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Publication numberUS3453897 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 8, 1969
Filing dateFeb 5, 1964
Priority dateFeb 5, 1964
Publication numberUS 3453897 A, US 3453897A, US-A-3453897, US3453897 A, US3453897A
InventorsAdinolfi Joseph N
Original AssigneeAlbert A Adinolfi, Adinolfi Joseph N
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Hydrant locking device
US 3453897 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 8, 1969 Sheet Filed Feb. 5, 1964 Q n mmm w j m A MN 0 Ho J. M w s i mm W 4 Q Q 3 Nu QM k E vw July 8, 1969 J. N. ADINOLFI HYDRANT LOCKING DEVICE Filed Feb. 5. 1964 :P Of3 Sheet FIG. 3

FIG. 5

INVENTOR. f0 SEFH /V. AD/A/OLF/ ATTUKA/EYS J. N. ADINOLFI HYDRANT LOCKING DEVICE July 8, 1969 She et Filed Feb. 5, 1964 m T .N m 0; m WWW United States Patent US. Cl. 74-8915 4 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A locking device and a tool in combination for a hydrant having a supply valve, a standpipe, a support plate with a central bore over said standpipe, a yoke secured to said plate with a bore coaxial with said plate bore, a bonnet over said yoke with a bore coaxial with said yoke bore, said combination comprising an external flange around said bonnet concentric with the bore therein, a valve-actuating stem passing through said plate bore into said yoke bore, a rotatable rod mounted for axial movement above and spaced from said stem projecting through said bonnet bore, clutch means in said yoke bore for interengaging said stem and said rod, and spring means spacing said rod from said interengaging clutch means in a locked position, whereby applying a force against said spring means to operate said clutch means interengages said rod and said stern so that the turning of said rod imparts motion to said stem, and a tool having a wrench for engaging said rod, a catch member for slidably engaging said bonnet flange and an arm for applying leverage against said spring means and for turning said rod.

This invention relates to a locking device for stem operated apparatus and more particularly to a device to prevent tampering with fire hydrants and the like.

Fire hydrants are for the purpose of supplying water with which to fight fires in order to protect life and property. The opening of hydrants by persons unauthorized to do so has been a source of trouble, inconvenience and danger. Such unauthorized opening of hydrants creates hazards due to the reduction of water pressure throughout the system and the flooding of thoroughfares and private property. In certain areas and at certain times of the year, moreover, water supplies tend to run short, and unauthorized openings result in the unnecessary waste of water. Time and money are also lost by the required constant surveillance to detect and labor to shut off opened hydrants.

It is therefore an object of this invention to alleviate those problems. It is a further object to provide a means for markedly decreasing the facility with which hydrants can be opened by unauthorized persons. Another object is to provide a device to prevent tampering with valves and other shaft operated devices and the like. Other objects of the invention will be in part obvious and in part discussed hereinbelow.

Referring to the drawings, it will be seen that:

FIGURE 1 is a perspective view and shows the upper portion of a hydrant;

FIGURE 2 is an axial section of the hydrant in FIG- URE 1 and shows the locking device of the invention in the normally inoperative position;

FIGURE 3 is an axial section as in FIGURE 2 and shows the locking device in the operative position for opening and closing the hydrant;

FIGURE 4 is a horizontal section taken along the line 44 in FIGURE 3;

FIGURE 5 is a perspective view of a tool for the operation of a hydrant having the locking devices of the invention;

FIGURE 6 is an axial section of the interior mechanism of a hydrant and shows another embodiment of the invention;

FIGURE 7 is an axial section as in FIGURE 6 and shows still another embodiment of the invention; and

FIGURE 8 is a horizontal section, along the line 88 of FIGURE 7 and shows additional detail of that device.

FIGURE 1 shows a hydrant 10 generally having a standpipe 12 (partially shown) and a bonnet 14 secured thereto, e.g., by bolts and nuts 13. The bonnet has a flange 16 around its top. Through the bonnet protrudes a rod 18 which, because it has a five-sided end, is commonly called a pentagon, and which is for opening and closing a valve (not shown) located in the water main at the base of the standpipe 12.

In FIGURES 2 and 3 it can be seen that a support plate 20 is seated on the top edge of the standpipe 12. Fitted over the plate 20 and the standpipe end is the bonnet 14 whose lower inner periphery has a recess to accommodate the parts. The center of the support plate has a recessed portion 22 and a bore 24. Seated above and secured to the top of the plate 20 is a yoke 26 having a bore 28 and a threaded recess 30. The yoke bore 28 and plate bore 24 are coaxial as are their respective recesses 30, 22. Through those two bores passes a stem 32 having a threaded upper end 34. The stem 32 passes downwardly from the yoke 26 through the plate 20 into the standpipe 12 wherein it is connected to a shaft (not shown) of the valve in the water main and serves to open and shut the valve as will be described below. A packing gland 23 is located in the plate recess 22 to compress a packing material around the stem to prevent leakage of water from within the standpipe 12. A bolt 27 or the like secures the gland 23.

Within the yoke bore 28 and recess 30 is a rotatable collar 36 having a flange 38 resting on the shoulder 40 formed by the recess 30. The interior of the collar has threads 42 at the lower end and is enlarged at the upper end to provide a shoulder 44. The upper end of the collar has a number of indentations which form teeth or cogs 52 at that end for a purpose to be discussed.

Loosely fitted over the upper portion of the collar 36 and screwed into the threaded recess 3'!) of the yoke is a bushing 46. The bushing has a hexagonal flange 48 which seats on the top edge of the yoke 26. The lower end of the bushing 46 is closely spaced from the flange 38 of the collar 36. Thus, the collar 36 is free to rotat within the bushing 46 and the bore 28, but its vertical movement is confined by the lower end of the bushing and the shoulder 40 of the yoke recess.

The top of the bonnet 14 has a bore 54 therethrough which is coaxial with the yoke and plate bores 28 and 24. The pentagon 18 projects through the bonnet bore 54. As mentioned, the pentagon 18 is a rod having, customarily, a pentagonal upper end as well as an external flange 56 about intermediate its ends and a recessed cavity 58 from its lower end longitudinally upward a goodly portion of its length. In addition, the lower end of the pentagon has a number of indentations 60 which form teeth or cogs 62 that correspond to the cogs 52 of the collar 36.

A stifr coil spring 64, desirably requiring a force in the order of several hundred pounds to compress, is located within the pentagon cavity 58 and the enlarged interior portion of the collar 36, and is seated against the end of the cavity 58 and the shoulder 44, respectively, thereof. In the normally inoperative position, as shown in FIG- URE '2, the spring 64 serves to urge the pentagon 18 upwardly away from the collar. The flange 56 on the pentagon limits the upward movement by hearing against the underside of the bonnet 14. In that position the pentagon can be rotated without operating the hydrant valve.

To open or shut the hydrant valve, it is necessary to depress the pentagon 18 against the strong resistance of the spring 64 until the pentagons cogs 62 engage the cogs 52 of the collar 36, as shown in FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4 shows a section taken along the line 44 of FIGURE 3 from which the engagement of the collar cogs 52 and the pentagon cogs 62 as well as the spring 64 and the bushing flange 48 can be seen. The pentagon is then rotated in the appropriate direction and causes the collar 36 to rotate. Since the vertical movement of the collar is limited, as previously described, and the valve mechanism to which the stem 32 is connected prevents rotation of the stem, when the collar 36 is rotated, the collar threads 42 engaging the stern threads 34 cause the stem 32 to move vertically in a direction depending on the direction of rotation of the engaged collar-pentagon. The vertical movement of the stem, directly or indirectly, serves to open and close the valve in the water supply main.

Other commonly used valve mechanisms require a rotary movement for their operation. The means depicted in FIGURE 6 is an embodiment of the invention adaptable for such valves.

In FIGURE 6, wherein parts corresponding to those shown in FIGURES 2 and 3 are identified by like reference numerals, the stem 32 is not threaded, but rather has a flange 66, a recessed upper end 68 and indentations 69 at the upper end which form teeth or cogs 70 corresponding to the cogs 62 of the pentagon 18. The bushing 46 is screwed into the threaded yoke recess 30 and its lower end serves to limit vertical movement of the stem 32 by being closely spaced from the flange 66 which rests on the yoke shoulder 40. A stifl spring 64 seated in the pentagons cavity 58 and the recessed end 68 of the stem separates those elements in the normally inoperative position.

For operation, the pentagon is depressed against the strong resistance of the spring 64 so that the cogs 62 engage the cogs 70 of the stem 32, in similar manner as shown in FIGURE 3, and the pentagon is rotated causing the stem 32 to rotate. The vertical movement of the stem is limited, as mentioned, and the rotary movement is transmitted to the valve mechanism in the main to turn the supply of water to the hydrant on and oif.

Another embodiment to transfer rotary motion to the valve, using the elements shown in FIGURES 2 and 3 modified somewhat, is shown in FIGURE 7. The collar threads 42 and stem threads 34 are replaced by a key and slot arrangement or, as shown, particularly in section in FIGURE 8, a series of interengaging splines 72 on the end of the stem 32 and in the recess 74 of the collar 36 so that the stem and collar are locked together in rotary movement. The splines 72, however, are loose enough to provide a slidable engagement of the stem 32 within the collar 36 to permit vertical movement of the stem 32. Vertical movement of the collar is limited as described in conjunction with FIGURE 2. Upward movement of the stem 32 is limited by the end of the splined collar recess 74 and downward movement of the stem is prevented by a thrust flange 76 thereon bearing against the packing gland 23. Thus, when the pentagon 18 and collar 36 are engaged, as shown in FIGURE 3, and the pentagon is rotated, the collar rotates and the splines 72 cause the stem 32 to rotate to operate the valve. Furthermore, depending on the valve mechanism, the stem is also free to move vertically.

A tool 78 is provided to facilitate the operation of the hydrant. As shown in FIGURES 3 and 5, the tool comprises an arm secured to a wrench 82 having a fivesided interior adapted to fit over the pentagon 18, a catch member 84 is pivoted to the wrench 82 opposite the arm 80 by a pin 86. The catch 84 is designed to fit over the bonnet flange 16 and is spaced from the wrench 82 a distance so that when fitted on the bonnet, the wrench will engage the pentagon 18. The wrench 82 and arm 80 are to turn the pentagon and also, because the pentagon must be depressed to operate the valve, to exert simultaneously a relatively great downward force on the pentagon against the pressure of the spring 64. The tool 78 is designed to enable an authorized person to perform easily the two operations necessary to operate the hydrant. This is done by engaging the catch member 84 on the bonnet flange 16, lowering the wrench 82 over the pentagon 18, and exerting both downward and rotary forces on the arm 80. The arm, of suitable length, gives suflicient leverage for easily applying both forces. Without such a tool, it would be very diflicult to operate the hydrant. It should be apparent that the catch member 84 can be on the same side of the wrench 82 as the arm 80, and the downward force to the pentagon 18 is applied by an upward force on the arm.

It is to be appreciated that the apparatus of the invention can be used in applications other than in hydrants where a rotary force, directly or indirectly, is used to operate a device and it is desired to make it difficult or virtually impossible for unauthorized persons to tamper.

I claim:

1. A locking device and a tool in combination for a hydrant having a supply valve, a standpipe, a support plate with a central bore over said standpipe, a yoke secured to said plate with a bore coaxial with said plate bore, a bonnet over said yoke with a bore coaxial with said yoke bore, said combination comprising an external flange around said bonnet concentric with the bore therein, a valve-actuating stem passing through said plate bore into said yoke bore, a rotatable rod mounted for axial movement above and spaced from said stem projecting through said bonnet bore, clutch means in said yoke bore for interengaging said stern and said rod, and spring means spacing said rod from said interengaging clutch means in a locked position, whereby applying a force against said spring means to operate said clutch means interengages said rod and said stern so that the turning of said rod imparts motion to said stem, and a tool having a wrench for engaging said rod, a catch member for slidably engaging said bonnet flange and an arm for applying leverage against said spring means and for turning said rod.

2. The combination defined in claim 1 wherein said flange is on the top of said bonnet.

3. A locking device and a tool in combination for a hydrant having a supply valve, a standpipe, a support plate with a central bore over said standpipe, a yoke secured to said plate with a bore coaxial with said plate bore and a bonnet over said yoke with a bore coaxial with said yoke bore, said combination comprising an external flange around said bonnet concentric with the bore therein, a rotatable collar in said yoke bore having internal threads, means to arrest vertical movement of said collar, a valve-actuating stern mounted for axial move-ment passing through said plate bore and having threads engaged with said collar threads, a rotatable rod mounted for axial movement above and spaced from said collar projecting through said bonnet bore, interengaging means on the adjacent faces of said collar and said rod, and spring means spacing said rod from said collar in a locked position, whereby applying a force against said spring means interengages said rod and said collar so that turning of said rod turns the collar and said threads therein impart axial motion to said stem, and a tool having a wrench for engaging said rod, a catch member for slidably engaging said bonnet flange and an arm for applying leverage against said spring means and for turning said rod.

4. A locking device and a tool in combination for a hydrant having a supply valve, a standpipe, a support plate With a central bore over said standpipe, a yoke secured to said plate with a bore coaxial with said plate bore and a bonnet over said yoke with a bore coaxial with said yoke bore, said combination comprising an external flange around said bonnet concentric with the bore there in, a valve-actuating stem mounted for rotary movement passing through said plate bore into said yoke bore, means to arrest vertical movement of said stem, a rotatable rod mounted for axial movement above and spaced from said stem projecting through said bonnet bore, interengagable means on the adjacent faces of said stem and said rod, and spring means spacing said rod from said stem in a locked position, whereby applying a force against said spring means interengages said rod and said stem so that the turning of said rod imparts rotary motion to said stem, and a tool having a Wrench for engaging said rod, a catch member for slidably engaging said bonnet fiange and an arm for applying leverage against said spring means and for turning said rod.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 212,486 2/1879 Morgan 137307 893,184 7/1908 Mercer 251-77 XR 1,044,336 11/1912 Ballard 137-272 XR 1,092,062 3/1914 Loney et a1. 251-292 XR 1,887,344 1/1932 Wise 251-292 957,592 5/1910 Allen 251-266 990,989 5 1911 Knickerbacker 137-305 1,172,959 2/1916 Dormon 137307 1,795,839 3/1931 Credle 251266 X 2,829,538 4/1958 Mueller 25196 X 3,210,040 10/1965 Thurlow 25196 CLARENCE R. GORDON, Primary Examiner.

R. GERARD, Assistant Examiner.

US. Cl. X.R.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US212486 *Aug 27, 1878Feb 18, 1879 Improvement in street-hydrants
US893184 *May 13, 1907Jul 14, 1908Allen I MercerSafety valve-stem.
US957592 *Apr 15, 1905May 10, 1910Norwall Mfg CompanyValve.
US990989 *Jun 14, 1909May 2, 1911Eddy Valve CompanyFire-hydrant.
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3556131 *Aug 29, 1968Jan 19, 1971Sota AngeloProtection device for fire hydrants
US3585867 *Jun 2, 1969Jun 22, 1971English Electric Co LtdActuators
US3586019 *Dec 18, 1968Jun 22, 1971Waterous CoFire hydrant
US3840041 *Jan 25, 1971Oct 8, 1974Mcmurray BMagnetic lock and wrench
US3916939 *Nov 25, 1974Nov 4, 1975Gillard ClarenceLocktop fire hydrant
US4057114 *Jan 7, 1976Nov 8, 1977Anderson Paul JHand-held ice auger
US4137945 *May 25, 1977Feb 6, 1979W. A. Deutsher Pty. Ltd.Gas tap
US4356839 *Sep 14, 1981Nov 2, 1982Anthony VoynovichTamper resistant valve actuator for fire hydrant
US4390038 *Feb 12, 1982Jun 28, 1983Salvato Guido AMagnetically locked valve
US4633896 *Feb 28, 1986Jan 6, 1987Mcgard, Inc.Operating nut for fire hydrant
US4790342 *Nov 30, 1987Dec 13, 1988Milton SegalFire hydrant valve actuator
US4936336 *Oct 30, 1989Jun 26, 1990Mcgard, Inc.Tamperproof construction for hydrant actuating nut
US5525267 *Apr 29, 1994Jun 11, 1996U.S.A. Zama, Inc.Tamper resistant limit cap
US5630442 *Jun 7, 1996May 20, 1997Mcgard, Inc.Tamper resistant construction for hydrant actuating nut
US5632301 *Jun 7, 1996May 27, 1997Mcgard, Inc.Tamper resistant construction for hydrant
US5722450 *Mar 20, 1997Mar 3, 1998Mcgard, Inc.Tamper resistant construction for hydrant
US5727590 *Mar 20, 1997Mar 17, 1998Mcgard, Inc.Tamper resistant construction for hydrant actuating nut
US6901950Jun 8, 2004Jun 7, 2005James E. BurtFire hydrant locking device
WO1996028679A1 *Mar 15, 1996Sep 19, 1996John Mcdermott Holdings Pty. Ltd.An improved tap spindle assembly
Classifications
U.S. Classification74/89.38, 251/96, 192/69.82, 251/291, 251/267, 192/34, 137/296
International ClassificationE03B9/02, E03B9/00
Cooperative ClassificationE03B9/02
European ClassificationE03B9/02