Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3456769 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 22, 1969
Filing dateApr 10, 1967
Priority dateApr 10, 1967
Publication numberUS 3456769 A, US 3456769A, US-A-3456769, US3456769 A, US3456769A
InventorsBrennan George A, Prichard Evan S
Original AssigneeChallenge Cook Bros Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Transit mixer discharge chute
US 3456769 A
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 22, 1969 E. s. PRICHARD ETAL TRANSIT MIXER DISCHARGE CHUTE 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed April 10, 1967 N 6606664 aza/A/aw INVENTQR5.

y 22, 1969 E. s. PRICHARD ETAL 3,456,769

TRANSIT MIXER DISCHARGE CHUTE Filed April 10, 1967 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 6.606664. fli/Wl/AA/ INVENTORS.

A 7/? Mil 6 United States Patent O 3,456,769 TRANSIT MIXER DISCHARGE CHUTE Evan S. Prichard, Newport Beach, and George A. Brennan, La Mirada, Calif., assignors to Challenge-Cook Bros., Incorporated, City of Industry, Calif, a corporation of California Filed Apr. 10, 1967, Ser. No. 629,545 Int. Cl. B65g 11/12 US. Cl. 1934 15 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A discharge chute apparatus for concrete transit mixers having a plurality of chute sections hinged together and foldable to a compact relationship with mechanical or powered devices to assist in folding and unfolding the chute sections.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to discharge chutes of the type employed on concrete transit mixer vehicles to conduct and direct the concrete from the mixer to the location of placement and, in particular, is directed to a discharge chute of substantially greater than normal length which can be readily folded to a compact position for convenient transportation on or off the highway.

conventionally, transit mix vehicles have a discharge chute mounted beneath the discharge opening of the mixer for conducting the concrete or other mixed material outwardly away from the vehicle to the desired point of deposit or placement. Such discharge chutes are normally mounted in a manner for pivoting about a vertical axis for swinging from side to side of the vehicle and about a horizontal axis for modifying the angle of inclination of the chute to achieve the appropriate elevation of the discharge end. In substantially all conventional type concrete transit mixer trucks a section of discharge chute is permanently mounted with its upper end in communication with and pivotal about a discharge accumulator for receiving the discharging concrete and the lowerextending end of that chute section is supported by an extendable element such as a hydraulic piston and cylinder for varying the angle of inclination. This permanently mounted section of discharge chute may be approximately five feet long, and a second shorter section of chute is pivotally mounted on the extending end to fold over on top of the first section. In the folded condition these chutes are in sufficiently compact relationship for both on and oif highway operation of the vehicle. Normally the vehicle carries one or more additional sections of discharge chute which may be hooked onto the extending chute to provide the desired length. Due to extreme weight of the concrete handled and the rough conditions of use these chutes must be of rugged and necessarily heavy construction.

In the normal discharge of the concrete from the transit mixer vehicle, it is a common requirement that the length of the discharge chute must be as long as possible at some time during the discharge, and yet the length must be varied during discharge. This requires the operator to manually add and remove the additional discharge chutes that are carried on the vehicle with the obvious resultant delay and substantial elfort required. Moreover, the plurality of chute sections cannot be left assembled in their extending condition during transit since they would extend beyond practical and legal limits. Thus these sections must be removed from permanently attached chute and mounted at some location on the vehicle.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION By this invention there is provided a novel form of extendable discharge chute for transit mixer vehicles wherein the chute is comprised of a plurality of permanently hinged sections adapted to fold into a compact relationship supported by the section of discharge chute mounted on the vehicle with means provided for physically assisting the folding of the plural chute sections.

An object of this invention is to provide a novel form of extendable discharge chute comprised of a plurality of sections wherein all but the terminal end section is mechanically counter-balanced to permit the manual folding of the excessively heavy multiple sections.

A further object of this invention is to provide a folding discharge chute for transit mixers wherein at least three chute sections are permanently hinged together in a manner whereby one or more of the sections may be folded on the remaining sections without inhibiting the passage of concrete through the remaining chute sections.

Still a further object of this invention is to provide a discharge chute for transit mixers comprising a plurality of chute sections permanently hinged together and foldable by means of power operated devices. Still another object of this invention is to provide such an arrangement wherein the power operated devices are successively operated to individually fold each chute section in succession from the extending end to the base end.

Other and more detailed objects and advantages of this invention will appear from the following description and the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIGURE 1 is an elevation view of the discharge chute of this invention mounted on the transit mixer vehicle and illustrating in phantom lines the successive folded positions of the chute sections.

FIGURE 2 is an elevation View of a modified form of the discharge chute of this invention which is adapted to fold to an even more compact relationship with the foldassisting means omitted for clarity of illustration.

FIGURE 3 is a fragmentary enlarged elevation view of the connection between two sections of the discharge chute shown in FIGURE 1, and illustrating the mechanical means for assisting in folding the chute.

FIGURE 4 is a view similar to FIGURE 3 but illustrating a modified embodiment for providing a power assist for folding and unfolding the chute.

FIGURE 5 is a view similar to FIGURES 3 and 4 and illustrating another modified arrangement for providing power assist for folding and unfolding the chute.

FIGURE 6 is a view similar to FIGURES 3, 4 and 5, but illustrates still a further modified embodiment for producing a power assist for folding and unfolding the chute.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Referring now more particularly to FIGURE 1, the rear portion of the conventional transit mixer is shown at the left of the figure with the concrete mixer drum 10 rotatably supported on the upright frame 11 which in turn is mounted on the rear of the truck frame 12. The mixer drum 10 is of the conventional type having the rearwardly and upwardly facing open end 10a into which the raw materials are supplied through the hopper 13 and from which the mixed concrete is discharged into the discharge accumulator 14. The discharge accumulator 14 is provided with a cylindrical lower portion having a circular track 15 thereon. A first discharge chute section 16 is mounted on the discharge accumulator 14 in a somewhat conventional fashion by means of rollers 17 engaging and captured in the track 15. This roller connection between the first discharge chute 16 and the discharge accumulator 14 permits the discharge chute to be pivoted from side to side about the vertical axis of the cylindrical lower portion of the discharge accumulator 14 and to be pivoted about a horizontal axis to the desired angle of inclination. The lower end of chute section 16 is pivotally connected at 18 to an extendable hydraulic piston and cylinder device 19 which in turn has its base end pivotally connected at 20 to a trunnion 21. The trunnion 21 is supported on the frame 11 for rotation about a vertical axis aligned with the vertical axis of rotation of the upper end of chute section 16. This serves to pivotally support both the upper and lower ends of the chute section 16 for pivoting from side to side of the transit mixer and by extending and retracting the hydraulic piston and cylinder device 19 the angle of inclination of the chute 16 may be varied. The foregoing is all relatively conventional and has been commercially used for many years.

On the extending end of the first chute section 16 is pivotally mounted a second chute section 22 for folding upwardly to a position above chute section 16. The pivotal mounting may be of any convenient form such as a rod 23 extending across and attached to the upper edge of the extending end of chute section 16 with a pair of hell cranks 24 pivotally mounted on the rod 23 on either side of the chute and attached to the chute section 22. At the juncture of chute sections 16 and 22 their cross sections are substantially similar whereby they mate to form a relatively liquid-tight connection, preferably with the lower section 22 exteriorly overlapping a portion of the upper chute section 16 with chute 22 in this down or extending position. The ends of chute sections 16 and 22 abut to support section 22 in this extending position. Chute 16 is normally of a tapered cross section increasing in width and depth toward the discharge hopper 14. Usually the chutes are most conveniently of semi-cylindrical cross section with the top open but, as will appear to those skilled in the art, various cross sections could be used without departing from this invention. The bell cranks 24 have an arm portion 25 extending beyond the pivot rod 23 and a clevis 26 is pivotally connected to the arm 25. A tension type coil spring 27 is connected from the clevis 2-6 to a bracket 28 mounted on the chute section 16. The arm 25 of the bell crank 24 extends laterally at a substantial angle to the length of chute 22 whereby the spring 27 is placed in substantial tension by lowering the chute 22 to the position extending from the end of chute section 16. Conversely this substantial tension stored in spring 27 assists in raising the chute section 22 from the extending position to the vertical position shown by solid lines in FIGURE 1. The precise shape of bell crank 24 and the tension applied by spring 27 is appropriately selected to substantially overcome the entire weight of both the chute section 22 and the hereafter described chute sections supported thereon.

A third chute section 29 is pivotally mounted and supported on the extending end of the second chute section 22 in a manner similar to the aforedescribed mounting of section 22 on section 16. A pivot rod 30 is attached to the upper edge of chute section 22 with bell cranks 31 mounted on either side of chute section 29 and pivotally mounted on the rod 30. Again the bell cranks have arm portions 32 angularly and laterally displaced from the chute section 29, as best shown in FIGURE 3, with 'a clevis 33 pivotally connected thereto. In turn a tension type coil spring 34 is connected from the clevis 33 to a bracket 35 along the length of the chute section 22. This arrangement mechanically assists in pivotally lifting the third chute section 29 from the extending position shown in phantom lines in FIGURE 1 to an upwardly extending position. The springs 34 and shape of hell cranks 31 are appropriately selected to lift the third section 29 and any additional sections that may be attached thereto. In the preferred embodiment shown in FIGURE 1 a fourth chute section 36 is pivotally and permanently mounted by a rod 37 and appropriate brackets to the upper edge of the extending end of the third chute section 29 to fold over on top of chute section 29. The fourth and final chute section 36 will normally be of a sufficiently short length and resultant light weight to be readily foldable manually and will not require a power assistance such as performed by the aforedescribed springs 34 and 27.

In operation of the mixer to discharge and place concrete through the discharge chute comprising sections 16, 22, 29 and 36, it may be desirable to use one, two, three or all four of these chute sections depending on the location to which the concrete is to be placed. Assuming that all four sections are needed, the chute sections will be arranged in their unfolded or extended condition as shown in the phantom lines designated A in FIGURE 1. When a shorter distance of discharge chute extension is desired the fourth section 36 is folded on top of the third section 29 which step is shown in the intermediate position of folding by phantom lines B. If still a shorter discharge chute is desired, the third chute section 29, with section 36 folded thereon, is folded upwardly to a position above chute section 22 and such folding step is shown in an intermediate position by the phantom lines C. Chute section 29 is not folded to a position parallel to chute section 22 due to the presence of chute section 36 which necessarily would be positioned within section 22 thereby preventing the free flow of concrete through section 22. It is to be noted that this step of folding the combined sections 29 and 36 is mechanically assisted by springs 34, otherwise the combined weight would be prohibitively heavy for lifting. When still a shorter length of discharge chute is desired or when the vehicle is in transit, the three chute sections 22, 29 and 36 are folded upwardly to the position shown by solid lines in FIGURE 1 by folding section 22 upwardly and it is to be noted that this folding step is power assisted by the tension in springs 27, just as the previous folding step was assisted by spring 34, neither of which steps could have been manually accomplished without such assistance.

A latch arrangement comprised of a yoke shaped lever 38 pivotally mounted on chute section 16 and having a hook portion adapted to engage pins 39 on each side of chute section 29 serves to rigidly maintain the folded chute sections as shown in solid lines in FIGURE 1 during transit. As a further convenience a latch 40 may be provided on chute section 29 for engaging a rod 41 on the extending end of chute section 36 to maintain the folded relationship between sections 29 and 36 during successive folding steps. Still further latches 42 and 43 may be provided on chute section 22 for latching chute section 29 to section 22 and chute section 16 to section 22, respectively, in the extending position. Latches 42 and 43 are desirable only if the folding forces produced by the springs 34 and 27, respectively, are selected to be of such a magnitude as to nearly balance or overbalance the Weight of the extending chutes whereby such chutes might tend to inadvertently fold upwardly from their extended position. Since the folding forces are more desirably selected to noticeably less than this magnitude the latches 42 and 43 normally will not be required.

Referring now to FIGURE 2 a modified embodiment of the foldable chute of this invention is shown with the power assisting folding devices such as springs 27 and 34 omitted for clarity of illustration. In this embodiment the first chute section 116 may be identical to aforedescribed chute section 16 both as to configuration and mounting. The second chute section 122 is pivotally connected to section 116 in the same manner but is substantially shorter than the aforedescribed section 22. The third chute section 129 is also pivotally connected in the same maner but is both shorter and of smaller cross section than the aforedescribed section 29 whereby chute section 129 will fit into the first chute section 116. The fourth and final chute section 136 is pivotally connected to section 129 and is in turn smaller than section 122 to fit therein as shown in FIGURE 2. The successive chute sections 122, 129 and 136 may be continually tapering to produce the dilferential in cross sectional size or tapered at either or both ends to accomplish the mating between sections and yet successively reducing the cross sectional size. The arrangement of FIGURE 2. is desirable only if an extremely compact folded condition is required since some total length of chute is sacrificed.

Referring now to FIGURE 4 a modified power assist means is shown which may be substituted for either or both of the springs 27 and 34. Again the chute sections 222 and 229 are pivotally connected by a rod 230 and bell cranks 231 similar to the aforedescribed connection between chute sections 22 and 29. A clevis 250 is pivotally connected to bell crank 231 and to the piston rod 251 of a piston and cylinder assembly, generally designated 252. Assembly 252 may be either pneumatically or hydraulically operated and it is preferred that it is double acting to accomplish both folding and unfolding of the chute sections. The supply hoses 2-53 for fluid extend to appropriate controls mounted on the truck. The base end of the assembly 252 is pivotally mounted at 254 to the chute section 222. This arrangement permits completely power operated folding and unfolding and eliminates the need for mechanical latches 40, 42 and 43.

Referring to FIGURE 5 a further modified form is shown wherein the chute sections 322 and 329 are again pivotally connected but are folded and unfolded by means of meshing gears 360 and 361 mounted on the respective chute sections. Gear segment 360 is pivotally mounted and the pivotal movement is accomplished by the piston and cylinder assembly 352 through the piston rod 351 and clevis 350. A still further modified form is shown in FIGURE 6 where the chute sections 422 and 439 are folded by means of a worm gear drive 470 operated by a fiuid motor 471 mounted on chute section 422. As described with respect to FIGURE 4, the power assist devices of FIGURES 5 and 6 may be substituted for either or both of the spring assists employed in the embodiment of FIGURE 1.

Thus it may be seen that by this invention there is provided an arrangement whereby an extremely long discharge chute is permanently mounted on the transit mixer vehicle and may be quickly extended or retracted to a number of different lengths. Specifically, without limiting the scope of this invention, the entire discharge chute shown in FIGURE 1 may conveniently be 16 feet long by section 16 equaling 5 feet long, section 22 equaling 4 /2 feet long, section 29 equaling 3 /2 feet long, and section 36 equaling 3 feet long. Despite this available substantial length the chutes are compactly folded for transit to a condition which is both practical and within the legal limits of extensions which may be carried on vehicles. Moreover the versatility of the discharge chute with respect to pivoting from side to side and up and down is identical to that obtained by prior arrangements requiring manual assembly and disassembly.

Having fully described our invention it is to be understood that we do not wish to be limited to the embodiments herein described and shown but rather our invention is of the full scope of the appended claims.

We claim:

1. In a folding discharge chute for a transit mixer vehicle, comprising, a base discharge chute adapted for permanently mounting on the transit mixer vehicle and having an extending end, at least two extension chutes having one end of each pivotally connected to the other for folding to a compact relationship, one of said extension chutes having the other end pivotally connected to the extending end of the base discharge chute for folding the folded extension chutes to a compact relationship with said base discharge chute, said one extension chute folding over on top of and substantially parallel to said base chute with the other extension chute nesting within said base chute, and means interconnecting said one extension chute and the base discharge chute for providing a force assisting said folding therebetween.

2. In a folding discharge chute for a transit mixer vehicle, comprising, a base discharge chute adapted for permanently mounting on the transit mixer vehicle and having an extending end, at least two extension chutes having one end of each pivotally connected to the other for folding to a compact relationship, one of said extension chu'tes having the other end pivotally connected to the extending end of the base discharge chute for folding the folded extension chutes to a compact relationship with said base discharge chute, said one extension chute folding upwardly to a relatively vertically extending condition, the other extension chute folding upwardly over the said one to extend toward the base chute when both extension chutes are in the folded condition, a third extension chute is pivotally mounted on said other extension to fold to a position between said first two extension chutes in said folded condition, and means interconnecting said one extension chute and the base discharge chute for providing a force assisting said folding therebetween.

3. The apparatus of claim 2 in which a releasable latch device secures said other extension chute to said base chute in said folded condition.

4. In a folding discharge chute for a transit mixer vehicle, comprising, a base discharge chute and first and second extension chutes serially connected together to extend outwardly in a relatively straight line with the base chute adapted for permanently mounting on the transit mixer vehicle, said first and second extension chutes pivotally connected for folding said second chute upwardly more than relative to said first chute to a position overlying said first extension chute, said first extension chute pivotally connected to said base chute for folding upwardly more than 90 relative to said base chute to a position overlying said base chute with said second extension chute in said folded position and between said first extension chute and base chute for supporting and stowing said first and second extension chutes above said base chute.

5. The apparatus of claim 4 wherein a third extension chute is pivotally connected to the extending end of the second extension chute and said third extension chute is adapted to fold to a compact position substantially parallel to said chute extension to which it is connected.

6. The apparatus of claim 5 wherein said third extension chute is shorter than the extension chute to which it is connected which extension chute is in turn shorter than the remaining extension chute connected to the base chute for accommodating successive folding of the extension chutes on top of one another.

7. The apparatus of claim 5 wherein means interconnect the first two said extension chutes and produce a force for assisting the folding therebetween.

8. The folding discharge chute of claim 4 wherein said second extension chute is of a shorter length than said first extension chute for allowing substantially more than 90 of folding of said first extension chute relative to said base chute before engagement of said second extension chute with said base chute.

9. The folding discharge chute of claim 4 wherein means interconnect said base discharge chute and said first extension chute and produce a force for assisting the folding movement of the first extension chute relative to the base chute.

10. The apparatus of claim 9 wherein said interconnecting means includes spring biasing means which are urged to an energy storing condition by unfolding said one extension relative to said base chute to the extending condition.

11. The apparatus of claim 10 wherein said interconnecting means includes a bell crank arm mounted on and extending upwardly from said one extension chute and said spring biasing means comprises a tension spring extending between said bell crank arm and said base chute.

12. The apparatus of claim 9 wherein said interconnecting means is comprised of a power operated mechanism actuatable to fold and unfold said one extension chute relative to said base chute.

13. The folding discharge chute of claim 4 in which a releasable latch device is provided and secures said second extension chute to said base discharge chute in said folded condition.

14. The apparatus of claim 12 wherein said mechanism is a fluid powered piston and cylinder extending from one section of chute and connected to a bell crank arm extending from the other section of chute.

15. The folding discharge chute of claim 4 in which said first extension chute folds substantially 180 relative to said base chute to a position substantially parallel to said base chute and said second extension chute pivots substantially 180 to a position substantially parallel t said first extension chute and nests within said base chute in the folded position.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 817,896 4/1906 Bartholomew 19887 X 1,144,386 6/1915 Schroder 19887 1,178,326 4/1916 Lichtenberg 193-10 X 1,510,479 10/1924 Hoven 198-87 2,577,328 12/1951 .Hyman 198-87 2,713,929 7/1955 Castendyck 19310 2,808,923 10/1957 Rogers 193-18 X 3,053,367 9/1962 Lynch 193-10 ANDRES H. NIELSEN, Primary Examiner

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US817896 *May 26, 1900Apr 17, 1906Sattley Stacker CompanyStraw-stacker.
US1144386 *Sep 8, 1914Jun 29, 1915Henry F SchroderStraw-stacker.
US1178326 *Apr 20, 1915Apr 4, 1916Koehring Machine CompanyDistributing-chute.
US1510479 *Apr 13, 1923Oct 7, 1924Gust PriceHay loader
US2577328 *Jul 14, 1948Dec 4, 1951Int Harvester CoSpring balanced receiving conveyer for portable elevators
US2713929 *Mar 12, 1951Jul 26, 1955Castendyck Jesse RDistributing chute for concrete mixers
US2808923 *May 23, 1955Oct 8, 1957Rogers John HarlanAdjustable counterbalanced extensible conveyor
US3053367 *May 11, 1959Sep 11, 1962Machinery Company ConstConnecting means for movable concrete chute sections
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3930567 *Sep 30, 1974Jan 6, 1976Travel Batcher CorporationChute for front end discharge concrete mixers
US4047604 *Mar 25, 1976Sep 13, 1977Front Discharge Mixer, Inc.Apparatus for controlling the flow of concrete from a mixer
US4458800 *Mar 29, 1982Jul 10, 1984Mcneilus Truck & Manufacturing, Inc.For a concrete mix truck or the like
US4498568 *Jan 31, 1984Feb 12, 1985Mcneilus Truck & Manufacturing Co., Inc.Swinging chute linkage assemblies
US4711334 *Aug 28, 1986Dec 8, 1987Barry Joseph ATelescopic chute for mixer discharge
US4919249 *Apr 17, 1989Apr 24, 1990Rexworks Inc.Multiple section chute restrictor
US4969586 *Jun 20, 1989Nov 13, 1990Michael OstroskiChute closure device
US5884998 *Oct 2, 1996Mar 23, 1999Maxim TrucksFront discharge transit mixer
US5954429 *Nov 13, 1998Sep 21, 1999Silbernagel; Fred J.Front discharge transit mixer with movable rear drum mount
US6123444 *Jan 11, 1999Sep 26, 2000Maxim TrucksFront discharge transit mixer with weight system for determining amount of material discharged
US6152457 *Nov 13, 1998Nov 28, 2000Maxim TrucksFront discharge transit mixer
US6517774Dec 3, 1999Feb 11, 2003Ideas To Market, L.P.Replacement for lead in applications where the high density of lead is important, but where the toxicity of lead is undesirable; ammunition, bullets; tungsten powder, a fiber and a binder; pelletization
US6609603 *Jun 18, 2001Aug 26, 2003London Machinery Inc.Flip chute safety and assist mechanism
US6719118 *Sep 24, 2002Apr 13, 2004Schwing America, Inc.Fold-over chute safety device
US7101075May 27, 2005Sep 5, 2006Silbernagel Fred JMethod of changing the weight distribution loading on a front discharge transit mixer
US7178657 *May 14, 2004Feb 20, 2007Hafen MckayConcrete chute attachment
US8051970 *Jul 14, 2009Nov 8, 2011Mcneilus Truck And Manufacturing, Inc.Swinging chute linkage assembly
EP0079415A1 *Nov 13, 1981May 25, 1983I.C.A. S.p.A.Discharging assembly for concrete auto-mixer with side rotating shift winnowing device
Classifications
U.S. Classification193/4
International ClassificationB65G11/00, B28C5/42, B65G11/14, B28C5/00
Cooperative ClassificationB28C5/4251, B65G11/146, B65G2812/083
European ClassificationB65G11/14B, B28C5/42A3C2B