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Publication numberUS3447663 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 3, 1969
Filing dateMar 27, 1967
Priority dateMar 27, 1967
Publication numberUS 3447663 A, US 3447663A, US-A-3447663, US3447663 A, US3447663A
InventorsSarovich Steve
Original AssigneeSardee Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Magnetic elevator for containers
US 3447663 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 3, 1969 s. SAROVICH 3,447,663

MAGNETIC ELEVATOR FOR CONTAINERS Filed March 27, 1967 Sheet of3 INVEIJ FOR STEVE SAROVICH ATTORNEY June 3, 1969 s, SAROVICH 3,447,663

MAGNETIC ELEVATOR FOR CONTAINERS Filed March 27, 1967 Sheet 013 |NVENTOR STEVE SAROVICH BY 6% ATTORNEY United States Patent 3,447,663 MAGNETIC ELEVATOR FOR CONTAINERS Steve Sarovich, Oak Forest, 11]., assignor to The Sardee Corporation, Chicago Ridge, 111., a corporation of Illinois Filed Mar. 27, 1967, Ser. No. 626,259 Int. Cl. B65g 47/00, 17/46 US. Cl. 198-41 1 Claim ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE Background of the invention This invention relates generally to magnetic elevator conveyors of magnetic sensitive articles and more particularly, to improvements in magnetic elevators of the type described in my patent entitled, Upward Magnetic Can Conveyor, US. Patent No. 3,272,313. Specifically this invention relates to magnetic elevators having magnetic means for attracting the articles to the belt when the same are transported upward and over the hump of the elevator.

The prior upward magnetic conveyors usually comprised a cylindrical drum or roller means journalled at the upper and lower ends of an elongated frame with an endless conveyor belt revolving about the drums. The upper drum was positioned at the transitional area of the belt where the rising portion of the same changes its direction of movement. This is commonly referred to as the hump of the conveyor. A drive means was generally associated with the upper drum to provide the rotational force for revolving the belt.

An elongated magnetic means was disposed behind the belt and extended upward from the conveyor input feed to a position spaced just below the upper drum. This spacing or gap was necessary in order to avoid interfering with the rotation of the drum. A magnetic shell encased the upper drum and rotated therewith. Thus, the magnetic sensitive containers were initially attracted to the belt by the elongated magnetic means until reaching the gap adjacent the hump. At this point, the magnetic field of the rotating magnetic drum shell was intended to provide the magnetic force to maintain the attraction of the containers to the belt as they revolved over the hump. However, because of the gap between the elongated magnetic means and the magnetic drum shell, the containers frequently slipped off the belt, falling down into the path of the next rising containers; thus often disrupting the entire conveying operation. The problem became more acute when heavier containers were transported by the conveyor.

In addition to the magnetic drum it was usually necessary to provide upper magnetic means beyond the hump to maintain the containers attracted to the belt. The upper magnetic means was also spaced from the magnetic drum and quite often, because of the gap therebetween, the forward momentum of the containers caused the same to fly off the belt and then bounce uncontrollably on the belt amd finally into a conveyor output chute. The bouncing and rubbing of the containers on the belt not only weakened the same and thus substantially reduced the useful life of the belt, but also injured the container and even its contents. Furthermore, for those conveyor systems which relied solely on the magnetic drum shell to attract the containers to the belt prior to their discharge therefrom, the aforesaid problem of the containers bouncing and rubbing on the belt was substantially compounded. The reason for this was because after the containers passed over the hump of the conveyor, the magnetic field from the drum offered little, if any, counteraction or neutralization of the forward momentum of the containers.

My aforementioned patent afforded means for preventing damaging frictional contact of the containers with the belt by providing an upper plate spaced slightly above the upper part of the front of the belt to receive the containers as the momentum imparted from the upward movement of the belt ejected the containers upward. Thus, the plate provided a sliding surface to guide the containers away from the belt and off the conveyor. Although an improvement over the elevators used previously, my prior elevator had several undesirable features. For example, the containers were delivered to the output means in an unstable state. Consequently, the containeres as well as the contents inside frequently became damaged. The invention herein overcomes this defect by providing a magnetic elevator which conveys output means in their stable or upright positions.

Summary of the invention- The elevator for magnetic sensitive containers of this invention affords magnetic means extending continuously from the container input feed to a point over the hump where the containers have been returned to a horizontal surface at the upper end of the elevator. Thus, the magnetic means herein eliminates the gap or dead area heretofore present in the area just before the containers reached the hump. Hence, throughout the upward travel of the containers, the same are at all times securely attracted to the belt. Therefore, slippage of the containers from the belt, as in the prior magnetic elevator systems, is eliminated.

Moreover, the magnetic means of this invention may also be continuously extended to any predetermined point beyond the hump of the elevator. Hence, due to the absence of a gap or dead area in the magnetic means just beyond the hump, the magnetic means easily counteracts or neutralizes any forward momentum forces acting on the containers.

Still another feature of the invention is that the containers are always in stable contact with the belt as the same are transported from the input feed to the output means. Thus, at no time do the containers rub or bounce on the belt nor do they uncontrollably bounce against each other.

It is therefore a primary object of this invention to provide a magnetic elevator which uninterruptedly securely maintains the containers in contact with the conveyor belt while the same are transported up and over the hump of the bolt.

It is another object of this invention to provide a magnetic elevator which does not require the articles to be transferred from one magnetic means to another while traveling up and over the hump of the elevator.

Another object is to afford a magnetic elevator for conveying magnetic sensitive containers on a conveyor belt from a lower level or input feed to an upper level in such a manner that the containers may be removed from the belt without producing belt damaging friction or damage to the containers or their contents.

Another object is to provide a magnetic elevator from which the containers may be removed in an upright or stable position.

Still another object is to provide a magnetic means which extends continuously from the lower end of the conveyor to a point over the hump at the upper end the containers to the thereof. A related object is to afford means for extending the magnetic means to any predetermined point beyond said hump.

Still another object is to afford a magnetic elevator having a conveyor belt for moving cylindrical containers upward with one of the fiat end surfaces of the same in continuous contact with the belt.

Yet another object is to provide a magnetic elevator having guide means for directing the containers away from the moving belt and onto an output area.

Still another object is to provide a magnetic elevator which does not require a magnetic drum shell in order to transport containers over the hump of the conveyor belt.

A still further object is to provide a magnetic means wherein the output point may be conveniently changed from one location to another. A related object is to provide a magnetic elevator wherein the output point may be conveniently changed to provide separate output locations for containers having various sizes or for containers having different contents.

With the foregoing and other objects in view which will appear as the description proceeds, the invention consists of certain novel features of construction, arrangement and a combination of parts hereinafter fully described, illustrated in the accompanying drawings, and particularly pointed out in the appended claim, it being understood that various changes in the form, proportion, size and minor details of the structure may be made without departing from the spirit or sacrificing any of the advantages of the invention.

Brief description of the drawings For the purpose of facilitating an understanding of my invention, 1 have illustrated in the accompanying drawings a preferred embodiment thereof, from an inspection of which, when considered in connection with the following description, my invention, its mode of construction, assembly and operation, and many of its advantages should be readily understood and appreciated.

Referring to the drawings in which the same characters of reference are employed to indicate corresponding or similar parts throughout the several figures of the drawmgs:

FIG. 1 is a perspective elevational view of a vertical magnetic elevator embodying the principles of the invention;

FIG. 2 is a top view of the magnetic elevator of FIG. 1, showing containers moving from the belt and onto the rotating disc of the output means;

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary enlarged perspective view of the input feed shown in FIG. 1 but positioned at the opposite side of the conveyor with portions thereof removed for purposes of illustration;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view of the input feed positioned as in FIG. 3 and showing the containers in position as they are presented to the conveyor belt for travel thereon;

FIG. 5 is an elevational partially sectional view of a vertical magnetic elevator having a modified output means and a slightly dilferent frame shape than the vertical elevator of FIG. 1;

FIG. 6 is an enlarged sectional view taken on the plane of line 6-6 in FIG. 5, rotated 90, viewed in the direction indicated, and showing the association of the belt with the magnetic means; and

FIG. 7 is a fragmentary elevational side view of a forty-five degree elevator with portions cut away for facility of illustration.

Description of the preferred embodiment Referring now to FIGS. 1 and 2 of the drawings, the reference numeral 10 indicates generally an upward magnetic elevator for conveying magnetic sensitive cans or containers 12 from an input feed indicated generally by 4 the reference numeral 14, along an upwardly extending path, and finally to an output means indicated generally by the reference numeral 16 positioned at the upper end of the elevator. In FIG. 5 an alternate type output means indicated by the reference numeral 16' is illustrated and will be further referred to later in the description. Since the conveyor 10 illustrated in the drawings has many parts similar to the conveyor disclosed in my US. Patent 3,272,313, only so much thereof as is necessary for an understanding of the subject invention will be described.

The conveyor 10 comprises an elongated frame 18 mounted on a supporting base 19. The frame 18 includes a lower section 20 and an upper section 22. The lower section 20 comprises a pair of spaced apart substantially rectangular side walls 24, 26. The upper section 22 comprises a pair of spaced upper side walls 28, 30 disposed above the lower side walls 24, 26 in end-to-end relationship. The upper side walls 28, 30 are wider than the lower side walls, the purpose of which will become apparent as the description proceeds.

A front flange 32 is bent inward at right angles from the front edge of the lower and upper side walls, 24, 26, 28, 30 (FIG. 1). Similarly, a top flange 34 (FIG. 2) is bent inward at right angles from the top edge 36 of each of the upper side walls 28, 30.

A pair of rectangular mounting plates 37, 37' having slots 38 therein (FIG. 3) are rigidly attached respectively to the front edge of the side walls 24 and 26 at the lower section 20 of the frame and extend perpendicularly outward therefrom. The input means 14 is secured to the plates 37, 37. The level of the input means above the base 19 may be varied along the length of the slots 38.

Referring now specifically to FIG. 5, it will be seen that a main rotating drum 40 is positioned in the upper section 22 of the frame adjacent the rear end of the elevator. Drum 40 is supported on a main drive shaft 42. The drive shaft 42 of the drum 40 is driven by a drive motor 43. A speed reducer 44 may be coupled between the drive motor and the drum 40 by drive belts 45, 46; thereby affording means for controlling and adjusting the rotational speed of the drum 40. The drive motor 43 and speed reducer 44 may be supported on the outside of the elevator frame by bracket members 47 (FIGS. 1 and 5).

An idler drum 48 (FIG. 5) is supported on an idler shaft 50 rotatably mounted in the lower section 20 of the frame adjacent the front end of the elevator. The idler drum 40 is positioned below the input feed 14.

An endless conveyor belt indicated generally by the reference numeral 54 is supported within the frame 18 and revolves through substantially the entire length thereof.

An upper portion of the belt is disposed about the upper main drum 40. A lower portion of the belt is disp sed about the lower idler drum 48. The main drum 40 drives the entire belt.

The container transporting section of the belt 54 which extends from the input feed 14 to the output means 16 (FIGS. 1 and 2) or 16 (FIG. 5) comprises an upward extending portion 56, an arcuate portion 58 (which is popularly identified as the hump of the belt"), and a substantially horizontal segment 60 near the top of the elevator.

The belt 54 is disposed between the flanges 32, 34. (FIGS. 1, 2, 3, 4 and 6.) The edges 61, 61' of the belt are adjacent the side flanges 32 while the belt is rising and adjacent the flanges 34 While the belt is moving horizontally toward the output means.

As shown in FIG. 5, the descending portion, indicated generally by the reference numeral 62, of the conveyor belt 54 is disposed inside the frame 18. A pair of spaced apart upper idler pulleys 63, 64 are journalled on the upper section 22 of the frame 18 and support the upper part of the descending portion 62 of the conveyor belt 54. The idler pulley 63 is positioned inward from the main drum 40 and above the lower arcuate surface thereof Thus, as shown, roller 63 cooperates with the main drum and braces the belt.

A lower idler pulley 65 is rotatably mounted on the lower section 20 of the frame at a point above the idler drum 48. A belt tensioner indicated generally by the reference numeral 68 is disposed adjacent the lower pulley 65. The belt tensioner 68 comprises a roller member 69 positioned on a portion of the descending belt. A control means 69' is associated with the roller member 69 for varying the level of the same and is accessible from the outside of the frame. Thus, the lower the level of the roller member 69, the less slack there is in the belt.

A magnetic means indicated generally by the reference numeral 70 (see FIG. 5) is associated with the frame 18 and positioned at the back of the conveyor belt (see FIG. 6). The magnetic means comprises an elongated bar composed of an integrally formed straight section 71 and an arcuate section 72. Adjacent the outermost end of the arcuate section 71 are a pair of horizontally spaced apart magnetic strip members 73, 74. The magnetic strip member 73 is also spaced from the outer edge of the arcuate magnetic section 72.

As may be seen from FIGS. 5 and 6, the rising portion of the belt 54 is supported by the magnetic means 70 until reaching the upper main drum 40. Thus, upon making the proper adjustment of the belt tensioning means 68, the upward extending portion 56 of the belt and the arcuate part 58 thereof conform Or assume precisely the outer form of the elongated magnetic section 71 and the arcuate magnetic section 72. Moreover, it should be specifically noted that the position of the output drum 40 with respect to the magnetic means 70 provides sutficient support to form the substantially horizontal belt portion 60.

The input feed 14 is positioned at the lower end of the frame and disposed laterally with respect to the front side of the belt 54. The input feed 14 defines a downward pathway 75 from an input point 75' into a cradle 76 positioned at the front of the belt. Thus, as may be seen particularly in FIG. 4, the cylindrical portion of the containers roll downward from the input point 75' into the cradle 76, where the flat end surfaces of the containers are attracted to the front of the belt in response to the magnetic field of the magnetic section 71 (FIGS. 5 and 6). In FIG. 1, the input feed is laterally positioned so that the coutainers pass over the edge 61 t0 the front of the belt, whereas in FIGS. 3 and 4 the input feed is positioned so that the containers pass over the edge 61 to the front of the belt.

As specifically shown in FIGS. 3 and 4, the input means 14 includes a laterally extending inner side plate 77 having an inner end 77' disposed over the portion of the edge of the belt adjacent the input pathway 75. Thus, the inner end 77 protects the edge of the belt from damage as the containers roll downward within pathway 75 from the input point 75' into the cradle 76.

Turning now to FIGS. 1 and 2, the output means 16 will be described. The output means 16 comprises a rotating disc or platform member 88 laterally disposed outward from the edge 61 of the belt 54 and mounted on a drive shaft 89 driven by a motor means (not shown).

A pair of spaced gate rails indicated generally by the reference numerals 90, 90 guide the containers 12 off the edge 61 of the belt and onto the rotating disc 88. The gate rails 90, 90' further guide the containers while on the disc to an output point 91.

The gate rails 90, 90 comprise an outlet guide part 92, 92 and a side support part 93, 93'. The outlet guide part 92 extends transversely and angularly across the belt from the edge 61' to the edge 61 toward the direction of of the belt movement. The outlet guide part 92 extends angularly outward from edge 61 and parallel with the guide part 92. The guide part 92 blocks the containers from continuing further on the belt and causes the same to slide on the belt between the guide portions 92, 92' and finally off the belt and onto the revolving dics 88. The disc 88 rotates and carries the containers to the output point 91. The outer ends of the guide parts 92, 92' are bent to afford side support for the containers while the same are on the disc.

The side support parts 93, 93' of the gates 90, are

positioned above the edges 61, 61' respectively. Substantially U shaped brackets 94 secure the side support parts 93, 93' to the flanges 34 at the top of the frame. Thus support parts 93, 93' afford support for the containers in the event the same move to the edge of the belt when separating from attraction with the magnetic means .70 or after initially contacting the guide part 92. Each gate rail 90 or 90' may comprise a single bar or a plurality of vertically spaced bars. The U brackets 94 are slotted along the sides and afford adjustment means for varying the positioning of the gate rails 90, 90 above the belt. Thus, the gates 90, 90" may be adjusted to accommodate the various sizes and shapes of containers transported by the elevator.

The gate rails, 90, 90 and the disc member 88 are removably associated with the frame. Therefore, the container output means 16 may be positioned laterally optward anywhere along the length of the horizontal belt portion 60. Thus, to move the output means 16 closer to the front of the elevator merely requires the repositioning of the gate rails 90, 90" and the disc member 88 inward from the position shown in FIGS. 1 and 2. How ever, to move the output means 16 further from the front of the elevator requires the replacement of the upper side walls 28, 30 with wider upper side walls. Thus, the drum 40 may be re-mounted further to the rear of the elevator, thereby increasing the length of the horizontal portion 60 of the belt 54. Then, the gate rails 90, 90' and the disc member 88 are repositioned to a more rearward point.

Moreover, the removability of the gate rails and the disc member enable the output means 16 to be disposed laterally outward from either edge of the horizontal portion of the belt. Thus, by simply varying the position of the gate rails and disc member separate output points may be used for various sized containers or for containers having different contents.

Referring now to FIG. 5, it will be seen that the alternate output means 16' comprises an output plate 95 spaced horizontally outward from the transitional point where the belt 54 begins to descend while being revolved by the main drive drum 40. Thus, the forward momentum of the containers causes the same to move olf the belt and onto the output plate 95.

Still referring to FIG. 5, it will be seen that a pair of spaced apart side rails, 96, 96' are positioned spaced but adjacent respectively the edges 61, 61 of the belt and extend from the input feed 14 to the output means 16. A top support rail 97 may be disposed above the container at a point spaced above the side rails 95, 95'- and intermediate from the edges 61, 61' of the belt. A plurality of substantially U type brackets 98 may be secured to the rails 95, 95' and 96 and secured at their outer ends to flanges 32 at the front of the conveyor and to flanges 34 at the top of the conveyor; thus maintaining the side and top rails securely in place. Note, that the side rails 96, 96' and top rail 97 conform to the curvature of the belt 54 and the magnetic means 70.

FIG. 7 illustrates another embodiment of the inven tion with similar parts indicated by like numerals with the added suffix a. The upward extending portion of the elevator 10a is positioned at approximately forty-five degrees (45). Moreover, note that the arcuate magnetic section 72a of the magnetic means 70 has less curvature than the vertical elevator 10 of FIGS. 1 and 5. Since the containers 12a transported on the belt 54a are inclined with respect to the ground, less magnetic force is required to maintain a secure attraction with the belt in comparison with the vertical elevator 10. However, elevator height is sacrificed in order to be able to use less magnetic material.

Turning now to FIGS. 1, 2, 4 and S, the operation of the elevator will be explained in detail. The containers 12 are fed into the input means 14 at point 75' and roll downward through input pathway 75 and into the cradle 76. When the container is in the cradle, one of the flat ends thereof faces the front of the belt in an opposed relationship withthe magnetic section 71 of the magnetic means 70. The magnetic means attracts the containers to the belt 54 for upward travel thereon.

The moving belt 54 carries the containers upward and over the hump of the belt of the elevator 10. The containers move smoothly over the hump and the flat end of the containers maintain at all times a secure contact with the belt. Due to continuity of the magnetic means 70, even slight slippage of the containers is avoided. After the containers have travelled beyond the hump and are moving in a horizontal direction toward the output means 16 (in FIG. 1) or 16' (in FIG. the spacing between the outer end of the arcuate portion 72 of the magnetic means and the magnetic strip 73 and the spacing between the magnetic strips 73, 74 gradually reduce the magnetic attraction. However, note in FIG. 5 that the magnetic field is reduced only after the containers are moving on the belt in their upright or stable positions.

Referring again to FIGS. 1 and 2, the moving containers are guided or nudged off the moving belt on to the rotating disc 88 by the gates 90, 90' and finally removed from the elevator at point 91 in an upright and stable position. Turning to FIG. 5, the forward momentum of the containers move the same 011 the belt and on to the output plate 94 of the alternate output means 16'.

Thus, the containers are transported from the input feed to the output means without the containers at any time rolling or bouncing over the conveyor belt. Moreover, the containers are removed from the belt without contacting one another.

From the foregoing description and drawings, it should be apparent that a novel magnetic conveyor has been described which accomplishes the aforestated objects in an efficient and simplified manner. By providing a magnetic means which extends continuously from the input feed to a point beyond the hump of the belt, the containers are at all times in positive contact with the belt.

Moreover, since the rotating drum is positioned to the rear of the front of the belt instead of at the hump of the belt, a rotating magnetic drum shell which was required to be spaced from the upward extending magnetic means is no longer necessary. Hence, the containers transported on elevator are not transferred over a dead area prior to being carried over the hump.

It is believed that my invention, its mode of construction and assembly, and many of its advantages should be readily understood from the foregoing without further description, and it should also be manifest that while a preferred embodiment of the invention has been shown and described for illustrative purposes, the structural details are nevertheless capable of wide variation within the purview of my invention as defined in the appended claim.

What I claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States is:

1. In an elevator for conveying magnetic sensitive containers including an elongated frame with an upper and lower end, an endless conveyor belt having a rising portion preceding a hump portion, an input means associated with the lower part of said rising portion of the belt for presenting containers to the front side thereof, an output means associated with the upper end of the frame for receiving the containers from the belt after the same have passed over the hump portion, a magnetic plate means disposed behind the belt and extending continuously from said input means to at least a point adjacent the end of said hump portion of the belt, said magnetic means attracting and maintaining such containers in contact with the rising and hump portions of the belt, said conveyor belt including a horizontal portion, said horizontal portion extending from the hump portion of the belt to a point at least adjacent the output means, said arcuate magnetic section attracting said containers to the belt until the same have been transported to substantially the trailing end of the horizontal portion of the belt, said magnetic means comprising an elongated straight section to maintain the containers in contact with the rising portion of the belt and an arcuate section to maintain the containers in contact with the hump portion of the belt, said rising and hump portions of the belt contacting said magnetic means and thereby conforming to the contour of the same, the herein improvement 3 comprising:

at least one magnetic strip member spaced to the rear of the outer end of the arcuate magnetic section, said strip member being disposed beneath the horizontal portion of the belt, the spacing allowing the container to slip relative to the belt to a lower speed of advancement after the same have passed over the hump.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,110,983 9/1914 Ayars. 1,457,364 6/1923 Hallok et al. 3,109,532 11/1963 Milan 198-41 3,120,891 2/1964 Cmiel 198-41 3,272,313 9/1966 Sarovich 198-41 3,338,374 8/1967 Dudley 19841 RICHARD E. AEGERTER, Primary Examiner.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3554131 *Apr 9, 1969Jan 12, 1971Sybron CorpAutomatic conveyor for container
US3590974 *Aug 4, 1969Jul 6, 1971Loveless Marion WDescrambler
US3754635 *Jan 7, 1972Aug 28, 1973Fleetwood Syst IncCan handling apparatus
US3862681 *Jun 4, 1973Jan 28, 1975Barker Maynard CConveying arrangement for containers
US3941237 *Dec 28, 1973Mar 2, 1976Carter-Wallace, Inc.Puck for and method of magnetic conveying
US4337856 *Aug 14, 1980Jul 6, 1982Dorner Mfg. Corp.Transfer mechanism for a magnetic conveyor
US4347928 *Jan 16, 1978Sep 7, 1982The Continental Group, Inc.Magnetic conveyor
US4670087 *Aug 1, 1984Jun 2, 1987Brown Packaging Inc.Labeling machine
US4890960 *Oct 11, 1988Jan 2, 1990Raymond Production Systems CorporationVacuum metering drum assembly
US5158169 *Sep 24, 1991Oct 27, 1992The Stolle CorporationMagnetic drum assembly and method for orienting side-by-side steel can bodies
US5579897 *Feb 14, 1994Dec 3, 1996Saseb Bakery North America, Inc.For transporting products
US5597284 *Dec 8, 1995Jan 28, 1997Ball CorporationMethod and apparatus for processing container ends
US5649619 *Sep 18, 1996Jul 22, 1997Sasib Bakery North America, Inc.Magnetic conveyor system
US5871084 *Mar 12, 1997Feb 16, 1999Sasib Bakery North America, Inc.Magnetic conveyor system
US7097026Sep 30, 2004Aug 29, 2006Lawrence Equipment, Inc.Magnetic turnaround
WO1990003931A1 *Oct 10, 1989Apr 19, 1990Raymond Prod Systems CorpMagnetic metering drum assembly
WO2005032981A2 *Sep 30, 2004Apr 14, 2005Lawrence Equip IncMagnetic turnaround
Classifications
U.S. Classification198/540, 198/690.1
International ClassificationB65G21/20
Cooperative ClassificationB65G21/2018
European ClassificationB65G21/20B1