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Publication numberUS3446530 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 27, 1969
Filing dateOct 16, 1967
Priority dateOct 16, 1967
Publication numberUS 3446530 A, US 3446530A, US-A-3446530, US3446530 A, US3446530A
InventorsRowland David L
Original AssigneeRowland David L
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Nested armchair
US 3446530 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

- May 27, 1969 o. L. ROWLAND NEST-ED ARMCHAIR Sheet Filed Oct. 16. 1967 INVENTOR. D4 V/D ROWLAND aromvsrs D. L. ROWLAND NESTED ARMCHAIR May 27, 1969 Sheet med Oct. 16. 1967 INVI NTOR. DAV/0 L. ROWLAND BY 0M, 5%

ATTORNEYS May 27, 1969 o. L. ROWLAND 3,446,530

NESTED 'ARMCHAIR Filed Oct. 16, 19s? Sheet 3 of s INVENTOR 04 W0 L. ROWLAND ATTORNEYS United States Patent US. Cl. 297-239 13 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A compactly stacking armchair is provided of the type having a frame that has at each side of the chair a rear leg portion, a bottom rail portion, a front leg portion and a side rail portion above and inset from the bottom rail portion, the frame having at least one cross member extending across from one side to the other, and a seat and back bridging from one side to the other. The armchair is characterized by a metal arm frame on each side of the chair having a generally horizontal upper portion above and generally parallel to the side rail and outset therefrom beyond the bottom rail, extending and outset from and secured to the rear leg portion. A generally vertical portion extends from the forward end of the horizontal upper portion to ground level, a short bottom horizontal portion connects the vertical'portion to the bottom rail portion, and an arm rest is supported by the generally horizontal portion of the arm frame.

This invention relates to a compactly stacking armchair. r

The present invention provides for an armchair which is otherwise of the same basic construction as the very compactly stacking chairs shown in my US. Patents Re. 26,071, 3,275,371, 3,278,227, and Des. 202,775. Like the chairs of those inventions, the armchair is compactly stackable, and has a light, airy appearance. It is also comfortable, and it has the additional comfort of a pair of arms.

It is unusual to provide an armchair which is so compactly stackable, and the structure by which the compactly stackable chair of my above-mentioned patents can be modified to make it an armchair is unique. It is particularly desirable to have the two types of chair (armchair and armless chair) be substantially identical except for the arms, so that production costs are saved, and by this invention it is not necessary to re-design the chair in order to provide the arms. Thus, it becomes compatible with and stackable with armless chairs of the same general design and can be made by exactly the same processes by simply adding the arms and the supporting structure for the arms.

It is important in providing compactly stackable arm chairs to prevent binding between the successive chairs, for binding is liable to occur in several places, as will be explained below. This problem has been solved in a simple and practical structure, which enables full use of a regular armless chair with the addition of parts in a few simple operations to convert it into the armchair of this invention.

Other advantages and objects of the invention will appear from the following description of a preferred embodiment.

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In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a view in perspective of an armchair embodying the principles of the invention.

FIG. 2 is a view similar to FIG. 1 showing one armchair of FIG. 1 being stacked over another.

FIG. 3 is an exploded view of the arm and arm-supporting sub-assembly of the chair of FIG. 1.

FIG. 4 is a bottom view in perspective of the arm rest portion.

FIG. 5 is an enlarged view in section of the assembled arm rest, showing one means of securing the arm rest to the arm-supporting frame.

FIG. 6 is a view similar to FIG. 5 of a modified form of the invention with the arm frame secured to the arm rest in another way.

FIG. 7 is a view in side elevation of a stack of three chairs embodying the principles of the invention, showing how they are compactly stacked together.

FIG. 8 is a fragmentary top plan view partly in section showing the side portions of two stacked chairs, including the arm and arm-supporting frame.

FIG. 9 is a view in front elevation of ing the principles of the invention. I

As stated earlier, the chair of this invention is basically that shown in patents, Re. 26,071, 3,275,371, 3,278,227, and Des. 202,775. Like them, there is a seat 20, a back 21, and a frame having a rear leg portion 22, 23, bottom rails 24, 25, front legs 26, 27, and side rails 28, 29 which are joined to the rear legs 22, 23. There are also cross support members 30 and 31 joining the two sides of the chair, which are mirror images of each other. Each rear leg 22, 23 has a reinforcing fin structure 32, 33 extending out laterally and extending both above and below the level of the side rails 28, 29. In the preferred structure shown, the seat 20 is supported by the side rails 28, 29, and the back 21 is supported by the rear legs 22 and 23.

In the present invention, there is an arm support frame 40 and an arm rest 41 which is secured to and supported by the arm support frame 40.

The arm support frame 40 comprises a metal rod preferably of substantially the same thickness and characteristics as that from which the main frame is made, which is bent to provide a generally horizontal arm rest support portion 42, a generally vertical pillar '43 extending down to ground level and a short crosswise extending horizontal portion 44, which is welded to the bottom rail 24, 25 and which serves to offset the pillar 43 and support portion 42 from the bottom rails 24, 25. At the rear end of the horizontal portion 42 is a curved portion 48, extending in to the rear leg 22, 23 and welded to it. Preferably welded to this horizontal portion is also a metal horizontal support plate '45 which may have a pair of openings 46 and 47.

The arm rest 41 itself may be made from plastic, wood, or other suitable material and is shaped preferably as shown in the drawings. It is provided on its lower surface 50 with a recess 51 for receiving the support plate. As shown in FIG. 5, the arm rest 41 may be secured to the plate 45 by a pair of rivets 52, 53 or screws indicated in FIG. 3 also, or, as shown in FIG. 6, the attachment may be made by heat-staking the plastic of the arm rest 41 into the openings 46 and 47.

It is important that the vertical pillar 43 be spaced out from the seats side rail 28, 29, leaving space so that stacking can be accomplished. It is advisable to have the a chair embodyinner edge of this pillar 43 substantially outboard of the outer edge 55 of the fin 32, '33 to help to prevent binding in stacking.

It is also important that the inner edge 56 of the arm 41 be canted outwardly to help feed in the pillar 43 of the next chair on the stack. The space is important in preventing binding between the arm pillar 43 and the inner edge 56 of the arm 41. The arm rest 41 may have substantially parallel edges 56, 57 for most of its length, although the edges may converge toward the rear and may turn upwardly at a rear portion 58 both as a design feature and for comfort. The outward divergence is noticeable in FIG. 8, and it will be seen there that the arm rest 41 itself may partly overlie the horizontal portion 42 of the arm support frame 40, but as it approaches the outer edge, the canting diverts it entirely away from it.

Thus, it will be seen that when the arm rest 41 is attached to the arm rest support frame '40, the two form a unit which is simply added to the chair already made in accordance with the procedure explained in the patents referred to. The only thing necessary to complete the armchair is to weld the end 48 to the rear leg 22 or 23 and the end of the short portion 44 to the bottom rail 24 or 25. The two arrnsupport frames 40 and the arm rests 41 are mirror images of each other, rather than identical, but only these two sub-assemblies are required to complete the armchair assembly.

That the chair is compactly stackable is shown in FIG. 2 as well as in FIG. 7. The lowermost chair is set in any desired position and then an upper chair is placed on it coming down and from the front. The chair is stacked with the pillar lying within the arm, and therefore the canting helps in the stacking. Also, the stacking results in the upper chair being slightly forward of the lower chair, so that in order to get a high stack, it is desirable to support the bottom chair at an angle as shown in Patent Re. 26,071, as upon a dolly, such as shown in U.S. Patent 3,338,591.

To those skilled in the art to which this invention relates, many changes in construction and widely differing embodiments and applications of the invention will suggest themselves without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention. The disclosures and the description herein are purely illustrative and are not intended to be in any sense limiting.

I claim:

1. A compactly stacking armchair of the type having a frame providing at each side of the chair a rear leg portion, a bottom rail portion, a front leg portion and a side rail portion above and inset from the bottom rail portion, said frame having at least one cross member extending across from one said side to the other, and a seat and a back bridging from one side to the other characterized by a metal arm frame on each side of said chair having a generally horizontal upper portion above and generally parallel to said side rail and outset therefrom beyond said bottom rail, extending and outset from and secured to said rear leg portion,

a generally vertical portion extending from the forward end of said horizontal upper portion to ground level, and

a short bottom horizontal portion connecting said vertical portion to said bottom rail portion, and

an arm rest supported by the generally horizontal portion of said arm frame.

2. The chair of claim 1 wherein said arm rest has generally parallel side edges diverging outwardly from said generally horizontal upper portion of said arm frame, considered from the rear of said chair forward, to prevent binding in a stack.

3. The chair of claim 1 wherein said vertical portion is substantially parallel to the rear leg portion that lies below said seat.

4. The chair of claim 1 wherein said arm rest comprises a metal plate portion secured to said generally horizontal upper portion and a second portion having a bottom recess mating with said plate portion and secured to said plate portion and having an upper surface that extends above said horizontal upper portion and out beyond said plate portion.

5. The chair of claim 4 wherein the rear end of said second portion is upwardly curved and tapered toward the back of the chair and terminates closely adjacent said back.

6. A compactly stacking armchair of the type having a frame providing at each side of the chair a rear leg portion, a bottom rail portion, a front leg portion and a side rail portion above and inset from the bottom rail portion, said frame having a seat and a back bridging from one side to the other, and a cross member at the rear of the seat extending across from one said side to the other, each said rear leg having a laterally outwardly extending strengthening fin extending from below said cross member to above said cross member, said armchair being characterized by a metal arm frame on each side of said chair having a generally horizontal upper portion above and generally parallel to said side rail and outset therefrom beyond the outer edge of said strengthening fin, extending and outset from and secured to said rear leg portion,

a generally vertical portion extending from the forward end of said horizontal upper portion to the level of said bottom rail, and

a short bottom horizontal portion connecting said vertical portion to said bottom rail portion, and

an arm rest supported by the generally horizontal portion of said arm frame.

7. The chair of claim 6 wherein said horizontal upper portion is connected to said rear leg portion by a terminal rear inturned portion.

-8. The chair of claim 7 wherein said arm rest comprises a non-metallic member having a bottom recess, and there is a metal support plate secured to said horizontal upper portion outboard therefrom, said plate fitting in said recess, said arm rest having a generally flat upper surface.

9. The chair of claim 8 wherein said arm rest has generally parallel side edges diverging outwardly from said generally horizontal upper portion of said arm frame, considered from the rear of said chair forward, to prevent binding in a stack.

10. The chair of claim '8 wherein said arm rest has a rear tapered portion curving toward said back and covering said terminal rear inturned portion.

11. A sub-assembly for a compactly stacking chair, for converting said chair to an armchair, said chair being of the type having a frame providing at each side of the chair a rear leg portion, a bottom rail portion, a front leg portion and a side rail portion above and inset from the bottom rail portion, said frame having a cross member extending across from one side to the other, and a seat and a back bridging from one side to the other, said sub-assembly comprising a metal arm frame for each side of said chair having a generally horizontal upper portion above and generally parallel to said side rail and outset therefrom beyond said bottom rail, extending from and secured to said rear leg portion,

a generally vertical portion extending from the forward end of said horizontal upper portion to ground level, and

a short horizontal bottom portion connecting said vertical portion to said bottom rail portion, and

an arm rest supported by the generally horizontal portion of each said arm frame.

12. The chair of claim 11 wherein said arm rest has generally parallel side edges diverging outwardly from 5 6 said generally horizontal upper portion, considered from 3,273,922 9/1966 Rasor 297239 the rear of said chair forward, to prevent binding in a 3,275,371 9/1966 Rowland 297-239 stack.

FOREIGN PATENTS 13. The chair of claim 11 having a metal plate secured to the outboard side of said horizontal upper portion, said 5 07 95 Germalm arm rest being supported by said plate.

JAMES T. MCCALL, Primary- Examiner.

References Cited U.S. Cl. X.R.

UNITED STATES PATENTS A 1,993,601 3/1935 Goldberg 297239 10 297-411

Patent Citations
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US1993601 *Nov 6, 1934Mar 5, 1935Bunting Glider CompanyFurniture
US3273922 *Sep 21, 1964Sep 20, 1966Gen Fireproofing CoFurniture construction
US3275371 *May 14, 1965Sep 27, 1966David L RowlandCompactly stackable chair
DE948007C *Oct 10, 1951Aug 23, 1956Armin WirthStapelbarer Stuhl mit Gestell aus Rundmaterial
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3594038 *Nov 29, 1968Jul 20, 1971Fixtures Mfg CorpChair and ganging connectors
US3847433 *Jul 12, 1973Nov 12, 1974American Seating CoStacking chair
US4366980 *Jun 9, 1980Jan 4, 1983Rowland David LStackable armchair
US4456296 *Jun 11, 1981Jun 26, 1984Rowland David LStackable armchair
US4938530 *Aug 22, 1988Jul 3, 1990Steelcase, Inc.Wire frame chair
US5924769 *Jun 9, 1998Jul 20, 1999Kao; Hsin-LinArmrest unit having a top plate with wood grain patterns
US6435305May 29, 1998Aug 20, 2002Meco CorporationStackable step stool
US6644749May 15, 2001Nov 11, 2003Herman Miller, Inc.Office chair
US6837546May 21, 2003Jan 4, 2005Herman Miller, Inc.Office chair
US7114782 *May 26, 2004Oct 3, 2006Center For Design Research And Development N.V.Flexible chair with stiffener inserts and method for forming a chair
US7118175 *Sep 17, 2003Oct 10, 2006Vendor Development GroupSecurely stacking bar stools
US7278687Jan 3, 2006Oct 9, 2007Marshall AssociatesSystem and method for bar stool height adjustment
US7404607Jan 4, 2007Jul 29, 2008Vendor Development GroupEasy assembly barstool
US7806473Nov 21, 2005Oct 5, 2010Faiks Frederick SStackable chair and framework therefor
US7918504 *Jul 15, 2004Apr 5, 2011J. Thompson Solutions LimitedSeating for a passenger vehicle
US8201885Mar 17, 2011Jun 19, 2012J. Thompson Solutions LimitedSeating for a passenger vehicle
US8449037Apr 11, 2011May 28, 2013Herman Miller, Inc.Seating structure with a contoured flexible backrest
US9301615Nov 25, 2014Apr 5, 2016Herman Miller, Inc.Seating structure with a contoured flexible backrest
US20040061365 *Sep 17, 2003Apr 1, 2004Dean CrueSecurely stacking bar stools
US20060119156 *Jan 3, 2006Jun 8, 2006Vendor Development Group, Inc.Securely stacking bar stools
US20070188005 *Jan 4, 2007Aug 16, 2007Dean CrueEasy assembly barstool
US20070241232 *Jul 15, 2004Oct 18, 2007James ThompsonSeating for a Passenger Vehicle
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USD637423Apr 13, 2010May 10, 2011Herman Miller, Inc.Chair
USD639091Apr 13, 2010Jun 7, 2011Herman Miller, Inc.Backrest
USD650206Apr 13, 2010Dec 13, 2011Herman Miller, Inc.Chair
USD652657Apr 13, 2010Jan 24, 2012Herman Miller, Inc.Chair
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USD657166Apr 13, 2010Apr 10, 2012Herman Miller, Inc.Chair
Classifications
U.S. Classification297/239, 297/411.2
International ClassificationA47C7/54, A47C3/00, A47C3/04
Cooperative ClassificationA47C7/54, A47C3/04
European ClassificationA47C3/04, A47C7/54