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Publication numberUS3452382 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 1, 1969
Filing dateMay 25, 1966
Priority dateMay 25, 1966
Publication numberUS 3452382 A, US 3452382A, US-A-3452382, US3452382 A, US3452382A
InventorsSamuel Kazdan
Original AssigneeSamuel Kazdan
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Tooth cleansing device
US 3452382 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

S. KAZDAN July 1, 1969 TOOTH CLEANS ING DEVICE Filed May 25, 1966 INVEA /TOR. f4 V/[Z 5204M United States Patent 3,452,382 TOOTH CLEANSING DEVICE Samuel Kazdan, 465 West End Ave., New York, N.Y. 10024 Filed May 25, 1966, Ser. No. 552,882 Int. Cl. B08b 1/00, 13/00 U.S. Cl. 15104.93 7 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE wherein It had a value in excess of about ten. Furthermore, the saccharide binding agent is one which has relatively minimal cariogenic properties. The formed fibrous cotton, after being thoroughly impregnated with an aqueous dispersion of the dentifrice containing the polishing and abrasive agent and a water-soluble binder, is then dried. In use, the dried, formed impregnated device may be carried and used for tooth cleansing even in the absence of water, in the presence only of normal saliva in the human mouth. Not until water or saliva comes into contact with the water soluble saccharide binder 0f the dried impregnated body is the dentifrice released to do its polishing and mild abrading action. Until then the binder keeps the dentifrice intact within the carrying fibrous body. When wetted, the impregnated body becomes pliable and is pressed with the thumb directly against the tooth surface and takes the shape of the surface so as to provide the necessary close-contact polishing and mild abrading action. The body is held with the thumb, index finger and middle finger during the scrubbing action, thus achieving maximum surfaces contact between the body and the tooth surface. In thi novel combination, the medium-grained pumice of the polishing and abrasive agent, bound together with other dentifrice grain and into the layers of the fibrous cotton body which carries it, makes the device thus capable of mildly scouring the tooth surface so as to conveniently and rapidly remove otherwise very resistant deposits and stains, including minor calculus deposits and dental plaques, along with nicotine and chromogenic stains, even when deposits are located interproximally The dentifrice in the dried impregnated body remains intact, bound and held by the binding agent within the formed fibrous body until it becomes wetted by water or saliva, at which time the dentifrice is released.

This invention relates to a new, outstanding and improved tooth cleansing device, and in particular, to a disposable cleansing device which is admirably suited for cleaning natural teeth as well as the porcelain and acrylic surfaces of dental prosthetic devices.

The most common cleansing device, of course, for teeth, both natural and artificial, is the conventional toothbrush which consists of a rigid handle providing with bristles at one end thereof. Such devices, however, not only are inconvenient, particularly where the user is not at home, but they have many failings insofar as their efficiency in cleansing is concerned. With such devices, not only is it difiicult to reach all of the recesses of the human mouth, but the rigidity of the toothbrush is a built-in detriment by virtue of the fact that in attempting to reach the diflicult places in the mouth, a great deal of damage can be done to the gums and surrounding tissues.

Many devices have been suggested to overcome the aforementioned defects of the conventional toothbrush including devices to be used in combination with a finger, either mounted thereon or in association therewith. While some of these devices suggested as alternatives to toothbrushes overcome some of the defects of the latter, none of such replacements has achieved a recognition of excellent utility and efficiency coupled with suitable economics to warrant their general acceptance by the public.

It is therefore an object of the present invention to provide a device, and particularly a tooth cleansing device, which is highly efiicacious in its cleansing action on natural and artificial teeth.

It is another object of this invention to provide a tooth cleansing device which is relatively inexpensive to fabricate and which is extremely versatile in its applicability and can be employed for its intended purposes not only in the home but wherever water is available.

It is still another object of this invention to provide a highly efficient and inexpensive tooth cleansing device which can be used not only wherever water may be available but will also function admirably in the absence of water and in the presence only of the saliva which is normally present in the human mouth.

It is still a further object of this invention to provide a tooth cleansing device which can be readily carried by any person and can be employed for its intended function at any time desired by the user even absent the availability of water.

Other objects will appear hereinafter as the description proceeds.

The tooth cleansing device of this invention comprises, on the one hand, a body of a fibrous material, and on the other hand, the tooth cleansing composition which is associated with the fibrous body as an impregnant and/or coating. The fibrous material may be any suitable substance which may be fabricated of either natural or synthetic fibers and may be in any suitable form such as a sphere, cylinder, or even an irregularly shaped pad. The specific nature of the fibrous material is not critical but it is preferred to employ a cellulosic base material such as cotton. Cotton forms the most admirable and preferred body material and produces the best results with the cleansing compositions hereinafter to be described.

The cleansing compositions which are herein contemplated comprises a unique combination of tooth cleansing ingredients, medicants, and a binding material. The binding material forms one of the essential and critical features of the present invention and may comprise any compound from the group of mono and polysaccharides. Included within the group of such contemplated substances are the lower saccharidic materials characterized as sugars. Such substances are white, crystalline, water-soluble products which are well known and include such compounds as dextros, lactose, sucrose, as illustrative of the sugars, and among the group of polysaccharides, those which are contemplated are the watersoluble or water-dispersible types characterized by the formula:

wherein n has a value in excess of about 10. Suitable polysaccharide materials include the dextrins, inulin, karaya, agar, arabic, algin, pectin, tragacanth and the like.

In addition to the binding agent or mixture of binding agents, the other materials which are conventionally present in a tooth cleansing composition and which may be employed herein include pumice, calcium carbonate,

trisodium phosphate, flavoring materials, sweetening agents, coloring matters, wetting agents, bactericides and the like.

The tooth cleansing device of the present invention is prepared by selecting a suitable and desired fibrous body which, as pointed out above, is preferably a pliable cotton pad, and immersing such pad in an aqueous dispersion of the selected ingredients but necessarily including one of the succharidic binding agents and pumice. In addition to these materials, there may also be present in this composition any of the aforementioned additives, their selection being primarily dependent upon the particular and desired features normally wanted by the user. After the cotton pad has been so immersed and treated with the aforementioned composition, it is withdrawn from the impregnating bath and dried in any suitable manner producing thereby the tooth cleansing device of this invention which contains the components of the dentifrice cleansing composition bonded together within the interstices of the cotton pad and as a coating thereover. It has further been discovered that the combination of a cotton pad, pumice, and a water-soluble binding agent as heretofore described results in a unique combination which is characterized by outstanding cleansing action flowing from the use of the pumice as a polishing agent along with the natural cleansing action of the cotton itself.

To use the cleansing device as prepared above, it is only necessary to wet or dampen the impregnated pad with water or salvia and then apply it to the tooth sur faces by means of suitable finger pressure. By virtue of the physical motion of the hand and the fingers, the tooth surfaces, whether they be natural teeth or of an artificial nature, are thereby efliciently cleansed of dental plaques and other organic or inorganic discolorations such as, for example, smokers stains and the like.

Because of the unique nature and physical characteristics of the impregnated pad and particularly of the pad body which is, as pointed out above, preferably cotton, there is achieved in the cleansing device a compressibility and adaptability of the pliable-when-wetted, impregnated cotton body against most of the tooth surfaces even these surfaces may not be flat and may, as in the usual situation, have many crevices and irregular surfaces, thereby resulting in an outstanding cleansing action by the cleansing device of this invention merely by the simple expedient of a rubbing hand motion.

The primary purpose of the water-soluble binding agent is to hold the selected active cleansing ingredients and other additives together onto and in the cotton body so they do not fall off or shed from the cotton in the users hand, in a package holding same, or at any time and place before or during use thereof. By the proper selection of the components of the cleansing composition as hereinafter to be described, it is possible to effect a tooth cleansing device which will not prematurely release the various components contained therein during normal handling before the cleansing device is ready to be used. When the device is to be used, as pointed out above, upon application of an aqueous medium, the effect of the water is to release the active ingredients contained therein so that the cleansing qualities thereof along with the cleansing and absorptive characteristics of the cotton body can be brought into play upon application of finger pressure and hand motion transmitted through the cleansing pad to the tooth surfaces.

By virtue of the combination of the cotton body and the nature of the impregnating ingredients, and as a result of the particular method employed for producing the tooth cleansing device of this invention, the major advantages of said device may be summed up as follows:

(1) It is relatively small in size and hence it is easy to carry, easy to use, and readily disposable.

(2) It is very efiicient as well as simple to employ. The scouring action of the principal ingredients combined with a finger and/9r rubbing motion coupled with the moistened .4 and treated cotton fibers all coact to adapt the device for excellent and total surface contact with the teeth. All of the necessary ingredients to perform the desired function of tooth cleansing are provided in a single selfcontained tooth cleansing pad which will not shed and will become activated only upon the application thereto of some aqueous medium.

(3) The device is relatively easy to produce by the simple expediency of dipping the cotton body into the impregnating solution or dispersion which contains the desirable and necessary ingredients including, of course, the water-soluble binding agent a well as the tooth cleansing substances.

The amounts of the principal ingredients to be employed in combination with the cotton body may vary considerably and quite obviously the characteristics and results produced in the final device will vary somewhat depending upon the proportions of the ingredients used. Thus, where more of a selected binding agent is employed, a somewhat stiffer product is produced and usually a greater amount of moisture is necessary to effect activation of the pad for its desired purpose. Depending upon the pad binding agent, a more or less stiffer texture will be produced in the final product. Thus, for example, starch or scodium carboxy methyl cellulose will result in a harder surface than corn dcxtrin.

As pointed out above, pumice is the conventional and most widely used abrasive material for cleaning teeth and here, too, the amount and/ or the mesh grade thereof may be varied conisderably depending upon how much abrasion or cleansing action is desired.

As an optional ingredient, calcium carbonate may be included as a polishing agent and it is particularly useful to note that where employed, its action will be to decrease the abrasive effect of the pmice used and enhance the polishing effect on the teeth. With regard to the other optional and conventional additives such as the sweetening agent, flavoring material and the like, these may be varied within wide limits and their concentration in the present compositions is in no way critical and forms no inventive aspect of the instant device.

The body of the device which in its preferred form is a cotton pad, may take any of several forms. Thus, the pads may be in the form of cylindrical cotton rolls about inch in diameter 1 /2 inches long. During the impregnation it may be expeditions to keep the rolls in their desired form by the use of thread maintaining them in a fairly tight cylindrical shape. Alternatively, the body may be irregularly shaped or spherically shaped.

Still another variation in the shape of the pad involves the twisting of a loose form of cotton around the serrated end of a metal or wooden toothpick. In this form the treated cotton is readily adaptable to be extended interproximally and thereby clean the proximal surfaces of the teeth more easily.

The general procedure for producing the teeth cleansing device of this invention involves preparing an aqueous solution of the various ingredients, and preferably a hot water solution thereof, and maintaining the resultant aqueous composition in a well stirred state so that all of the non-dissolvable ingredients are uniformly dispersed throughout the composition. The resultant composition may either then be sprayed on the cotton base material, or alternatively, the latter may be dipped into the bath for a short time, removed and then dried. The drying of the impregnated and/or treated cotton bodies may be done in any one of several ways. Thus, they may be placed on any suitable surface such as a highly glazed ceramic surface or on highly polished metal rods and permitted to dry at room temperature. The treated cotton bodies may also be dried at elevated temperatures but preferably not over about 110 C. At about C., anywhere from 5 to 30 minutes is usually sufficient to effect a suitable drying of the treated products.

While it has been noted above that the concentration of the various ingredients in the cleansing composition are not particularly critical, nevertheless it is preferred to operate within certain limits in order to achieve the optimum in results. In general, the impregnating bath should contain from about 5 to about 35% by weight based on the total weight of the aqueous bath of solids, such solids including the necessary binder along with other cleansing additives, and include, of course, the abrasive and polishing components. The amount of binder which may be employed should vary between about 0.1 to about by weight thereof, with the specific amounts employed being dependent upon the particular binders used in the formulation and as hereinafter illustrated. The abrasive and polishing component of the composition should vary preferably between about 4% to about 80% by weight thereof based on the weight of the total aqueous composition and again, the particular amount selected will vary depending upon the degree of abrasion and polishing desired. The other additives which have been suggested and which are conventional in tooth cleansing compositions are employed in relatively minor amounts, such amounts being in no way critical and the illustrations below, exemplifications of amounts and types of such additives are given.

In the following examples which are given by way of illustration only, where parts are employed, these are to be understood to be parts by weight unless otherwise indicated.

Example 1 Treating composition:

Saffron water 1 cc 216 Sodium cyclamate grams 1.5 Starch d .7 Cetylcide solution cc 50 Oil of cinnamon, 1 drop or 0.1 cc. Pumice (if 100 gramsmuch more effective.)

grams 7 Calcium carbonate do 7 safiron water.-214.- cc. of water boiled with 0.2 gram of snlfron and then strained.

2 Cetylcide solution 980 cc. Water+10 cc. of:

Cetyl dimethyl C2H ammonium bromide Benzalkonium chloride (U.S.P.) alkyl (C1SH17 to CISHST) dimethyl benzyl ammoni'um chloride 6.5 Isopropyl alcohol 13 Inert ingredients including 11% NaNOa as rust inhibitor 74 The cotton impregnating composition described above is prepared as follows. The sodium cyclamate is added to the saffron water (heated), then there is added the oil of cinnamon and cetylcide solution followed by starch and heat till a thickening reaction occurs. Then add the pumice and calcium carbonate. Stir the mixture so no settling of ingredients occurs. Dip selected cotton forms in and continue to stir for about /2 minute. Take treated cotton bodies out and place them on drying rack (of glazed porcelain or highly polished metal rods). Place in oven at 105 and heat for several minutes to dry.

Percent by wt.

Example 2 Treating composition:

Saffron water cc 216 Sodium cyclamate grams 1.5 Starch do 5 Cetylcide solution cc 50 Oil of cinnamon, 1 drop or 0.1 cc. Pumice grams 7 Calcium carbonate do 7 The ingredients are formulated as follows. The sodium cyclamate is added to the saffron water (heated). Then there are added the oil of cinnamon and cetylcide solution. Then starch is added and heated until a thickening reaction occurs. The pumice and calcium carbonate are then added. The mixture is stirred so no settling of the ingredients occurs. The cotton forms are dipped in the mixture while stirring for about /2 minute. The treated cotton bodies are withdrawn and placed on a drying rack (of glazed porcelain or highly polished metal rods), then placed in an oven at 105 and heated for a short time to substantial dryness.

The above composition is formulated as in Example 2 and cotton pads treated similarly.

Example 5 Saffron water cc 216 Sodium cyclamate grams 1.5 Starch do 5 Cetylcide solution cc h. 50 Oil of cinnamon, 1 drop or 0.1 cc. Pumice grams 100 Calcium carbonate do 7 The above composition is formulated as in Example 2 and cotton pads treated similarly.

Example 6 Saffron water cc 216 Sodium cyclamate grams 1.5 Starch do 1.4 Cetylcide solution cc 50 Oil of cinnamon, 1 drop or 0.1 cc.

Pumice grams Calcium carbonate do 7 The above composition is formulated as in Example 2 and cotton pads treated similarly.

Example 7 Saffron water cc 216 Sodium cyclamate grams 1.5 Starch do 3.5 Cetylcide solution ncc Oil of cinnamon, 1 drop or 0.1 cc.

Pumice grams 45 Calcium carbonate do 7 The above composition is formulated as in Example 2 and cotton pads treated similarly.

Example 8 Saffron water cc 216 Sodium cyclamate -grams 1.5 Starch do 3.5 Sodium carboxy-methyl cellulose (U.S.P.) do 2 Cetylcide solution cc 50 Oil of cinnamon, 1 drop or 0.1 cc.

Pumice grams 45 Calcium carbonate do 7 The above ingredients are formulated as follows:

The sodium cyclamate is added to the salfron water (heated). Then oil of cinnamon and cetylcide solution are added followed by the starch and heated until a thickening reaction occurs. The sodium carboxy-methyl Example 9 Water cc 216 Sodium cyclamate grams 1.5 Cetylcide solution cc 50 Oil of peppermint, 1 drop or 0.1 cc.

Sodium carboxy-methyl cellulose (U.S.P.) grams 4 Pumice do '7 Calcium carbonate do 7 The above ingredients are formulated as follows:

The water is heated and the sodium cyclamate added, stirring until dissolved. Then cetylcide solution and oil of peppermint are added, the mixture is stirred and then the sodium carboxy-methyl cellulose is slowly added, stirring until dissolved and a thickening reaction occurs. The pumice and calcium carbonate are added, stirring the mixture so no settling of the ingredients occurs. Cotton forms are then immersed in the composition while continuing to stir for about /2 minute. The treated cotton bodies are withdrawn and placed on a drying rack (of glazed porcelain or highly polished metal rods). They are then placed in an oven at 105 C. and heated until substantially dry.

Example 10 Water cc 216 Sodium cyclamate grams 1.5 Cetylcide solution cc 50 Oil of peppermint, 1 drop or 0.1 cc. Sodium carboxy-methyl cellulose (U.S.P.) grams 4 Pumice do 57 Calcium carbonate do 7 The procedure of Example 9 is repeated.

Example 11 Water cc 216 Sodium cyclamate grams 1.5 Cetylcide solution cc 50 Oil of peppermint, 1 drop or 0.1 cc. Sodium carboxy-methyl cellulose (U.S.P.) grams 4 Pumice do 100 Calcium carbonate do 7 The procedure of Example 9 is repeated.

Example 12 Water cc 216 Sodium cyclamate grams 1.5 Cetylcide solution cc 50 Gum arabic (U.S.P.)acacia powder grams Z Amaranth solution, 2 drops or 0.2 cc. Pumice grams 7 Calcium carbonate do 7 The above ingredients are formulated as follows:

The water is heated and when boiling, sodium cyclamate is added, stirring until dissolved. The cetylcide solution is added, then the gum arabic, stirring until dissolved and a thickened solution is obtained. Amaranth solution is then added, While stirring, then the pumice and calcium carbonate, stirring the mixture so no settling of the in gredients occurs. Cotton forms are then immersed in the composition while continuing to stir for about /2 minute. The treated cotton bodies are withdrawn and placed on a drying rack (of glazed porcelain or highly polished metal rods). They are then placed in an oven at 105 C. and heated until substantially dry.

Example 13 Water cc 216 Sodium cyclamate grams 1.5 Cetylcide solution cc 50 Gum ar-abic (U.S.P.)acacia powder grams 25 Amaranth solution, 2 drops or 0.2 cc. Pumice grams 42 Calcium carbonate do 7 The procedure of Example 12 is repeated.

Example 14 Water cc 216 Sodium cyclamate grams..- 1.5 Cetylcide solution cc 50 Gum ar a-bio (U.S.P.)acacia powder grams 25 Amaranth solution, 2 drops or 0.2 cc. Pumice "grams" Calcium carbonate do 7 The procedure of Example 12 is repeated.

Example 15 Water cc 216 Sodium cyclamate grams 1.5 Cetylcide solution cc 50 Corn dextrin (NR) "grams" 16.4 Amaranth solution, 2 drops or 0.2 cc. Pumice grams 7 Calcium carbonate do 7 The above ingredients are formulated as follows:

The water is heated and the sodium cyclamate dissolved therein. The cetylcide solution is added, and the white corn dextrin (N.F.) is stirred into the mixture until dissolved. Then there is added the amaranth solution, the pumice and calcium carbonate, stirring so there is no settling of the ingredients. Cotton forms are then immersed in the composition while continuing to stir for about /2 minute. The treated cotton bodies are withdrawn and placed on a drying rack (of glazed porcelain or highly polished metal rods). They are then placed in an oven at C. and heated until substantially dry.

Example I 6 Water cc 216 Sodium cyclamate grams 1.5

Cetylcide solution cc 50 Corn dextrin (N.F.) "grams.- 16.4

Amaranth solution, 2 drops or 0.2 cc.

Pumice grams 80 Calcium carbonate do 7 The procedure of Example 15 is repeated.

Example 17 Amaranth solution, 2 drops or 0.2 cc.

Sodium carboxy-methyl cellulose (U.S.P.) grams 2 Pumice do 80 Calcium carbonate do 7 The above ingredients are formulated as follows:

The water is heated and the sodium cyclamate dissolved therein. The cetylcide solution is added, and the white corn dextrin is stirred into the mixture until dissolved. Then the sodium carboxy-methyl cellulose is dissolved and the mixture becomes thickened. Next there is added the amaranth solution, pumice, and calcium carbonate, stirring so there is no settling of ingredients. Cotton forms are then immersed in the composition while continuing to stir for about /2 minute. The treated cotton bodies are withdrawn and place-d on a drying rack (of glazed porcelain or highly polished metal rods). They are then placed in an oven at 105 C. and heated until substantially dry.

Amaranth solution, 2 drops or 0.2 cc.

The above ingredients are formulated as follows:

The water is heated and the sodium cyclamate dissolved therein. Then there is added the cetylcide solution and the oil of peppermint. The inulin is stirred in until dissolved. There is then added the amaranth solution, the pumice and the calcium carbonate, stirring so there is no settling of the ingredients. Cotton forms are then immersed in the composition while continuing to stir for about /2 minute. The treated cotton bodies are withdrawn and placed on a drying rack (of glazed porcelain or highly polished metal rods). They are then placed in an oven at 105 C. and heated until substantially dry.

Example 19 Water cc 216 Sodium cyclamate grams 1.5 Cetylcide solution cc 50 Oil of peppermint, 2 drops or 0.2 cc. Inulin (C.P.) grams 12 Pumice do 80 Calcium carbonate do 7 Amaranth solution, 2 drops or 0.2 cc.

The procedure of Example 18 is repeated.

Example 20 Water 214 Sodium cyclamate grams 1.5 Cetylcide solution cc 50 Oil of peppermint, 2 drops or 0.2 cc. Amaranth solution, 2 drops or 0.2 cc. Pectin (N.F. powder) grams 3.5 Pumice do 7 Calcium carbonate do 7 The above ingredients are formulated as follows:

The water is heated and the sodium cyclamate is dissolved therein. Then the cetylcide solution and oil of peppermint are added, slowly stirring in the pectin until dissolved. There is then added the amaranth solution, pumice and calcium carbonate, stirring so there is no settling of ingredients. Cotton forms are then immersed in the composition while continuing to stir for about /2 minute. The treated cotton bodies are withdrawn and placed on a drying rack (of glazed porcelain or highly polished metal rods). They are then placed in an oven at 105 C. and heated until substantially dry.

Example 21 Water cc 216 Sodium cyclamate grams 1.5 Cetylcide solution cc 50 Oil of peppermint, 2 drops or 0.2 cc. Amaranth solution, 2 drops or 0.2 cc. Pectin (N.F. powder) grams 3.5 Pumice -a do 80 Calcium carbonate do 7 The procedure of Example 20 is repeated.

Example 22 Water cc 216 Cetylcide solution cc 50 Lactose (U.S.P.) grams Pumice do 7 Calcium carbonate do 7 The above ingredients are formulated as follows:

The water is heated and the cetylcide solution is added slowly, followed by the lactose, stirring until dissolved. The pumice and calcium carbonate are then added, stirring so there is no settling of the ingredients. Cotton forms are then immersed in the composition .while continuing to stir for about /2 minute. The treated cotton forms are withdrawn and placed on a drying rack (of glazed porcelain or highly polished metal rods). They are then placed in an oven at 105 C. and heated until substantially dry.

Example 23 Water cc 216 Cetylcide solution cc 50 Lactose (U.S.P.) grams 10 Pumice do Calcium carbonate do 7 The procedure of Example 22 is repeated.

Example 24 Water cc 216 Sucrose grams 10 Pumice do 7 Calcium carbonate do 7 The above ingredients are formulated as follows:

The water is heated and the sucrose slowly dissolved therein. The pumice and calcium carbonate are then added, stirring so there is no settling of the ingredients. Cotton forms are then immersed in the composition while continuing to stir for about /2 minute. The treated cotton forms are withdrawn and placed on a drying rack (of glazed porcelain or highly polished metal rods). They are then placed in an oven at C. and heated until substantially dry.

Example 25 Water cc 216 Sucrose grams 10 Pumice do 100 Calcium carbonate do 7 The procedure of Example 24 is repeated.

Example 26 Saffron water cc 216 Cetylcide solution cc 50 Dextrose (U.S.P.) anhydrous grams 12 Pumice do 7 Calcium carbonate do 7 The above ingredients are formulated as follows:

To warm safiron water, the cetycide solution is added and then the dextrose is introduced, stirring until dissolved. The pumice and calcium carbonate are then added, stirring so none of the ingredients settle. Cotton forms are immersed in the composition, continuing to stir for about /2 minute. The treated cotton forms are withdrawn and placed on a drying rack (of glazed porcelain or highly polished metal rods). They are then placed in an oven at 105 C. and heated until substantially dry.

The procedure of Example 26 is repeated.

In some of the foregoing examples the impregnant pickup by the cotton Wad is about 100 percent on a weight basis or in other words for each gram of cotton the impregnant pick-up is one gram. It is of course clearly understood that the amount of the impregnant may be varied considerably, namely from about 80 percent to about 290 percent of the weight of the cotton and thereby the amount of the various components contained therein will vary accordingly based upon the Weight of the cotton pad body. In general, however, the amounts heretofore described should be observed in order to obtain the optimum in properties. Where it is desirable to vary the pickup either above or below the uggested and preferred 100 percent pickup described herein this can conveniently be accomplished by any one of several different techniques, the first involves a cotton body of either more or less dense characteristics. Generally, the more dense the cotton body the less will be the impregnant pick-up. An alternative procedure for effecting the same results involves squeezing the impregnated cotton body to a predetermined weight thereby insuring the proper desired cleansing composition concentration therein.

In the accompanying drawings there is given by way of illustration only an example of the preferred cotton body (FIG. 1), the treated cotton body (FIG. 2), a side elevational view of one form of cotton body in FIG. 3 and a cross sectional view of the latter taken along the line 4-4 as shown in FIG. 4. In the figures 1 represents the cotton body and 2 the components of the impregnating composition including the binder as Well as the other additives and 3 a coating of the cleansing composition held as an integral film by the binder material.

While there have been illustrated and specifically described specific embodiments and preferred formulations of the compositions and devices of the present invention within the scope of what has been herein described and taught it is quite clear that many variation within these teachings and descriptions may be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention. Thus, while only certain specified binder materials have been enumerated others within the genus of what has been taught herein as well as other equivalent substances, all preferably pharmaceutically acceptable in view of the nature of the composition and its intended use in the human mouth may be employed in the present invention. Similarly, other additives conventional or in which may be used and accepted in a tooth cleansing composition may be employed Without departing from and affecting the basic nature of the present invention. Other abrasive substances and polishing agents in addition to those specifically shown may be used although the ones described herein are preferred from the point of view of efiicacy of manufacture and cost.

I claim:

1. A tooth cleaning device comprising, in combination, a finger-compressible fibrous body, pliable when wetted and adapted for insertion into a human mouth, said fibrous body being impregnated and coated With a dentifrice polishing and abrasive tooth cleaning composition containing a major portion of pumice and including from about 0.1% to about 10% by weight based on the weight of the fibrous body of a water-soluble saccharide binding agent.

2. A tooth cleaning device as defined in claim 1 wherein the fibrous body is formed cotton.

3. A tooth cleaning device as defined in claim 2 wherein the saccharide is a polysaccharide with the general formula (C H O wherein n has a value in excess of about 10 and the polysaccharide has relatively minimal carlogenic properties.

4. A tooth cleaning device as defined in claim 2 wherein the saccharide binding agent is dextrin.

5. A tooth cleaning device as defined in claim 2 wherein a polishing and abrasive dentifrice component is present in an amount of from about 4% to about by weight based on the weight of the total composition.

6. A tooth cleaning device as defined in claim 5 wherein the saccharide binding agent is starch.

7. A tooth cleaning device as defined in claim 5 wherein the binding agent is sodium carboxy methyl cellulose.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,103,031 9/1919 Winston 15-10493 3,283,357 11/1966 Decker et al. 15-10493 1,769,747 7/1930 Major. 2,763,885 9/1956 Lyons 15244 2,915,767 12/1959 Vaughan. 3,138,820 6/ 1964 August.

FOREIGN PATENTS 1,026,738 11/1964 Great Britain.

ROBERT W. MITCHELL, Primary Examiner.

ROBERT I. SMITH, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
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US2763885 *Sep 22, 1952Sep 25, 1956William E LyonsDisposable toothbrush containing a dentifrice
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3754332 *Sep 9, 1970Aug 28, 1973L WarrenTreatment member
US3853412 *Jun 26, 1973Dec 10, 1974Griffin GTooth cleaning ball
US6129092 *Feb 5, 1997Oct 10, 2000Mondl; John T.Mouse cleaning apparatus and method
US6378698Sep 28, 2000Apr 30, 2002Katrina M. ScogginsInfant's disposable fluoride tooth wipes
US20060257331 *Jul 31, 2006Nov 16, 2006Periodontx Laboratories Inc.Oral Hygiene System and Method of Treatment
WO1982002481A1 *Aug 10, 1981Aug 5, 1982Frank Thomas ReesIntra-buccal tongue-manipulated toothbrush
WO2005063142A1 *Dec 29, 2004Jul 14, 2005Streletskiy Igor StanislavovicTooth cleaning device
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/104.93, 15/167.1
International ClassificationB08B1/00, A61K8/02, A46B9/04, A61Q11/00, B08B13/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61Q11/00, A61K8/0208
European ClassificationA61K8/02C, A61Q11/00