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Publication numberUS3458189 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 29, 1969
Filing dateJul 9, 1965
Priority dateJul 9, 1965
Publication numberUS 3458189 A, US 3458189A, US-A-3458189, US3458189 A, US3458189A
InventorsHolt John W
Original AssigneeHolt John W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Duplicate books or kits for assembling game
US 3458189 A
Images(2)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 29, 1969 J. w. HOLT 3,458,189

v DUPLICATE BOOKS OR KITS FOR ASSEMBLING GAME Filed July 9, 1965 v 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 A w 55 3a.

FI GZ DUPLICATE BOOKS OR KITS FOR ASSEMBLING GAME Filed'July 9, 1965 J. w. HOLT July 29, 1969 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR. $4.. ALI/Mr 3 NQ Q United States Patent 3,458,189 DUPLICATE BOOKS OR KITS FOR ASSEMBLING GAME John W. Holt, 90 S. Highland Ave., Pearl River, N.Y. 10965 Filed July 9, 1965, Ser. No. 470,813

Int. Cl. A63h 33/00 US. Cl. 273-1 13 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE Two discrete assembly kits having a support means and a given number of different components, each component in one kit being identical with one of the components in the other kit. A plurality of identifying means respectively associated with one of the components and each such identifying means being identical with a corresponding indentifying means in the other of the kits, identical identifying means being associated in the respective kits witth non-identical components. Persons who are each in possession of one of the kits but who cannot see each others kit may alternately direct one another to apply components identified by given identifying means to the respective support means so that, after a series of such directions has been given, the resulting compositions may be compared and differences between them ascertained.

The present invention concerns an assembly toy. More specifically, it concerns an assembly toy whereby a composite image may 'be assembled from various components. Still more specifically, the present invention concerns an assembly toy comprising at least two assembly kits so as to permit the two participants, each provided with one of such kits, may direct one another in assembling the components of their respective kits.

It is well known that teen-agers, bed-ridden youngsters, etc. enjoy having long conversations with one another by telephone. Such conversations often range from a discussion of common school work to talk about the days happenings, future plans, etc. Beyond this it is often observed that the children will attempt to entertain one another over the telephone with various games. In view of this it is thought that the provision of a game, and specifically of an assembly toy with which two children can amuse themselves, even or particularly if they are separated from one another by a certain distance, can prove both entertaining and educational for such youngsters.

It is therefore an object of the present invention to provide a game in the form of an assembly toy for assembling composite images, which permits participation by two or more youngsters separated by distance. A more specific object of the present invention is to provide a toy of the above-described nature which is assembled by the participating youngsters directing one another to carry out certain assembly steps, and in which the final product, a composite image, can then be compared to determine the outcome of the game played by the youngsters.

Another object of the invention is to provide such a toy when the assembly instructions, which are given sightunseen, are likely to result in assembly of a humorous image.

With the above objects in mind I have provided an assembly toy comprising:

(a) Two assembly kits, each having a plurality of components identified by similar, but not identical symbols,

-(b) And each kit further having support means to which said components may be applied, whereby persons who are each in possession of said kits and who cannot see each others kit, may alternately direct one another to apply components identified by given symbols to the respective support means so that, after a series of such directions has been given, the resulting composite images may be compared and the differences between them ascertained.

The most readily visualizable realization of the inventive assembly toy is in the form of two like kits each including a replica or representation of a doll or the like, to act as support means, and various articles of attire which may be applied to the respective doll by one child upon such article or articles being identified by the other child by means of a symbol or reference numeral. Of course, the invention is not in any way limited to this particular example; it is very well possible to provide assembly toys with different subjects, such as for instance the construction of a barn yard, the trimming of a Christmas tree, etc.

The novel features which are considered as characteristic for the invention are set forth in particular in the appended claims. The invention itself, however, both as to its construction and its method of operation, together with additional objects and advantages thereof, will be best understood from the following description of specific embodiments when read in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a schematic representation of one of two kits constituting the inventive assembly toy;

FIG. 2 is a schematic representation of the second kit of the inventive assembly toy;

FIG. 3 is a schematic representation of the first kit of another embodiment of the inventive assembly toy; and

FIG. 4 is a schematic representation of the second kit of the modified assembly toy of which the first kit is shown in FIG. 3.

Discussing firstly FIG. 1, representing one of two kits making up the inventive assembly toy, it will be seen that there is shown a likeness of a doll D. Of course, although the doll in this figure is shown as a printed likeness, for instance a picture or drawing in a picture book, it can also be an actual three-dimensional replica of a doll. By way of illustration of the components to be assembled to this doll D, although not by any means in an exclusive sense, there is shown in FIG. 1 a pair of dresses, respectively numbered 1a and 11). It will be noted that the left-hand dress 1a is of a different style than the right-hand dress, the neckline in the right-hand dress being of different shape and the hemline being longer. Let it be assumed, for purposes of explanation, that the lefthand dress 1a is a street dress and the right-hand one 1b an evening gown. There is further shown a pair of belts numbered 2a and 2b of which the left-hand one, that is belt 2a, is a more elegant and stylish belt whereas the right hand one is a sporty-looking belt.

FIG. 1 also shows a pair of hats, designated with reference numerals 3a and 3b and again it will be noted that the hat designated 3a is of more stylish type whereas the hat 3b is a sportier model. The same is true of the pocketbooks 4a and 4b which are also shown in this figure. 4

Turning now to FIG. 2, which represents the counterpart to the kit of FIG. 1, it will be seen that there is included in this second kit also a doll D, this doll being substantially identical with the doll D of FIG. 1. Beyond this, the second kit shows all of the articles of apparel which are contained in the first kit. However, in the kit shown in FIG. 2 it will be noted that the reference numerals, although identical with those of FIG. 1, are reversed. In other words, reference numeral 1a, which in 3 FIG. 1 indicated the street dress, in FIG. 2 indicates the evening gown, and vice versa. The same is true of all of the other articles.

Let it now be assumed that two children A and B, who wish to play this game over the telephone, each have one of these kits in their possession. Merely for the sake of clarity it should be pointed out here that it is of course not necessary that this game be played over the telephone; two children in the same room or adjoining rooms can play the game just as well, provided that they do not see each others kit. Assuming that child A is in possession of the kit shown in FIG. 1, and is to start the game, chlid A may wish to tell child B who has the kit of FIG. 2, to apply dress 1a to the doll D. Although the children know that the reference numerals in both kits are not applied to the respective article in identical order, neither child is aware to which particular article the given reference numeral applies. Thus, given the instruction to apply dress 1a to doll D, child A will have applied to the doll a dress which is totally different from the dress shown under this reference numeral in the kit child B has in his or her possession. Naturally, it is not necessary, and not even desirable, to limit the various articles to only two each. I envision the provision of many different types of dresses and other articles, such as blouses, hats, scarves, belts, shoes, coats, jewelry, etc., all of which may be self-adhesive in known manner so as to adhere when applied to the dolls. The children now proceed to dress each others dolls by alternately directing another which of the articles, which are, of course, only identified by symbols or reference numerals, to apply to the respective dolls. It is to be assumed that the doll with the evening gown will probably end up with a very sporty belt around the dress, with a sporty hat and with a large satchel-type pocketbook. The reverse may be true of the doll of the other child which may be wearing a street dress with various paraphernalia intended for wear with an evening gown.

When the assembly of both kits is completed, the children may wish to describe to one another the looks of the final composite picture. Again, if the children are in the same room, they can of course inspect the resulting composite pictures directly, or, in case of bedridden youngsters, they may wish to mail the completed pictures or images to one another.

The invention has been illustrated in FIGS. 3 and 4 by way of another example. The assembly of the kits shown in these latter figures is identical with that of the kits shown in FIGS. 1 and 2. It will be noted, however, that in FIG. 3. The same is true of all of the other articles. The to which the various accessories are to be assembled, is not a doll but an outline of a house. Given this basic structure the kits may then include, for example, outlines of roofs, such as tile roof 10a, and the thatched roof 10b, outlines of doors such as the board-and-batten door 11a and the colonial type door 11b, windows such as the picture window 12a and the leaded-glass window 12b, chimney structures such as the stove pipe 13a and the brick chimney 13b, and paths leading to the door of the house, such as the cobble-stone path 14 and the fiagstone path 1412. Again, the reference numerals in both kits are identical, but are applied to different items in different order. Thus, in FIG. 4, reference numeral 10a may indicate a thatched roof rather than the tile roof it designates in FIG. 3. The same is true of all of the other articles. The game is of course played in the same manner as outlined with reference to FIGS. 1 and 2.

It will be understood that the possibilities of this game are almost limitless and that the subject matter is by no means exhaused with the provision of a doll or the outline of a house. As mentioned before, barnyards or a circus can be assembled in this manner, a Christmas tree can be trimmed, etc., also, it is not necessary that the articles in both kits be identical. Instead of both kits having a street dress and an evening gown as in FIGS. 1 and 2, one of the kits could have a street dress and the other a bathing suit, etc. The one consideration that must not be forgotten is that identical reference numerals must indicate different articles in the respective kits.

It will be understood that each of the elements described above, or two or more together, may also find a useful application in other types of assembly toy differing from the types described above.

While the invention has been illustrated and described as embodied in assembly toys, it is not intended to be limited to the details shown, since various modifications and structural changes may be made without departing in any way from the spirit of the present invention.

Without further analysis, the foregoing will so fully reveal the gist of the present invention that others can by applying current knowledge readily adapt it for various applications without omitting features that, from the standpoint of prior art, fairly constitute essential charactertistics of the generic or specific aspects of this invention, and, therefore, such adaptations should and are intended to be comprehended within the meaning and range of equivalence of the following claims.

What is claimed as new and desired to be secured by Letters Patent is:

1. An assembly toy comprising a pair of discrete assembly kits each having a plurality of different components, each component in one of said kits being identical with one of the components in the other of said kits, each said kit having the same number of components, each of said kits further including a plurality of identifying means respectively associated with each of its components and each such identifying means being identical with corresponding identifying means in the other of said kits, identical identifying means being associated in the respective kits with non-identical components, so that each component of one kit has an identifying means different than the identifying means of the corresponding component of the other kit, and said kits further having identical support means adapted to have said components applied thereto whereby persons who are each in possession of one of said kits, and who cannot see each others kit, may alternately direct one another to apply components identified by given identifying means to the respective support means so that, after a series of such directions has been given, the resulting compositions may be compared and the differences between them ascertained.

2. An assembly top for assembling composite representations and comprising a pair of discrete assembly kits each having a plurality of different components, each composent in one of said kits being identical with one of the components in the other of said kits, each said kit having the same number of components, each of said kits further including a plurality of identifying means respectively associated with each of its components and each such identifying means being identical with corresponding identifying means in the other of said kits, identical identifying means being associated in the respective kits with non-identical components, so that each component of one kit has an identifying means different than the identifying means of the corresponding component of the other kit, and said kits further having identical support means including a representation of an entity adapted to have said components applied thereto whereby persons who are each in possession of one of said kits, and who cannot see each others kit, may alternately direct one another to apply components identified by given identifying means to the respective support means so that, after a series of such directions has been given, the resulting compositions may be compared and the differences between them ascertained.

3. An assembly toy defined in claim 2 wherein said entity is an animate object.

4. An assembly toy as defined in claim 2 wherein said entity is an inanimate object.

5. An assembly toy as defined in claim 2 wherein said entity is a person.

6. An assembly toy comprising a pair of discrete assembly kits each having support means representing an animate object; and each kit further having a plurality of different components adapted to be applied to said support means and which will, when applied thereto, effect changes in the visual impression of said support means, each of the components in one of said kits being identical with one of the components in the other of said kits, each said kit having the same number of components, each of said kits further including a plurality of identifying means respectively associated with each of its components and each such identifying means being identical with corresponding identifying means in the other of said kits, identical identifying means being associated in the respective kits with non-identical components, so that each component of one kit has an identifying means different than the identifying means of the corresponding component of the other kit, whereby persons who are each in possession of one of said kits, and who cannot see each others kit, may alternately direct one another to apply components identified by given identifying means to the respective support means so that, after a series of such directions has been given, the resulting compositions may be compared and the differences between them ascertained.

7. An assembly toy comprising a pair of discrete assembly kits each having identical support means representing an animate object, and each kit further having a plurality of different components dapted to be applied to said support means and which will, when applied thereto, effect changes in the visual impression of said support means, each of the components in one of said kits being identical with one of the components in the other of said kits, each said kit having the same number of components, each of said kits further including a plurality of identifying means respectively associated with each of its components and each such identifying means being identical with corresponding identifying means in the other of said kits, identical identifying means being associated in the respective kits with non-identical components, so that each component of one kit has an identifying means different than the identifying means of the corresponding component of the other kit, whereby persons who are each in possession of one of said kits, and who cannot see each others kit, may alternately direct one another to apply components identified by given identifying means to the respective support means so that, after a series of such directions has been given, the resulting compositions may be compared and the differences between them ascertained.

8. An assembly toy comprising a pair of discrete assembly kits each having a representation of a human being, and each kit further having a plurality of representations of different articles of apparel for human beings, said articles being adapted to be applied to said representation of a human being so as toeffect changes in the visual impression conveyed thereby, each of the articles in one of said kits being identical with one of the articles in the other of said kits, each said kit having the same number of representations of articles, each of said kits further including a plurality of identifying means respectively associated with each of its articles and each such identifying means being identical with corresponding identifying means in the othe rof said kits, identical identifying means being associated in the respective kits with non-identical artcles so that each article of one kit has an identifying means different than the identifying means of the corresponding article of the other kit, whereby persons who are each in possession of one of said kits, and who cannot see each others kit, may alternately direct one another to apply articles identified by a given identifying means to the respective representation of a human being so that, after a series of such directions has been given, the resulting compositions may be compared and the differences between them ascertained.

9. An assembly toy comprising a pair of discrete assembly kits each having an image of a human being, and each kit further having a plurality of images of different articles of apparel for human beings, said articles being adapted to be applied to said image of a human being so as to effect changes in the visual impression conveyed thereby, each of the articles in one of said kits being identical with one of the articles in the other of said kits, each said kit having the same number of images of articles, each of said kits further including a plurality of identifying means respectively associated with each of its articles and each such identifying means being identical with corresponding identifying means in the other of said kits, identical identifying means being associated in the respective kits with non-identical articles so that each article of one kit has an identifying means different than the identifying means of the corresponding article of the other kit, whereby persons who are each in possession of one of said kits, and who cannot see each others kit, may alternately direct one another to apply articles identified by a given identifying means to the respective image of a human being so that, after a series of such directions has been given, the resulting compositions may be compared and the differences between them ascertained.

10. An assembly toy as defined in claim 9, wherein said articles comprise clothing, jewelry, and accessory items.

11. An assembly toy as defined in claim 9 wherein said kits are picture books, and at least said images of said articles are adapted to be separated from said picture books and to be attached to said images of human beings.

12. An assembly toy as defined in claim 11 wherein said images of articles are self-adhesive.

13. An assembly toy comprising a pair of discrete picture books each having an image of a human being therein, and each of said picture books further having a plurality of images of different articles of apparel for human beings therein, said images of said articles being adapted to be separated from the respective picture book and to be applied to the respective image of a human being so as to effect changes in the visual impression conveyed by the latter, each of said images of articles in one of said books being identical with one of said images of articles in the other of said books, each said book having the same number of images of articles, each of said books further including a plurality of identifying means respectively associated with each of its articles and each such identifying means being identical with corresponding identifying means in the other of said books, identical identifying means being associated in the respective books with non-identical articles so that each image of an article of one book has an identifying means different than the identifying means of the corresponding image of the other book, whereby persons who are each in possession of one of said books and who cannot see each others book, may alternately direct one another to apply articles identified by a given identifying means to the respective image of a human being so that, after a series of such directions has been given, the resulting compositions may be compared and the differences between them ascertained.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 720,876 2/1903 Atherton. 805,432 11/ 1905 Freeman 46-157 2,331,776 10/1942 Heggedal.

FOREIGN PATENTS 1,213,043 10/ 1959 France.

423,200 1/ 1935 Great Britain.

F. BARRY SHAY, Primary Examiner US. 01. X.R. 46-22; 273

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US720876 *Mar 25, 1902Feb 17, 1903Jessie Davis AthertonToy.
US805432 *May 9, 1905Nov 21, 1905William FreemanFashion-chart.
US2331776 *Aug 6, 1943Oct 12, 1943Emil J HeggedalToy
FR1213043A * Title not available
GB423200A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3592469 *Feb 10, 1969Jul 13, 1971Marvin Glass & AssociatesCutting game with timer
US3768176 *Feb 2, 1972Oct 30, 1973T HuddlestonGame for improving communication skills
US4911670 *Feb 15, 1989Mar 27, 1990Mcnicholas Cindy DEducational doll kit
US5288084 *Nov 30, 1992Feb 22, 1994Miller Kenneth AObject contact interpretation game
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/156, 273/276, 446/98, 446/85, 273/459
International ClassificationA63H3/00, A63H3/08
Cooperative ClassificationA63H3/08
European ClassificationA63H3/08