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Publication numberUS3459357 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 5, 1969
Filing dateJan 5, 1967
Priority dateJan 5, 1967
Publication numberUS 3459357 A, US 3459357A, US-A-3459357, US3459357 A, US3459357A
InventorsEgger William, Naylor Edward Shaw
Original AssigneeUnion Camp Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bag-in-a-box
US 3459357 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

'Ahg; 5', 1969 w. EGGER ETAL 3,459,357

BAG-IN-A-BOX Filed Jan. 5. 1967 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 N I &

WILLIAM EGGER EDWARD S. NAYLOR ATTORNEY 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 FIG.8

BAG-IN-A-BOX w. EGGER ETA!- INVENTORS WILLIAM EGGER EDWARD s. "more ATTORNEY Aug. 5.; i569 F lled Jan. 5, 1967 United States Patent '0 US. Cl. 229-37 4 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A collapsible container comprising a box having sides with bottom and top flaps attached thereto. Median fold lines traverse two opposing sides and their attached flaps. A flat, open top bag is located between the median lines within the collapsed box, and is bonded by adhesive to the sides and flaps. The bag is bonded to the two flaps which are traversed by the median lines at its oppositely disposed top corners. In view of the bonding between the box and the bag, inward movement of the sides having the median lines sets up the box and bag with its top open for filling. Outward movement of the top flaps secured to the opposite top corners of the bag brings the tops of the sides of the bag into parallel juxtaposition for sealing. Inward movement of the top and bottom flaps causes unfolding movement of the top and bottom of the bag to form rectangular top and bottom closing means.

A bag combined with a box having flaps at least on one end on opposed sides, such flaps and sides being traversed by median fold lines. The bag is secured to the inside of the box and to the opposed flaps adjacent the median fold lines so that the unit can be collapsed into flat condition and can be easily set up to provide a flat base and facilitate closing and sealing of the bag and box. Adhesive patterns are applied to the sides and flaps of the blank for such box, the bag is applied to the blank and the blank is folded into a collapsed tube around the bag. Moving the median fold lines inwardly forms the bag-box combination which can be filled and easily closed and sealed.

Prior to the advent of lined containers, numerous liquids, viscous, powdered or granular substances such as chemicals, spices, comestible products, paint, oil and grease were shipped in wooden, fiber or metal containers. This was necessary in order to avoid leakage and/or contamination of the substances being shipped. These containers are relatively heavy and expensive both to ship and to construct.

In order to avoid the unncessary expense of shipping an constructing wood, fiber and metal containers, various types of composite containers were developed. These composite containers began with a separate bag and box combination wherein the substance was put into the bag and the bag was sealed. The sealed filled bag was placed into the box and the box was then sealed. This combination posed many obvious problems. Since the bag is flexible, it tended to expand so that it was too large to fit within the box. Additionally, without the supporting structure of the box the bag tended to burst due to the forces exerted by the substances packed therein. In order to solve these problems, a new composite container, consisting of an outer relatively rigid carton lined with a thin flexible sheet of material in the form of a bag was developed. However, considerable difliculty has been encountered in trying to cause the highly flexible bags to lie in close juxtaposition to the internal walls of the outer carton and also in maintaining the bags in their proper position after initial positioning within the cartons. This problem is due to the thin flexible walls of the bag which will not readily conform and remain in contact throughout its surface with the inner walls of the carton, when empty, or during the subsequent filling operation.

During filling, the flexible bag is frequently flexed or warped away from the walls of the surrounding carton, with the result that a portion of the substance being deposited therein, falls into and fills the spaces between the outer surface of the bag and the inner walls of the carton. Additionally, the inward flexing of the bag during the filling operation decreases the usable volume of the bag and the amount of material capable of being packed therein is reduced. In order to overcome these difliculties, the liner bag can be pasted or secured to the inner walls of the carton.

However, the pasting of the liner bag to the inner walls of the carton has produced additional problems. When the bag is secured to the inner walls of the carton, the collapsing of the carton and bag combination is extremely difiicult. If the bag-box combination is forced into a collapsed condition, the bag frequently rips or tears free from the inner walls of the carton. Since the ability to collapse for storage or shipment when empty is extremely important from a space saving and economy standpoint, these boxes are at best inefficient.

Additionally, after the liner bag within the carton is filled it is very diflicult to seal the bag opening in order to prevent leakage and contamination of the substance packed therein.

In order to alleviate these problems, the applicants have invented a new and eflicient collapsible box having a bag secured therein in a manner wherein the bag lies in close juxtaposition to the internal walls of the carton during filling and easily folds in conjunction with the carton when empty. I

One object of this invention is to provide a collapsible box having a bag secured therein. A 7

Another object is to provide a method of securing a bag to the internal Walls of a box.

Another object is to provide a method of securing a bag to the internal walls of a box in a manner wherein the bag lies in juxtaposition to the box during filling and shipping.

Another object is to provide a bag and box combination wherein the bag folds flat when the box is collapsed.

Another object is to provide a bag and box combination wherein the bag is automatically open in conjunction with the box.

Another object is to provide a bag secured within a box in a manner wherein the bag opening is held in a sealing position by maneuvering the top flaps of the box.

Another object is to provide a quadrilateral box wherein each side has a hingedly secured top and bottom flap, a median fold line traverses two opposed sides of the box and their adjacent top and bottom flaps, and an open top bag is secured within the box, one side of the bag lying substantially between the median fold lines. The box and bag are collapsible about the median fold lines when the top and bottom flaps are coplanar with the sides of the box.

Another object is to provide a method of making a collapsible shipping container wherein a blank is cut and scored to form four side portions, a flap on at least one end of each side portion, and median fold lines in two opposed side portions and their adjacent flaps; printing predetermined adhesive patterns on the side portions and flaps; securing one side of a two-sided bag to the side portion and the flaps between the median fold lines; folding the side portions of the blank which extend outwardly of the median fold lines inwardly into overlapping engagement with the opposite side of the bag and securing the outer edges of the overlapping box portions together to form a collapsed tubular lined shipping container.

Other objects of the invention will in part be obvious and will in part appear hereinafter.

The invention accordingly comprises the several steps and the relation of one or more of such steps with respect to each of the others, and the article possessing the features, properties, and the relation of elements, which are exemplified in the following detailed disclosure, and the scope of the invention will be indicated in the claims.

For a fuller understanding of the nature and objects of the invention, reference should be had to the following detailed description taken in connection with the accompanying drawing, in which:

FIG. 1 is a plan view of a blank of the box showing the adhesive patterns.

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of a bag to be inserted in the box.

FIG. 3 is a plan view of the blank of FIG. 1 with one side of the bag of FIG. 2 adhered thereto;

FIG. 4 is a plan view of the blank with the portions of the sides folded over the bag to complete the tube;

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of the container showing the bottom closure;

FIG. 6 is a perspective view of the container ready for filling;

FIG. 7 is a perspective view of the container showing the top closure of the filled bag;

FIG. 8 is a perspective view of the container with the flaps folded into a closed position ready to be sealed.

Referring now to the drawings, wherein like reference numbers designate like or corresponding parts throughout the several views, there is shown in FIG. 1 a flat, substantially rectangular blank 10 of sheet material, such as corrugated paperboard or the like, of a weight suitable for the type of carton to be constructed.

The blank 10 consists of substantially rectangular side portions 11, 12, 13 and 14, top flaps 15, 16, 17 and 18 and bottom flaps 19, 20,21 and 22. The top flaps 15, 16, 17 and 18 are attached to the side portions 11, 12, 13 and 14, respectively, along a longitudinal score line 23. The bottom flaps 19, 20, 21 and 22 are attached to the side portions 11, 12, 13 and 14, respectively, along a longitudinal score line 24. The side portions are attached to gether along score lines 25, 26 and 27 which score lines are normal to and extend between the longitudinal score lines 23 and 24. The normal score lines 25, 26 and 27 and the longitudinal score lines 23 and 24 effectively define the side portions 11, 12, 13 and 14.

The side portion 12 and its adjacent top and bottom flaps 16 and 20 are traversed by a normal median fold line 28. The side portion 14 and its adjacent top and bottom flaps 18 and 22 are traversed by a normal median fold line 29. Extending outwardly from the longitudinal score lines 23 and 24, coaxially with the normal score lines 25, 26 and 27, are slots 30, which separate the top flaps 15,16, 17 and 18 and the bottom flaps 19, 20, 21 and 22 from each other.

Disposed on side portions 11 and 13 adjacent to the score lines 23 and 24 are adhesive patterns 31. The adhesive patterns 31 extend substantially along the width of the side portions 11 and 13 parallel to the longitudinal score lines 23 and 24. Disposed on side portions 12- and 14 and extending over score lines 23 and 24 onto the top and bottom flaps 16, 18, 20 and 22, are adhesive patterns 32 and 36. The adhesive patterns 32 which extend onto the top flaps 16 and 18 are both located on the same side of their respective median fold lines 28 and 29. The adhesive patterns 36 which extend onto the bottom flaps 20 and 22 are both disposed on the same side of their respective median fold lines 28 and 29. The adhesive patterns 32 are disposed on opposite sides of the median fold lines 28 and 29 from the adhesive patterns 36 but could be on the same sides. Furthermore, the adhesive pattern can be on both sides of the median fold lines on each flap, both at the top and bottom. The adhesive patterns 32 and 36 are substantially trapezoidal in configuration with their rectangular area disposed on the side portions and their triangular area extending outwardly onto the adjacent top and bottom flaps. One of the legs of the triangular area glue pattern extends parallel to and adjacent its respective median fold line as shown in FIG. 1. Although the adhesive patterns shown and described are of a certain design, it should be clearly understood that other patterns may be used. The primary purpose of the adhesive is to secure the bag to the sides of the box and flaps to prevent shifting of the bag, to permit the bag to conform to the shape of the box when the collapsed bag-box container is erected, and to set up the end of the bag for closing when the flaps are moved into a predetermined position. In some cases it may be desirable to secure the bag to the box adhesively along the top edges so that the material being deposited in the bag cannot fall into the space between the bag and the box.

FIG. 2 shows a two-sided bag or pouch 33 which is capable of being enclosed in the blank 10. The bag 33 can be made from any number of flexible sheet materials which are or can be made impervious to moisture or gases. One such material which is thin, flexible, impervious and has the additional advantage of hermetically uniting under heat is sold under the name of Pliofilrn and is made from a chlorinated rubber compound. This material has a thermoplastic characteristic of being readily sealed by the application of heat and pressure even though the sealed surfaces are wet. Another mate-rial which may be satisfactorily used is a thin sheet material having a waterproof coating such as that sold under the trade name Koroseal. Additionally, any type of flexible material such as kraft paper which has been coated with a waterproof material or which has a waterproof liner thereon can be used, ie polyethylene, foil and the like. While materials which are impervious to liquids have been described for use in making the bags 33, it will be obvious that the type of material used to make the bag will depend upon the type of substance to be packed therein.

While the style of bag can be any one of many known to those skilled in the art, it is preferred to use the twosided pouch type as illustrated in FIG. 2. The pouch style bag 33 is formed from a sheet or tube of impervious material which is capable of being readily united by the application of heat and pressure. The flexible material is formed into a bag 33 in a manner well known to those skilled in the art. Such bag may have one or more longitudinal seams or may be formed of a seamless tube. The bag 33 is open at its top and has a sealed closure 35 at its bottom. In order to ensure that the bag 33 will fit securely within the container 34 formed from the blank 10 and be capable of being collapsed and opened in conjunction with the container 34 after being adhered thereto, the bag 33 may be of a width substantially equal to the distance between the median fold lines 28 and 29 and of a length greater than the combined length of a side portion, top flap and bottom flap. However, such bag may be gusseted or may be of a width greater than the distance between the median fold lines in which case, longitudinal folds will be made in the bag in the area 7 adjacent such median fold lines when the bag is enclosed within the box tube.

In assembly, the blank is cut and scored and the adhesive patterns 31, 32 and 36 are printed thereon (FIG. 1). The bag 33 (FIG. 2) is placed upon the blank 10 with one side between the median fold lines 28 .and 29 (FIG. 3). The outwardly projecting bottom seam 35 of the bag 33 is positioned in overlapping engagement with the bottom flaps 20, 21 and 22 between the median fold fines 28 and 29. In this position, the open top of the bag 33 extends outwardly beyond the outer edges of the top flaps 16, 17 and 18 between the median fold lines 28 and 29. The blank 10 is then folded inwardly about median fold lines 28 and 29 so that the outer edges of side por= tions 11 and 14 are in abutting relationship (FIG. 4). The abutting edges of the side portions 11 and 14 are joined together to form a tube in any well known manner such as tape 37 or an extra flap which is secured by adhesive or stitching. The folding of the blank 10 about the median fold lines 28 and 29 causes the portions of side portions 11, 12 and 14 which extend outwardly of the median fold lines 28 and 29 to come into overlapping engagement with the bag 33. In this position the bag 33 comes into contact with the adhesive patterns 31, 32 and 36.

Because of the location and configuration of the glue patterns 31, 32 and 36, the bag 33 is effectively held in close engagement with the internal walls of the side portions. As illustrated, opposite corners of the bag 33 are adhesively secured along diagonally opposite ends to the top and bottom flaps. For example, on one side of the bag 33, the upper left portion toward the top of the bag is secured to top flap 16 by glue pattern 32 and the lower right portion toward the bottom of the bag is secured to the bottom flap 22 by the glue pattern 36. On the opposite side of the bag 33, the lower left portion is secured to bottom flap 20 and the upper right portion is secured to top flap 18. However, as heretofore stated, the adhesive pattern and placement may be varied without alfecting the purpose or operation of the container. For example, where sifting of the material between the bag and the box is not a factor, spot pasting may be used instead of the bonds shown. Furthermore, spot pasting may likewise be used on a flap adjacent either side of the median line instead of the trapezoidal configurations on opposite flaps as shown.

In operation, after the outer edges of the side portions 11 and 14- are joined together and the bag 33 is secured to the internal walls of the blank 10, the median fold lines 28 and 29 are moved inwardly so that the flat blank 10 forms a quadrilateral container 34. By pushing inwardlyupon median fold lines 28 and 29* (FIG. 5), the bottom of the bag 33-, because of the disposition of the adhesive patterns, forms a substantially flat base. In this position the bottom flaps 20 and 22 are folded inwardly to a substantially horizontal position, the bottom flaps 21 and 1-9 are then folded inwardly into a substantially horizontal position overlapping the flaps 20* and 22, with the edges of the opposite flaps abutting. The bottom flaps 19, 20, 21 and 22 are now secured together in any well known manner such as glue, tape, etc. A

At this point, a quadrilateral container 34 having a liner bag 33 securely bonded thereto is formed. The bag 33 provides a substantially flat bottom conforming to the bottom of the box and lies in close juxtaposition to the internal walls of the the box. The open top of the bag 33 extends upwardly beyond the outer edges of the top flaps 15, 16, 17 and 18 (FIG. 6). Material of the type desired to be shipped is poured into the bag 33 through its open top until it is filled to the desired level. The top flaps 16 and 1 8 are now folded outwardly 90 to a substantially horizontal position. Because a portion of the bag 33 is secured to the top flaps 16 and 18 the top open end of the bag 33 is forced outwardly with the flaps 16 and 18 and the upper edges of both sides of the bag 33 are brought into parallel abutting juxtaposition as shown in FIG. 7. In this position, the abutting top portion of the bag 33 is easily passed between a pair of sealing rollers or jaws which, by the application of heat and pressure, cause the upper edges of the bag 33 to be united together to close the bag.

After sealing the open top end of the bag 33, the end is folded flat into a horizontal position, the top flaps 16 and 18 are folded inwardly 180 to a substantially horizontal position over the end of the bag, and the top flaps 15 and 17 are folded inwardly into overlapping engagement with the top flaps 16 and 18. The top fiaps 15, 16, 17 and 18 are secured together by glue, tape or any other fastening means and the box and bag combination (FIG. 8) is complete for shipment to its ultimate destination.

It may be desirable to form the closure herein described on only one end of the box so that a cap or other type of closure may be used on the opposite end. In such case the tube for the box will only have flaps on one end. If the fiaps are at the bottom end the construction of the present invention will provide a bottom with the bag squared out with a flat base and little distortion; the top of the bag can be sealed or merely folded and a cap can be applied over the box to provide a reclosable cover. If the flaps are at the top end the construction of the present invention will provide a means for readily sealing the bag and box as heretofore explained; the bottom can be closed with a cap or other closure. Furthermore the construction of the present invention can be used with only the flaps hinged to the opposite sides having the median fold lines, in which case the other flaps are omitted. In such case the two opposite flaps meet in the center and can be sealed with tape. This closure is not as satisfactory but is adequate for some purposes.

Since certain changes in carrying out the above process, and certain modifications in the article which embody the invention may be made without departing from its scope, it is intended that all matter contained in the above description or shown in the accompanying drawing shall be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

It is also to be understood that the following claims are intended to cover all of the generic and specific features of the invention herein described, and all statements of the scope of the invention which, as a matter of language, might be said to fall therebetween.

Having described my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. A collapsed shipping container comprising: a quadrilateral box wherein each side has a hingedly secured top flap; a median fold line traversing two opposed sides of said box and their adjacent top flaps; an open top bag lying in fiat condition substantially between said median fold lines within the collapsed box; means for securing said flat bag to the internal surfaces of the collapsed box, said securing means comprising one set of disposed adhesive patterns for securing portions of sa d bag to said sides, a second set of disposed adhesive patterns for securing one top corner of the bag to its adjacent top flap and for securing an opposite top corner to its adjacent top flap; movement of said median fold lines in an inward direction setting the box and the flat bag secured thereto into a tubular form of substantially rectangular cross section with the top flaps and top of the bag into the open position for filling; movement of said top flaps secured to said top corners of the bag in an outward direction bringing the tops of the sides of said bag together into parallel juxtaposition for sealing; and inward folding movement of said latter flaps moving the top of the bag to form a substantially rectangular top; and means forming a closed bottom for the box.

2. A collapsed shipping container in accordance with claim 1, wherein the last claimed means comprises bottom panels hingedly secured to each side, a third set of disposed adhesive patterns for securing bottom corners of said bottom flaps to their folded position causes infolding of the bottom of the bag to form a substantially rectangular bottom.

3. A collapsed shipping container in accordance with claim 1, wherein the top flaps secured to the top corners of said bag are the fiaps' traversed by said median lines.

4. A collapsed shipping container in accordance with claim 3, wherein the second set of adhesive patterns are formed on said top flaps adjacent the median lines.

8 References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3/190'2 Birnie et a1 229-14 7/ 1941 Bergstein 229-14 6/1952 Gottesman 22914 FOREIGN PATENTS 11/1959 Australia.

US. Cl. X.R.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification229/117.32, 229/132, 229/117.33, 53/449, 493/96
International ClassificationB65D5/60, B65D5/56
Cooperative ClassificationB65D5/606
European ClassificationB65D5/60B2