperforate lower end wall, 675,947 6/1901 Hach 4-109 said upper end wall having an opening therein; 9761992 11/1910 Eiiantm et a1 4220 an ashtray having an open top, imperforate side walls, 1186345 6/1916 slefght 4109 and an imperforate bottom wall, said ashtray dis- 15 1208675 12/1916 Slag]? 4 109 posed in said opening to close said opening and 9/1917 Doenng 4-109 render said hollow container a completely closed 2,075,266 3/1937 Bfwvman 4 109 enclosure for containing a volatile liquid deodorant 2,614,265 10/1952 Vlerra 4223 material, said ashtraty further having flanges ex- 2,950,959 8/1960 Rene 4-423 tending outwardly from said side walls adjacent the 3,001,210 9/1961 Dlehl 4 225 open top and bearing against the outer surface of 3,060,456 10/1962 Jacobs 7 4-225 the upper end wall of said hollow container for 3I118462 1/1964 Pannuttl 4224 engancilrig tfhe clioilurle1 of thetopenirgg in said Epper FOREIGN PATENTS en wa o sai o ow con a1ner y $211 as ray, and for facilitating removal of the ashtray from the 960520 3/1957 Germany. container; 161,3 3 7/1871 Great Br ta n. means for securing said container and associated ashg i g lz i tray in a position adjacent the top wall of said urinal 523526 4/1921 33 n bas1n means with said openlng and the ashtray there- 715,534 9/1931 France.

in exposed from above, and with said ashtray remaining removable from said container without detaching 912920 6/1954 Germany said container from said urinal basin means; a conduit having one end attached to the imperforate LAVERNE GEIGER P'lmary Examiner lower end wall of the container for receiving a MASSENBERG, Assistant Examiner-

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US487979 *Jul 6, 1892Dec 13, 1892Emil tausigJohn w
US500734 *Apr 6, 1893Jul 4, 1893 Henry l
US515210 *Oct 11, 1893Feb 20, 1894 Disinfecting apparatus
US675947 *Feb 9, 1901Jun 11, 1901Richard G HachUrinal-strainer.
US976992 *Dec 2, 1908Nov 29, 1910Pierre Claude Francois EffantinDisinfecting apparatus.
US1186345 *Sep 24, 1915Jun 6, 1916George A SleightSanitary screen.
US1208675 *Oct 11, 1916Dec 12, 1916George A SleightSanitary screen.
US1240831 *Jan 21, 1916Sep 25, 1917Charles Doering JrDisinfecting device.
US2075266 *Jan 16, 1934Mar 30, 1937Bowman Earle LDisinfecting dispensing apparatus
US2614265 *Aug 24, 1948Oct 21, 1952Nunes Vierra AntoneDisinfecting device
US2950959 *Mar 24, 1958Aug 30, 1960Ve Relle William HChemical dispenser
US3001210 *May 12, 1958Sep 26, 1961Charles C DiehlDeodorant supply mechanism for toilets and urinals
US3060456 *Jun 9, 1959Oct 30, 1962Donald ColvinDetergent dispenser for flush valve fixtures
US3118462 *Mar 27, 1961Jan 21, 1964Delano Pannutti AntonePressure metering dispenser
DE912920C *Feb 22, 1951Jun 3, 1954Saalfeld & DorfmuellerVorrichtung zum Desinfizieren von Abwaessern in Klosetts oder sonstigen Spuelanlagen
DE960890C *Nov 17, 1954Mar 28, 1957Mann & Schroeder K GSelbsttaetig wirkendes Reinigungs- und Desinfektionsgeraet fuer Spuelklosetts oder sonstige sanitaere Anlagen
FR523526A * Title not available
FR715534A * Title not available
GB164842A * Title not available
GB379553A * Title not available
GB187101859A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3929412 *Nov 15, 1974Dec 30, 1975Kendall & CoLiquid receiving device
US5251340 *Mar 9, 1992Oct 12, 1993Su Land LiaoFlush toilet with an automatic sterilizing device
US5584079 *Jul 31, 1995Dec 17, 1996Wong; Sek M. G.Programmable dispenser
US20150013053 *Jul 15, 2014Jan 15, 2015Pavoda, Inc.Methods and systems for reducing spread of microbes
EP0586826A1 *Jul 10, 1993Mar 16, 1994von Lepel, Freifrau, BarbaraUrinal with flush and additive
EP2341196A1 *Dec 30, 2009Jul 6, 2011KERAMAG Keramische Werke AktiengesellschaftHygienic improvements for sanitary basins
WO2006102015A2 *Mar 16, 2006Sep 28, 2006Janssen Terrance ECartridge apparatus for urinal
WO2006102015A3 *Mar 16, 2006Apr 16, 2009Terrance E JanssenCartridge apparatus for urinal
Classifications
U.S. Classification4/309, 4/DIG.100
International ClassificationE03D9/03, E03D13/00
Cooperative ClassificationE03D13/00, Y10S4/10, E03D9/032
European ClassificationE03D9/03C, E03D13/00