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Publication numberUS3451621 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 24, 1969
Filing dateMay 26, 1967
Priority dateMay 26, 1967
Also published asDE1759684A1
Publication numberUS 3451621 A, US 3451621A, US-A-3451621, US3451621 A, US3451621A
InventorsSplinter Donald H De
Original AssigneeTrw Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Rail anchor
US 3451621 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 24, 1969 D. H. DE sPLlNTr-:R

RAIL ANCHOR sheet @f2 Filed May 26, 1967 \\1 l. l Q l l' l INVENTOR: D13/NALE H l/E SPLJNTER.

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l June 24, 1959 I D. H. DE SPLINTER 3,451,621

RAIL ANCHOR Filed May 26, 1967 sheet 2 of 2 "iol I /4 5 70 INVENTOR:

" II-E E- BUNALDHDEEPLINTEH.

m7-- MQW@ United States Patent O i" U.S. 'Cl. 23S-315 5 Claims ABSTRACT F THE DISCLOSURE An improved rail anchor has features resulting in a number of advantages over anchors heretofore known. The new rail anchor includes an insulating pad below a rail plate and a second pad between the rail plate and the rail to be anchored. This arrangement achieves improved sound deadening, a minimum of vibration, and a more silent, comfortable ride. The rail anchor also includes a unique insulating block arrangement for aflxing the anchor assembly to the base which enables complete sound and electrical isolation to be attained. The springs of the rail anchor are aixed to the rail plate by a post and pin arrangement which also achieves additional advantages for the new rail anchor, including ease of assembly, quick inspection, reliability in the connection, and predetermined, constant spring deflection and force. Finally, the invention provides a unique tool by means of which the springs can be easily and rapidly assembled with the plate to hold the rails resiliently in place.

This invention relates to a rail anchor having a number of unique features.

Although rails have generally been anchored to rail ties by means of conventional spikes, a number of rail anchor designs have long been known in the art. In spite of the fact that various rail anchor designs have been proposed over a number of years, relatively little is actually known about rail anchors in terms of stresses encountered, etfective life of the components, ability to accommodate creep, ability to distribute load, etc.

The new rail anchor has a number of unique features not heretofore suggested in the rail anchor art, which features provide a number of advantages not heretofore achieved. For example, the new rail anchor includes an insulating pad located between the rail plate and the supporting base as well as a second insulating or cushioning pad between the rail plate and the rail anchored thereon.

In a preferred form, the new rail anchor also includes an insulating block for aixing the rail plate to the base through bolts anchored in the base. The block design provides complete electrical isolation between the rail and the base and also enables the rail plate to be shifted somewhat relative to the base to accommodate accurate initial alignment of the rails and also to accommodate subsequent transverse shifting of the base or rail.

The overall arrangement assures electrical and sound isolation of the rail from the base which also substantially reduces vibration transmission from the rail to the base, a factor which is especially important for trains travelling through residential areas. The lower insulating pad also improves the load distribution from the rail to the supporting base.

Springs of a generally C-shaped configuration are used to hold the rails on the rail plate. These springs enable the rails to yield vertically and yet be held securely in place. The springs are held on the rail plate by a pair of posts extending upwardly through holes in the lower leg of the spring. The posts have aligned openings therein above the lower leg, through which openings a single pin extends. The post and pin arrangement for aixing the Patented June 24, 1969 ice springs enables the springs to be assembled quickly and also provides a quick inspection for the rails since an inspector knows the rail anchors are properly assembled if the pins are in place. A uniform force is always applied through the spring on the rail because there are no nuts or similar adjustable fasteners which can be over or under tightened. Where bolts and nuts are employed, as has been heretofore known, the inspector must test each of the nuts to make sure it is tight. Further, with the pin and post arrangement, there is no possibility of the fastenings becoming loose.

ln assembling each spring on the posts, the lower leg of the spring is urged downwardly to clear the openings in the post for insertion of the pin. The spring can accommodate corrosion or wear and also differences in thicknesses of the rail anges simply by deflection of the leg to a greater or lesser extent. The invention provides a unique tool by means of which this spring deflection can be easily and quickly accomplished.

It is, therefore, a principal object of the invention to provide an improved rail anchor structure having the features and advantages discussed above.

Numerous other objects and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the following detailed description of a preferred embodiment thereof, reference being made to the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. l is `a view in perspective of a rail anchor embodying the invention with a rail thereon and with an assembly tool associated therewith;

FIG. 2 is a view in transverse cross section taken along the line 2-2 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a view in cross section taken along the line 3 3 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a plan view, with parts broken away and with parts in section, of the anchor of FIG. 1;

FIG. 5 is a view in perspective of a pin used in assembling the rail anchor;

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary view of the rail anchor with an assembling tool inserted therein; and

FIG. 7 is a fragmentary view similar to FIG. 6 but with the assembling tool pivoted to a different position in which the rail anchor spring is spread.

Referring to the drawings and particularly FIG. l, a rail 10 is mounted on a rail anchor 12 which is supported on and atlixed to a supporting base 1'4 which can ibe of various types. For example, with an elevated train, the base 14 may be in the form of a reinforced concrete beam constituting part of the elevated structure. In other instances, the base may be in the form of concrete ties or even conventional railway ties. In one arrangement for afxing the anchor to the supporting base, a pair of main anchoring bolts 16 are aixed to the base 14 and, in some applications, can be anchored therein when the concrete is poured. Since the bolts 16 in all of the bases must be accurately positioned in order to align properly the anchors 12 and the rails 10, the bolts may be put in place subsequent to the forming of the base 14. In such an instance, the base can be made with large recesses therein in the general position of the bolts 16. The rails 10 and the anchors 12 can then be temporarily put in place over the bases 14. After the rails are precisely aligned and the positions of the bolts 16 determined, the bolts can be anchored in place by pouring additional concrete in the recesses in the otherwise completed base 14. In some instances, the rail anchor 12 can be affixed to the base 14 by other fasteners such as conventional or screw-type spikes, particularly where the ibase is of wood and electrical isolation of the anchor is not a problem.

After the bolts 16 are anchored in the base 14, by one method or another, a main supporting pad 18 having openings 20 (FIG. 2) is placed on the base 14 over the bolts 16. The pad 18 is preferably of an insulating material especially when an electrically-powered train or signal system is employed. However, the pad also helps isolate the rail from the base to reduce vibration transmission which is particularly important in residential areas. The pad 18 has a third important function in helping to distribute the load on the rail` more uniformly over a wider area of the base 14. The pad 18 has been found to be effective when made of one-quarter inch thick polyethylene which provides the insulating, isolating, and load-distributing functions effectively.

A metal rail plate 22 is next placed on the pad 18, the plate being no larger than and preferably somewhat smaller in area than the pad 18. The plate 22 has a central recess or groove 24 which receives a Abase flange 26 of the rail 10 with the groove being formed by a pair of integral ridges 28 extending across the rail plate 22 and spaced apart a distance just sufcient to receive the base flange 26 of the rail. Outer mounting portions 30 of the plate 22, located outside of the ridges 28, have diametrically opposite openings 32 therein, centrally through which extend the anchor bolts 16 or other fasteners. To anchor the rail plate 22 on the anchor bolt 16, rectangular insulating block members 34 having central holes 36 are placed over the bolts 16 with lower projecting rectangular portions 38 of the blocks 34 extending into the rectangular openings 32 of the plate. The holes 36 can be offset somewhat from the center of the blocks 34, eg. one-half inch, to enable the blocks to be reversed in the openings 32, if desired, in order to shift the rail plate 22 somewhat relative to the base 14. By having insulating characteristics, the blocks 34 complete the electrical isolation of the rail 10 and the rail plate from the supporting base 14. This is particularly important where electrically-powered trains or signal systems are employed and where the base 14 is made of reinforced concrete wherein current could otherwise be transmitted through the reinforcement in the concrete by the anchor -bolts 16. If electrical isolation is unimportant, the blocks 34 can be eliminated and the openings 32 made smaller.

Metal bearing plates 40 are then placed over the insulating blocks 34 to distribute the load thereon. The plates 40 have projections 42 which extend into recesses 44 in the upper surfaces of the blocks 34 to prevent shifting of the plates 40l relative to the blocks 34. The plates and blocks can be substantially of the same size, as shown. Lock washers 46 and nuts 48 are subsequently assembled with the anchor bolts 16 to anchor the rail plate 22 in iixed position on the base 14. The nuts 48 are tightened sutiiciently to prevent any movement of the lock washers 46, the plates 40, the blocks 34, and the rail plate 22. The springs 58 also resist longitudinal and transverse movement of the rail 10 but yield somewhat to vertical movement thereof.

A rubber mounting pad 50 is located between the rail 10 and the rail plate groove 24. The pad has end anges 52 extending over the edges of the rail plate 22, as shown in FIGURE 1, to retain the pad in place. The pad 50 primarily provides vibration and sound isolation and also helps accommodate creep. The polyethylene pad and the rubber pad also improve passenger comfort and train rideability, and increase rail life by attenuating dynamic loads. An effective material for the pad 50 is natural or synthetic rubber having a hardness of 70 durometer with a tensile strength of 1700 p.s.i., an elongation of 500 percent, and a modulus at 200 percent of 1000 p.s.i. It may be noted that the pad 50 covers the entire surface of the groove 24 as well as the entire bottom surface of the rail flange 26 extending between the edges of the rail plate 22.

For mounting the rail 10 relative to the plate 22, the pla-te 22 has a pair of upstanding posts 54 on each of the outer portions 39, shown in diametrica'lly opposite positions. The posts 54 preferably are end welded by a stud welding technique to the plate portions 30 with the posts being parallel to the longitudinal extent of the rail 10 and the groove 24. The posts also have aligned upper openings 56 therein.

Generally C-shaped fastening springs 58 are next assembled with the plate 22 to hold the rail 10 in place. As shown in FIG. 3, each of the springs S8 has a lower ieg S9 which extends generally horizontally above the outer plate portion 30 of the rail plate 22 with the leg 59 having a pair of openings 60 therein to receive the posts 54. The spring 58 bends downwardly in a rounded connecting portion 62 and then forms an upper leg 64 which bends downwardly at an outer edge portion 66 thereof to engage the upper surface of the rail flange 26. The entire edge portion 66, which is as long as the widest portion of the spring 58, preferably engages the rail flange 26 for greater stability. The lower leg 59 of the spring 5-8 is held down (FIG. 3) by a fastening pin 68, as shown in FIG. 5, having a shank 70, a head 72, and a tapered lower end 74. With the pin forcing the lower leg 59 downwardly, the upper leg 64 and edge portion 66 are also urged downwardly against the rail flange 26 to place downward pressure on the flange and hold the rail in place.

The post and pin arrangement for holding the `spring 58 in place is very effective, and assures uniform force on the rail through the spring by deiiecting each spring a constant amount. With the pins, the rails can be easily inspected because, if the pins are in place, it is assured that the springs are properly being held. In contrast, with the usual bolt and nut arrangement for holding the rail anchors, each of the nuts must be individually checked by the inspector to determine if they are properly tightened. Further, when the pins are in place, the tapered end portion 74 can be simply bent over to hold the pin securely in place.

When the springs 58 are placed over the posts 54, the lower legs 59, when in their unsprung position, partially cover the post holes 56. This is essential, of course, so that the spring edge portion 66 will place pressure on the rail base ange 26 when the pins 68 are inserted in the post holes. Consequently, the lower spring legs 59 must be forced downwardly to clear the holes S6 so that the pin can be received therein. An elective tool 76 for easily and rapidly accomplishing this lis shown in FIGS. l, 4, 6, and 7. The tool 76 includes a long handle or lever 78 made of a suitable metal bar with a deflection bar 80 at the lower end thereof aflixed by any suitable means. As shown, the dellection bar has a threaded end 82 extending through the handle 78 and a reinforcing plate 84 and is atiixed by a washer 86 and a nut 88. The threaded end 82 can have a non-circular portion cooperat-ing with a similar opening in the handle 78 to prevent rotation of the dellection bar relative thereto. The deflection bar 80 has a longitudinally extending groove 90 at the forward lower corner thereof, as shown in FIG. 7, with a ridge portion 92 adjacent the groove. The tool 76 is further characterized by an L-shaped stop member or guard 94 aiiixed to the handle and spaced a predetermined distance from the deliection bar 80.

The operation of the tool 76 is best described in connection with FIGS. 6 and 7. iWth the handle 78 in a generally upright position as shown in FIG. 6, the deflection bar 80 is inserted between the upper and lower legs 64 and 59 of the spring 58 with the groove 90 of .the bar cooperating with the front edge of the lower spring leg 59. The handle 78 which can angle outwardly to avoid contact with other track equipment, if desired, is then rotated in a counterc-lockwise direction as shown in FIG. 7 to move the deflection bar 80 approximately 90". The ridge portion 92 then seats on the top of the lower leg 59 and forces the legs 59 and 64 apart because of the longer dimension of the bar 80 now positioned between the legs. At the same time, the stop member 94 is close to the curved end portion 62 of the spring 58 to prevent the ridge 92 from slipping oif the front edge of the leg 59. The stop member 94 also prevents the spring from flying back toward the operator in the event that the tool does slip from the spring.

The deflection bar `80 is of a dimension sufficient to force the lower leg 59 below the post openings 56. The openings are then clear to receive the pin 68 which can be inserted through both openings in the post on the side opposite the tool handle 78, as shown in FIG. 4. The tapered end por-tion 74 of the pin can -then be bent over, after the tool is removed, to hold the pin securely with respect to the posts.

The deflection bar 80 can be of a number of suitable designs as long as it operates on the principle that a portion of it can be inserted in the spring without forcibly engaging any portion of the spring, and has a longer dimension which forces the spring legs apart when the handle is -pivoted away from the original position.

The tool 76 should force the leg 59 of the spring 58 downwardly a distance of about one-iifth of an inch. The exact distance may vary somewhat, which enables the spring to accommodate corrosion or wear of the rail anchor components and also variations in the tolerances of the stud length, rail plate thicknesses, etc.

Various modifications of the above described embodiment of the invention will be apparent to those skilled in the art, and it is to be understood that such modifications can be made without departing from the scope of the invention, the embodiment shown and described being primarily by wvay of illustration and not limitation.

I claim:

1. A rail anchor for anchoring a rail to a supporting base having a pair of upstanding anchor bolts extending upwardly therefrom, the bolts being equally spaced from and on a diagonal line to a center line of a rail when in a desired position relative to the base, said anchor comprising a pad of insulating material with holes positioned to receive the bolts, a metal rail plate on said pad, the pad being at least substantially as large as said plate, said plate having a pair of ridges on an upper surface thereof spaced apart slightly more than the width `of a base ange of the rail, to receive the base ange between said ridges, said plate also having a pair of openings substantially larger than the bolts and positioned to receive the bolts through the center portions thereof when the plate is on the base with the ridges parallel to the rail and centered with respect to the center line of the rail, when in position, said plate further having a pair of up standing posts aixed thereto adjacent each of said plate openings and positioned parallel to said ridges, said posts having aligned pin openings therein spaced above said plate, insulating blocks for said plate openings and shaped to extend partly into said plate openings, said insulating blocks having openings generally centrally therein to receive the bolts, a nut for each `of the bolts to fasten the insulating blocks on said plate, a rubber pad on said plate and covering substantially the entire area thereof between said ridges, two generally C-shaped springs, each having a short lower leg and a long upper leg, the short leg having a pair of openings to receive one of said pair of posts, the longer leg being adapted to engage and be urged against an upper surface of the base flange of the rail, and a pin extending through the pair of pin openings in each pair of said posts, said pin being above the short leg of the spring and holding the short leg downwardly below its unsprung position.

2. A rail anchor according to claim 1 characterized further by a bearing plate adapted to be located between each of the insulating blocks and the associated nut when threaded on the anchor bolt.

3. A rail anchor for anchoring a rail to a supporting base, said anchor comprising a metal rail plate having means to receive the rail, said plate further having a pair cf upstanding posts affixed thereto on each side of said rail-receiving means and positioned parallel thereto, each pair of said posts having aligned pin openings therein spaced above said plate, two generally C-shaped springs, each having a short lower leg and a long upper leg, the longer leg being adapted to engage and be pressed against an upper surface of the base ange of the rail, the short leg having a pair of openings to receive one of said pair of posts, and a pin extending through each pair of aligned pin openings in each pair of posts and being parallel to longitudinal extent of the rail, said pins being above the short legs of the springs and holding the short legs downwardly below their unsprung positions.

4. A rail anchor according to claim 3 wherein said upstanding posts are aixed to said metal rail plate by weld metal.

5. A rail anchor for anchoring a rail to a supporting base, said anchor comprising a metal rail plate having means to recei-ve the rail, said plate further having an opstanding post aixed thereto on each side of said rail receiving means, said posts having pin openings therein spaced above said plate, two generally C-shaped springs, each having a short lower leg and a long upper leg, the short legs having openings to receive said posts, the longe-r legs being adapted to engage and be pressed against upper surfaces of the base flange of the rail, and pins extending through the pin openings in said posts, said pins being above the short legs `of the springs and holding the short legs downwardly below their unsprung position, said -rail plate further having large openings therein to receive anchor bolts of the supporting base, said anchor bolts having dimensions substantially smaller than the openings, insulating blocks having openings to receive said anchor bolts and to ybe received in said openings of said rail plate to position said rail plate relative to said anchor bolts and to electrically insulate said rail plate from said bolts.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,960,550 5/1934 Preston 23S-349 2,016,845 10/1935 Turner 23S-368 2,146,341 2/1939 Kahn 23S-283 2,154,931 4/1939 Gailor 23S-349 2,265,745 12/ 1941 Roscoe 23 8-349 FOREIGN PATENTS 1,031,773 3/1953 France.

ARTHUR L. LA POINT, Primary Examiner.

R. A. BERTSCH, Assistant Examiner.

US. Cl. X.R.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1960550 *Mar 23, 1931May 29, 1934P & M CoTieplate
US2016845 *Jan 22, 1935Oct 8, 1935Dave TurnerRail fastening means
US2146341 *Jun 19, 1934Feb 7, 1939Myrtil KahnPermanent ways
US2154931 *Jul 9, 1936Apr 18, 1939Rails CoTie plate
US2265745 *Mar 12, 1941Dec 9, 1941Roscoe George HRail fastener
FR1031773A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3612395 *Jul 16, 1969Oct 12, 1971Tracked Hovercraft LtdLinear motor reaction rail assembly
US3756507 *Aug 4, 1971Sep 4, 1973Salzgitter Peine StahlwerkeRailroad track bed
US3758032 *Nov 3, 1971Sep 11, 1973Resilient Grip LtdRail fastening arrangements
US3784097 *Oct 13, 1972Jan 8, 1974Landis Sales CoDirect fixation rail fastener
US4074860 *Sep 8, 1976Feb 21, 1978Albert Edward RexSpring rail clamp
US4150791 *Jan 31, 1977Apr 24, 1979Quigley Richard JRail fastener
US4150792 *Feb 25, 1977Apr 24, 1979Portec, Inc.Rail fastener
US4254909 *Sep 15, 1978Mar 10, 1981Rex Albert ERail cleat
US4310120 *Feb 27, 1980Jan 12, 1982Tetsudo Kizai Kogyo Company LimitedElastic rail fastening device
US4312478 *Jul 2, 1979Jan 26, 1982Tetsudo Kizai Kogyo Company LimitedElastic rail fastening device
US4447006 *Mar 10, 1982May 8, 1984Tetsudo Kizai Kogyo Company LimitedCam type elastic rail fastening device
US4479607 *Jul 8, 1982Oct 30, 1984Toyo Kizai Kabushiki KaishaRail fastening device
US4494695 *Sep 16, 1981Jan 22, 1985Sonneville International CorporationDevice for affixing a rail to a concrete support
US4505428 *Aug 18, 1982Mar 19, 1985Tetsudo Kizai Kogyo Company LimitedRail fastening device
US7914109Nov 26, 2007Mar 29, 2011Eastman Kodak CompanyLiquid drop dispenser with movable deflector
US8033646Jan 21, 2011Oct 11, 2011Eastman Kodak CompanyLiquid drop dispenser with movable deflector
US8033647Jan 21, 2011Oct 11, 2011Eastman Kodak CompanyLiquid drop dispenser with movable deflector
US20090011955 *Jul 3, 2006Jan 8, 2009Forskarpatent L Uppsala AbMethod for Localization of Nucleic Acid Associated Molecules and Modifications
US20110109698 *Jan 21, 2011May 12, 2011Yonglin XieLiquid drop dispenser with movable deflector
US20110109699 *Jan 21, 2011May 12, 2011Yonglin XieLiquid drop dispenser with movable deflector
DE2921826A1 *May 29, 1979Dec 6, 1979Omark Industries IncBefestigungsvorrichtung fuer schienen und werkzeug zum einsetzen derselben
Classifications
U.S. Classification238/315, 238/287, 238/310, 238/283, 238/349
International ClassificationE01B9/68, E01B29/00, E01B29/24, E01B9/02, E01B9/00, E01B9/48
Cooperative ClassificationE01B9/486, E01B9/02, E01B29/24, E01B9/681
European ClassificationE01B9/02, E01B9/48C, E01B29/24