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Publication numberUS3452316 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 24, 1969
Filing dateMar 22, 1965
Priority dateMar 22, 1965
Also published asDE1640443A1, DE1640443B2
Publication numberUS 3452316 A, US 3452316A, US-A-3452316, US3452316 A, US3452316A
InventorsMocek Aloysius M, Panek George James
Original AssigneeItt
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Peripheral threaded tang quick-disconnect umbilical connector
US 3452316 A
Abstract  available in
Images(6)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 1969 G. J. PANEK ETAL 3,452,316

PERIPHERAL THREADED TANG QUICK-DISCONNECT UMBILICALCONNECTOR Filed March 22, 1965 Sheet of e June 1969 G. J. PANEK ETAL PERIPHERAL THREADED TANG QUICK-DISCONNECT UMBILICAL CONNECTOR Sheet 12 of 6 Filed March 22, 1965 I 9 INVENTOQS'.

w w w June 24, 1969 G. J. PANEK ETAL 3,452,316

-DISCONNECT UMBILICAL CONNECTOR PERIPHERAL THREADED TANG QUICK Sheet Filed March 22, 1965 .zQLOY-SVUJ M. MOCEK DISCONNECT UMBILICAL CONNECTOR june 1969 G. .J. PANEK ETAL PERIPHERAL THREADED TANG QUICK- Sheet 4 Filed March 22, 1965 a 2 m M I 650265 (.5 p'Q/VEK JQLOYS/US' M.

June 24, 1969 G. J. PANEK ETAL PERIPHERAL THREADED TANG QUICK-DISCONNECTUMBILICAL CONNECTOR Filed March 22, 1965 Sheet J44 OVS/US 0 M06516 U.S. Cl. 339-45 13 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A connector has a number of tangs for threaded receipt onto a mating connector. A shell disposed about the tangs is movable from a first position holding the tangs in threaded engagement with the mating connector to a second position releasing the tangs and permitting them to spring outwardly by inherent resilience to disengage the mating connector.

This invention relates in general to umbilical or staging connectors capable of being rapidly disengaged, and in particular to connectors of the above character in which the connector parts are held in engagement by threaded fingers or tangs located near the periphery of one portion of the connector and engaging cooperating tang threads on a different portion of the connector, the disengagement of the connector being accomplished by pressure operated devices such as explosive, pneumatic, hydraulic devices or manual control.

In prior art quick-disconnect connectors with peripheral tang locking, the tangs are in the form of latches or cams which require the plug and receptacle portions of the connector to be manually pushed into complete engagement before any locking occurs. If the plug and receptacle are spring loaded in order to store energy for subsequent separation or contain a large number of contacts to be engaged, the manual force required to be exerted on engagement is relatively large, resulting in an unsatisfactory connector in many instances. An object of this invention is to provide a tang locking quick-disconnect connector in which the manual force necessary for engagement of the connector portions is minimized.

Another disadvantage of certain prior art connectors of the above type is that the tang locking element, such as a sleeve, must be in an unlocking position until the connector parts are completely engaged and then the locking element must be moved into locking .position. Some connectors obviate this disadvantage by providing spring biased elements which yield when the connector is being engaged. Another object of this invention is to provide a connector in which engagement is possible with the tang locking element in a locked position and in which additional parts to provide this advantage are not necessary.

In known tang lock connectors of the cam or latch type, sufficient play must be provided between the receptacle and plug so that the tang may freely pass over and slightly beyond its detent structure. This noted play is undesirable since the connector is then subject to deleterious effects from vibration, shocks and cable weights. Accordingly, it is still another object of this invention to provide a tang lock connector in which no play exists between the receptacle and plug.

The tang retaining element or tang retaining sleeve is normally urged into locking relationship with the tangs by spring means, the tension of which must be overcome when the tangs are to be released. It is a further object of this invention to eliminate additional parts such as the States Patent 3,452,316 Patented June 24, 1969 Ice noted spring means by arranging the tang retaining sleeve to resiliently engage the tangs when in the tang locking position. This is particularly advantageous when a combined pressure operated and lanyard control connector is provided since the overall dimensions may be substantially reduced.

Still another object is to provide a pressure operated tang release mechanism in which the disconnect force normally applied to the receptacle mounting structure is diverted after initial operation and is applied directly to the movable plug portion, the initial force only unlocking the tangs and the subsequent and prevailing force acting on the plug portion.

Other objects and features of the invention will become apparent and the invention will be best understood when the specification and claims are read in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, comprising FIGS. 1 to 14 in which:

FIG. 1 shows a perspective view of a pressure operated internally threaded tang umbilical connector;

FIGS. 2 to 4 show various views, partly in elevation and partly in section of the pressure operated connector of FIG. 1 in different stages of engagement;

FIG. 5 shows a perspective view of a lanyard operated internally threaded tang umbilical connector;

FIGS. 6 to 8 show various views, partly in elevation and partly in section, of the lanyard operated connector of FIG. 5 in different stages of engagement;

FIGS. 9 and 10 show sectional views of a portion of the tang retainer sleeve, without and with the receptacle associated therewith;

FIG. 11 shows a part elevation and part sectional view of a combined pressure and lanyard operated umbilical connector;

FIGS. 12 and 13 show various views, partly in elevation and partly in section of the umbilical connector of FIG. 11 in different stages of disconnect as a result of pressure operation; and

FIG. 14 shows the connector of FIG. 11 in disconnect position as a result of lanyard operation.

Referring now in particular to FIGS. 1 to 4, the umbilical conector includes a receptacle portiton 2 containing an insulator 4 having a plurality of sockets 5 fixedly secured therein and terminating contact connected wires contained in cable section 6, and includes a plug portion 1 containing an insulator 7 having a plurality of pin contacts 8 rigidly secured therein in alignment with sockets 5 and terminating contact connected Wires contained in cable section.

The plug portion 1 also includes a pair of pressure operated devices or squibs 3 which are connected to the cable 9 by wires not shown or to pneumatic or hydraulic lines not shown.

The receptacle portion 2 has a flange 10 forming a part thereof which is utilized for securing the receptacle 2 to a mounting panel 11, for example.

The forward end of the receptacle 2, has clearance space between the shell 11 and insulator 4 for receiving a cooperating forward portion of plug 1 and includes a plurality of keyways 12 for receiving correspondingly aligned keys 13 of plug 1 for properly orienting the pins and sockets. The keys and keyways are clearly seen in FIGS. 9 and 10. A peripheral seal 14 is located at the cable end of the clearance space between the forward shell of receptacle 2 and is arranged to be deformed slightly when the forward end of the shell of plug 1 is inserted into the clearance space with the keys and keyways in alignment.

On the outer periphery of the forward end of the shell of receptacle 2, a series of coupling threads are provided for holding the plug and receptacle in engagement, as will be described hereinafter.

The plug 1 includes an inner shell 15, an end bell or back shell 16 and a main shell '17. The main shell 17 is permanently secured to a tang collar 18 which is in turn rotatably secured to inner shell by a flange 20 thereon engaging a retainer ring 119 for preventing axial movement of the collar 18 in the forward direction. Axial movement of the collar 18 in the rearward direction is precluded by a retainer ring 21 that bears against the flange formed by end bell 1'6 threadedly engaging the inner shell 15. A sealing O-ring 22 is provided between the tang collar 18 and main shell '17. With this construction, main shell 17 and its rigidly connected tang collar 18 are free to rotate about the inner shell 15, thereby permitting rotation of the tang collar when the pin contacts and sockets are in engagement.

Clearance space is provided between the forward end of the main shell 17 and the finger or tang portion 23 of the tang collar 18. A tang retaining sleeve 24 is retained against rotational movement within this clearance but is permitted axial movement between a rear stop on the main shell 17 and a forward stop or flange 25 on tang collar 18. The distance of axial movement of sleeve 24 is slightly in excess of the depth of the clearance space between the main shell and panel 11 of receptacle 2.

A friction O-ring 26 in encircled by the rear portion of the tang retaining sleeve 24 and nests in an annular groove 27 on collar 18. This friction ring 26 prevents inadvertent axial movement of the tang retaining sleeve 24. Another sealing O-ring 28 is positioned between the main shell 17 and the retaining sleeve.

The forward portion of tang retaining sleeve 24 includes an internal and inwardly extending section 29 which is bevelled at both ends to permit sliding displacement over the end of tangs 23.

The tang collar 18 contains a series of longitudinal cuts extending from the free end of the collar 18 to the front stop or flange 25, thereby defining a plurality of individual fingers or tangs 23. An end view of the tang collar 18 may be best seen in FIGS. 9 and 10. The inside periphery of each of the tangs 23 contain coupling threads the same as those on the shell of receptacle 2.

The tangs 23 include an external outwardly extending section which is bevelled at both ends to permit sliding displacement with respect to the internal raised section 29 of tang retaining sleeve 24.

The wires attached to the pin contacts are sealed in the plug 1 by a grommet which is deformed into sealing contact with the wires by a ferrule 31 placed thereover and secured in position by the end bell 16 threadedly engaging the inner shell 15.

The squib, pneumatic, or hydraulic fitting 3 is threadedly secured to main shell 17. A chamber 32 and cooperating channel 33 interconnect the rear face of tang retaining sleeve 17 with the squib explosive head or pressure source.

OPERATION OF PRESSURE RELEASE CONNECTOR The disconnect operation of the connector of FIG. 1 will now be described.

As shown in FIG. 2, the plug 1 is mated to the receptacle 2 so that the polarizing keys 13 enter their respective keyways 12. At this time, tang retaining sleeve 24 is in its retracted position with the end portion 29 in engagement with the tangs 23.

The plug body or outer shell 17 is rotated clockwise, causing the tang collar 18 and tangs 23 to rotate therewith and engage the coupling threads on the receptacle shell 2. As the plug outer shell is rotated, the threaded tangs engage the coupling threads and the pin contacts 8 are drawn into complete engagement with the sockets 5. The plug rotation is stopped when the forward end of the inner shell 15 abuts and deforms the peripheral seal 14. The connector as shown in FIG. 2 is now fully engaged and ready for disconnect operation.

If desired, the plug 1 and receptacle 2 may be disengaged by rotating the main shell of plug 1 in a counterclockwise direction.

When disconnect is desired by explosive, pneumatic or hydraulic means, the squib 3 or pressure source is fired activated and as seen in FIG. 3, the gas or liquid therefrom enters chamber 32 and passes through channel 33 and exerts a force against the rear face of the tang retaining sleeve 24. The presure of the gas or liquid is sufficient to overcome the friction of O-ring 26 causing the sleeve 24 to move forward into abutting relationship with the receptacle mounting panel '11. At the same time, the tang retaining head 29 moves out of engagement with tangs 23 which, by built-in tension, spring radially outward and disengage from the coupling threads on the forward end of the receptacle shell 2. The position of the connector parts at this stage is shown most clearly in FIG. 3.

The pressure from the squib gas or pneumatic and hydraulic lines exceeds the force holding the pin contacts in their sockets and continues to force the tang retaining sleeve in a forward direction against the panel 11. As a result thereof, the plug -1'is ejected from engagement with the receptacle 2 and disconnect is completed. The flange 20, engaging the ring 19, prevents separation of the sleeve 18 from the inner shell 15. The position of the part of the disengaged connector is seen in FIG. 4.

The disconnected portions of the connector are reusable when the exploded squib 3 is replaced by a new unfired squib or the pneumatic or hydraulic lines are bled off and the tang retaining sleeve is returned to its locking position by finger pressure.

The foregoing description of the construction and operation involved in carrying out the above objects pertained to an explosively or pneumatically or hydraulically controlled connector. The carrying out of the above objects will now be described in connection with a manually released connector.

Referring now to FIGS. 5 to 8, a description of a lanyard controlled connector will be given. In these drawings, the plug and receptacle are similar to the plug and receptacle of FIGS. 1 to 4, with the exception of the elimination of the outer shell and modified construction of the tang retaining sleeve and tang collar. With the exception of these modified elements, the reference characters assigned the connector elements in FIGS. 1 to 4 have been applied to similar elements in FIGS. 5 to 8.

The inner shell 15, insulator 7, grommet 30, ferrule 31 and end shell 16 are assembled as described hereinbefore. An intermediate key 45 is rotatably positioned over the threaded end of the end shell 16 and is rigidly secured to the outer shell 41 by rivet means 49, for example.

A clearance space is provided between the forward end of the inner shell 15 and the outer shell 41. A tang collar 40 is positioned in this space by one end of the intermediate key 45 and a collar retaining ring 19 encircling the inner shell 15. The outer sleeve 41 is arranged for axial movement with respect to the tang collar 40 but is arranged to rotate the tang collar 40 when outer shell 41 is rotated.

A lanyard ring 44 is rotatably secured to the outer ring 41 by a keyway in both elements with a circular wire type key 42 disposed therein. A lanyard pull 43 is rigidly secured to the lanyard ring 44.

The tang collar 40 comprises a plurality of tangs or fingers 48 having internal coupling threads on the end thereof. As described in connection with FIGS. 1 to 4, these threaded tangs engage the coupling threads on the receptacle 2 to hold the plug 1 in engagement therewith.

A camming rib 47 is provided intermediate the fixed portion of tang collar 40 and the tang end 48. A similar rib 46 is provided on the inner periphery of the outer shell 41 and is disposed so as to engage rib 47 when the outer shell 41 is in the most forward position as shown in FIG. 6. When outer shell 41 and tangs 48 are in engagement,

tangs 48 are forced radially inwardly into engagement with the coupling threads on receptacle 2.

OPERATION OF LANYARD-RELEASE CONNECTOR The disconnect operation of the connector of FIG. 5 will now be described.

As shown in FIG. 6, the plug 1 is mated to the receptacle 2 so that the polarizing keys 13 enter their respective keyways 12. At this time, outer shell 41 is in its most forward position with the foremost end thereof in engagement with tangs 48.

The outer shell 41 is rotated clockwise, causing the tang collar 40 and tangs 48 to rotate therewith and engage the coupling threads on the receptacle shell 2. As the plug outer shell is rotated, the threaded tangs 48 engage the coupling threads on receptacle shell 2 and the pin contacts 8 are drawn into complete engagement with the sockets 5. The receptacle rotation is stopped when the forward end of inner shell 15 abuts and deforms peripheral seal 14. The connector, as shown in FIG. 6, is now fully engaged and ready for disconnect.

If desired, the plug 1 and receptacle 2 may be disengaged by rotating the main shell of plug 1 in a counterclockwise direction.

When disconnect is desired by manual means, such as lanyard release, the lanyards 43 are pulled with a force sufficient to cause rib 46 to be cammed over rib 47. The outer shell thereafter continues to move rearwardly until the forward end of the shell moves out of engaging relation with tangs 48. At this time, tangs 48 move radially outward under built-in tension and disengage from the coupling threads of receptacle 2. Continued pull on the lanyard causes the rib 46 on outer shell 41 to engage the fixed end of tang collar 40. The position of the connector parts at this time is shown in FIG. 7.

The continued pull applied to the lanyard 43 transmits a force through the fixed end of tang collar 40 to the end shell 16, causing the receptacle to be separated from the plug. The position of the parts of the disengaged connector is seen in FIG. 8.

The disconnected portions of the connector are reusable by manual movement of the outer shell into its foremost position.

It is to be noted that the ribs 46 and 47 cooperate to prevent accidental axial movement of the outer shell and replace spring retention means normally used in known connectors of this character.

Referring now to FIGS. 11 through 14, the connector there disclosed is a modified pressure mechanism of the connector of FIG. 1 in combination with the lanyard mechanism of FIG. 5. In these figures, the reference characters applied to the elements of FIGS. 5 through 8 are applied to similar elements in FIGS. 11 through 14.

In FIGS. 11 through 14, a pressure device housing is rigidly secured to the outer shell 41 and is compressionsealed therewith by compression ring.

The outer shell 41 has an outwardly extending flange 52 at the forward end thereof which serves as a stop for the ejection piston 53 which is axially movable within a clearance space provided between the outer shell 41 and the pressure device housing 50'. The piston 53 is normally retained in its retracted position by a friction O- ring 54 recessed in a groove 55 in the pressure device housing 50. A compression seal 56 is provided on the interior of the piston 53.

A squib, pneumatic or hydraulic fitting 57 is threadedly secured in the housing 50. A chamber 58 immediately adjacent the pressure source is in communication with the face of piston 53 by chamber 59.

OPERATION OF COMBINED PRESSURE LANYARD RELEASE CONNECTOR The disconnect operation of the connector of FIG. 11 will now be described, with the pressure operation being described first.

As shown in FIG. L1, the plug 1 and receptacle 2 are mated, the tangs 48 are threadedly engaged with the coupling threads on receptacle 2, the outer shell 41 is in its forward position and piston 53 is in its retracted position. The connector parts are thus in engagement and operational. As before described, the plug and receptacle may be disengaged by manual rotation of the outer shell 41 or pressure housing 50 which is rigidly secured thereto.

When disconnect is desired by pressure means, the pressure source 57 is actuated and, as seen in FIG. 12, the gas or liquid therefrom enters chamber 58 and passes through channel 59 to exert a forward force on the face of piston 53. The pressure of the gas or liquid is sufficient to overcome the retaining force of the friction O-ring 54, causing the piston 53 to move forward into abutting relationship with the receptacle mounting panel 11. Since the piston 53 is not in direct association with tangs 48, as is the case in FIGS. 1 through 4, the tangs are not disengaged from the receptacle coupling threads. The position of the connector parts at this stage is shown in FIG. 12.

At this time, the pressure from the gas or liquid exerts a force against the chamber 58, causing the pressure device housing to move rearwardly while piston 53' remains in abutting contact with the panel 11. Since pressure device housing 50 is rigidly secured to the outer shell 41, the shell 41 is likewise moved rearwardly sufiiciently to cause the forward end thereof to move out of engagement with tangs 48, permitting them to spring radially outward, and disengaging from the coupling threads on the receptacle.

The continued force of the gas or liquid drives the housing 50 and outer shell 41 rearwardly sufiiciently to overcome the camming force of ribs 46 and 47 to disengage the pin contacts from their sockets and separate the plug and receptacle. The separated position of the connector parts is shown in FIG. 13.

The disconnected portions of the connector are reusable when the exploded squib is replaced or the pneumatic and hydraulic lines are bled off and the outer shell and piston are moved to their foremost position.

It is to be noted that the movement of the outer shell 41 in releasing the tangs and in separating the plug and receptacle is a result of force applied against the mounting panel while in the connector of FIG. 1, the tangs were released on forward movement of the retaining sleeve.

Referring now in particular to FIG. 14, a pull on lanyard 43 causes movement of the outer shell 41 out of engagement with tangs in the manner described in conneetion with FIG. 8, the pressure device housing 50 moving integrally therewith.

While we have described our invention in conjunction with specific apparatus, it is to be understood that numerous other embodiments could be made without departing from the spirit of our invention.

What is claimed is:

1. A quick-disconnect umbilical connector for electrical conductors comprising:

(a) interengageable plug and receptacle means each including an electrical insulator supporting a plurality of electrical contact members arranged for interconnection with the contact members of the oppos ing plug or receptacle means when the plug and receptacle are brought into interengagement to complate an electrical circuit through the connector,

(b) a receptacle shell concentrically secured about the receptacle insulator and proportioned with respect thereto to provide an annular space thereabout,

(c) thread means formed on a peripheral surface of the receptacle shell,

(d) an inner plug shell rigidly secured to the plug in sulator,

(e) a collar journaled for selective rotation about the inner plug shell,

(f) a plurality of resilient tangs on the collar rotatable therewith and each having a threaded portion normally biased into threadable relationship with said thread means on the receptacle shell to effect connection or disconnection of the plug and receptacle means upon selective rotation of the collar,

(g) and means operatively associated with the collar normally retaining the tangs biased into threaded engagement with the receptacle shell and selectively movable to permit the tangs to move to their free position and thereby disengage from the receptacle shell to enable separation of the plug and receptacle means.

2. The umbilical connector as claimed in claim 1, characterized in that the inner plug shell includes a forwardly projecting cylindrical flange portion which projects into the annular space between the receptacle shell and receptacle insulator when the plug and receptacle means are interengaged.

3. The umbilical connector as claimed in claim 1, characterized in that the collar journaled on the inner plug shell is proportioned to provide an annular space between the inner plug shell and collar to receive therewithin the receptacle shell when the plug and receptacle means are interengaged.

4. The umbilical connector as claimed in claim 1, characterized in that the receptacle shell is threaded about its outer periphery and the tanks are circumferentially spaced about the outer periphery of the receptacle shell.

5. The umbilical connector as claimed in claim 1, characterized in that the receptacle shell is provided with at least one keyway cooperating with a key on the plug shell to orient the contacts carried by the plug with the contacts carried by the receptacle.

6. The umbilical connector as claimed in claim 1, characterized in that resilient seal means is interposed between the receptacle shell and the inner plug shell when the plug and receptacle are interengaged to eilect sealing of the receptacle against contaminants.

7. The umbilical connector as claimed in claim 1, characterized in that said means operatively associated with the collar to normally retain the tangs biased into threadable relationship with the thread means on the receptacle shell includes a sleeve coaxially disposed about the collar and movable axially relative to the collar to effect disengagement of the tangs from the receptacle shell.

8. The umbilical connector as claimed in claim 7, char acterized in that means are provided operatively associated with said sleeve to ecect axial translation thereof relative to the tangs to release the tangs for disengagement from the receptacle shell.

9. The umbilical connector as claimed in claim 8, characterized in that said means provided to efiect axial translation of the sleeve includes a main shell supported on the plug and defining a pressurizable-chamber one wall of which is formed by the sleeve.

10. The umbilical connector as claimed in claim 8, characterized in that said means provided to eflect axial translation of the sleeve includes lanyard means connected thereto.

11. The umbilical connector as claimed in claim 8, characterized in that said means for effecting release of the tangs includes a first sleeve coaxially disposed about the collar and movable in a direction away from the re ceptacle means to release the tangs from engagement with the receptacle shell, lanyard means secured to said first sleeve to effect selective axial displacement thereof, a second sleeve coaxially disposed about the first sleeve and movable axially with respect thereto in a direction toward the receptacle shell, and a main shell supported on the first sleeve and therewith and with said second sleeve defining a pressurizable-chamber one wall of which is formed by the second sleeve.

12. The umbilical connector as claimed in claim 8, characterized in that said means for effecting release of the tangs includes a first sleeve coaxially disposed about the collar and movable in a direction away from the receptacle to release the tangs from engagement with the receptacle shell, a second sleeve coaxially disposed about the first sleeve and movable axially with respect thereto into abutment With the receptacle means, and a main shell secured to the first sleeve and therewith and with said second sleeve defining a pressurizable chamber one wall of which is movable with respect to the main shell and formed by the second sleeve whereby pressure within the chamber after abutment of the second sleeve against the receptacle means efiects movement of the first sleeve to unlock the tangs to release the receptacle shell to effect a disconnection of the plug means from the receptacle means.

13. The umbilical connector as claimed in claim 10, characterized in that cam means are provided on the tangs cooperating with cam means on the sleeve to resiliently restrain the sleeve against inadvertent axial translation while permitting intentional translation of the sleeve upon application of a force upon the lanyard sufficient to overcome the resilient restraining force.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,049,132 12/1912 Mowrer 339 2,178,931 11/ 1939 Crites et al. 339-16 2,301,783 11/1942 Lee 339-16 2,409,650 10/ 1946 Wiggins 33991 X 2,750,569 6/1956 Moon 33916 3,059,207 10/ 1962 Baird. 3,071,188 1/1963 Raulins 285-34X 3,118,713 1/1964 Ellis. 3,156,513 11/1964 Peterson et al.

MARVIN A. CHAMPION, Primary Examiner. PATRICK A. CLIFFORD, Assistant Examiner.

US. Cl. X.R.

2,3 3 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF' CORRECTION 3,452,316 Dated June 24, 1969 Patent No.

lnventofls) Geage]. Panek and Aloysius M. Mocek It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

Column 6 lines 65-55,

r- Column 3, line 25, "in" should be is--.

"complate" should be complete--, Column 7, line 28, "tanks" should be tangs-- SIG NED AND SEALED NOV 181959 (SEAL) Attest:

WILLIAM E. 50mm, .112.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification439/255, 439/312, 439/350
International ClassificationH01R13/637, H01R13/633
Cooperative ClassificationH01R13/637
European ClassificationH01R13/637
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Apr 22, 1985ASAssignment
Owner name: ITT CORPORATION
Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:INTERNATIONAL TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:004389/0606
Effective date: 19831122