Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3455485 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 15, 1969
Filing dateMar 20, 1967
Priority dateMar 20, 1967
Publication numberUS 3455485 A, US 3455485A, US-A-3455485, US3455485 A, US3455485A
InventorsCrownover Lawrence T
Original AssigneeCrownover Lawrence T
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Automatic cycling mechanism
US 3455485 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 5, 1969 fr. CROWNOVER 3,455,485

AUTOMATIC CYCLING MECHANISM Filed March 20, 1967 0 I /4 N 5 52 O 33 2 3. a 2. Q

M 6 7 4 7 7 7 6 \\v\\ \\\q \\v- :1 Ag 2 0 2 B \m 7 8 9 4 0 H 6 6 FIG. 4

INVENTOR. LAWRENCE T. CROWNOVER 65 FIG.3

3,455,485 AUTOMATIC CYCLING MECHANISM Lawrence T. Crownover, 942 Brown Thrush, Wichita, Kans. 67212 Continuation-im art of application Ser. No. 541,939,

Apr. 7, 1966. This application Mar. 20, 1967, Ser.

Int. Cl. B65d 83/14 US. Cl. 22270 24 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE This invention provides novel fluid operated automatic cycling means for periodically releasing a predetermined quantity of pressure fluid from a container, such as an aerosol can. The cycling mechanism comprises a compressed gas operated timing device and a quick acting valve device. The aerosol can may contain any suitable active and inactive ingredients that can be discharged through a spray nozzle. The inactive ingredient is usually the pressurizing fluid. The active ingredient may be aspirating fluids, germicides, medicines, pesticides, deodorants, insecticides, and so forth, that are desired to be automatically discharged from an aerosol can in selected quantities at predetermined intervals. For example, the mechanism can discharge fluid from an aerosol can for ten seconds every hour until the can is empty or until the cycling mechanism is deactivated.

This invention relates to automatic cycling mechanisms.

This is a continuation-in-part of pending, but now abandoned, United States patent application Ser. No. 541,939 filed Apr. 7, 1966, entitled Compressed Gas Operated Bait Bucket Aerator of Lawrence T. Crownover.

This invention provides novel fluid operated automatic cycling means for periodically releasing a predetermined quantity of the contents of a container. More particularly, the novel automatic cycling mechanism comprises a compressed gas operated timing device and a quick acting valve device. The container industry has recognized a need for suitable means for automatically releasing or discharging any contents of a container, such as an aerosol can, at selected and/ or controlled intervals and in selected and/or controlled quantities. For example, aspirating fluids, germicides, medicines, deodorants, insecticides, and so forth, are desired to be automatically discharged in an atomized spray from an aerosol can at selected intervals and in selected quantities without any attention being required by the user once the invention has been set into operation. Another desirable feature is the elimination of electrical cords, batteries, spring motors, and/or escapement mechanisms that require winding.

An object of this invention is the provision of a novel automatic cycling mechanism.

Another object of this invention is the provision of a novel gas operated timing and/ or metering device especially suitable for use with a pressure packaged container.

Another object of this invention is the provision of a novel pressure packaged container for use with an automatic cycling mechanism of the character described.

A still further object of this invention is the combination of a pressure packaged container, such as an aerosol can, with an automatic cycling mechanism of the character described for periodically releasing fluid from the aero sol can in the quantity desired.

A still further object of this invention is the provision of an automatic cycling mechanism packaged as a portable unit adapted to receive and operate an aerosol can that can be readily replaced when the contents of the can have been depleted.

States Patent Another object of this invention is the provision of a novel aerosol container especially adapted to supply pressure fluid for operating the automatic cycling mechanism set forth in the preceding paragraphs.

Yet another object of this invention is the provision of an automatic cycling mechanism having a timing and metering valve controlling a snap-action valve device. The snap-action valve, when open, admits fluid under pressure to drive an actuating mechanism in one direction for a predetermined distance. When the actuating mechanism forces the valve to snap into a closed position, a return spring means then automatically biases the actuating mechanism in a return direction along the same path at a rate determined by the timing and metering valve. When the actuating mechanism reaches the end of the return path, it bottoms against the closed snap-action valve device and causes the same to again snap into the open position to admit pressure fluid that drives the actuating mechanism back in the direction from whence it came. Thus the cycle automatically repeats itself so long as the timing and metering valve is open to some degree and there is an adequate supply of pressure fluid available to overpower the return spring means.

The invention further resides in certain novel features of construction, combinations, and arrangements of parts and further objects and advantages of the invention will be apparent to those skilled in the art to which it pertains from the following description of the present preferred embodiment thereof described with reference to the accompanying drawings, which form a part of this specification, wherein the same reference numerals indicate corresponding parts throughout the several views, and in which:

FIG. 1 is an elevational view of a device embodying the invention with a majority of the parts broken away and in cross-section for showing details of the invention;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged cross-sectional view along line 22 in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a plan view of a leaf spring forming a part of snap-action valve means in FIG. 1 and FIG. 4 is an enlarged view of a depressible nozzle and valve means of an aerosol can.

Referring to FIG. 1, reference numeral 10 indicates generally an aerating or atomizing device embodying the invention useful for discharging a prescribed quantity or dose of aerosol fluid into the atmosphere at selected time intervals. More particularly, reference numeral 11 indicates generally a pressure packaged or pressurized container referred to herein as an aerosol can. The aerosol can 11 may obtain any desired fluid such as a gas, a liquid, or a mixture of a gas and a liquid. Moreover, the

p can 11 may contain in addition to a pressure fluid, a finely particulated solid such as, for example, talcum powder. Most aerosol cans on the market today contain both active and inactive ingredients. The pressure fluid is usually designated as. an inactive ingredient. Freon 12, which is inert and relatively harmless, is a pressure fluid commonly used in aerosol cans now on the market. However, it is to be understood that other pressure fluids may be used as desired.

The active ingredients for use in the can 11 may be selected from a group that includes insecticides, deodorants, medicines, germicides, aspirating fluids, and so forth. It is to be understood that the selection of the active ingredient and the pressurizing fluid for use in the aerosol can 11 does not form a part of this invention. However, for this invention to work there must be a source of pressure fluid. It is preferred that the pressure fluid be provided by the aerosol can 11.

AEROSOL CAN The aerosol can 11 contains pressure fluid 12 and an active ingredient 13. The can 11 has a cylindrical side wall 14, and a circular bottom or lower end wall 15 integrally connected to and forming the lowermost end of the cylindrical wall 14. A circular upper or top end wall 16 is connected to the inner surface of the cylindrical side wall 14 and secured thereto in a manner to be described.

The top end wall 16 has a peripheral bead 17 that overlaps and is crimped over the upper peripheral end of the cylindrical wall 14. A polymeric sealant 18 is interposed between the inner wall of the bead 17 and the upper end of the cylindrical wall 14 for providing a leakproof seal.

As best seen in FIGS. 1 and 4, the upper end wall 16 is provided at a central portion thereof with a nozzle and valve means indicated generally by reference numeral 20. A cylindrical valve housing 21 has attached at a lower reduced end portion 22 thereof a tubular siphoning member 23 that extends to the bottom of the cam 11 and rests on the end wall 15 for siphoning active ingredient 13 therethrough into the valve housing 21. The pressure fluid 12 is preferably Freon 12 gas and is referred to herein as an inactive ingredient. The pressure fluid 12 flows into the valve housing 21 via one or more horizontal peripheral ports 24 formed in the housing 21, FIG. 4. A valve member 25, preferably made of a polymeric plastic, has a cylindrical body portion 26 slideably disposed within the valve housing 21. A lower end of the valve body 26 is provided with a cylindrical stud 27 for centering a resilient biasing means 28. Preferably the resilient biasing means 28 is an helical spring preferably enclosed in a flexible impervious cover or jacket, not shown, for protecting the same from the contents of the can 11.

The upper end of the valve body 26 is provided with a cylindrical plunger 31. A finger engageable nozzle 32 is seated upon and secured to the outer end of the valve plunger 31. The active ingredient 13 siphoned through the tubular member 23 by the pressure fluid admitted to the port 24, into the valve housing 21 travels through an annular passage about the valve body 26 and within the inner wall of the valve housing 21, through a closeable port 33 that is opened when the nozzle 32 and the valve member 25 are pressed downwardly either by an operator or a mechanically operated finger 35, FIG. 1. The mixture of ingredients 12 and 13 passes upwardly into a vertical cylindrical passage 36 both in the valve body 26 and the plunger portion 31, into an L-shaped passage 37 in the nozzle 32, and thence into the atmosphere.

The L-shaped passage 37 is preferably cylindrical and terminates in a frusto-conical shaped port 38. When the nozzle 32 and the valve member 25 are biased outwardly by the spring 28 as shown in FIG. 4, the port 33 is isolated from the inner chamber of the valve body 26 and sealed ed by a washer-shaped packing member 40. The packing member 40 is disposed about the outer plunger portion 31 of the valve 25 and is adapted to be engaged by and to cushion the upper shoulder of the valve body 26. If desired, there can be more than one passage 33 as shown in FIG. 4. The packing member 40 is secured between the upper end of the valve housing 21 and a cup-shaped or doughnut-shaped annular closure member or insert indicated generally by the reference numeral 41. The closure member or insert 41 permits the nozzle and valve means 20 to be secured as a unit in the aerosol can 11.

More particularly, the packing member 40 is biased between the upper end of the valve housing 21 and a flat 2:11- nular portion 42. The outer periphery of the flat annular portion 42 is connected to a central cylindrical or tubular portion 43, FIG. 4. The tubular portion 43 is integrally connected at a lower end thereof to an annular disk-shaped portion 44. The annular portion 44 is integrally connected to a cylindrical portion 45 that extends parallel about the central portion 43. The cylindrical portion 45 terminates in an U-shaped annular channel portion 46. The channel portion 46 is adapted to seat over an annular or circular bead 47 formed at the inner periphery of the end wall 16 of the can 11. A sealant 48, similar to the sealant 18, is interposed between the bead 47 and the bight of the channel-shaped portion 46 of the insert 41.

The bottom end wall 15 of the aerosol can 11 is provided with an inverted nozzle and valve means 20' that is opposed to the similar upper valve means 20. However, the nozzle 32 has been removed from the valve means 20'. Otherwise, the valve means 20 and 20' are similar in every detail. The upper end of a valve housing 21 is connected to a pressure fluid conduit or tube 50 that extends upwardly into the aerosol can 11 and terminates at a point adjacent the upper end 16 of the can 11. The bottom end wall 15 is concave upwardly and is integrally formed with the lower edge of the cylindrical wall 14 of the can 11. The lower valve means 20 forms a part of an insert 41 similar to the insert 41 described in connection with the top end wall 16 of the can 11. The cylindrical plunger 31' of the valve means 20 extends downwardly and is fitted into an adapter block 53. The adapter block 53 is cylindrical and seated in a similarly-shaped opening 54 in a rectangular pad or base 55 of the device 10.

AUTOMATIC CYCLING MECHANISM The device 10 is operated by the finger 35 depressing the nozzle 32 of the valve means 20 for discharging aerosol fluid to the atmosphere from the upper end of the can 11. An automatic cycling mechanism, indicated generally by reference numeral 60, is supplied with the pressure fluid 12 from the can 11 through the valve means 20 and into an L-shaped passage 61 in the block 53, an horizontal passage 62 in the base 55, and an L-shaped 63 in a cylindrical member or block 64. The block 64 is seated in the base 55 in a manner similar to the block 53. Preferably, the blocks 53 and 64 are of a polymeric plastic and the base 55 is of a similar material.

The finger 35 comprises an adjustable set screw having a knurled head portion 65 for easy adjustment by an operator. The finger 35 is threaded into an outer end of an horizontal arm 66. The arm 66 forms a part of an L shaped actuating member 67 having a vertical push-pull rod portion 68. The lower end of the rod 68 is threaded into a cylindrical piston 70, preferably made of a polymeric plastic. The piston 70 is slideably disposed in a cylinder member 71. The piston 70 is biased downwardly by resilient biasing means comprising an helical spring 72. A lower end of the spring 72 bears against an upper sur face of the piston 70. An upper end of the spring 72 bears against a disk-shaped upper end member 73 closing the end of the cylinder 71.

The end member 73 carries an aerosol can retainer member 74. One end of the retainer member 74 is secured to the member 73 by means of two screws 75. An outer end of the retainer member 74 is provided with a lip portion 76 for having the peripheral edge or bead 17 of the can 11 inserted therebeneath for holding the same securely against the base 55 of the device 10. This is necessary because there must be suflicient reaction force to hold the can 11 down against the base 55 for depressing a valve plunger 31 of the valve means 20' in the bottom wall 15 of the can 11. This is necessary to provide a continuous supply of pressure fluid 12 through the passages 61, 62, and 63 to snap-action valve means, indicated generally by the reference numeral 80 in the cylinder member 71. The lower end of the cylinder member 71 is telescoped or press-fitted over the cylindrical block 54 for preventing the escape of pressure fluid therefrom. Moreover, the lower face or end wall of the piston 70 is provided with a suitable packing member 81 secured in place by a broad flat washer 82 and a cap screw 83 threaded into the piston 70. The packing member 81 may be of leather or any other suitable material and is suitably dished and provided with a feathered peripheral edge for assuring an adequate seal for preventing the transgression of pressure fluid therepast from a pressure chamber 84 defined by the piston 70 and the upper surface of the block 64.

SNAP-ACTION VALVE MEANS The snap-action valve means 80 comprises a thin leaf spring 85 as seen in FIGS. 1, 2 and 3. It has the opposite ends thereof disposed in horizontal and opposed parallel slots formed in two laterally spaced posts 86 and 87. The posts 86 and 87 are of a rectangular cross-section and are set in correspondingly-shaped slots 88 and 89 formed in the upper end of the block 64. The posts 86 and 87 are spaced close enough together to require that the leaf spring 85 be bowed in a concave or convex direction by a suitable distance when inserted in place. When the leaf spring 85 is bowed downwardly as seen in FIG. 1, a midportion thereof bears against a T-shaped valve 90, FIG. 1.

The valve 90 has an erect cylindrical stem or plunger portion 91 and a cylindrical or disk-shaped poppet valve portion 92. The valve portion 92 is disposed in a cylindrical valve chamber 93 formed in the block 64 that is closed by an annular valve seat 94 preferably press-fitted into the upper end of the valve chamber 93 in the block 64. The valve plunger 91 reciprocates freely in the seat 94. The seat 94 has a central cylindrical opening 95 formed therein. The valve 90 is urged to a closed position with the seat 94 by a conically-shaped helical spring 96 seated on an annular bottom floor or surface of the valve chamber 93 in the block 64.

So long as the valve 90 is held open by the leaf spring 85 as shown in FIG. 1, pressure fluid 12 escapes from the can 11 via the tube 50, the passages 61, 62, and 63 into the valve chamber 93. The fluid then escapes from the chamber 93 through the annular passage between the valve seat 94 and the central opening 95 into the chamber 84. This causes the piston 70 to be driven upwardly against the resistance of the spring 72 and causes a flexible means 100 to be drawn taut. Preferably the flexible means 100 is a nylon cord suitably secured at the upper end thereof to a loop 101 connected to the head of the cap screw 83. The lower end of the cord 100 is suitably secured to an eyelet member 102 clamped to the leaf spring 85. When the cord 100 is drawn taut, the leaf spring 85 is snapped upwardly into a convex bowed position.

It has been found that by connecting the eyelet member 102 at a point midway between one end of the spring 85 and a center portion of the leaf spring 85 that the leaf spring 85 does not move in lost motion, hang, or reach a null point between the open and closed positions before the snap of the spring occurs. It has been found when the cord is connected to the center of the spring 85 that a null condition will occur and the valve will not promptly snap into an open or closed position in the manner desired. It is not desired for the spring 85 to partially open or close and then respectively snap to a closed or open position but it is desired that the spring 85 quickly move from a closed to an open position and then move from the open position to the closed position in one fast motion referred to herein as snap-action.

Referring to FIG. 2, the eyelet member 102 has an eyelet portion 103 and opposed parallel U-shaped clamping legs 104 and 105 that embrace a portion 106 of reduced width formed in the spring 85. By reducing the width of the leaf spring 85 as shown in FIG. 2, the eyelet member 102 is prevented from slipping longitudinally of the leaf spring 85. Accordingly, the leaf spring 85 is provided with a necked portion formed by U-shaped grooves 107 and 108, as best seen in FIG. 3.

TIMING MEANS The distance that the piston 70 will travel depends upon the length of the cord 100. The length of time that is required for the piston to travel upwardly is dependent upon the helical spring 72 and the setting of a timing means indicated generally by the reference numeral 110. This timing means 110 comprises a needle valve threaded into an horizontal opening in the cylinder member 71 and the block 64. The needle valve 110 controls the escape of pressure fluid from the chamber 84 through an L-shaped passage 111. The time it takes for the piston 70 to travel in a return or downward direction once the valve 90 has been snapped to a closed position depends primarily upon the setting of the needle valve 110 and only secondarily upon the size and strength of the spring 72 and the gage pressure of the fluid 12.

When the piston 70 reaches the end of the downward stroke, the loop 101 on the cap screw 83 will engage a midportion of the leaf spring and cause the spring 85 to snap into a valve opening position as shown in FIG. 1. As soon as the valve is snapped open, the piston 70 is again forced upwardly by the pressure fluid 12 to cause the finger 35 to release the nozzle 32 and eventually permit the valve spring 28 to cause the valve 25 to close off the port 33 in conjunction with the packing member 40 of the valve means 20. As soon as the piston 70 has reached the upper limit of its stroke as defined by the length of the cord 100, the leaf spring 85 is snapped to a valve closing position and the timing means defined by the needle valve controls the length of time it will take for the piston 70 to complete its downward stroke and cause the valve 90 to be again snapped into the open position.

As can be seen from FIG. 1, there may be a time lapse before the finger 35 engages the nozzle 32 of the valve means 20. Moreover, the finger 35 will continue its downward stroke after engaging the nozzle 32 and thus release aerosol fluid into the atmosphere. Aerosol fluid will continue to be released into the atmosphere until the finger 35 reaches a point of disengagement on its return or upward stroke at which time the finger 35 loses contact with the nozzle 32 of the valve means 20.

By properly adjusting the timer 110 and by adjusting the finger 35 so as to control the length of stroke and the time it takes to travel the length of the stroke for releasing aerosol fluid from the aerosol can, a prescribed quantity or dose or aerosol fluid can be discharged into the atmosphere at controlled time intervals.

What is claimed is:

1. An automatic cycling mechanism comprising, cylinder means adapted to be connected to a source of pressure fluid, piston means reciprocably disposed in said cylinder means, first valve means controlling the flow of the pressure fluid to said cylinder means for acting against said piston means and urging thesame in one direction in said cylinder means, resilient means biasing said piston means in a return direction in said cylinder means, means for opening said valve means when said piston means have traveled a predetermined distance in said return direction, means for closing said valve means when said piston means have traveled a predetermined distance in said one direction, and second valve means for bleeding the pressure fluid from said cylinder means at a selected rate for controlling the rate said resilient means biases said piston means in said return direction.

2. An automatic cycling mechanism as set forth in claim 1, further comprising means for controlling the rate of admission of the pressure fluid to said cylinder means past said first valve means.

3. An automatic cycling mechanism as set forth in claim 1, wherein said second valve means is an adjustable needle valve.

4. An automatic-cycling mechanism as set forth in claim 1, wherein said first valve means comprises means forming an orifice, orifice valve means, spring means biasing said orifice valve means into closed relationship with said orifice means, and snap-action spring means comprising a leaf spring when bowed in one direction is adapted to hold said orifice valve means in an open position for admitting pressure fluid through said orifice means and when bowed in an opposite direction is adapted to permit said spring means to bias said orifice valve means to a closed position relative to said orifice means,

and flexible means of predetermined length connecting said leaf spring to said piston means for causing said leaf spring to be snapped from said bowed position in said one direction that holds said orifice valve means in an open position to said bowed position in said opposite direction that permits said orifice valve means to be biased to said closed position when said flexible means have been drawn taut by said piston means.

5. An automatic cycling mechanism as set forth in claim 4, wherein said flexible means is a cord that can have the length thereof increased to increase the cycling time, and decreased to decrease the cycling time.

6. An automatic cycling mechanism comprising, first means adapted to be connected to a source of pressure fluid, second means reciprocably disposed in said first means, third means controlling the flow of the pressure fluid to said first means for acting against said second means and urging the same in one direction in said first means, fourth means biasing said second means in a reverse direction in said first means, fifth means for opening said third means when said second means have traveled a predetermined distance in said reverse direction, sixth means for closing said third means when said second means have traveled a predetermined distance in said one direction, and seventh means for bleeding the pressure fluid from said first means at a selected rate for controlling the rate said fourth means biases said second means in said reverse direction.

7. An automatic cycling mechanism as set forth in claim 6, further comprising eighth means for controlling the rate of admission of the pressure fluid to said first means past said third means.

8. An automatic cycling mechanism as set forth in claim 6, wherein said seventh means is an adjustable needle valve.

9. In an automatic cycling mechanism of the character described means forming an orifice, orifice valve means, spring means biasing said orifice valve means into closed relationship with said orifice means, and snap-action spring means comprising a leaf spring, said leaf spring when bowed in one direction is adapted to hold said orifice valve means in an open position for admitting pressure fluid through said orifice means, and said leaf spring when bowed in an opposite direction is adapted to permit said orifice valve means to be moved to a closed position relative to said orifice means, and flexible means of predetermined length adapted to connect said leaf spring to a reciprocable member for causing said leaf spring to be snapped from said bowed position in said one direction that holds said orifice valve means is an open position to said bowed position in said opposite direction that permits said orifice valve means to be moved to said closed position when said flexible means have been drawn taut by the reciprocable member.

10. In an automatic cycling mechanism as set forth in claim 9, wherein said flexible means is a. cord that can have the length thereof increased to increase the cycling time, and decreased to decrease the cycling time.

11. In an automatic cycling mechanism as set forth in claim 9, wherein said flexible means is connected to said leaf spring at a location between the midportion of said leaf spring and an end thereof.

12. An automatic cycling mechanism comprising, expansion chamber means adapted to be connected to a source of pressure fluid, valve means controlling the flow of the pressure fluid to said expansion chamber means for expanding the same, means for contracting said expansion chamber means, means for closing said valve means when said expansion chamber means have expanded a predetermined amount, means for opening said valve means when said expansion chamber means have contracted a predetermined amount, and means for bleeding the pressure fluid from said expansion chamber means at a predetermined rate for controlling the contraction of said expansion chamber means.

13. An automatic cycling mechanism as set forth in claim 12, further comprising means for controlling the rate of admission of the pressure fluid to said expansion chamber means past said valve means.

14. An automatic cycling mechanism as set forth in claim 12, wherein said valve means comprises means forming an orifice, orifice valve means, said orifice valve means being adapted to be biased into closed relationship with said orfice means by the pressure fluid, and snapaction valve operating means when in one position adapted to hold said orifice valve means in an open position for admitting pressure fluid through said orifice means, and when in another position adapted to permit said orifice valve means to be biased to a closed position relative to said orifice means, and flexible connecting means of predetermined length connecting said valve operating means to a portion of said expansion chamber means for causing said valve operating means to be snapped from said one position that holds said orifice valve means in an open position to said another position that permits said orifice valve means to be biased to said closed position when said flexible connecting means have been drawn taut by the expansion of said expansible chamber.

15. An automatic cycling mechanism as set forth in claim 14, wherein said flexible connecting means is a cord that can have the length thereof adjusted to increase the cycling time by an increase in the cord length, and to decrease the cycling time by a decrease in the cord length.

16. An automatic cycling mechanism comprising, expansible chamber means adapted to be connected to a source of pressure fluid, first valve means controlling the flow of the pressure fluid to said expansible chamber means for expanding the same, means for contracting said expansible chamber means, means for opening said first valve means when said expansible chamber means have contracted a predetermined amount, means for closing said first valve means when said expansible chamber means have expanded a predetermined amount, and second valve means for bleeding the pressure fluid from said expansible chamber means at a predetermined rate.

17. An automatic cycling mechanism as set forth in claim 16 further comprising, actuating means drivingly connected to said expansible chamber means adapted to actuate a valve of an aerosol can for releasing pressure fluid therefrom through a nozzle.

18. An automatic cycling mechanism as set forth in claim 17, wherein the source of fluid pressure for operating the automatic cycling mechanism is the pressure fluid from the same aerosol can actuated by said actuating means.

19. A mechanism of the character described in combination with a source of pressure fluid having a depressible nozzle and valve means for containing pressure fluid therein, comprising, first means for depressing the valve means and releasing fluid directly from the fluid source through the nozzle, second means operated by the pressure fluid source for operating said first means in such a manner as to cause said first means to periodically depress the valve means and to release the same after a predetermined length of time to discharge a predetermined amount of fluid from the fluid source, and third means for automatically recycling said second means and causing said first means to depress the valve means at predetermined intervals.

20. A container adapted to contain under pressure both active and inactive fluid means comprising, first end means, second end means, side wall means connected to said first end means and said second end means for forming a container, valve means disposed in said first and second end means, each said valve means comprising tube means extending substantially the length of the container, valve plunger means disposed in one end of said tube means and extending through one of said end means,

means in said tube means biasing said plunger means outwardly through said one of said end means, seal means disposed about said plunger means inside the container and sandwiched between said one of said end means and said tube means for preventing the transgression of the fluid means therepast, means forming a passage in said plunger means extending through an outer end thereof for admitting the fluid means therethrough from said tube means to the outside of the container when said plunger means are depressed inwardly of the container, and the inner end of said passage means being in sealing engagement with and sealed off by said seal means for preventing admission of the fluid means therethrough when said plunger means is not depressed.

21. A container as set forth in claim 20, wherein each said valve means further comprises annular insert means carried by one of said end means and having a cup-shaped central portion disposed about an outer end of said tube means, and an outer end of said plunger means extends through the central opening of said insert means.

22. A container as set forth in claim 21, wherein each said insert means has a channel-shaped annular periphery sealingly secured to a central circular bead of said end means.

23. A container as set forth in claim 20, further comprising nozzle means carried by the upper end of said plunger means of one of said valve means.

24. In combination with an aerosol can having a valve for containing pressure fluid therein, means operated by pressure fluid from the aerosol can for automatically and continuously releasing at substantially equal intervals a predetermined amount of pressure fluid directly from the aerosol can by periodically opening and closing the valve of the aerosol can.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS ROBERT B. REEVES, Primary Examiner H. S. LANE, Assistant Examiner US. Cl. X.R. 222-335, 394, 504

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2613108 *Apr 1, 1949Oct 7, 1952Kraus George FFluid dispenser
US2695766 *Mar 3, 1953Nov 30, 1954Bridgeport Brass CoIntermittently acting fluid valving device
US2751114 *Oct 23, 1953Jun 19, 1956Bruce Greaves HermanLiquid dispensing apparatus
US2864534 *Apr 12, 1955Dec 16, 1958Virginia Smelting CompanyApparatus for simultaneously puncturing gas charged containers
US2973781 *Jul 16, 1959Mar 7, 1961Anthony CadellaAutomatic hydraulic timer valve
US3045925 *Sep 29, 1959Jul 24, 1962Giangualano Michael NMultiple spray apparatus
US3125135 *Aug 14, 1961Mar 17, 1964 Filling device with detachable flow coupling means
US3182857 *Aug 9, 1963May 11, 1965Bischoff Garth LPeriodically actuated aerosol dispenser
US3200998 *Jun 12, 1962Aug 17, 1965Union Carbide CorpLiquefied gas cylinder
US3326418 *Jan 21, 1966Jun 20, 1967Kropp Willis ADispensing device
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5246147 *Jul 13, 1992Sep 21, 1993Sil Medics Ltd.Liquid material dispenser
US5397028 *Sep 13, 1994Mar 14, 1995Jesadanont; MongkolAutomatic fluid dispenser and method
US8381951Aug 16, 2007Feb 26, 2013S.C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Overcap for a spray device
US8387827Mar 24, 2008Mar 5, 2013S.C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Volatile material dispenser
US8469244Aug 16, 2007Jun 25, 2013S.C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Overcap and system for spraying a fluid
US8556122Aug 16, 2007Oct 15, 2013S.C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Apparatus for control of a volatile material dispenser
US8590743May 10, 2007Nov 26, 2013S.C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Actuator cap for a spray device
US8746504Oct 17, 2013Jun 10, 2014S.C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Actuator cap for a spray device
DE8714805U1 *Nov 6, 1987May 11, 1988Sonderegger, BrunoTitle not available
Classifications
U.S. Classification222/645, 222/394, 222/504, 222/335
International ClassificationB65D83/16
Cooperative ClassificationB65D83/265
European ClassificationB65D83/26C