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Publication numberUS3456661 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 22, 1969
Filing dateFeb 13, 1967
Priority dateFeb 13, 1967
Publication numberUS 3456661 A, US 3456661A, US-A-3456661, US3456661 A, US3456661A
InventorsFarley John David
Original AssigneeAndre Fedotowsky, Francois C Vigier, Gerry Lynch, William W Nash Jr
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Windproof umbrella
US 3456661 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 22, 1969 J- D. FARLEY WINDPROOF UMBRELLA 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Feb. 13. 1967 NVENTOR J. 04w #7142 5/ BY q ATTORNEYS July 22, 1969 J. D. FARLEY 3,

WINDPROOF U BRELLA Fi led Feb. 13. 1967 3 Sh ets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR .I DA /D FAREF KM, fiLg a M ATTORNEY S July 22,1969 6 imp-1 6L156! 3,456,661

WINDPROOF UMBRELLA Filed Feb. 13; 1967 a Sheets-Sheet s INVENTOR J. pnwo FweLE/ B a, $419.49., a ,M

ATTQRNEYS United States Patent US. Cl. 135-20 2 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A windproof umbrella is disclosed in which, in addition to the normal umbrella covering, there is provided at least one opening in the umbrella covering and one or more tiers comprised of a plurality of tapered gores forming a plurality of arcuate flying vents adapted to fill with air rising through an opening from below and expel the air horizontally to thereby relieve air pressure from below and provide aerodynamic stability when the umbrella is in an open position. At the same time, the flying vents form a covering impervious to rain from above.

Field of the invention This invention relates to a new and improved windproof umbrella which facilitates umbrella use in windy Weather by providing means for the release of air pressure from below the umbrella while successfully shedding rain falling from above.

Description of the prior art A common problem encountered in the use of umbrellas in windy Weather is that the umbrella may be inverted or otherwise mutilated by the wind. Attempts have been made to overcome this problem by providing umbrellas with frames of high strength but such frames are bulky and inconvenient. Other attempts have been to overcome this problem by providing holes and slits of various sorts in the umbrella covering material with one way flaps to prevent rain from entering. Such attempts have been unsuccessful because the holes and slits could not move a suflicient volume of air nor could they stabilize the umbrella in high winds. For this reason, since the inception of the folding frame umbrella industry, there has never been nor is there now a commercially successful windproof umbrella.

' It is an object of this invention to provide a new and improved windproof umbrella which can move a suflicient volume of air to relieve pressure from below, while shedding rain from above in the normalfashion.

It is another object of this invention to provide a windproof umbrella which incorporates aerodynamic principles to stabilize the umbrella in high winds.

It is a further object of this invention to provide a windproof umbrella with great aesthetic appeal for a fashion conscious industry whose product has not undergone any significant changes since 1755.

Summary of the invention In order to accomplish these results, my invention contemplates the provision of one or more tiers of a plurality of arcuate flying vents comprised of a plurality of tapered generally triangular gores, each gore extending and tapering with increasing width from the central staff to substantially beyond the outer perimeter of an opening in the first umbrella covering. Each gore is secured at its radial edges to the umbrella between two radially depending ribs and has dimensions wider than the width beice tween those ribs and tapers with increasingly greater width than the width between those ribs. The flying vents are adapted to fill with air rising from below and expel air outwardly to thereby release air pressure from below and provide aerodynamic stability when the radial ribs are rigidly held in an open position. My invention further contemplates flying vents that are adapted to simultaneously form a covering over the umbrella impervious to rain.

Brief description of the drawings FIG. 1 is a side elevation view of an umbrella in open position embodying my invention in which one tier of flying vents is provided.

FIG. 2 is a similar view of another umbrella embodying my invention and showing two tiers of flying vents.

FIG. 3 is a similar view of an umbrella embodying my invention in which the flying vents are secured to alternate radial ribs of the umbrella.

F IG. 4 is a similar view of an umbrella embodying my invention in which the flying vents are provided only on alternate gores of the umbrella.

FIG. 5 is a similar view of an umbrella embodying my invention in which in addition to a tier of flying vents there is provided a plurality of one-way valves in the vicinity of lowest pressure on the umbrella surface.

FIG. 6' is a side elevation view of an umbrella embodying my invention similar to the umbrella illustrated in FIG. 2 further provided with a third tier of flying vents.

FIG. 7 is a side elevation view of an umbrella frame in almost closed position.

FIG. 8 is a side elevation view of an umbrella as illustrated in FIG. 4 in closed position.

FIG. 9 is a similar view of the umbrella illustrated in FIG. 8 further provided with a furling band about the flying vents.

Description of the preferred embodiments In each of the embodiments of my invention I provide a standard umbrella frame, such as that illustrated in FIG. 7 by way of example, consisting of a central staff 1, depending radial ribs 2 pivotally mounted toward the head of the staff, and means such as a ring 3, slidable along the longitudinal axis of the staff, connected to the radial ribs by means of links 4, and stop means such as 5, 6 and 7 whereby the radial ribs may be rigidly maintained at one or more predetermined angles of elevation with the staff. Such a frame may consist of the standard folding steel frame, the folding wood frame constructed of bamboo or other wood, the new one-piece folding polypropylene frame sold under the trademark Rainpiper, or other suitable folding frame material.

In the embodiment of my invention illustrated in FIG. 1, I provide a first umbrella covering material 8 secured to each of the radially depending ribs 2, of such dimensions that it will be held under tension by the ribs and form a canopy when the ribs are rigidly held in one of the open positions. The first umbrella cover 8 has a relatively large circular central opening or aperture 9 concentric with the central staif 1. The hole 9 may extend radially outwardly up to one-half the dimensions of the radial ribs 2.

Above the first umbrella covering -8 I provide a second umbrella covering 10 comprised of a plurality of tapered generally triangular gores 12 extending and tapering with increasing width from the central staff 1 substantially beyond the perimeter 11 of the central hole 9. Each gore is secured at its radial edges to the umbrella along the lines defined by two radially depending ribs 2 and has dimensions wider than the width between those ribs and tapers with increasingly greater width than the width between those ribs. The tapered gores of the second umbrella covering 10 are secured between adjacent radial ribs 2 either to the ribs themselves or the material of the first umbrella covering along the lines of the ribs to form a first tier comprising a plurality of generally arcuate flying vents 12 adapted to fill with air rising from below through the central hole 9 and expel the air horizontally when the radial ribs are rigidly held in open position.

Each air vent when filled with air is of the general shape of the section of a cone, and the perimeter of the outer edge of the air vent 12 generally forms an arc. Substantial overlap, by the material forming each flying vent, of the perimeter 11 of the central hole in the first umbrella covering simultaneously prevents the material from falling into the hole 9 and directs the air flow from hole 9 out wardly in a generally horizontal direction or a direction at an angle from the vertical axis to provide aerodynamic stability for the umbrella.

When the air pressure above and below the umbrella is equalized, the flying vents are adapted to collapse and form a loose covering over the central hole of the first umbrella covering to thereby shed rain in the normal fashion.

In the embodiment of my invention illustrated in FIG. 2, I provide an umbrella generally as set forth in FIG. 1 in which the central hole 9 in the first umbrella covering is somewhat larger. I further provide a relatively larger circular opening or aperture 13 in the second umbrella covering 10", which may extend up to one-third the dimensions of the radial depending ribs 2'. I then provide a third umbrella covering 1-4 comprised of a plurality of tapered generally triangular gores 16 extending substantially beyond the perimeter 15 of the central hole 13 in the second umbrella covering 10. Each gore of the third umbrella covering extends and tapers with increasing width from the central stalf 1 between adjacent radially depending ribs 2'. Each gore is secured at its radial edges to the umbrella along the lines defined by two radially depending ribs 2 and has dimensions wider than the width between those ribs and tapers with increasingly greater width than the width between those ribs. The third umbrella covering thus forms a second tier of a plurality of generally conical flying vents 16 adapted to fill with air rising from below through central hole 13 and expel the air outwardly and generally horizontally when the radial ribs are rigidly held in an open position. The flying vents may be secured to the ribs themselves or to the material of an umbrella covering along the lines of the ribs.

When the flying vents are filled with air they generally conform to the shape of a section of a cone, and the outer perimeter 15 of the air vent material 14 generally form an arc.

In the embodiment of my invention illustrated in FIG. 3, I provide an umbrella as generally set forth in FIG. 1 wherein the second umbrella covering 17 comprised of a plurality of tapered generally triangular gores 19 extends between non-adjacent alternate depending radial ribs 18 only, to form a first tier of a plurality of adjacent generally arcuate flying vents 19 each of which spans the widths bounded by three depending radial ribs. The principle of operation and structure of the flying vents is similar to those illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2. Air rising through central hole 20 in the first umbrella covering 21 fills the flying vents and is expelled outwardly in a horizontal direction.

In the embodiment of my invention illustrated in FIG. 4, I provide a first umbrella covering 22 secured to each of the radiallydepending ribs 23, of dimensions so that it will be held under tension by the ribs and form a canopy when the ribs are in an open position. The first umbrella covering includes triangular holes 24 extending from the central staff 25, between alternate adjacent pairs of radially depending ribs 23. Over each triangular hole 24 I provide a generally arcuate flying vent consisting of a tapered triangular gore extending from the central staff between alternate adjacent pairs of ribs over each hole and adapted to fill with air rising from below 7 through each hole 24 and expel the" air horizontally when the radial ribs are rigidly held in an open position. Each gore is secured at its radial edges to the umbrella along the lines defined by two radially depending ribs and has dimensions wider than the width between those ribs and tapers with increasingly greater width than the width between those ribs. When the flying vents are filled with air they generally form the section of a cone and the outer perimeter 27 of each vent 26 is generally arcuate. Each flying vent extends substantially beyond the triangular hole 24 over which it is placed and is adapted to collapse and form a loose covering over each hole when no air is rising from below. The flying vent may be secured to the rib itself or to the material of an umbrella covering along the line of a rib.

The embodiment of my invention illustrated in FIG. 5 comprises the umbrella as set forth in FIG. 1 further provided with air vent openings or apertures 28 which may be of various shapes, and flaps 29 to form one-way valves to release air pressure from below while shedding rain from above. Such additional air vents may be placed in the region of lowest pressure on the umbrella surface when the umbrella is caught in an upward rising column of air. It is known from aerodynamics that this region of lowest pressure for a hemispherical body in an air flow is approximately half way down the length of one of the radial ribs.

The embodiment of my invention illustrated in FIG. 6 is generally the umbrella as set forth in FIG. 2 further provided with a relatively large central circular hole 30 in the third umbrella covering material 31. I then provide a fourth umbrella covering material 32 comprised of a plurality of tapered generally triangular gores 33 extending and tapering with increasing width from the central staff substantially beyond the central hole 30 of the third umbrella covering material 31. Each gore is secured at its radial edges to the umbrella along the lines defined by two radially depending ribs and has dimensions wider than the width between those ribs and tapers with increasingly greater width than the width between those ribs.

The fourth umbrella covering material 32 forms a third tier of a plurality of generally arcuate flying vents 33 secured along the line of each radial rib and adapted to fill with air rising from below through central hole 30 in the third umbrella covering material 31 and expel the air horizontally when the radial ribs are rigidly held in an open position. When filled with air the flying vents form generally the section of a cone and the outer perimeter of each flying vent 33 forms an arc. The flying vents are adapted to collapse and form a covering impervious to rain over the central hole 30 of the third umbrella covering material when no air is rising from below.

In each of the embodiments of my invention illustrated in the diagrams I have provided flying vents with sulficient overlap to prevent the vent material from falling into the openings or apertures in the umbrella covering below when the vents are in a collapsed position. In addition, I may provide a mesh means 35 formed by threads of plastic or other material as illustrated in FIG. 2 to further prevent the material of the flying vents from falling into the openings or apertures or being blown into the openings. Such mesh means may be of any suitable material and of any configuration which does not significantly impede the flow of air through the central openings but which supports the air vents when collapsed to thereby exclude water. When such a mesh is used, there is then some variation permissible in the extent of overlap of the flying air vents.

Alternatively I might provide a string or thread 37 secured between the peak of the vent and a point down the surface of the first umbrella covering as in FIG. 5 in order to prevent the vent material from falling into the opening in the umbrella covering.

In another form of my invention I provide a plurality of smaller openings in place of the large openings in the umbrella covering material illustrated in the accompanying diagrams to thereby prevent the flying vents from being depressed in such an opening. Such an arrangement also provides a pleasing visual pattern of color and light viewed from the undersurface of the umbrella produced by light passing through the variously colored flying vents above.

In addition, for all types of umbrellas which are not intended to protect from rain such as beach umbrellas, sun umbrellas, various types of fashion umbrellas, etc., wide variation in the extent of overlap of the flying vents would be possible without fearthat water might enter the umbrella cover openings.

Each of the plurality of umbrella coverings may be of the same material or of a different material. For instance, the upper tiers of air vents formed by the upper umbrella coverings may be of a material with more structural or self-supporting properties than the first umbrella covering which is held under tension by the depending radial ribs. Thus, the upper umbrella coverings may be of a synthetic material such as plastic.

Alternatively, the flying vents may be of the same material as the first umbrella covering but include plastic strips extending radially outward from the direction of the central staff to impart structural or self-supporting properties to the flying vents. When the flying vents are composed of plastic or include plastic strips the structural properties imparted will prevent the vents from falling into the umbrella covering openings therefore permitting variation again in the extent of overlap. Furthermore, such structural properties give to the flying vents the aesthetically pleasing appearance of being filled or inflated with air when the umbrella is in an open position even if there is no wind.

When the umbrella is in a closed position the flying vents 27 may project outwardly from the closed umbrella portion as in FIG. 8. These projections 27 may be designed for pleasing appearance. Alternatively, the flying vents may be concentrically folded about the umbrella staff by means of a furling band 34 as in FIG. 9, and 34 as in FIG. 4.

In another alternative form, the material of the flying vents may be permanently pressed, accordion fashion, imparting to it the tendency to contract when the umbrella is closed.

Other variations in the embodiments of my invention are immediately apparent from the examples already discussed. For instance, further tiers of flying vents may be provided on the umbrella illustrated in FIG. 6. Further tiers of flying vents might also be provided on the umbrella illustrated in FIG. 3 wherein the flying vents are secured only at alternate radially depending ribs.

In order to prevent water from blowing up the surface of an umbrella covering and into an opening or aperture formed in that covering I may also provide a raised seam 36 as in FIG. 5 along the outer perimeter of an opening.

Furthermore, my invention is particularly suitable for aesthetic design in a fashion conscious industry. Thus, the

flying tiers may be printed with various colors and designs to provide aesthetic appeal both when the umbrella is closed and when the umbrella is open and the flying vents filled with air.

I claim:

1. A windproof aerodynamically stable umbrella comprising: an umbrella frame formed of a central staff having a handle portion and a head portion, a plurality of radially depending ribs pivotally mounted near the head of the staff, and means slidable along the longitudinal axis of the stalf engaging the radially depending ribs to rigidly maintain the ribs at least at one predetermined open position; a first umbrella covering secured to each of the radially depending ribs, said first umbrella covering having dimensions to form a canopy held under tension by the ribs when the ribs are rigidly held in an open position, said first umbrella covering also having at least one opening adjacent to the central staff and spaced around the central staff, and a raised seam formed along the outer perimeter of each said opening to prevent the flowback of water along said first umbrella covering into the openings formed therein; a second umbrella covering comprised of a plurality of tapered generally triangular gore-like sections each gore-like section extending and tapering with increasing width from near the central staff to substantially beyond the outer perimeter of an opening of the first umbrella covering and in superimposed relation with said opening, each gore-like section also being secured at its radial edges to the umbrella between two radially depending ribs and also having dimensions wider than the width between said ribs and tapering with increasingly greater width than the width between said ribs to form a first tier of a plurality of generally arcuate flying vents adapted to fill with air rising from below through an opening and expel the air outwardly and generally horizontally when the radial ribs are rigidly held in an open position to thereby relieve pressure from below and provide aerodynamic stability while simultaneously forming a covering impervious to rain, each said gore-like section formed with at least a portion of structural material to impart self-supporting properties.

2. A windproof umbrella as set forth in claim 1, wherein is provided means to tie the second umbrella covering around thecentral staff when the umbrella is closed.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS D. 162,617 3/1951 Benivegna --35 X 1,031,974 7/ 1912 Thomas. 2,335,184 11/1943 Houseman 135--20 2,696,959 12/ 1954 Aileo 244-442 2,923,449 2/ 1960 Sund 135-20 X 2,929,588 3/ 1960 Ewing 244-- 3,018,784 1/ 1962 Buxman. 3,032,047 5/ 1962 Wendorf 135-35 PETER M. CAUN, Primary Examiner US. Cl. X.R. 135-35

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3794054 *Nov 1, 1971Feb 26, 1974Watts PInverse umbrella tent
US3885582 *Jun 3, 1974May 27, 1975Stanley S KowalskiHeat dissipating sunshade
US3960162 *Mar 19, 1975Jun 1, 1976Francois Gilbert NoelVented umbrella
US4804008 *Oct 28, 1987Feb 14, 1989Ryder Peter MWindproof umbrella
US4865063 *Sep 5, 1988Sep 12, 1989Williams Curtis JWind resistive umbrella
US4979534 *Feb 10, 1989Dec 25, 1990Leonard HoltzWindproof umbrella
US5065779 *Oct 30, 1990Nov 19, 1991Leonard HoltzWindproof umbrella
US5103848 *Apr 23, 1990Apr 14, 1992Parsons Gerald WSunshade umbrella
US5289839 *Jul 2, 1992Mar 1, 1994Lombardo John LWind-resistant umbrella
US5368055 *Feb 9, 1990Nov 29, 1994Leonard HoltzWindproof umbrella
US5487401 *Nov 15, 1994Jan 30, 1996Leonard HoltzWindproof umbrella
US5669402 *Jun 24, 1996Sep 23, 1997Sun; San-ShiungWater collection device derived from an umbrella
US5678586 *Jun 10, 1996Oct 21, 1997Baksh; FareedUmbrella for alleviating wind gust
US5890506 *Feb 24, 1997Apr 6, 1999Kupferman; GlennUmbrella and umbrella canopy
US6006769 *Oct 28, 1998Dec 28, 1999Asia Umbrella Industries Co., Ltd.Umbrella structure
US6095171 *Nov 20, 1998Aug 1, 2000Fu Tai Umbrella Works, Ltd.Multiple-fold windproof umbrella with compact restoring mechanism
US6202662 *Apr 13, 1999Mar 20, 2001Lin Yao-ChinVentilated umbrella
US6385895 *Mar 20, 2000May 14, 2002Joseph L. ScariesCollapsible animal decoy
US6520193 *Mar 26, 2001Feb 18, 2003Ching-Chuan YouUmbrella with vents on the umbrella cloth for venting wind
US7048333 *May 3, 2002May 23, 2006Martinez Robert ECollapsible sun shade for a chair
US7207344Feb 13, 2004Apr 24, 2007Caravan Canopy International, Inc.Two tier canopy system
US7793674 *May 15, 2009Sep 14, 2010James Christopher ElderPortable sun and weather shelter
US7918236Aug 24, 2010Apr 5, 2011James Christopher ElderPortable sun and weather shelter
US7992581Jun 7, 2006Aug 9, 2011Senz Technologies B.V.Canopy device
US7992582 *Jan 9, 2009Aug 9, 2011Glenn KupfermanUmbrella and umbrella canopy
US8104494Dec 22, 2010Jan 31, 2012James Christopher ElderPortable sun and weather shelter
US8469044Apr 13, 2011Jun 25, 2013Vinod PatelUmbrella with multiple canopy structure
US8550099Oct 25, 2010Oct 8, 2013James Ollans EssexSunbrella-sunscreen
US20120111381 *Oct 7, 2011May 10, 2012Brandon SolotoffUmbrella
US20140326284 *Apr 1, 2014Nov 6, 2014Zhejiang Hengfeng Top Leisure Co., Ltd.Umbrella cover and beach umbrella
DE4115467A1 *May 11, 1991Sep 17, 1992Karoly NagyUmbrella with wire frame and slide rod - has automatic pressure release through air flaps
DE19627766C1 *Jul 10, 1996Sep 18, 1997Ngoc Vang DinhWindproof umbrella
WO1990009118A1 *Feb 9, 1990Aug 11, 1990Holtz LeonardWindproof umbrella
WO1993000840A1 *Jul 6, 1992Jan 21, 1993Noel PerrierMultifunction solar parasol
Classifications
U.S. Classification135/33.7
International ClassificationA45B25/22, A45B25/00
Cooperative ClassificationA45B25/22
European ClassificationA45B25/22