Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3456773 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 22, 1969
Filing dateMar 7, 1967
Priority dateMar 7, 1967
Also published asDE1556710A1
Publication numberUS 3456773 A, US 3456773A, US-A-3456773, US3456773 A, US3456773A
InventorsJohn E Titmas Jr
Original AssigneeAmerican Chain & Cable Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Case diverter
US 3456773 A
Abstract  available in
Images(7)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

J. E. TITMAS, JR 3,456,773

CASE DIVERTER 7 Sheets-Sheet 1 fi- J. 1 7 I. v 5: wi 1 E i K! |J. -...H... m E 5: f rm. Q. HI .1

INVENTOR. JOHN E. TITMAS,JR.

HTTO NEYS July 22, 1969 Filed March 7, 1967 H HHH H .HH H. Wm .H l x L. Q t SR mm mg N6 .88

J. E. TITMAS, JR

CASE DIVERTER July 22, 1969 7 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed March 7, 1967 INVENTOR.

JOHN E. T-ITMHS, JE.

ATTO EVE J. E. TITMAS, JR

July 22, 1969 CASE DIVERTER '7 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed March 7, 1967 -llII m ENToR. JOHN E. TITMHSMR July 22, 1969 J. E. TITMAS, JR 3,456,773

CASE DIVERTER FiledMarch 7, 1967 7 Sheets-Sheet 4 mvsmoR. JOHN F TITMAQJR.

&MwAo-w% dad HTTO was 7 July 22, 1969 J. E. TITMAS, JR 3,456,773

CASE DIVERTER Filed March 7. 1967 7 Sheets-Sheet 6 INVENTOR. JOHN E. TITMFIS, JR.

HTTOR EYS July 22, 1969 J. E. TITMAS, JR

CASE DIVERTER 7 Sheets-Sheet '7 Filed March '7, 1967 United States Patent US. Cl. 19820 10 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A case diverter for diverting selected cases from a main conveyor onto a spur conveyor while maintaining the relative positions of the faces of the case with respect to the direction of motion having means for detecting the cases to be selected for delivery to the spur conveyor, means for moving the leading ends of a plurality of rollers vertically upward between the moving means of the main conveyor to move the selected cases onto the spur conveyor, the rollers of the spur conveyor being skewed in both the horizontal and vertical dimensions to facilitate maintaining the orientation of the diverted cases so that the leading faces of the cases on the main conveyor remain the leading faces of the cases on the spur conveyor.

The invention relates to case diverters which transfer selected cases from a main conveyor to spur conveyors which are substantially perpendicular to the main conveyor. In particular, the invention is directed toward such case diverters wherein the orientation of the cases, which are diverted to the spur conveyors, is not changed, namely the leading face of the case as it moves on the main conveyor remains its leading face as it moves on the spur conveyor.

It is an important object of the invention to provide a case diverter which removes selected cases of product from a main conveyor and delivers them to a spur conveyor which is substantially perpendicular to the main conveyor without changing the orientation of the diverted cases or affecting the movement of other cases on the main conveyor.

It is a further object of the invention to provide such a case diverter wherein the diverting mechanism comprises a plurality of rollers which are raised into the stream of the main conveyor to raise the selected cases off the main conveyor and direct them onto the spur conveyor.

It is a still further object of the invention to provide such a case diverter wherein the rollers in the upper position are skewed in the vertical plane so that the leading ends are higher than the trailing ends and the axes of the rollers make an angle of about with the horizontal members of the conveyor frame.

It is a still further object of the invention to provide such a case diverter wherein the rollers of the spur conveyor are skewed in both the vertical and horizontal planes so that the diverted cases are pulled around to maintain their orientation.

These and other objects, advantages, features and uses Will be apparent during the course of the following description.

Broadly, the invention is directed toward sorting a mixed line of cases of products into a plurality of separate lines of cases of product to simplify the sorting of the individual products. Thus, the single main conveyor can deliver the cases to forming tables for the preparation of tier loads and pallet loads. If desired, the cases may also be coded to permit the formation of such loads 3,456,773 Patented July 22, 1969 with a plurality of products in each tier or successive tiers.

The cases are preferably coded in the lower left corner of one side (near the leading face). A reader is lo cated ahead of the case diverter and if the code calls for the case to be diverted at that point, the reader actuates the cam shaft and the diverter rollers are raised to engage the case and direct it onto the spur conveyor. If the code calls for the case to remain on the main conveyor, the reader actuates the cam shaft to lower the diverter rollers if they are up or to leave them down if they are down.

It is also within the contemplation of the invention to utilize height or Width sensors or 'any other sensing means capable of distinguishing among the various cases moving on the main conveyor. Such sensing means may then be used to actuate the cam shaft and the diverter rollers, as required.

In the drawings, wherein there is illustrated a preferred embodiment of the case diverter of the invention;

FIGURE 1 is a diagrammatic plan view of the invention showing the main conveyor and three spur conveyors;

FIGURE 2 is a side elevational view of a portion of the main conveyor, two spur conveyors and case diverters of the invention;

FIGURE 3 is a plan view of a portion of the main conveyor, one spur conveyor and diverter;

FIGURE 4 is a plan view similar to that of FIGURE 3 with the rollers and chains removed to show the driving elements for the diverter and spur conveyor rollers and the cam shaft for raising and lowering the diverter rollers;

FIGURE 5 is a side elevational view, viewed in the direction of arrow 5 of FIGURE 4;

FIGURE 6 is a vertical sectional view, taken along lines 6 -6 of FIGURE 5, viewed in the direction of the arrows;

FIGURE 7 is an enlarged elevational view of the cam showing a diverter roller in its lower position;

FIGURE 8 is a view similar to that of FIGURE 7 showing a diverter roller in its upper position; and

FIGURE 9 is an enlarged, side elevational view, viewed in the direction of arrows 99 of FIGURE 1, showing the head of the main conveyor with the motor for driving the main conveyor chains.

In the drawings, wherein, for the purpose of illustration, is shown a preferred embodiment of the invention, the numeral 20 designates the case distribution system generally. System 20 is seen to comprise (FIGURE 1) main conveyor 22, spur conveyors 24A, 24B and 24C, and code readers 26A, 26B and 26C.

The sufiix letters are used to indicate that different product cases are selected and directed onto the particular spur conveyor by its associated code reader. Otherwise, the spur conveyors will be designated as 24 and the code readers as 26.

The cases of products enter the system at its tail 28 and are carried on chains 32 toward the head 30. A case A is detected by code reader 26A and rollers 34A are raised to contact case A to direct it onto rollers 36A of spur conveyor 24A. When any code other than that of case A is read by code reader 26A, the rollers 34A are either lowered or left in the down position and the case proceeds on chains 32 until it reaches the proper spur conveyor.

In systems of the invention, there are occasional uncoded cases or cases whose code is improperly read by the code readers so that they are not diverted onto the appropriate spur conveyor. These cases are taken from the head ofthe main conveyor and hand palletized or otherwise disposed of.

In FIGURE 2, there is a view of the frame 38 in which the conveyors are mounted and which comprises horizontal members 40 and vertical members 42. Code readers 26A, 26B and 26C are well known in the art and are, for example, model 420DS-2 manufactured by General Atronics Corp, Philadelphia, Pa.

Chains 32 are, preferably, of the extended pitch type because the flat top surface of this type chain increases the case stability at high speeds. The chains are mounted in U-shaped channels 44 which are affixed to frame 38.

The cases are spaced apart by metering belts or rollers prior to their entering onto chains 32. Chains 32 are driven by motor 46 which is mounted at the head 30 (FIG- URE 9). The drive train comprises shaft 48 of motor 46 on which is mounted drive sprocket 50 which drives chain 52. Chain 52 drives sprocket 54 which is located together with sprocket 56 on common shaft 58. Sprocket 56 drives chain 32. There is a socket 56 for each chain 32.

Diverter rollers 34 are mounted between chains 32 (FIGURE 3) and their surfaces are preferably formed of material such as urethane or a metal roller painted with an anti-skid coating which has a high coefficient of friction and which is manufactured by 3M Company, St. Paul, Minn. This type of surface improves the operation since it reduces the likelihood of the diverted cases slipping. Rollers 34 and 36 run at a higher velocity than chains 32 so that the cases do not pile up at the spur conveyor and thereby block the main conveyor.

The drive train for rollers 34 and 36 and the cam shaft control for rollers 34 is illustrated in FIGURES 4-6 and the cam operation is illustrated in FIGURES 7 and 8. Motor'6tl drives rollers 34 and 36 so that they run all the time. The drive train comprises sheave 62, belt 64, sheave 66, shaft 68, pulley 70 and belt 72 (FIGURE 4). All the rollers 34 and 36 are driven by belt 72 as can be seen in FIGURE 5.

When a code reader 26 calls for a case to be diverted to a spur conveyor 24, clutch 74 connects transmission 76 to drive belt 78 which is connected to motor 60. The rotation of transmission 76 moves belt 80 which is coupled to cam shaft 82. As cam shaft 82 rotates it moves cams 84 to the upper position (FIGURE 8). When cams 84 reach the upper position, clutch 74 is released, brake 86 is actuated and the rotation of the cam shaft is stopped. When it is necessary to lower rollers 34, brake 86 is released, clutch 74 is actuated and the cam shaft is rotated until cams 84 reach the position of FIGURE 7 at which point the clutch 74 is released and the brake 86 stops the rotation of the cam shaft.

Rollers 34 are moved by means of cam 84 which acts against follower 88. It is seen from FIGURE 8 that the leading end 90 of roller 34 is raised above the other or trailing end 92 so that a portion of a roller 34 is above the level of chain 32 and thereby engages the case which overlies it. By the term leading end is meant the end of the roller nearer the head of the machinte. The rollers 34, in their upper position, are skewed in the vertical plane so that their axes make a vertical angle of about with the horizontal frame members.

Rollers 34 are mounted in carriage 98 as shown in FIGURES 7 and 8. When low spot 96 of cam 84 contacts cam follower 88, carriage 98 which pivots on shaft 100 is in its lower position and rollers 34, which are below the level of chains 32, do not contact any cases which overlie them and the cases move along the main conveyor.

When high spot 94 of cam 84 contacts cam follower 88, carriage 98 is pivoted upward about shaft 100 and rollers 34 contact the case which overlies it and moves it onto the spur conveyor.

Rollers 36 of the spur conveyor 24 are skewed both horizontally and vertically. Ends 102 are skewed with respect to ends 104 (FIGURE 3) by about 5 in the horizontal plane so that the axes of the rollers make a hori- *zontal angle of about 5 with the vertical frame members.

Ends 102 are higher than ends 104 so that the rollers are skewed in the vertical plane and their axes make a vertical angle of about 5 with the horizontal frame members. This configuration and the use of roller surfaces having a high coefficient of friction aid in moving the cases so that their orientation remains unchanged from the main conveyor to the spur conveyor, namely, the leading face of the case remains the leading face.

As various changes could be made in the above construction without departing from the scope of the invention, it is intended that all matter contained in the above description or shown in the accompanying drawings shall be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

The embodiments of the invention in which an exclusive property or privilege is claimed are defined as follows:

1. A system for delivering selected cases of product from a main conveyor to at least one spur conveyor while maintaining the leading face of each selected case as it moves on the main conveyor as the leading face as it moves on the spur conveyor comprising:

a frame having horizontal and vertical members;

a main conveyor supported by said frame;

a plurality of rollers mounted in the frame in the stream of the main conveyor and movable to an upper position and a lower position with respect to the horizontal members of the frame so that in the upper position the plurality of rollers engages the case overlying it and in the lower position the plurality of rollers does not engage the case overlying it, said rollers having forward ends and rearward ends taken relative to the movement of said main conveyor;

means for moving the plurality of rollers to either the upper position or the lower position;

a spur conveyor making an angle with the main conveyor;

means for actuating the means for moving the plurality of rollers;

means for rotating the plurality of rollers;

the plurality of rollers being positioned such that when the rollers are in the upper positions and are rotated, the case overlying the plurality of rollers is moved from the main conveyor onto the spur conveyor;

the plurality of rollers being skewed in the vertical plane in the upper position so that the forward ends of the rollers are higher than the rearward ends; and

a second plurality of rollers which are skewed in the vertical plane so that the end of each roller of the second plurality of rollers in line with the forward ends of the plurality of rollers is higher than the other end thereof.

2. The invention of claim 1 wherein the spur conveyor comprises:

a second plurality of rollers which are skewed in the vertical plane so that the end of each roller of the second plurality of rollers in line with the leading ends of the plurality of rollers is higher than the other end thereof.

3. The invention of claim 1 wherein:

the plurality of rollers and the second plurality of rollers are formed of material having a high coefficient of friction; and

the axes of the rollers of the plurality of rollers in the upper position and of the second plurality of rollers make a vertical angle of the order of 5 with the horizontal members of the frame.

4. The invention of claim 1 wherein:

the plurality of rollers is formed of material having a high coefiicient of friction; and

the axes of the rollers of the plurality of rollers in the upper position make a vertical angle of the order of 5 with the horizontal members of the frame.

5. A system for delivering selected cases of product from a main conveyor to at least one spur conveyor while maintaining the leading face of each selected case as it moves on the main conveyor as the leading face as it moves on the spur conveyor comprising:

a frame having horizontal and vertical members;

a main conveyor supported by said frame;

a plurality of rollers mounted in the frame in the stream of the main conveyor and movable to an upper position and a lower position with respect to the horizontal members of the frame so that in the upper position the plurality of rollers engages the case overlying it and in the lower position the plurality of rollers does not engage the case overlying it, said rollers having forward ends and rearward ends taken relative to the movement of said main conveyor;

means for moving the plurality of rollers to either the upper position or the lower position;

a spur conveyor making an angle with the main conveyor;

means for actuating the means for moving the plurality of rollers;

means for rotating the plurality of rollers;

the plurality of rollers being positioned such that when the rollers are in the upper position and are rotated, the case overlying the plurality of rollers is moved from the main conveyor onto the spur conveyor;

the plurality of rollers being skewed in the vertical plane in the upper position so that the forward ends of the rollers are higher than the rearward ends; and

a second plurality of rollers which are skewed in the horizontal plane so that the end of each roller of the second plurality of rollers in line with the forward ends of the plurality of rollers is forward of the other end thereof.

6. The invention of claim 5 wherein the second plurality of rollers is skewed in the vertical plane so that the end of each roller of the second plurality of rollers which is forward of its other end is higher than the other end thereof.

7. The invention of claim 6 wherein:

the main conveyor comprises a plurality of chains mounted in the frame and means for moving the chains longitudinally;

the plurality of rollers is positioned within the plurality of chains; and

the plurality of rollers and the second plurality of rollers are formed of material having a high coefiicient of friction.

8. The invention of claim 7 wherein:

the axes of the rollers of the plurality of rollers in the upper position and of the second plurality of rollers make a vertical angle of the order of 5 with the horizontal members of the frame.

9. The invention of claim 6 wherein:

the plurality of rollers and the second plurality of rollers are formed of material having a high coefiicient of friction; and

the axes of the rollers of the plurality of rollers in the upper position and of the second plurality of rollers make a vertical angle of the order of 5 with the horizontal members of the frame.

10. The invention of claim 5 wherein:

the plurality of rollers and the second plurality of rollers are formed of material having a high coefficient of friction; and

the axes of the rollers of the plurality of rollers in the upper position make a vertical angle of the order of 5 with the horizontal members of the frame.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,944,702 7/1960 Fenton 19833 3,086,640 4/1963 Verrinder 19833 3,191,747 6/1965 Pollard 198-185 3,291,279 12/1966 De Good et a1. 19833 EDWARD A. SROKA, Primary Examiner US. Cl. X.R.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2944702 *Mar 12, 1956Jul 12, 1960Beacon Production Equipment CoPallet unloading machine
US3086640 *Dec 22, 1960Apr 23, 1963Fmc CorpArticle handling apparatus
US3191747 *Apr 3, 1963Jun 29, 1965A J Bayer CompanyConveyor and dispatch device
US3291279 *Jul 26, 1965Dec 13, 1966Rapids Standard Co IncDiverting conveyor
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3904053 *Nov 6, 1973Sep 9, 1975Japan National RailwayEngage-disengage device for cargo-transfer means in mechanical cargo handling system of the load replacing type
US4039072 *Aug 20, 1975Aug 2, 1977C. Keller & Co.Apparatus and method for conveying molded briquettes from a press to bed plates via an inclined conveyance track
US4093064 *Nov 17, 1976Jun 6, 1978Sparton CorporationConveyor packing station
US4373320 *Apr 24, 1981Feb 15, 1983Hoogovens Ijmuiden B.V.Packing line for packing stacks of rectangular tinplate sheets on pallets
US4382516 *May 18, 1981May 10, 1983Nippon Steel CorporationMethod of and apparatus for classifying steel products
US4530199 *May 17, 1982Jul 23, 1985Sasib S.P.A.Discarding device for discarding defective cigarette packs
US4572350 *Apr 6, 1984Feb 25, 1986E. C. H. Will Gmbh & Co.Apparatus for diverting stacks of sheets in paper processing machines
US4798275 *Jun 30, 1986Jan 17, 1989Versa CorporationLine-shaft conveyor diverter
US4880099 *Oct 17, 1988Nov 14, 1989Versa CorporationTilting reversible belt transfer mechanism
US5630495 *Nov 18, 1996May 20, 1997Rapistan Demag Corp.Conveyor system diverter components having friction-enhancing surfaces and related methods of use
US5735388 *May 7, 1997Apr 7, 1998Mannesmann Dematic Rapistan Corp.Conveyor system diverter components having friction-enhancing surfaces and related methods of use
US6269933 *Aug 10, 1998Aug 7, 2001Mannesmann Dematic Rapistan Corp.Compact article unscrambler
US6276508Dec 21, 1999Aug 21, 2001United Parcel Service Of America, Inc.Chute having sortation features
US6359247Jul 6, 1999Mar 19, 2002Quantum Conveyor Systems, LlcMulti-fire and variable fire diverter conveyor system and method
US6409451Apr 13, 2000Jun 25, 2002Ibp, Inc.Item handler and method for flow through storage
US6474924Feb 20, 2002Nov 5, 2002Ibp, Inc.Skid handling system for flow through storage
US6520735Feb 19, 2002Feb 18, 2003Ibp, Inc.Method of automation for flow through storage
US6578700Jun 26, 2002Jun 17, 2003Ibp, Inc.Item handler for sorting and packing
US6591965Jun 26, 2002Jul 15, 2003Ibp, Inc.Item handler for sorting and packing
US6622847Aug 3, 2001Sep 23, 2003Rapistan Systems Advertising Corp.Compact article unscrambler
US6625953Dec 2, 1999Sep 30, 2003Ibp, Inc.Item handler for sorting and packing
US6660953Feb 11, 2002Dec 9, 2003Quantum Conveyor Systems, LlcMulti-fire and variable fire diverter conveyor system and method
US6843365Mar 9, 2004Jan 18, 2005Paragon Technologies, Inc.Narrow belt conveyor system
US6907978 *Nov 5, 2003Jun 21, 2005Lockheed Martin CorporationMethods and apparatuses for inducting articles onto a conveyor
US7104388 *Aug 26, 2004Sep 12, 2006Arr Tech, Inc.Conveyor system for stacked product
US7178659 *Jan 7, 2005Feb 20, 2007Lockheed Martin CorporationMethods and apparatuses for inducting articles onto a conveyor
US7588139 *Aug 12, 2008Sep 15, 2009Campbell Iii William ArthurConveyor assembly
US7681710Apr 10, 2008Mar 23, 2010Fki Logistex, Inc.Modular conveyer transfer systems and methods
US7954810 *Feb 10, 2005Jun 7, 2011Beiler Beheer B.V.Method and device for transporting a sheet
US8561790 *Sep 28, 2010Oct 22, 2013Dematic Corp.Belt drive conveyor with power tap off
US8684169 *Aug 16, 2011Apr 1, 2014Itoh Denki Co., Ltd.Transfer device
US20040173436 *Mar 9, 2004Sep 9, 2004Paragon Technologies, Inc.Narrow belt conveyor system
US20050077145 *Nov 5, 2003Apr 14, 2005Lockheed Martin CorporationMethods and apparatuses for inducting articles onto a conveyor
US20050115798 *Jan 7, 2005Jun 2, 2005Lockheed Martin CorporationMethods and apparatuses for inducting articles onto a conveyor
US20060054463 *Aug 26, 2004Mar 16, 2006Arr Tech, Inc.Conveyor system for stacked product
US20070170644 *Feb 10, 2005Jul 26, 2007Beiler Beheer B.V.Method and device for transporting a sheet
US20090152074 *Dec 8, 2008Jun 18, 2009Dematic Corp.Conveyor diverter
US20090255784 *Apr 10, 2008Oct 15, 2009Fki Logistex, Inc.Modular Conveyor Transfer Systems and Methods
US20110233031 *Sep 28, 2010Sep 29, 2011Dematic Corp.Belt drive conveyor with power tap off
US20120048678 *Aug 16, 2011Mar 1, 2012Kazuo ItohTransfer device
CN102548874A *Sep 28, 2010Jul 4, 2012德马泰克公司Belt drive conveyor with power tap off
CN102548874B *Sep 28, 2010Dec 3, 2014德马泰克公司Belt drive conveyor with power tap off
DE3343732A1 *Nov 30, 1983Jun 20, 1984Ocme SpaAusruestung zum palettieren schicht fuer schicht auf entsprechende paletten von verschiedenartigen, aus gesonderten kanaelen zugefuehrten gegenstaenden
DE3407555A1 *Mar 1, 1984Sep 5, 1985Orthmann & HerbstContainer transport belt with transfer table
EP0704393A1 *Jul 20, 1995Apr 3, 1996Rapistan Demag Corp.A conveyor diverter system
WO1992019520A1 *May 7, 1992Nov 12, 1992Markku KoistiMethod and apparatus for transferring articles to an article receiving area
WO2001046044A1 *Dec 8, 2000Jun 28, 2001United Parcel Service Of America, Inc.Chute having sortation features
WO2002064459A2 *Feb 8, 2002Aug 22, 2002Paragon Technologies, Inc.Narrow belt conveyor system
WO2002064459A3 *Feb 8, 2002Nov 14, 2002Paragon Technologies IncNarrow belt conveyor system
WO2011038376A1 *Sep 28, 2010Mar 31, 2011Dematic Corp.Belt drive conveyor with power tap off
Classifications
U.S. Classification198/370.9, 209/925
International ClassificationB65G47/24, B65G47/54, B65G47/49
Cooperative ClassificationB65G47/24, B65G47/54, B65G47/49, Y10S209/925
European ClassificationB65G47/24, B65G47/49, B65G47/54