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Publication numberUS3460603 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 12, 1969
Filing dateApr 26, 1968
Priority dateApr 26, 1968
Also published asDE1921295A1, DE1921295B2, DE1921295C3
Publication numberUS 3460603 A, US 3460603A, US-A-3460603, US3460603 A, US3460603A
InventorsToder Ellis I
Original AssigneeToder Ellis I
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Drapery system
US 3460603 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

E. TODER DRAPERY SYSTEM Aug. 12, 1969 5 Sheets-Sheet l Filled April 2s, 196s i. TODE R cil/@MMM ELLIS Au8 12, 1969 E. l. Toni-:R 3,460,603

DRAPERY SYSTEM Filed April 26, 1968 5 Sheets-Sheet MWA-W. ELL ls l. TODER E. l. TODER DRAPERY SYSTEM Aug. 12,1969

Filed April 26, 1968 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 E L L l S Aug. 12, 1969 E. Tonen 3,460,603

DRAPERY SYSTEM Filed April 2e, 1968. 5 sheets-sheet s MMM United States Patent O U.S. Cl. 160-345 11 Claims ABSTRACT F THE DISCLOSURE A traverse drapery system for reversely folded pleated drapes of both the single acting and double acting type including a one-piece extruded ceiling track, tmolded master carriers concealed within the track, molded drapery carriers slidable within the track and extending downward to one part of a molded detachable coupling of which the other part is formed at the upper end of a Inolded drapery heading stiffener, flexible spacers coupling together adjacent carriers to control the extent of pleat separation of adjacent pleats, and a molded pulley housing usable at both ends of the track. The master carriers ride above the upper level of the other drapery carriers and override some to closely stack the drape end folds against the drape. A novel L-shaped wall support bracket including a break-off wedge fastener for wall mounting of the ceiling track is described, as well as a molded pulley housing extension part which provides an option for concealment behind the drape of the vertical run of the traverse cord. A novel combined hem weight and hem pleat former is also disclosed consisting of elongated rod-like weights stitched into pockets in a continuous flexible sleeve, the weights being each somewhat shorter than the pleat width.

This invention relates to a drapery system of the traverse type employing a novel track and drapery carrier system combined with a novel heading stiffener detachably coupled to the track held carriers. Accordingly, it is a primary object of my invention to provide a novel drapery system of the type described.

Another object of my invention is to provide a novel drapery system in which the drapes may be caused to hang in accordion pleat fashion with relatively sharply defined creases, or may alternatively be caused to hang in a continuously reversely folding sinuous form with smoothly curved fold regions to provide a softer visual impression.

A further object of my invention is to provide a novel traverse drapery track and carrier system in which the traverse cord is operable from either the right hand or left hand sides and may be quickly switched from one side for operation from the other side without disassembling the track structure and without requiring access to the master carriers.

Yet a further object of the invention is to provide an auxiliary end structure for the traverse track in the form of a pulley housing extension which when utilized results in the concealment of the vertical run of the traverse cord behind the drape.

The foregoing and other objects of my invention will appear more fully hereinafter from a reading of the following specication in conjunction with an examination of the appended drawings, wherein:

FIGURE l is a perspective view of a traverse drapery installed with the drapery system according to the invention;

FIGURE 2 is a horizontal sectional view on an enlarged scale taken immediately below the traverse track through the drapery carriers and looking downward onto the drapery, as would be seen when viewed along the line 2 2 of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 3 is a front elevation jump section of the drapery system according to the invention as would be seen when viewed along the line 3--3 of FIGURE 3;

FIGURE 4 is a bottom plan view of one end of the draper track showing a master carrier in the track at the pulling end of the traverse cord as would be seen when viewed along the line 4--4 of FIGURE 3;

FIGURE 5 is an enlarged vertical sectional view through the end of the track structure shown in FIG- URE 4 as would be seen when viewed along the line 5-5 of FIGURE 4;

FIGURE 6 is a horizontal jump section through the showing of FIGURE 5 as would be seen when viewed along the line 6-6 thereof and. illustrating details o securement of the master carrier to the traverse cord;

FIGURE 7 is an enlarged horizontal sectional view through the opposite end of the traverse track and looking upward as would be seen when viewed along the line 7-7 of FIGURE 3;

FIGURE 8 is a view similar to that of FIGURE 7 but looking downward as would be seen when viewed along the line 8 8 of FIGURE 3;

FIGURE 9 is an enlarged vertical cross section through the traverse track as would be seen when viewed along the line 9-9 of FIGURE 3;

FIGURE l0 is a vertical cross sectional view through the traverse track similar to FIGURE 9 but taken at a point passing through a portion of the master carrier as well as the track as would be seen when viewed along the line 10-10 of FIGURE 3;

FIGURE 1l is a longitudinal vertical sectional View through the master carrier and a portion of the traverse track as would be seen when viewed along the line 11--11 of FIGURE 10;

FIGURE 12 is a vertical cross section through the traverse track as would be seen when viewed along the line 12-12 of FIGURE 12, showing one end of the master carrier;

FIGURE 13 is a vertical cross section through the traverse track on an enlarged scale as would be seen when viewed along the line 13-13 of FIGURE 3 looking the right hand end of the track and showing one of the end pulleys for the traverse cord;

FIGURE 14 is a showing similar to that of FIGURE 2 but illustrating the drapery in an open condition so that the folds of the drape are substantially disposed against one another;

FIGURE 15 is an enlarged fragmentary view of a portion of the heading of the drapery in llat form and as viewed from the nonvisible or reverse side of the drapery, illustrating the relative spacing of the drapery head-stiffeners with respect to one another longitudinally along the top of the drape to provide a sharply folded drape of the type shown in FIGURE 2;

FIGURE 16 is a vertical cross section through the head-stiffener and drapery head as would be seen when viewed along the line 16-16 of FIGURE l5;

FIGURE 17 is an enlarged vertical cross section through one form of detachable-coupler-carer headstiffener as would be seen when viewed along the line 17-17 of FIGURE 16;

FIGURE 18 is a view similar to that of FIGURE 2 but illustrating a modified form of head-stiffener to provide a soft fold drape;

FIGURE 19 is a fragmentary plan view of the type of head-stitfener operative to produce the drapery form of FIGURE 18;

FIGURE 20A and 20B are plan and side elevation views respectively of the drapery system fold spacer as seen in FIGURES 2, 14 and 18;

FIGURE 21 is a vertical cross sectional view through a modified form of traverse track suitable for recessed :eiling mounting;

FIGURE 22 is a perspective View of a wall mounted auxiliary track support bracket operatively mounted to support a section of traverse track;

FIGURE 23 is a bottom plan view of the pulley housing used at opposite ends of the traverse track;

FIGURE 24 is an enlarged vertical sectional detail showing the recess for capturing the end heading-stitfener couple-r-carrier;

FIGURE 25 is a simplified longitudinal horizontal sectional view through the traverse track below the level of the master carriers illustrating a double acting traverse system with two master carriers meeting to provide a closed drape;

FIGURE 26 is a showing similar to that of FIGURE 25 but showing the master carriers retracted to opposite ends of the track;

FIGURE 27 is a showing similar to that of FIGURE 2 but illustrating the meeting ends of a double acting d-rapery system utilizing two carriers;

FIGURE 28 is an enlarged -fragmentary view, partially sectioned, of the bottom edge of an accordion folded drape as would be seen when taking a section on line 28 of FIGURE 1, and illustrating a novel form of fold retaining hem weight;

FIGURE 29 is a vertical cross section through the drapery hem structure as would be seen when viewed along the line 29-29 of FIGURE 28;

FIGURE 30 is a `fragmentary front elevational view of one end of the drapery system according to the invention similar to the showing of FIGURE 3 but modified by the addition of a pulley housing extension to provide for a concealed vertical traverse cord;

FIGURE 31 is a bottom plan view of the modified track end structure as would be seen when viewed along the line 31-31 of FIGURE 30;

FIGURE 32 is a top plan view of the modified track end structure as would be seen when viewed along the line 32-32 of FIGURE 30;

FIGURE 33 is a longitudinal vertical sectional view through the pulley housing and extension as would be seen when viewed along the line 33-33 of FIGURE 32;

FIGURE 34 is a vertical cross sectional view through the pulley housing extension as would be seen when viewed along the line 34-34 of FIGURE 33;

FIGURE 35 is a `bottom plan View of the pulley housing extension and FIGURE 36 is a top perspective View of the same;

FIGURE 37 is a side elevation of the pulley housing extension and pulley housing, together with a pulley assistor secured thereto;

FIGURE 38 is a vertical cross section through the pulley assistor shown in FIGURE 37 as would be seen when viewed along the line 38-38 thereof.

In the several figures, like elements are denoted by like reference characters.

Referring now to the drawings, there is seen in FIG- URE l a drapery designated generally as 50' supported at its top from a track 51 shown in FIGURE 3 by two-part supports consisting of a heading stiifener 52 and detachable coupler-carrier 53, best seen in FIGURE 15, the heading stiifener 52 being secured to the upper margin of the drapery fabric while the detachable coupler-carrier 53 rides within the track 51. Adjacent ones of the detachable coupler-carriers 53 are connected together by liexible spacers 54 which restrain the lateral movement of adjacent folds of the drapery so that folds of desired depth are maintained when the drape is in closed condition. Fitted into each of the opposite ends of the track S1 are pulley housings 55, as shown in FIGURE 3, of the type seen in bottom plan view most clearly in FIG- URE 23. In a single acting system employing only one master carrier, one detachable coupler-carrier 53 is held saptive by one Qt the pulley housings 5,y as Seen at the 4 right hand end `of FIGURE 3, while the detachable coupler-carrier 53 at the opposite end of the drapery 50 is held captive within and moves with the master carrier 56, as best seen in FIGURES 5, 6 and 11.

The track 51, as best seen in FIGURE 9, has a base wall 57 from which extends a pair of laterally spaced longitudinally extending side walls 58 which turn toward one another and merge into a pair of bottom walls 59, the bottom walls terminating in a pair of upwardly projecting master carrier track formations 60` and laterally inwardly projecting lower track formations -61 upon which ride the heads 62 of the detachable coupler-carriers 53, as best seen in FIGURE 9.

As best seen from the showings of FIGURES 9, 10, 17 and 2l, the heads 62 of the detachable coupler-carriers 53 have a conically tapered undersurface 63 which rides along the downwardly sloped upper faces 64 of the lower track formations 61. The inner facing edges of the lower track formations 61 are spaced apart to thereby define a longitudinally extending bottom slot in the track 51 somewhat wider than the neck 65 of the couplercarrier 53 so that the latter may slide freely through the slot with the ability to roll laterally toward opposite sides of the track to a limited extent which is sufficiently to completely prevent any binding of the coupler head in the track.

As best seen from FIGURES 6, l0, 1l and 12, the master carrier 56 is of generally rectangular configuration having a top wall 66, opposite end walls 67 and 68, an intermediate transverse wall 69 which together with end Wall 67 -forrn the compartment within which rides the detachable coupler-carrier 53 which is secured to the movable end of the drapery 50, and a pair of side walls 70 and 71. As best seen from FIGURE 10 the inside faces of the master carrier side walls 70 and 71 are spaced apart a distance just slightly greater than the upwardly projecting track formations 60 of the drapery track 51, and the height of the side walls 70` and 71 is just slightly less than the distance between the inside facing faces of the base Wall 57 and bottom walls 59 of the track 51. As a consequence, the master carrier 56 may be slipped endwise into the track 51 with sufficient vertical and lateral clearance so that it slides easily and smoothly through the track but cannot cock, twist or jam. As best seen from FIGURE 11, end wall 67 and transverse wall 69 `of the master carrier project downward into the track slot between the lower track formations 61 to maintain captive the head of the detachable coupler-carrier 53.

The exposed ceiling track 51 shown in FIGURES 9 through 13, and generally through the figures has its base wall 57 formed on one longitudinally extending edge with a short lip or flange 72 and along the other longitudinally extending edge with a broad ange 73 provided at intervals along its length with apertures 74 for securing the track to the ceiling by means of bolts or screws or other suitable fasteners. A longitudinally extending rib 75 is formed along the upper surface of the outer edge of broad flange 73 to maintain the flange 72 up against the ceiling when the track is secured to the latter by fasteners projected through the flange 73. If a heavy drape is being used, such that there might be tendency for the track edge 72 to move downward away from the ceiling due to the cantilevered load at the track securement, auxiliary clips 76, such as shown in FIGURE 10, may be used to clamp the narrow flange 72 to the ceiling at suitable intervals to provide the requisite support.

Alternatively, a recessed ceiling track as shown in FIGURE 21 may be utilized in which the track 51a is provided with iianges 59b extending laterally outward from the track bottom walls 59a, the flanges 59b being each suitably apertured to provide passage for securing screws such as 77. The track 51a is otherwise the same as the previously described track 51.

Turning now to FIGURES l5 to 17, it is observed that the heading stiffener 52 is of generally rectangular shape and has a relatively stiff thickened central region 78 which divides into longitudinally extending ribs 79 which taper down at the outer ends of the stitfener to substantially the thickness of the heading stifener sewing anges 80 and 81 which are stitched as at 82 and 83 to the folded drapery heading 84. Extending upward from the thick central region 78 of the heading stiffener 52 is a split head 85 having a plurality of resiliently spread fingers 86 with shouldered outer faces. The lingers 86 of the split head 85 are projected into an undercut socket 87 so that the ngers are cammed together as the head enters the socket and then expand radially outward as they pass beyond the narrow neck 88 and snap into place within the socket 87. The socket 87 is the lower terminal end of detachable coupler-carrier 53 and is connected to the previously described coupler neck 65 by a sui-mounting circular cylindrical section 89 and an above-lying collar 90.

Referring now also to FIGURES 20A and 20B which show the flexible spacers 54, it is observed that eachof the spacers is formed with an elongated central strap-like section 91 relatively thin in horizontal thickness to pro vide easy flexibility for flexing movement in a horizontal plane, and a pair of opposite end sections each including a circular loop 92 with a peripheral segment of the loop joined to one end of the strap section 91 by a web sectlon 93 having a portion of the web slotted out as at 94 along a line extending substantially radially of the circular loop 92 and passing through the wall of the latter so that the loop may be radially enlarged by expansion of the slot 94 when the loop aperture is penetrated by a member of larger diameter than the inside of the loop 92. The spacers 54 are connected to the coupler-carriers 53 by projecting the coupler-carrier socket part 87 through the spacer loop 92 until the loop snaps into the space around the circular cylindrical section 89 between the upper edge of socket 87 and the collar 89. The length of the cylindrical section 89 is slightly longer than that necessary to accommodate two spacer loops 92 so that a continuous linkage of coupler-carriers 53 is achieved as shown in FIGURES 2, 14 and 18.

As best seen in FIGURES 2 and 18, the length of th flexible couplers 54 together with the length of drapery material between adjacent coupler-carriers determines the depth and width of the pleat or fold. The relatively short end spacing between heading stilteners 52 illustrated 1n FIGURE l5 results in the accordion pleated arrangement shown in FIGURES 2 and 14, whereas the substantially larger end spacing shown between heading stiieners 52a in FIGURE 19 results in the soft fold shown in FIGURE 18. This larger end spacing may be accomplished .by using a shorter heading stiffener as illustrated, or by using more material to obtain a deeper fold.

The pulley housing 55 as shown in bottom plan view in FIGURE 23 is made up of a cord guide well 95 which in operative condition is external to the track 51 and immediately adjacent each end thereof, and three track penetrating legs extending longitudinally from one end of the well 95. The track penetrating legs are spaced apart widthwise of the track and pulley housing and include a pair of opposite outside legs 96 and a central leg 97 longitudinally separated from each other by slots 98. As best seen in the showings of FIGURES 5 to 8 and 13, projecting upward from the central leg 97 of the pulley housing and cord guide 95 is a circular cylindrical pulley post 99 upon which is rotatably disposed a pulley wheel 100.

The pulley housing 55 is held captive in the track 51 by longitudinally slipping the legs 96 and 97 endwise into the track 51 until the end wall 101 of the cord guide well 95 abuts the end of the track 51, the outside legs 96 being contoured to follow the shape of the track side walls 58 and bottom walls 59, as best seen in FIGURE 13, to snugly tit between the upwardly projecting tracks 60 and the track top wall 57. The central leg 97 ts closely between the upwardly projecting track formations 60 above the lower track formations 61, also as best seen in FIG- URE 13, with the upwardly projecting track formations `60 extending into the slots 98 of the pulley housing 55.

As best seen from the showings of FIGURES 23, 24 and the right end of FIGURE 3, the central leg 97 which carries the pulley post 99 is recessed upward on its undersurface beneath the pulley post 99, as at 102, to capture the head 62 of the coupler carrier 53 which holds the fixed end of the drapery. As also best seen from FIG- URES 23, 4 and 6, a pair of support ears 103 apertured as at 104 extend laterally from the opposite side walls 105 of the cord guide well 95, the support ears 103v being the same width as broad ange 73 of the track 51. The ears 103 are longitudinally grooved as at 106 so that either ear may be snapped off depending upon which end of the track the pulley housing is inserted into, one ear being broken 0H for right hand track termination while the other ear is broken otf for left hand track termination. In this way a single pulley housing is suitable for both left hand and right hand track end use. The aperture 104 is of course provided to receive a securing element such as a screw to retain the pulley housing in position, although the use of such a fastener is not normally required. When the recessed track of FIGURE 2l is used, both ears 103 are snapped oiI to accommodate the pulley housing in the ceiling recess.

The cord guide well is best seen in the showings of FIGURES 5, 6 and 8 from which it is seen that the pulley housing legs 96 and 97 extend continuously into the cord guide well and turn smoothly downward into a downwardly curving rounded shoulder 107. The outside legs 96 continue for a distance beyond the leg 97 in the cord well so that the curved shoulder 107 when viewed from above appears to be generally of C-shape, the legs terminating at outer end wall segments 108 of the cord guide well. Extending longitudinally centrally from the lower edge of curved shoulder 107 and generally in alinement with central leg 97 is a central cord separator leg 109 which terminates at its outer end in vertically extending outer end wall segment 110, which latter is in plane with end wall segments 108 but is somewhat lower in vertical extent as is most clearly seen from FIGURE 5.

The cord separator central leg 1019 and C-shaped curved shoulder 107 together dene a pair of cord slots 111 through which pass the runs of the traverse cord 112, the slots 111 being of sufficient size to easily pass the traverse cords therethrough. The ends of the cord slots 111 are partially closed by cord gates 113 which are formed by the facing edges of the outer end Wall segments 108 and 110, the cord gates being less than the diameter of the traverse cord 112 so that there is no tendency for the cord runs to move out of the cord slots 111. The gates 113 are open sutiiciently so that the runs of the traverse cord 112 may pass therethrough by pulling pressure sufcient to deform the cord cross section appropriately. For this purpose the upper ends of the gates are opened out by the provision of outwardly sloped faces 114 on the outer end wall segments 108, as best seen in the showing of FIGURE 8.

As best seen in the showing of FIGURES 3 to 13, the traverse cord system for a single acting drape is set up in the following manner. An end 115 of the traverse cord is fed through side aperture 116 in the master carrier 56 and interlooped about the three trapezoidal lands 117 as shown in FIGURE 6, which act as a friction lock for the cord end. The cord which emerges from the side aperture 116 of the master carrier extends horizontally through the track 51 over to the right as run 118, loops about pulley 100 and returns as run 119 passing downward through one of the cord slots 111 in the left hand pulley housing and cord guide 55. The cord run 1119 drops vertically to whatever operating level is desired and then turns vertically upward returning as cord run 120 through the other of the cord slots 111 in the left hand pulley housing 55 into the track 51, alongside of the master carrier 56 and thereinto through side aperture 121, around and between trapezoidal lands 122, through apertures 123 in the master carrier top wall 66 and terminating in the space between carrier end wall 67 and transverse wall 69 above the head of coupler-carrier 53 which is carried by the master carrier, all as best seen in FIGURES 6 and ll.

When cord run 119 is drawn down upon, it pulls cord run 118 around the right hand pulley 100 and so draws the drape 50 over toward the right until it reaches its fully closed stop position. When cord run 120 is pulled upon, it pulls the master carrier 56 directly over to the left and consequently opens the drape. As best seen from FIGURES 6 and 8, the leg 97 and part of the legs 96 of the pulley housing 55 are of reduced length for a distance from the inner ends of legs 96 so that the master carrier 56 can move substantially further toward the end of the track, the end of the central leg 97 acting as a positive stop for the master carrier.

Referring now to FIGURES 25 to 27 which illustrate a double acting or center closing drapery utilizing two master carriers instead of one, it is observed that the left hand master carrier 56a is set up exactly as has already been described for the master carrier 56 in the single acting system with the sole exception that it has been shifted to the opposite end of the track 51 so that its carrier coupler 53a is enabled to move to a center close position, as for example shown in FIGURE 27. A second master carrier 5611 is also inserted into the track 51 and the traverse cord run 119a has been passed through the side apertures of the master carrier 56b and around and between several of the trapezoidal lands to secure the carrier in its center adjusted position.

As shown in FIGURE 25, a downward pull on the cord run 191a pulls the master carrier 5611 toward its center position and therefore lengthens the run 119a to the right of master carrier 56b while drawing cord run 120a toward the right and around the pulley 100. Consequently, master carrier 56a is drawn to the right by the pull of cord run 120a until the two master carriers abut at the center point of the track to provide a closed drapery position. The drapery is opened by merely pulling downward on cord run 118a as shown in FIGURE 26 to thereby move the master carriers 56a and 56b apart from one another to their opposite track end positions.

In the event that it is desired to reverse the side of the track from which the operation of a single acting drapery is carried out, as see FIGURES 4 to 7, it is only necessary to catch the cord loop which turns about the right hand pulley 100 and pull on cord run 119 to lengthen the loop, slip this loop outward through the cord gates 113 and draw the loop runs down through the cord slots. This will of course automatically immediately begin shortening the traverse cord loop at the left hand end until runs 119 and 120 have been shortened upward to the track level as a very small loop. This loop is then slipped through the cord gates of the left hand end pulley housing in an upward direction until it clears the pulley housing, thereafter being drawn downward inside the housing and around the pulley contained therein. For a double acting drapery, as see FIGURES 25 and 26, it is only necessary to release the cord from master carrier 56b, draw run 119a therethrough from the right end of the track, and re-secure the cord to the master carrier 56b.

Referring now to FIGURE 22, there is seen a track support in the form of a wall mounting bracket of generally L-shape having a vertical arm 124 and a horizontal upper arm 125. Depending from the horizontal arm 125 at its outer end is an arm 126 extending vertically downward and turning inward toward the vertical arm 124. Similarly depending from the horizontal arm 125 at a point substantially close to the vertical arm 124 is a second arm 127 extending downward and turning horizontally to face the horizontal portion of the depending arm 126.

The horizontal spacing between the inner faces of the vertical portions of the depending arms 126 and 127 is wider than the width of the base Wall 57 of the traverse track 51 and the vertical distance between the under surface of horizontal arm and the upper surface of the horizontal portion of depending arm 126 is just slightly greater than the thickness of the track base wall 57. The vertical clearance between the undersurface of horizontal arm 125 and the upper surface of the horizontal run of depending arm 127 is greater than the thickness of the track base wall 57 by an amount at least equal to the thickness of the rib 75 formed on the upper surface of broad flange 73.

A break-01T pin 128 is carried on a web 129 which depends from the horizontal bracket arm 125 and is utilized to retain the track 51 within the contines of the depending arms 126 and 127. This is effected by rst slipping the broad flange 73 of the track 51 between the bracket horizontal arm 125 and depending arm 127 so that the narrow ange 72 of the track 51 may vertically clear above the horizontal run of depending arm 126 and may then be back shifted to rest on the latter. The end space then existing between the outer edge of track broad ange 73 and the vertical run of depending arm 127 is filled by pushing thereinto the pin 128 after snapping the latter off of its web support 129. The track narrow flange 72 is thereby prevented from moving off of its underlying support provided by the horizontal run of depending arm 126. The track may of course be readily removed by reversing the aforedescribed installation procedure.

Considering now FIGURES 28 and 29 there is illustrated a drapery hem Weight particularly suitable for use with accordion pleated draperies of the type herenbefore described, the hem weight device being such that it maintains the shape of the pleat at the hem level by also utilizt ing the stifener principle. As shown in FIGURES 28 and 29, the hem k130 of the drape has laid therewithin a flexible sleeve 131 made of any suitable highly flexible fabric, within which are placed in endwise spaced relation a plurality of stiieners 132 which may be made of any suitable material such as metal to provide the requisite weight.

Each of the stiteners 132 is observed to be slightly less than the depth 0f the pleat with which it is associated so that it creates no interference with the free foldability of the drape along the fold lines such as 133. The stiffeners 132 are prevented from end shifting within the exible sleeve 131 by means of the stitching 134 which effectively holds each stiiener 132 within its own pocket. Were the stiifeners 132 not so contained, they eventually might shift longitudinally into the fold regions 133 and severely interfere with the foldability of the drape. It will be observed that the elongated stiifeners 132 are far more eiective in maintaining the shape of the drapery throughout its vertical length than are previously known types of hem weights such as ball chain and shot.

Consider now FIGURES 30 through 38 which illustrate the use of a pulley housing extension 135 which allows the drape to be carried beyond the end of the track 51 so that the traverse cord 112 may be concealed behind the drape through its vertical run. The housing extension 135 has a main body part 136 of the same width as the pulley housing 55, having an outer end wall 137, an inner end Wall 138 which abuts against the outer faces of the pulley housing outer end wall segments 108 and 110, a bottom wall 139, and a pair of hollow bosses extending downward from the bottom wall 139 at opposite sides of the housing extension main body.

The bottom wall |139 is centrally recessed as at 141 as is the central region of the inner end wall 138 adjacent thereto so that the head 62 of a detachable coupler-carrier 53 may be slipped laterally into the recess, as best seen in FIGURES 32, 33 and 34. With a coupler-carrier so positioned, it is clear from the showing of FIGURE 31 that the central point of the last pleat of the drape couples thereto so that the vertical cord runs are disposed between the first and second pleats and are concealed therebehind.

As also best seen from the showing of FIGURE 31, the flexible spacer 54 cannot be secured in its usual fashion to the cylindrical section 89 of the coupler-carrier because it would directly interfere with the vertical run of the pull cords. Consequently, the end loop 92 of the ilexible spacer which would normally be so connected is instead secured to the rear one of the bosses 140 by means of a machine screw 142 and nut 143 or other suitable fastener. The unused boss 140 in the illustrated case would of course be used if the cord pull were located at the opposite end of the track.

Extending from the inner end wall 138 of the main body 136 are a pair of vertically extending ribs 144 which extend away from the end wall 138 for a distance equal to the thickness of the pulley housing outer end wall segments 108 and 110, the lateral spacing of the ribs 144 being equal to the width ofthe central outer end wall segment 110 of the pulley housing 55 so as to accommodate the latter therebetween, and the thickness of the ribs is equal to the width of the cord gates 113 so that the ribs are projectable completely downward into the cord gates as best seen in FIGURE 3 l.

Extending longitudinally of the inner end wall 138 above the ribs 144 is a stepped top wall 145 from which latter downwardly projects a plug 146 from the sides of which plug laterally project wall extensions 147. The wall 138, ribs 144, top wall 145, plug 146 and wall extensions 147 dene a rectangular recess into which the outer end wall segment 110 of the pulley housing 55 exactly iits, as is best seen in FIGURE 33. The extension 147 and inner end wall 138 also capture therebetween portions of the outer end wall segments 108 of the pulley housing 55 irnmediately adjacent to the cord gates 113. With the pulley housing extension 135 completely seated into the pulley housing 55, the coupler-carrier 53 is held captive within the central recess 141 and cannot escape while the pulley housing extension 135 is operatively engaged with the pulley housing 55.

The plug 146 is also provided with a vertical 'bore 148 extending completely therethrough from top to bottom and alining with an aperture 149 formed through the cord separator central leg 109 of the pulley housing 55. This alined bore 148 aperture 149 are utilized when it is de sired to also employ a pulley assistor as an auxiliary `device for use in reducing strain on the drawing cord of a long or heavy drape, and in this connection reference should now be made to FIGURES 37 and 38.

The pulley assistor consists of a -pair of pulley wheels 150 suitably journalled on an axle 151 to a support block 152 which latter is fixedly secured to the pulley housing extension 135 and pulley housing 55 by a fastener 153 projected upward through an aperture in the support block through the pulley housing aperture 149 and vertical bore 148 formed in the plug 146 of the pulley housing extension. 'Ihe fastener may 'be any suitable type such as a machine screw and nut or a self tapping screw. As best seen from FIGURE 37, the positional location of the pulley wheels 150 moves the traverse cords partly off of the shoulder 107 and thereby reduces the frictional drag on the cord als it turns from its horizontal to its vertical direction. As best seen from FIGURE 38 the pulley wheels 150 have their rolling surfaces 154 tapered inward toward the support block 152 to capture the traverse cords and prevent jamming.

Having now described my invention in conjunction with a particularly illustrated embodiment thereof, it will be appreciated that variations and modifications may now occur from time to time to those persons normally skilled in the art without departing from the essential scope or spirit of my invention, and accordingly it is my intention to claim the same broadly as well as specically as indicated by the appended claims.

What is claimed as new and useful is:

1. A traverse drapery system comprising in combination,

(a) a hollow traverse drapery track through which move drapery carriers, said track having longitudinally extending top, bottom and opposite side walls, at least one of said walls having a slotted opening therethrough extending longitudinally continuously of said track,

(b) a plurality of drapery carriers ridable longitudinally .in line along said hollow track, each such carrier having a head portion captured in said track and a support portion depending from said head portion through said track slotted opening for isecurement to the heading of a drapery,

(c) at least one master carrier completely contained and slidable within said hollow track, detachably coupled to and holding captive one of said plurality of drapery carriers and operable to carry one end of a drapery longitudinally of said hollow track,

(d) interengaging means associated partly with said hollow track and partly with said master carrier effective to cause said carrier to follow a path through said hollow track immediately adjacent to the said slotted opening through the aforesaid wall of said hollow track, and

(e) shift means coupled to and effective when operated to shift said at least one master carrier in opposite directions as desired through said hollow track.

2. Apparatus as defined in claim 1 wherein said master carrier is narrower in width than the longitudinally extending hollow interior width of said hollow track and has portions extending vertically substantially the full clear distance `between said bottom wall and above lying top wall to thereby minimize vertical movement of said master carrier within said hollow track, Iand said interengaging means position said master carrier so that a pair of spaces parallel to said slotted opening `are defined at opposite sides of the master carrier and slotted opening at all positions within the hollow track, and wherein said shift means comprises a two run traverse cord with different ones of said two run traverse cord passing respectively through diierent ones of said pair of spaces.

3. Apparatus as described in claim 1 wherein the said depending support portion of said drapery carriers includes a carrier spacer support, and further including .a plurality of carrier spacers each comprising a flexible link of ixed length with couplings at its opposite ends coupled to the carrier spacer supports of `adjacent ones of said drapery carriers, whereby all carriers attached to a drapery panel are series coupled together.

4. Apparatus as described in claim 1 wherein the said depending support portion of said drapery carriers includes a carrier spacer support, and further including a plurality of carrier spacers each comprising a pair of spaced end loops coupled together by a flexible link of iixed length which latter is highly liexible in a plane parallel to the planes of the said end loops, said end loops of each spacer being rotatably coupled to the said carrier spacer supports of adjacent ones of said drapery carriers, whereby all carriers attached to a drapery panel are series coupled together.

5. Apparatus as `described in claim 1 wherein the said depending support portion of said drapery carriers includes a carrier spacer support, and further including a plurality of carrier spacers each comprising a pair of spaced end loops coupled together by a flexible link of fixed length which latter is highly flexible in a plane perpendicular to the hanging plane of the drapery, said end loops of each spacer being rotatably coupled to the said carrier spacer supports of adjacent ones of said drapery carriers, whereby all carriers attached to a drapery panel are series coupled together.

6. Apparatus as described in claim 1 wherein the said depending support portion of said drapery carriers includes a carrier spacer support, and further including a plurality of one piece molded plastic carrier spacers each comprising a flexible link of fixed length with couplings at its opposite ends coupled to the carriers spacer supports of adjacent ones of said drapery carriers, whereby all carriers attached to a drapery 4panel are series coupled together.

7. Apparatus as defined in claim 1 wherein the length of said master carrier is several times the head width of the said drapery carriers, the major portion of the underside of said master carrier is spaced above the level of the heads of said drapery carriers so as to ride thereover, and one end of the master carrier is provided with downwardly extending means operative to capture the head of a selected one of said plurality of drapery carriers, said selected drapery carrier being normally the one secured to the movable end of the drapery.

8. Apparatus as defined in claim 1 where in the said slotted opening in said hollow track is through the said bottom wall thereof and the slot defining edges of said bottom wall are provided with upwardly projecting master carrier upper track formations and laterally inwardly projecting drapery carrier head lower track formations, wherein said master carrier is of generally rectangular configuration having a top wall, opposite side walls, an end wall and an intermediate transverse wall spaced apart to form a compartment within which rides the head of the said capitive drapery carrier, the inside faces of said master carrier side walls being spaced apart a distance slightly greater than the said upper track formations to encompass the latter therebetween, and the height of said side walls being slightly less than the distance between the inside faces of said hollow track top and bottom walls and extending below the upper edges of said upper track formations* 9. Apparatus as defined in claim 1 wherein said hollow track is internally bilaterally symmetrical when viewed from either end, and the said slotted opening in said hollow track is through the said `bottom wall thereof and the slot defining edges of said bottom wall are provided with upwardly projecting master carrier upper track formations and laterally inwardly projecting drapery carrier head lower track formations, and further including pulley housings secured to said hollow track at each end thereof, said pulley housings being bilaterally symmetrical when end viewed to thereby be usable at either end of said hollow track and comprising,

(a) a cord guide well bounded by inner and outer end walls, opposite side walls and a bottom wall,

(b) three track penetrating legs extending longitudinally from the inner end wall of said cord guide well and spaced apart widthwise of said track and pulley housing,

said track penetrating legs including a pair of opposite outside legs contoured to follow the inside shape of said hollow track side walls and bottom wall to thereby fit between the hollow track top wall and the said upper track formations on each side of said slotted bottom wall, and said legs including a central leg fitted closely between the said upper track formations and which is provided with means for captively retaining the head of a drapery carrier; said cord guide well bottom wall being apertured with cord slots, said cord guide outer end wall being provided with cord gates com-municating with said cord slots, and said cord guide inner end wall being formed on the well inside with a downturned smoothly curved shoulder extending from said track penetrating legs to said cord slots.

10. Apparatus as defined in claim 9 wherein the said depending support portion of said drapery carriers includes, a carrier spacer support, and further including a plurality of carrier spacers each comprising a iiexible link of fixed length with couplings at its opposite ends coupled to the carrier spacer supports of adjacent ones of said drapery carriers, whereby all carriers attached to a drapery panel are series coupled together and further including a pulley housing extension detachably interfittable with said pulley housing to form an extension longitudinally of said hollow track, said extension comprising,

(a) means for operatively securing said extension Securely to the said pulley housing in longitudinal extension thereof,

(b) means of capitively retaining one of said drapery carriers in said extension outwardly endwise of said cord slots when said extension is secured to said pulley housing, and

(-c) means for securing to said extension one of said carrier spacer end couplings.

11. A traverse drapery system comprising in combination,

(a) a hollow traverse drapery track through which move drapery carriers, said track having longitudinally extending walls at least one of which has a slotted opening therethrough extending longitudinally continuously of said track,

(b) a plurality of drapery `carriers ridable longitudinally in line along said hollow track, each such carrier having a head portion captured in said track and a support portion depending from said head portion through said track slotted opening for securement to the heading of a drapery, and

(c) at least one master carrier completely `contained and slidable within said hollow track, detachably coupled to and holding captive one of said plurality of drapery carriers and operable to carry one end of a drapery longitudinally of said hollow track,

said drapery carriers support portion each comprising a detachable coupling including a depending socket part and a horizontally elongated heading stilfener provided centrally proximate to its upper edge with a head projectable upward and resiliently snappable linto said socket part, the vertical force required to separate said coupling head and socket being substantially greater than the portion of the drapery weight required to be carried by said detachable coupling.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,754,901 7/1956 Madsen.

2,794,502 6/1957 Toti 160--172 3,082,817 3/1963 Merrill.

3,190,346 6/1965 Arena et al 160-172 1,649,215 11/1927 Brown 100-126 2,106,585 l/1938 Weckstrom -126 2,806,525 9/1957 Stankewich et al 160-84 3,286,299 11/1966 Golden 160-84 X 3,312,273 4/1967 Adam et al 160-84 X 3,369,589 2/1968 Benkert 160-84 PETER M. CAUN, Primary Examiner

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3626429 *Oct 29, 1969Dec 7, 1971Toder Ellis IDetachable drapery carrier
US3951196 *May 19, 1975Apr 20, 1976Consolidated Foods CorporationTraverse rod assembly
US4227282 *May 22, 1978Oct 14, 1980Kirsch CompanySliders and rail for door support
US4793399 *Feb 12, 1987Dec 27, 1988Pryor John WHanger assembly
US5109912 *Oct 24, 1988May 5, 1992Leonard GaryDrapery system
US8042597 *Apr 27, 2009Oct 25, 2011Lutron Electronics Co., Inc.Roller shade system having hembar for pleating a shade fabric
Classifications
U.S. Classification160/345
International ClassificationE06B3/48, A47H1/00, A47H11/06, A47H5/032, A47H23/04, E05D15/26, A47H13/12, A47H1/04
Cooperative ClassificationE06B9/36
European ClassificationE06B9/36