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Publication numberUS3457575 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 29, 1969
Filing dateNov 30, 1966
Priority dateDec 23, 1965
Also published asDE1457024A1, DE1503746B1
Publication numberUS 3457575 A, US 3457575A, US-A-3457575, US3457575 A, US3457575A
InventorsBienek Gunter
Original AssigneeBissell Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Sweeper for carpeted and smooth floors
US 3457575 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 29, 1969 G. BIENEK 3,457,515

SWBEPER FOR CARPETED AND SMOOTH FLOORS Filed Nov. 50, 1966 5 Sheets-Sheetl Mfm w M 7 I fr av 1 11k L fa 0 11;. @W7 l 11 |1|111I ,fn/,.0 4 m 3 m 4 M 5 ||1 i 11 1111 111g, kw 7 |1||- 7 7|/ 1 11|ll a! ,.1 l A 2 11p 2 ZZJ/ 1 W llnl 1||111| JN( ,MU MN 1 W15 1| 11# July 29, 1969 G BIENEK 3,457,575

SWEEPER FOR CARPETED AND SMOOTH FLOORS Filed Nov. 30, 1966 S Sheets-Sheet 2 G. BlENl-:K

SWEEPER FOR CARI'E'IIII) ANI) SMOOTH FLOORS I5 Sheets-Sheet 3 July 29, 1969 med Nov. so, 196e United States Patent O Int. Cl. A47l 11/32 U.S. Cl. -41 13 Claims ABSTRACT 0F THE DISCLGSURE A carpet sweeper with a pair of freely rotatable brushes and adjacent dust pans. Each brush is mounted for free rotation about its axle during translation of the sweeper over a oor in one direction, and is automatically driven by coupling means when the sweeper direction is reversed. The direction of rotation of each brush remains constant regardless of the direction of translation of the sweeper, and the brushes rotate oppositely relative to each other. When one brush is freely rotating, the other is being driven by the coupling means, and vice versa. The coupling means may include springs wound about the brush axle, bail operated levers or unidirectional clutches. The brushes are formed with bristles disposed angularly to the brush core surface.

This invention relates to a sweeper for carpeted and smooth oors, and more particularly to an improved sweeper utilizing continuous unidirectional sweeping action of the rotary brush means.

Heretofore, most devices which have been commonly called carpet sweepers have included a single rotary brush disposed between a pair of dust-receiving pans. The brush was usually driven by the sweeper wheels and would change direction of rotation as the sweeper was reciprocated forward and backward over the floor. Thus, dust was alternately swept into one pan and then the other.

Since, in the above-mentioned prior construction, the brush continuously changed direction, it would often return to the floor some dust which had not yet been swept into a pan, and would even pull stringy bundles of ulf or hair from a pan and re-deposit them onto the floor. Repeated sweeper reciprocation over a given floor area was thus necessary, causing needless wear of the nap surface.

In addition, sweepers of the type mentioned above have not been eficient when used on smooth floors. The action was such that most dust and debris resisted being swept into the sweeper pan.

The present invention solves the aforementioned and other problems, and provides a sweeper usable on both carpeted and smooth floors, and which is substantially more efcient than prior constructions.

In accordance with the invention, the sweeper brush is mounted to sweep in a single direction toward its pan at all times, regardless of the direction of translation of the sweeper over the floor. In the embodiments illustrated herein, a pair of rotary brushes are disposed adjacent a pair of dust pans, with each brush contructed and mounted to rotate freely over the floor in one direction and to be poitively driven in the same direction upon reversal of sweeper action. The free vs. driven action of each brush is reversed relative to the other brush. The direction of rotation of either brush is always toward its respective dust pan.

Further in accordance with the invention, special brushes may be utilized which more adequately fling dust and debris into the pans. These brushes, while rotating 3,457,575 Patented July 29, 1969 ICC freely while being translated in one direction, will resist rotation in a normal direction upon opposite translation. This is especially true when the sweeper is used on smooth surfaces.

The brushes used in the illustrated embodiments comprise a core in which is secured a plurality of brush bristles and which extend outwardly therefrom. The bristles are disposed at an angle to the circumferential surface of the core, and are thus at an angle to a pure radial direction. Upon rotation of such a brush over a surface, the bristles act to positively flick dust and dirt into the adjacent pan with a snapping action.

The accompanying drawings illustrate the best mode presently contemplated by the inventor for carrying out the invention.

In the drawings:

FIG. l is a generally central vertical sectional view of a sweeper, showing a rst embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 2 is a generally horizontal sectional view of the sweeper of FIGURE 1;

FIG, 3 is a broken side elevation of the connecting web;

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary side elevation of the brush used in the sweeper of the invention;

FIG. 5 is a sectional view of the brush action during leftward sweeper movement;

FIG. 6 is a sectional view of the brush action during rightward sweeper movement;

FIG. 7 is a view similar to FIG. 1, showing a, second embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 8 is a View similar to FIG. 2 showing the second embodiment;

FIG. 9 is a fragmentary sectional view of a sweeper showing a third embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 10 is an enlarged edge elevation of the clutch means of FIG. 9;

FIG. 11 is a side view of a clutch disc; and

FIG. 12 is a view somewhat similar to FIG. 1, showing another embodiment of the invention.

As shown in the embodiment of FIGS. 1-3 of the drawings, the carpet sweeper includes a housing comprising side walls 1 and a suitable cover plate 2 disposed therebetween and forming a top portion 3 and end wall portions 4. If desired, rubber bumpers 5 may be secured to end wall portions 4 to protect furniture. Side walls 1 and cover plate 2 may be made of any suitable material, including injection molded plastic.

Means are provided to secure the opposing side walls together. For this purpose, a central web 6 extends across the sweeper between and is suitably secured to walls 1. Each end of web 6 is provided with a T-slot 7 (see FIG. 3) which receives a screw 8 and tightening nut 9. The outer end of each screw 8 is threadably received in a bore 10 formed centrally of the respective side wall 1.

A pair of spaced rotatable sweeper brushes 11 and 12 are mounted within the housing, with each brush being disposed closely adjacent end wall portions 4. Each brush is xedly m-ounted on an axle 13, 14 mounted in suitable' bores in side walls 1. A suitable brush core 15, 16 forms part of each assembly, with a plurality of groups of bristles 17, 18 secured therein, as will be described in greater detail hereinafter.

Axle 13 is provided with a coupling means, such as wheel 19 disposed between each outer brush end and the respective side wall 1. In like manner, axle 14 is provided with a coupling wheel 20 disposed between each outer brush and the respective side wall. Both pairs of wheels are freely rotatable on their respective axles. Wheels 19 and 20 are continuously engaged and driven by two pairs of sweeper drive wheels 21, 22 which support the sweeper on the surface for reciprocating translation thereover. Drive wheels 21, 22 are xedly mounted on respective rotatable axles 23, 24 which are suitably disposed in openings 25 in side walls 1.

Frictional engagement means are provided between adjacent coupling and drive wheels. As shown in the drawings, the frictional engagement means comprises a rubber-like surface layer 26 on coupling wheels 19 and a similar layer 27 on drive wheels 21. If desired, the friction layer could be disposed on all drive wheels and/or on all coupling wheels without departing from the spirit of the invention.

Brushes 11 and 12 are adapted to sweep dust and debris from the surface of a iloor 28 into suitable receptacles. For this purpose, a pair of dust pans 29, 30 are disposed between the brushes and are pivotally mounted on drive wheel axles 23, 24 respectively. Pans 29 and 30 are provided with a closed floor, but are open at the top and along the side facing the* respective brush. An inclined lip 31 on the open side of each respective pan assists the adjacent brush in its sweeping action. Pans 29 and 3) are held in normally closed position by a plurality of springs 32 which are mounted in suitable notches 33 in web 6 (see FIG. 3) and which extend fore or aft, as the case may be, and which engage pins 34 disposed on the ends of the pans. When the pans are closed, they may bear against rubber cushion means 35 secured to web 6.

Means are provided for simultaneously opening dust pans 29 and 30 so they can be emptied. For this purpose, a vertically movable dump button 36 extends through the top portion 3 of cover plate 2, and has a two-legged spring 37 secured thereto. The spring leg ends are suitably mounted in notches 38 in oneI end portion of pans 29 and 30. When button 36 is pushed downwardly, spring 37 will cause pans 29 and 30 to pivot downwardly about their respective axles and against the biasing force of springs 32.

In accordance with the concept of the invention, brushes 11 and 12 are so constructed and controlled so that they continuously rotate in one direction only and thus sweep dirt and the like into their respective pans at all times, regardless of the direction or change of direction of translation of the sweeper over a floor surface.

For the above purpose, each brush is adapted to rotate freely in one direction so that contact of the bristles 17 or 18 with floor 28 during translation will cause the brush to sweep into its respective pan. The direction of permissible free rotation for one brush is, however, oppositeI to the direction of free rotation for the other brush. Thus, brush 11 will rotate freely in counterclockwise direction during leftward sweeper translation, and brush 12 will rotate freely in a clockwise direction during rightward sweeper translation.

However, when one brush is rotating freely, the other brush is blocked from such free rotation and is actually driven by the sweeper mechanism in a direction opposite to that of the freely rotating brush. The result is shown by the arrows in FIGURE 1, wherein brush 11 is rotating freely counterclockwise and brush 12 is being driven clockwise. Upon reversal of the direction of sweeper translation, the free or driven actions of the brushes re- Verse.

In the embodiment of FIGS. 143 of the drawings, a coil spring 39 is circumferentially wrapped counterclockwise about each end portion of brush axle 13 and is held in place within the bore in side wall 1. A second coil spring 40 is similarly wrapped counterclockwise about axle 13 inwardly from each spring 39, and is held in place within a bore in freely rotatable coupling wheel 19 with one spring end engaging the wheel as shown in FIGURE 1. Clockwise wrapped coil springs 41 and 42 are similarly mounted about axle 14.

Upon leftward translation of the sweeper, brush 11 and axle 13 will tend to rotate counterclockwise, thus unwinding springs 39 and 40. This will release the spring connection of side' wall 1 and coupling wheel 19 with axle 4 13. Brush 11 can then rotate counterclockwise freely over the floor even though drive wheel 21 drives wheel 19 clockwise. At the same time, brush 12 may also tend to rotate counterclockwise, but this will tighten springs 41 and 42 onto axle 14, thus blocking the tendency for counterclockwise rotation. The tightening of the spring coupling between coupling wheel 20 and axle 14 will cause wheel 22 to positively drive brush 12 clockwise. In the event brush 12 does not tend to rotate counterclockwise, as explained hereinafter, the normal tightening force of coil spring 42 will maintain the coupling to drive wheel 22.

Upon rightward translation of the sweeper, the abovedescribed actions are reversed. Thus, no matter what the direction of translation, brushes 11 and 12 will always sweep into their respective pans.

The sweeper disclosed herein also includes an improved action by virtue of the brushes utilized. As best shown in FIGS. l, 4 and 5, groups of bristles 17, 18 are mounted in their respective cores 15, 16 at an angle to a radial direction and angularly to the' circumferential core surface. FIG. 5 shows the action of the bristles during free counterclockwise rotation of a brush 11 over a oor 28. As shown, the bristle group 17 touching floor 28 is mounted in core 15 and extends downwardly so that it engages the floor generally behind a vertical plane 43 containing the longitudinal core axis. As the roller moves forwardly, the bristles deform and tend to be compressed against the floor, and then suddenly release rearwardly to cause a flicking or snap action on the dirt, thus positively flinging the dirt into pan 29. FIG. 6 shows the action during positive drive of the brush when the direction of sweeper movement has been reversed. HereI the bristle groups extend downwardly and are deflected so that they engage the floor generally ahead of plane 43. In this instance, and especially on smooth floors, the brush resists rotation in its normal direction, thus assisting the positive drive described above and increasing the flicking action.

The bristle groups shown in FIG. 4 are arranged in spiral fashion and staggered. The groups could also be arranged in series, or in any other suitable way.

FIGS. 7 and 8 show a second embodiment of a sweeper which is generally similar to that shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, with the exception that the bail 44 is utilized to couple and uncouple the positive driving means. In this instance, coupling wheels 45, 46 are iixedly mounted on brush axles 13 and 14 respectively. Wheels 45 and 46 are adapted to be selectively engaged and driven by drive wheels 47, 48, which are in turn mounted on axles 49, 50 which extend into enlarged openings 51 in side walls 1.

A lever 52 is disposed closely adjacent each side wall 1 forwardly of the central web, and has a cam 53 on its rearward end and an arm 54 on its forward end. The lever is pivoted, as at 55 to side walls 1. A similar lever 56 is disposed rearwardly of the central web, is pivoted at 57, and has a similar cam 58 and arm 59. Each pair of opposed levers is actuated by the inner end 60 of bail 44 which is disposed for longitudinal sliding movement in a slot 61 in side walls 1.

During leftward movement of the sweeper, manual pressure on bail 44 will cause its end 60 to engage cam 53 and pivot lever 52 so that arm 54 pulls drive wheel 47 away from coupling Wheel 45. Brush 11 thus freely rotates. At the same time, wheels 46 and 48 are coupled to drive brush 12.

Reversing of direction of sweeper translation causes bail end 60 to shift rightward in slot 61 to actuate cam 58, thereby reversing the coupling action between brushes.

Other automatic coupling and uncoupling means may be used without departing from the spirit of the invention. For example, FIGS. 9-11 show a construction with a sweeper having clutch means wherein a toothed coupling disc 62 is secured to the loosely mounted coupling wheel 63, and a similar disc 64 is secured to the end of 5 brush 11. Discs 62 and 64 may be made of plastic for noiseless operation and have slightly flexible teeth which mutually engage for driving purposes upon one directlon of relative rotation, but which slide over each other in the other rotative direction.

In the sweepers shown in FIGS. 1-11, any dirt and debris not picked up by the forward brush in a given stroke will be picked up and swept into the pan by the rearward brush on the same stroke. Occasionally, the rearward brush will not pick up the missed debris. This rearward brush will, nevertheless, tend to sweep the debris toward the forward brush. This debris is, in effect, trapped between brushes so that it will be picked up upon reversal of reciprocation.

In some instances it may be desirable to reverse the positions of rotary brushes and pans. FIG. l2 shows a structure wherein two brushes 65, 66 are disposed between pans 67, 68. Brushes 65 and 66 are constructed and mounted similarly to the brushes in the previously described embodiments, with a resultant uni-directional rotation toward their respective pans, in both directions of sweeper translation.

The present invention provides a unique concept for sweeping carpeted or smooth-surfaced oors. By utilizing a pair of oppositely mounted and oppositely functioning brushes which sweep continuously into their respective pans, regardless of the translational direction of the sweeper, increased sweeping eiciency has been made possible. Further improvements in eiiciency are provided by the snap action of the brushes.

I claim:

1. A oor sweeper comprising:

(a) at least one dust pan providing two separate spaced dust receiving areas for the sweeper,

(b) and a pair of rotary tioor contacting brushes disposed to deliver dust to the corresponding dust receiving areas upon reciprocal translation of the sweeper over a oor,

(c) each said brush being mounted to Contact and freely rotate on the iloor in a direction to deliver dust to its corresponding dust receiving area upon translation of the sweeper in a corresponding direction,

(d) and said sweeper being characterized by having means to drive each brush in the direction of its aforementioned free rotation when the translation of the sweeper is in the opposite direction.

2. In a sweeper for carpeted and smooth-surface oors,

the combination comprising:

(a) a pair of rotatable brushes disposed for contact with the floor for sweeping debris therefrom,

(b) dust pan means disposed between said brushes and adapted to receive the debris swept from the floor by said brushes,

(c) means to cause each said brush to rotate unidirectionally toward said dust pan means in a generally continuous sweeping action upon both fore and aft reciprocating translation of said sweeper over the floor,

(d) said dust pan means comprising a separate pan for each brush, and means for simultaneously pivoting said pans to a selective open or closed position.

3. In a sweeper for carpeted and smooth-surfaced floors, the combination comprising:

(a) a pair of rotatable brushes disposed for contact with the oor for sweeping debris therefrom,

(b) dust pan means disposed adjacent said brushes and adapted to receive the debris swept from the oor by said brushes,

(c) and means to cause each said brush to rotate unidirectionally toward said dust pan means in a generally continuous sweeping action upon both fore and aft reciprocating translation of said sweeper over the oor, said last-named means comprising:

(1) mounting means positioning each said brush for free rotation thereof, on the floor caused by contact with the floor when said sweeper is translated in one direction,

(2) and drive means for each said brush for positively driving the brush in its free rotational direction when said sweeper is translated in the opposite direction.

4. The sweeper of claim 3 in which the direction of free and driven rotation of each brush is the opposite to that of the other brush.

S. The sweeper of claim 4 in which each said brush comprises:

(a) a core,

(b) and a plurality of bristles mounted in said core and extending outwardly therefrom at an angle to a radial direction and at an angle to the circumferential core surface,

(c) the construction being such that during free rota tion of the brush said bristles are compressively deformed against the oor ahead of a plane containing the core axis, and during driven rotation of the brush said bristles are compressively deformed against the floor behind said plane; with a subsequent snap-like release of the bristles from the floor to forceably ing debris into the adjacent pan means.

6. The sweeper of claim 5 in which each said brush is constructed and mounted so as to resist free rotation on smooth floors when the sweeper is translated in the direction to cause positive driving of the brush.

7. sweeper for carpeted and smooth-surfaced floors comprising:

(a) a housing,

(b) drive wheels mounted on said housing for supporting said sweeper for reciprocating fore and aft translation over the floor, n

(c) a pair of rotatable brushes disposed Within said housing and fixedly positioned for contact with the floor for sweeping debris therefrom.

(d) dust pan means disposed within said housing adjacent said brushes for receiving debris swept from the oor by said brushes,

(e) and releasable coupling means for each said brush, said coupling means being released upon sweeper translation in one direction to permit free rotation of the brush on the Hoor and toward said pan means, said coupling means being engaged upon sweeper translation in the other direction to positively drive the brush in its free rotational direction,

(f) the coupling means for each brush being reversed relative to the other brush so that the direction of free and driven rotation of each brush is opposite to that of the other brush,

(g) the construction providing generally continuous unidirectional sweeping action of each brush toward said pan means during both fore and aft reciprocating of said sweeper over the floor.

8. The sweeper of claim 7 in which said releasable coupling means comprises:

(a) an axle on each brush,

(b) a coupling wheel loosely mounted on said axle and drivingly engaged with a said drive wheel,

(c) and a coupling coil spring circumferentially wrapped around said axle with one end thereof engaging said coupling wheel,

(d) said spring being wound so as to loosen on said axle when said sweeper is translated in a direction requiring free brush rotation, and said spring tightening on said axle to connect said drive and coupling wheels with said axle when said sweeper is translated in a direction requiring driven brush rotation,

(e) the springs on opposite brushes being oppositely wound.

9. The sweeper of claim 7 in which a bail is mounted on said housing, and in which said releasable coupling means is connected to said bail for actuation thereby.

10. The sweeper of claim 9 in which said releasable coupling means comprises:

(a) an axle on each brush,

(b) a coupling wheel tixedly mounted on said axle and drivingly engageable with a said drive wheel,

Zc) means mounting said drive wheel for movement relative to said coupling Wheel for engagement or disengagement of the wheels,

(d) a pair of opposed fore and aft levers pivotally mounted Within said housing with said levers having outer arms engaging the respective drive wheel mounting means and having an inner end forming cam surfaces,

(e) said housing providing a slot receiving a bail end disposed adjacent said cam surfaces,

(f) fore and aft movement of said bail to reciprocate said sweeper causing said bail end to reciprocate in said slot and alternately engage first one cam surface and then the other to alternately pivot said levers to cause said lever arms to alternately cause release from and driving engagement of said drive wheels with said coupling wheels.

11. The sweeper of claim 7 in which said releasable coupling means comprises:

(a) an axle and core on each brush,

(b) a coupling wheel loosely mounted on said axle and drivingly engaged with a said drive wheel,

(c) and a unidirectional toothed disc clutch mounted between said coupling wheel and said core.

12. In a sweeper for carpeted and smooth-surfaced loors, the combination comprising:

(a) a pair of rotatable brushes disposed for contact with the oor for sweeping debris therefrom,

(b) dust pan means disposed adjacent said brushes and adapted to receive the debris swept from the oor by said brushes,

(c) means to cause each said brush to rotate unidirec- 8 tionally toward said dust pan means in a generally continuoussweeping action upon both fore and aft reciprocating translation of said sweeper over the floor, l

(d) said dust pan: means comprising a separate pan for each brush, with said pans being spaced apart and with said brushes disposed therebetween.

13;'In a sweeper for carpeted and smooth-surfaced oors comprising:

(a) a housing,

(b) drive wheels mountedfon said housing for supporting'said sweeper for reciprocating fore and aft translation over the floor,

(c) at least one rotatable brush ixedly mounted on an axle lwithin said housing and with `said brush being positioned for contact 'with`the ioor for sweeping debris therefrom,

(d) a coupling wheel disposed on said axle with said brush and with said coupling 'wheel being in continuous engagement with one of said drive wheels,

(e) and means to cause said coupling wheel to drive said axle and brush in a single direction of rotation only upon fore and aft translation of the sweeper over the floor.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 4/ 1926 Great Britain. 9/1956 France.

WILLIAM I. PRICE, Primary Examiner.

ROBERT I. SMITH, Assistant Examiner U.S. C1. X.R. 15-388

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3602932 *Jul 14, 1969Sep 7, 1971Bissell IncFloor sweeper with improved drive coupling
US3879788 *Feb 2, 1973Apr 29, 1975Cousin Cie Ets A & M FreresMechanical sweeper
US4084283 *Dec 17, 1976Apr 18, 1978Bissell, Inc.Floor sweeper
US4325156 *Dec 4, 1980Apr 20, 1982Bissell, Inc.Floor sweeper with improved construction
US4357727 *Dec 4, 1980Nov 9, 1982Bissell, Inc.Dual brush floor sweeper
US6574823Feb 12, 2001Jun 10, 2003The Scott Fetzer CompanyBrushroll
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Classifications
U.S. Classification15/41.1, 15/388
International ClassificationA46B13/00, A47L11/00, A47L11/33
Cooperative ClassificationA47L11/4013, A47L11/4075, A46B13/001, A47L11/4041, A47L11/4066, A47L11/4069, A47L11/33
European ClassificationA47L11/40J4, A47L11/40F4, A47L11/40D, A47L11/40L, A47L11/40J2, A46B13/00B, A47L11/33