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Publication numberUS3455550 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 15, 1969
Filing dateSep 22, 1966
Priority dateSep 22, 1966
Publication numberUS 3455550 A, US 3455550A, US-A-3455550, US3455550 A, US3455550A
InventorsHall Raymond L
Original AssigneeHall Raymond L
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ski simulation apparatus
US 3455550 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 15, 1969 R. HALL 3,455,550

SKI SIMULATION APPARATUS Filed Sept. 22, 1966 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 FIG. 2

RAYMOND L. HALL VU 'IOR.

fizz 1 PEM- AGENT July 15, 1969 R. L. HALL 3,

SKI SIMULATION APPARATUS Filed Sept. 22, 1966 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 FIG. 3

RAYMOND L. HALL- PEA? AGENT United States Patent 0- 3,455,550 SKI SIMULATION APPARATUS Raymond L. Hall, 19 Hamilton Court, Whippany, NJ. 07981 Filed Sept. 22, 1966, Ser. No. 581,356

Int. Cl. A63g U.S. Cl. 27257 14 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE An apparatus for enabling the operator to simulate the movements found in downhill skiing and the like. The apparatus comprises a base having a sloped upper surface having a slot or opening therethrough. A ski-like member is disposed to engage and be substantially supported by at least one powered roller carried in the base. The ski-like member or short ski has a tiltable truck carrying at least one small roller adapted to rest on and engage the powered roller. A movable stop restricts any forward movement while permitting the ski to be canted to skew the ski for limited lateral movement of the ski on the roller.

This invention relates to apparatus whereupon an operator may simulate skiing by using various skiing motions and exercises.

Particularly this invention relates to apparatus providing a ski simulation whereby an operator may utilize the motions and exercises necessary to condition one for skiing and in so simulating the act of skiing to maintain and improve the techniques used in ski training and ski instruction.

More particularly this invention relates to an apparatus of a small size having a rotating roller adapted to support an operator upon one or two short ski-like members and by means of these members simulate skiing at a determined slope and speed. This apparatus includes rotary or sliding means positioned to support and to engage means on the ski-like members whereupon as the apparatus is operated the ski-like members are retained from forward motion while being responsive to motions and gyrations of the operator, the gyrations causing skewing and canting of the members while the operator is standing or crouching upon these skis.

Even more particularly this invention relates to an apparatus having one or more ski-like members, each having a foot retaining means adapted to slidably engage and retain street shoes and the like, each member being supported by a rotating roller and positioned as it is rotated 0 so as to impart to each ski-like member a motion adapted to cause the ski-like member to move laterally in a skewing motion on the apparatus in response to a canting movement applied to the ski-like members. Each ski-like member is forwardly retained by engaging means movable in a transverse retainer so as to prevent accidental dislodgment or unwanted forward motion of the member and operator while at the same time providing defining limits to the lateral traverse movement of the ski-like members upon the apparatus.

Still more particularly this invention relates to apparatus having a pair of short skis or ski-like members, each having feet retaining means adapted to slidably engage and retain shoes and the like, each short ski being supported on one or more rotating rollers and usually at an angle similar to a skiing slope. A large portion of the support is provided by at least one rotating roller with the ski-like member being tiltable thereon to cant the member so as to impart to each ski-like member a skewing motion causing each ski-like member to move laterally on the apparatus in response to side pressures, gyrations and twisting of the ski-like members on one or more of the moving rollers by the operator. Each ski member is retained by a guideway engaging means riding in a lateral guideway so as to prevent accidental dislodgment or unwanted forward motion while at the ends of the guideway are provided stops for limiting the lateral traverse movement of the ski-like member upon the apparatus.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION For those who find skiing a demanding as well as an exhilarating sport it is disconcerting to the occasional skier to have to recondition and retrain himself on each return to his ski slope. This refresher is necessary at the beginning of the skiing session so that one is again attuned to his skill and ability to ski. If the intervals of time between actual ski trips or sessions are rather extensive, the refresher training and instruction necessary to recondition the muscles and to bring the skiers skills up to at least prior levels may be rather extensive.

In the past few years various apparatus are known to have been made and used so as to provide a means for the skier to practice skiing and to exercise in the forms, movements and executions particular to the sport of down-hill skiing, water skiing and like sports. This prior apparatus is generally characterized as being both large and expensive and the ski enthusiast often finds it nearly as inconvenient to travel, to if not as expensive, as a trip to the actual ski slope. In many instances the apparatus does not challenge or satisfy the skier in providing the quality of ski simulation desired. This disappointment often results in the discontinuance of use of the particular apparatus by the skier.

Among the known type of apparatus for simulating down-hill skiing is the device known by the trade name Ski Deck which is described generally in -my U.S. Patent 3,047,291 issued July 31, 1962. This apparatus is of a size that renders it more or less semi-mobile while its cost is such that group use or ownership is usually the only practical means of acquiring and using it unless it is supplied as a commercial service. In contrast to Ski Deck and like apparatus, the ski simulation device of the instant invention is, so far as is known, the first to provide a readily portable, inexpensive, and small-sized apparatus which is nearly fool-proof and accident-proof for anyone able to stand up. The apparatus of this invention provides a high degree of simulation of down-hill skiing and the like as is more fully described hereinafter.

In the manner of most sports requiring precision of movement, skiing requires that style, form, and routines as taught by ski schools and instructors be maintained through constant practice. This is necessary not only to keep the muscles in condition but also to maintain the skiers ability to coordinate movements. As travel to a satisfactory ski slope or the like may be rather extensive, these trips for many reasons may be rather infrequent. To keep attuned and in condition, a simulating apparatus upon which the operator can perform all of the actions of skiing and the like provides a satisfactory practice means for keeping sharp and in shape for actual skiing and the like.

The sports of water skiing and surfing are similar to down-hill snow skiing in that both require the use of the same motions, exercises and techniques commonly used in snow skiing. Of course in water skiing the operator leans backward and the same is often true in surfing. The apparatus of this invention need be only remounted to provide the desired modification of slope while also in surfing the ski-like member is enlarged so as to allow the operator to stand thereon with both feet. The rotating support roller and the ski-like member is arranged thereon and operated in the manner of ski simulation for down-hill snow skiing.

It is therefore an object of this invention to provide apparatus upon which an operator may reproduce and practice the various motions, exercises and form that is executed in actual down-hill skiing, water skiing and similar sports.

It is a further object of this invention to provide an apparatus having rotary means therein upon which there is disposed one or more ski-like members adapted to cant, to skew and to move laterally in response to actions and motions by the operator so that he is able to execute the exercises necessary to retain and/or improve himself so that when actually skiing those muscles and movements primarily used in skiing and the like will, through the use of the instant invention, be attuned so that the skier will be in top condition and practice.

It is a further object of this'invention to provide a portable, small and inexpensive ski simulating apparatus having substantially, if not all, the components contained or attached to a base, the apparatus including a rotating roller and at least one ski-like member carried by the roller and having means for retaining the ski-like member from forward movement while permitting transverse motion as the ski-like members are canted and skewed. The apparatus is provided with shoe or foot retaining means on each ski-like member so that the operator may step onto the apparatus and exercise as desired without the necessity of strapping on ski boots, and other special equipment.

ABSTRACT OF THE INVENTION The ski simulation apparatus to hereinafter be more fully described includes a frame within which is mounted one or more rollers driven by an electric motor or the like, each roller has its face extended through or disposed close to an upper surface of the frame. This surface is normally sloped but may be level with the ground to simulate water skiing and the like. Upon this roller or rollers there is carried one or more ski-like membersor short skis adapted to engage and to transmit to this roller or rollers a substantial portion of the weight of the user of this apparatus. The upper face of the frame is normally but not necessarily sloped so as to permit the ski-like members to be supported and used in a predetermined relationship to the floor or support surface. The user or operator, as he stands upon the skis, tilts or bends his body in the manner of the particular type of skiing being simulated, so that, as the body is crouched or bent, the skier as he turns his legs and feet and shifts his weight in the manner of skiing causes the ski-like members to swing in response to the movements of operator. The ski-like members are maintained upon this simulated skiing surface by a transversely displaced retaining means allowing the ski-like members to be moved laterally on the roller or rollers while at the same time preventing the members from moving forwardly on or from the platform or frame. The operator or skiing simulator in the instant invention need only to step onto the ski-like members, slip the shoes into the engageable retaining means thereon and he or she is in a predetermined position in relation to the ski-like members and to the roller or rollers providing their support. When in position the rotating roller is activated by the user so that the roller will engage the ski-like member in a rolling or sliding contact and permit the ski-like member to be moved laterally thereon in response to a canting of the ski-like member resulting from a rocking or leaning motion of the skier representative of the motion imparted to skis by the skier as he moves down a snow slope or to a water skier as he water skis.

There has thus been outlined rather broadly the most important features of the present invention in order that a detailed description thereof that follows may be better understood and in order that the present contribution to the art may be better appreciated. There are, of course, additional features of the invention that will be described hereafter. Those persons skilled in the art will appreciate that the conception on which the present disclosure is based may readily be utilized as the basis for designing other structures for carrying out the several purposes of this invention.

A preferred embodiment and two alternate embodiments of this invention have been chosen for the purpose of illustration and description and are shown in the accompanying drawings forming a part of the specifications in which:

FIG. 1 represents an isometric view of a preferred embodiment of this invention and in which portions of skilike members are broken away to show attached roller support means and transverse engaging means on the skilike members as they rest upon a pair of rotatable rollers disposed within a frame;

FIG. 2 represents a sectional View partly diagrammatic and taken on the line 22 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 represents a sectional view party diagrammatic and generally similar to FIG. 2 and showing an alternate construction in which a single roller is provided having a slip or sliding surface and in which the ski-like member residing thereon has stop means for preventing unwanted forward motion of the ski-like member;

FIG. 4 represents a plan view of the underside of the ski-like member for use with the apparatus of FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 represents a sectional end view of the ski-like member of FIG. 4 and looking in the direction of the arrows 55 of FIG. 4; and

FIG. 6 represents a sectional and partly diagrammatic view generally similar to FIG. 2 and showing yet another construction having a single supporting drive roller and a ski-like member having at least two rollers attached to its underside and engaging substantially the same circumferential portion of the drive roller and at different radial positions.

Referring now to the drawings in detail in which like numbers designate like members throughout the several views, it is to be noted that in FIGS. 1 and 2 there is shown a preferred embodiment having a frame generally designated 10 and preferably having a top 11 and end members 12 and 13. Frame 10 is shown as having no bottom member but may, if desired, have a bottom member providing an increase in rigidity or a cover to complete a closing of the frame. Carried in bearings in the ends 12 and 13 are a pair of rollers 15 and 16 which are driven by a prime mover such as a motor 17 attached to and supported by a rear wall portion 18 of the frame. In the present instance the rotation of the rollers 15 and 16 is powered by the motor 17 and is conventionally transmitted by means of a power train including a V-belt 20 extending from and carried by a drive pulley 21 mounted on the motor shaft and to a driven pulley 22 carried by an idler shaft 23. Also on this idler shaft 23 there is mounted a pair of pulleys 24 which, as shown, are of like size and which engage and drive a pair of V-belts 25 which in turn are carried by and drive like sized sheaves 26. One of these sheaves is carried on and drives a shaft 27 while the other sheave 26 is carried on and drives shaft 28, shafts 27 and 28 respectively driving and carrying rollers 15 and 16. The ends of shafts 27 and 28 are carried by bearings not shown, the bearings being mounted in or attached to the ends 12 and 13. As reduced to practice and as seen in FIGS. 1 and 2 the rollers 15 and 16 are positioned so as to extend through the top 11 and the slots provided therein. In the portion of the top between these two rollers there is provided a guideway portion or member 30, which guideway member is attached to or is supported by ends 12 and 13 and has provided therein a groove 31 sized so as to engage and retain a ball type cam follower 32. This cam follower or roller is rotatably carried by means of a stud 33 attached to and extending a determined distance below the undersurface of a short ski-like member 34.

There are preferably a pair of ski-like members 34 each having attached to their upper surfaces a shoe retaining or high friction surface such as a non-slip rubber mat or the like and identified as 36. At the forward end of the surface 36 there is a toe retaining member in the form of an upstanding clip 37. This retaining clip in addition to providing a forward stop for the foot of the operator also provides a preselection of the position of the operator upon each of the ski-like members. On the opposite or underside of the ski-like member and disposed at a predetermined distance rearwardly of the follower 32, there is a single roller 39 which is rotatably carried in a bracket 40 attached to the ski-like member, the bracket formed to maintain the roller in a fixed relationship to the ski-like member. As seen in FIG. 2, this roller 39 is so positioned as to ride on the roller 16 substantially at a point where a line joining the axis of the roller 16 and the axis of the roller 39 forms an angle of about 90 degrees to the top surface of the top 11. At a predetermined distance forwardly of the cam follower 32, there is a truck 42 which is attached to the underside of ski-like member 34. This truck carries a pair of rollers 43 which is carried on a frame not shown and is pivotally mounted and retained in the truck, the pivoting movement of the frame being restrained and limited by resilient bumpers not shown. The pivoted frame and resilient bumpers are made and used in the manner of the front frame and rollers of a conventional roller skate. A pivot pin not shown is used to mount and retain the roller frame and the axis of rollers 43 in the truck at approximately 45 degrees to the undersurface of the ski-like member 34. As and when the ski-like member is canted or rocked sideways, the roller frame and rollers thereon are moved around the pivot pin and at an angle to the longitudinal axis of the ski-like member. As for roller skates, the resilient means or bumpers are provided to not only absorb shock but also to insure that a rapid increase of resistance determines a maximum limit to the rotating or rocking of this roller frame around the supporting pivot pin.

As seen in FIG. 2, the wheels or rollers 43 are positioned upon the rotating drive roller 15 at a point between the cam follower 32 and a tangential point on the outer surface of roller 15. This tangential point is substantially coincidental with the intersection of a line extending from the top surface 11 to the top or roller 15. The positioning of the rollers 43 upon the larger supporting and rotating roller 15 at a position behind and below the top of the roller 15 insures that as the truck 42 is rocked upon the supporting roller surface of roller 15 the ski-like member will not tend to move forwardly. As the ski-like member is canted, the wheels 43 of the truck are rocked upon the surface of the roller 15 and as the frame pivots, one wheel 43 moves upwardly and forwardly and the other wheel 43 moves downwardly and rearwardly. The upwardly and forwardly moving wheel is on the high side of the ski-like member when it, the member, is tilted. The wheels 43 are positioned so that as they are pivoted in response to the canting of the truck they, the Wheels, do not pass forwardly of a theoretical line which is at right angles to the top 11 and which passes through the axis of the shaft 27.

It is to be further noted that in FIGS. 1 and 2 there is indicated by phantom outline a pair of Vertically or upwardly extending support bars 45 carrying between them a grasp bar 46. This grasp bar is used by the operator to steady himself or herself as the ski simulation is made. On the left side of the apparatus as seen in FIG. 1 and providing a rightward limit of movement of ski-like member, there is a step 48 having its top portion at the level of the top of the mounted ski-like member. On the side opposite the step and extending upwardly fromend 13 there is a stop plate 49 which provides a rightward limit of movement of ski-like member 34 in groove 31. To the rear of step 48 there is mounted a switch 50 which is placed in the upper surface 11. This switch, adapted to start the motor 17, is manipulated to start and stop the apparatus. A foot of the operator may be used by the operator to manipulate the switch which foot, of course, may be either the right or the left as desired. The operation and use of this ski simulation apparatus is more completely described hereinafter.

Referring next to FIGS. 3, 4 and 5, there is shown an alternate ski simulation apparatus in which one or more ski-like members 134 are adapted to rest upon a rotatable support roller 135 carried by shaft 136 between the ends of a frame 110. Also carried on a rear member portion of this frame is a motor or prime mover 17 as described above, which motor is coupled with a V-belt drive not shown and in the manner of FIG. 2 is utilized to rotate support roller 130 in the direction indicated by the arrow. As a part of, or attached to, upper portions of the frame or of top 111 are front and rear slide surfaces 112 and 113, which surfaces provide slide support for the front and rear portions of ski-like member 134. As seen in FIG. 5, the underside or bottom of ski-like member 134 is arcuate in shape and has formed in a portion of this arcuate surface a pair of grooves each being disposed at a slight angle to the longitudinal axis of the ski-like member 134. Attached to and extending downwardly from the undersurface of each skilike member is a stud or cap screw 133 which carries on its extending or lower portion of a stop block 135 bored so as to be pivotally retained upon this stud 133.

Referring particularly to FIG. 4, it is seen that the forward surface of block 135 is provided with supporting or contacting ribs 136, said ribs adapted to provide a minimum of surface contact against the periphery of the rotating roller 130. In this particular embodiment of FIGS. 3, 4 and 5 the roller is provided with a slip surface which preferably is of fabric such as nylon pile or the like. This slip surface on the roller 130 as it supports the undersurface of the ski-like member 134 provides a minimum of friction so that the ski-like member, when stood upon and canted by an operator, is laterally movable on the roller by the engagement of one of the grooves 120 in the pile slip surface of the support roller. The lateral movement of the ski-like member is in the same direction as the cant or tilt of the ski-like member upon the supporting fabric surface of the roller.

Referring finally to FIG. 6, there is shown still another embodiment in which a motor 17 or prime mover in the manner above-described is carried within or on a frame 210. Mounted in and carried between ends of frame 210 is a roller 230 which is rotated in the direction of the arrow by means of a drive means such as a V-belt not shown in FIG. 6. This drive means is connected to and extends from the motor to the roller. A ski-like member 234 which is similar to ski-like member 34 has shoe toe engaging stop 237 attached to the upper surface thereof. On both the forward and rear end portion of each ski-like member 234 and on the underneath side of the member there is mounted or attached a ball caster 238. Each ball caster is positioned so as to ride either upon raised portion 239 or 241 each portion being attached to and extending above the top surface of the frame 211 In the present embodiment the raised portions are of a hard surfaced material and providing therewith a firm support and smooth surface for the rolling thereover of a spherical roller of one of the ball casters 238.

Attached to the undersurface of the ski-like member 234 is a truck 242 carrying a pair of rollers 240 in a frame and pivotally movable in the manner of the truck 42 of FIGS. 1 and 2. This truck 242 and the pivoted frame therein is positioned in the manner of the wheel frame and truck 42 above-described and supports the wheels 246' so that they ride upon or are supported by the roller 230 rearwardly of a theoretical line extending through the axis of a shaft 243 carrying roller 230 and with the theoretical line being at substantially right angles to a top 211 of the frame. Positioned at a determined distance rearwardly of the truck 242 and attached at about a right angle to the underside of the ski-like member 234 is an arm 244. This arm has mounted on its lower portion a single roller 246 carried by a fixed support 247. The roller 246 is spaced so as to engage and rotate as the roller 230 is rotated and in its forward movement roller 246 acts as a forward limiting means while permitting lateral movement of the ski-like member upon the rotating support roller 230.

USE AND OPERATION The apparatus of FIGS. 1 and 2 has the ski-like membars 34 thereon formed sufiiciently wide so that the wheels 43 carried underneath the ski-like members are positioned so that their extreme lateral extent is less than the width of the ski members. As so proportioned the facing edges of the ski-like members 34 are free to bear against and to slide upon each other without any possibility of engagement of facing or adjacent wheels 43. To use the ski simulation apparatus the operator arranges his feet upon the two ski-like members with the toe of the shoe engaging the toe retaining clip 37. The operator or an observer starts the apparatus as by means of switch 50 whereupon the rollers 15 and 16 begin rotating in the direction indicated by the arrows and the operator is now ready to simulate the motions and actions of skiing. The operator if/and as he wishes grasps the bar 46 so as to assist in the maintaining of his balance. As the operator leans in the direction in which he wishes to turn, he turns the feet causing the ski-like members to cant or rock. As the ski-like members are canted they cause the trucks 42 to likewise cant, causing the IOllers 43 carried in the pivoted frame to pivot and move out of alignment with the axis of the shaft 27. As this is done, the rollers 43 move laterally on roller 15 either to the left or the right depending upon the direction of cant and at the same time the ski-like members are skewed, as for example, as seen in FIG. l.

As the ski-simulating operator shifts his weight and twists his feet the ski-like members cant and skew either to the right or to the left and the ski-like members and the operator thereon move either to one side of the apparatus or to the other side of the apparatus as directed by the angular relationship of the rollers 43 upon the larger rotating support roller 15. The responsiveness of the movement of the ski-like members to the right or the left is proportional to the amount of cant of the ski-like members and the speed of the roller 15. It, of course, is apparent that the faster the support roller 15 is turning and the greater is the amount of cant allowed by the bumpers in the truck 42, the greater is the amount of skew developed and the faster is the movement of the ski-like members to the right and the left on the support roller. In extensive tests and operation it has been found that the leaning to the right or left in the manner of down-hill skiing causes a like cant of the ski-like member as it is carried on the roller 15. This ski simulation is similar to the motions and movements utilized in down-hill slope skiing on the snow and in other regular activities in which skis are used in the winter sport.

It is to be noted that the use of a single roller 39 upon the rear of the ski-like member is advantageous in that it allows the heel of the operator to be maintained in alignment on the ski-like member and in the manner in which a ski is normally used. With the heel aligned, the toe of the operator is used to guide the movement of the skis as it is canted either to the right or to the left. As the wheels 43 are canted in response to the rocking and twisting movement of the ski-like member upon the support roller 15, one of the wheels 43 moves forwardly and upwardly approaching the theoretical vertical center line of support roller 15. At the same time the other roller 43 moves rearwardly and downwardly thus accentuating slightly the cant movement of ski-like member 34. Ski-like member 34- being supported at its rear portion by the single wheel 39 with this one wheel allows the forward tip of the ski to move in an exact relation and response to the cant or tilt of the ski-like member as is found in skiing down a slope. The maintaining of the ski-like members in a fixed relationship to each other and to the top member of the apparatus is by means of the cam followers 32 and their retention in groove guideway 31 which allows limited sideways movements without forward motion of the skilike members. i A

Although the ski simulation apparatus is shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 as having a down-hill slope forwardly from the rear wall 1-8;the apparatus may have its front elevated so that top 11 is parallel to a normal support or in fact may be further elevated so that the ski-like members 34 are in fact sloped a small amount upwardly. The use of this apparatus to simulate water skiing, for example, would have the members 34 at least level, if not tilted, or sloped upwardly. No changes in the apparatus are necessary to change the slope and to simulate other sports; however, the use of the grasp bar 46 in the manner of a water ski tow rope is highly desirable when simulating water skiing.

When one wishes to simulate surfing, the ski-like member 34 may be increased in width and provided with a larger non-slip surface 36. A single ski-like member is preferably used and the apparatus is adjusted so the single ski-like member is substantially level.

In the operation of the apparatus of FIGS. 3 through 5, the canting of the ski-like member 134 on the slip surface of roller 130 causes one or the other of the grooves 129 to be brought in the way of and to engage the slip surface. This engagement causes the ski-like member to deflect or move sideways in a skewed manner. The stop block 135 and ribs 136 provide the necessary stabilizing means for the heel action of the operator as well as providing the forward limiting motion of the ski-like member of the apparatus. A small disadvantage of this embodiment is the wear imposed on the slip surface of the support roller 130 and on the underside of the ski-like member 134. The response to the canting of the ski-like member 134 in this embodiment is slightly less than in the embodiment of FIGS. 1 and 2.

In the embodiment of FIG. 6 the canting of the ski-like member 134 results in the frame within truck 242 pivoting and in so doing the front of the ski member is skewed as in the manner of the ski-like member 34 discussed above. The spherical rollers in ball caster 238 allow the ski-like member to be canted and its ends swung and moved laterally on the raised portions 239 and 241. In this embodiment the casters 238 on both ends of the skilike member and the rolling friction with raised portions 239 and 240 produce a slightly different reaction to movements of the ski-like member than is the case of the embodiment of FIGS. 1 and 2. For less skillful skiers, the embodiment of FIG. 6 is often preferred, as this exemplification is slightly less responsive to the movements of the operator.

The present invention considered as a method provides steps whereby the tractive effect of the cooperative engagement of the ski-like member on the rotating surface of the support roller is used to provide a response which simulates the motions and actions in sports such as downhill skiing, water skiing, surfing and the like. In these steps is included the transversing of the support roller or rollers in a lateral to-and-fro movement in response to the canting and twisting of the ski-like member or members on the rotating support roller, and skewing the ski-like member or members in the direction of the lateral movement of the canted member on the roller. This traversing in one embodiment is in response to a pair of pivoted small Wheels being moved from a normally parallel axial alignment with the rotating support roller. The traversing in another embodiment is in response to the engagement of one of a plurality of angled longitudinal grooves in the ski-like member as the groove is brought in the way of a slip surface on the rotating support roller.

The terms up, down, in, out, left, right, and similar terms are applicable to the apparatus as described in conjunction with the accompanying drawings and it is to be noted that such terms are merely for the purpose of description and do not necessarily apply to a position in which the apparatus may be constructed or used.

The invention in its broader aspects is not limited to the specific combinations shown and described but departures may be made therefrom within the scope of the accompanying claims, without departing from the principles of the invention and without sacrificing its chief advantages.

What is claimed is:

1. In a ski simulating apparatus wherein an operators skiing movements thereon provide a response thereto comparable to those skiing reactions and actions usually found in down-hill skiing, water skiing, surfing and similar sports, the apparatus comprising: (1) at least one rotatable support roller; (2) a prime mover and a power transmitting means extending therefrom and to the roller support and providing for the rotating of the support roller at a selected speed; (3) at least one ski-like member supported intermediate its ends by said rotatable support roller; (4) means for carrying the operator on the ski-like member in the manner of the sport being simulated; (5) means on the ski-like member for engaging the support roller so that as said roller is rotated and the operator cants the ski-like member the means for engaging is skewed to correspondingly skew the ski-like member and move it laterally on the roller, and (6) means for retaining the ski-like member in a predetermined forward relationship to the support roller.

2. Ski simulating apparatus as in claim 1 in which there is additionally provided means for limiting the lateral movement of the ski-like member on the rotatable support roller.

3. Ski simulating apparatus as in claim 2. in which the means for engaging the support roller includes a truck attached to the underside of the ski-like member; a frame pivotally carried in the truck, and a pair of smaller rollers carried in the pivoted frame the axis of the rotation of said smaller rollers being normally generally at right angles to the longitudinal axis of the ski-like member.

4. Ski simulating apparatus as in claim 3 in which the pivoted frame is movable around a pivot pin disposed generally in the plane of and at an angle to the longitudinal axis of the ski-like member so that as said member is canted the axis of the rotation of the smaller rollers is moved out of the generally right angle relationship to the longitudinal axis of the member, whereupon the small roller toward which the member is canted moves rearwardly while the other small roller moves a like amount forwardly.

5. Ski simulating apparatus as in claim 4 in which there is provided biasing means cooperatively disposed to engage the truck and frame and adsorb at a determined rate the cant of the ski-like member and at full adsorption to limit the maximum amount of cant.

6. Ski simulating apparatus as in claim 5 in which there is provided an arm extending from the underside of the ski-like member and disposed rearwardly of the truck and the pair of first small rollers; at least one additional smaller roller carried in a support and adapted to engage the support roller as it is rotated and to the rear of and substantially below the engaging point of the pair of first small rollers and the support roller.

7. Ski simulating apparatus as in claim 6 in which each ski-like member has its end portion adapted to be carried at a determined angle and with minimum friction upon a support means.

8. Ski simulating apparatus as in claim 4 in which there is provided a second rotatable support roller said second roller being disposed a fixed distance to the rear of the first support roller; means to rotate the second support roller at a determined speed; and at least one additional smaller roller carried in a support extending from the underside of the ski-like member and spaced so that the additional smaller roller will rest upon and be supported by the second rotatable support roller at a position near the top of said second roller.

9. Ski simulating apparatus as in claim 8 in which the first and second support rollers are parallel to each other and their axes lie in a common plane; and in which the means for retaining the ski-like member in a predetermined forward relationship is a guideway intermediate and parallel to the first and second rotatable support rollers, and a guide follower adapted to engage and be retained'in the guideway and extending from the ski-like member so that as the guide follower is moved in the guideway it restrains the forward movement of while permitting the lateral to-and-fro movement of the ski-like member and the operator thereupon.

10. Ski simulating apparatus as in claim 9 in which the prime mover is a motor and in which the power transmitting means is a V-belt drive operatively engaged with the motor and the first and second rotatable rollers.

11. Ski simulating apparatus as in claim 9 in which the first and second rotatable rollers are carried in a frame and in which there is provided a hand grasping means extending abov the top of the frame and out of the way ski-like members, the engaging means disposed at divergapparatus.

12. Ski simulating apparatus as in claim 2 in which the means for engaging the support roller includes at least two longitudinally extending rotatable roller support surface engaging means provided on the underside of the ski-like member, the engaging means disposed at diverging angles and about an equal angle to and on each side of the longitudinal axis of the ski-like member.

13. Ski simulating apparatus as in claim 12 in which the support surface of the support roller is made with a carpet-like slip face and in which the undersurface of the ski-like member is convex, and in which the rotatable roller support surface engaging means are grooves formed in said undersurface.

14. Ski simulating apparatus as in claim 13 in which the means for retaining the ski-like member in a predetermined forward limiting relationship to the rotatable support roller is a stop block having a ribbed face adapted to slidably engage the slip surface of said rotatable support roller, and a member extending from the underside of the ski-like member and pivotally carrying the stop block, the member spaced to carry the block rearwardly of the rotatable roller support surface engaging portion of the undersurface of the ski-like member.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,274,081 2/ 1942 Mautin 27257 RICHARD C. PINKHAM, Primary Examiner R. W. DIAZ, 111., Assistant Examiner

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2274081 *Jun 5, 1941Feb 24, 1942Francois MautinSki exercising machine
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3707283 *Aug 10, 1970Dec 26, 1972Gerald R CormierSki board training device
US3711089 *Oct 20, 1969Jan 16, 1973P ReinhardSki training apparatus
US3950776 *Mar 26, 1975Apr 13, 1976Malcolm CorriganSki position simulator
US4023795 *Dec 15, 1975May 17, 1977Pauls Edward ACross-country ski exerciser
US4544153 *Nov 5, 1984Oct 1, 1985Babcock Michael ASlalom waterskiing simulator
US5318488 *Oct 26, 1992Jun 7, 1994Michael Anthony BabcockWaterskiing simulator
US5338273 *Jan 27, 1993Aug 16, 1994Roadmaster CorporationQuick change mechanism for synchronous/asynchronous exercise machine
US5374228 *Jun 2, 1992Dec 20, 1994Nordictrack, Inc.Downhill skiing exercise machine
US5499957 *Aug 10, 1994Mar 19, 1996Roadmaster CorporationQuick change mechanism for synchronous/asynchronous exercise machine
US5503610 *Jun 2, 1995Apr 2, 1996Roadmaster CorporationQuick change mechanism for synchronous/asynchronous exercise machine
Classifications
U.S. Classification482/7, 482/71
International ClassificationA63B69/18
Cooperative ClassificationA63B69/18
European ClassificationA63B69/18