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Publication numberUS3460617 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 12, 1969
Filing dateApr 5, 1967
Priority dateApr 5, 1967
Publication numberUS 3460617 A, US 3460617A, US-A-3460617, US3460617 A, US3460617A
InventorsBrown Joe R, Montgomery James W
Original AssigneeBrown Oil Tools
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Liner hanger packer
US 3460617 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 12, 1969 J. R. BROWN ET AL 3,460,617

LINER HANGER PACKER Filed April 5. 1967 5 Shasta-Sheet 1 A T TO/P/VEKS Aug. 12, 1969 R, BROWN ET AL 3,460,617

LINER HANGER PACKER Filed April 5, 1967 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 A T TORNEYS Aug. 12, 1969 R, OW ET AL 3,460,617

LINER HANGER PACKER Filed April 5, 1967 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 5 V1355 mg xg w 5 if, M

ATTORNEYS Aug. 12, 1969 J. R. BROWN ET AL 3,46 7

LINER HANGER PAGKER Filed April 5, 1967 v I 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 J05 R BROWN A T 7' ORNE Y5 Aug. 12, 1969 J. R. BROWN ET AL 3,460,617

LINER HANGER PACKER Filed April 5, 1967 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 MOE R. sRow/v y JAMES nmww 13 y W a A T TORNE Y5 ii United States Patent M 3,460,617 LINER HAN GER PACKER Joe R. Brown and James W. Montgomery, Houston, Tex., assignors to Brown Oil Tools, Inc, Houston, Tex. Filed Apr. 5, 1967, Ser. No. 628,632 Int. Cl. E21b 33/129, 23/00 US. Cl. 166-124 11 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE Background of the invention The present invention relates generally to an improved liner hanger.

In production of well fluids from well bores, it is desirable to set a liner in the well bore adjacent the pro ducing formation and in some installations to seal between the exterior of the liner and the interior of the well bore. It is often desirable to set the liner hanger and be able to pull the pipe string on which it is run without having to also pull the liner hanger. Further, it is desirable that the liner hanger may be unset and pulled from the well bore with the pipe string.

An object of the present invention is to provide an improved, retrievable liner hanger which may be left in set position in a well bore while the tubing string is pulled. I

Another object is to provide an improved liner hanger and well packer combination which is set responsive to pressure and released by manipulation of the tubing string to which it is connected.

A further object is to provide an improved liner hanger which is set hydraulically and may be released by rotation or lifting of the tubing string to which it is connected.

Still another object is to provide an improved liner hanger which when set, is locked in set position to allow the tubing string to be pulled without releasing the liner hanger.

A still further object is to provide an improved retrievable combination liner hanger and well packer which combination utilizes forces resulting from pressure differentials across its packing when set, to reinforce the original setting forces and thereby assure that it remains set until positively released.

Another object is to provide an improved pressure responsive setting tool for use in setting the liner hanger of the present invention.

These and other objects and advantages of the present invention are hereinafter described with reference to the preferred form of the present invention illustrated in the drawings wherein:

FIGURE 1 is a detailed partial longitudinal sectional view of the device of the present invention in running position with the liner portion thereof not shown.

FIGURE 2 is a similar view illustrating the setting of the deivce shown in FIGURE 1.

FIGURE 3 is another similar view showing the release of the setting tool.

FIGURE 4 is a similar view of the device with a production string connected thereto.

FIGURE 5 is a similar view showing one form of unsetting of the device.

3,460,617 Patented Aug. 12, 1969 FIGURE 6 is a similar view showing another form of unsetting of the device.

FIGURE 7 is a longitudinal sectional view of a Well bore with the preferred form of liner hanger and well packer shown in elevation.

FIGURE 8 is a longitudinal partial sectional view of the liner shown in FIGURE 7 and is drawn to illustrate the liner portion of the device which is not shown in FIGURE 1.

FIGURE 9 is a transverse sectional view taken along line 9--9 in FIGURE 1.

FIGURE 10 is another transverse sectional view taken along line 10-10 in FIGURE 1.

FIGURE 11 is still another transverse sectional view of the deivce shown in FIGURE 1 taken along line 11- 11.

Referring more in detail to the drawings, the preferred form of the present invention, an improved retrievable combination liner hanger and well packer, is illustrated in FIGURES 1, 7 and 8 in running position. As best seen from FIGURE 7, the liner hanger well packer is adapted to be run into a well bore B and to be anchored within the lower portion of the well casing C so that the liner L depends therefrom into the lower portion of the well bore B. In running the illustrated device into the well bore B, it is supported on the tubing: string T and connection to tubing string T is provided by the setting means S.

The combination liner-hanger and well packer illustrated, includes the tubular support 10 which is secured at its upper end to the upper abutment :12 and is releasably connected at its lower end to the lower abutment 14. The packing assembly P and the anchoring assembly A are positioned around the tubular support 10 between the upper abutment 12 and the lower abutment 14 and the liner L is supported from the lower abutment 14 as hereinafter more fully explained.

The packing assembly P includes. the resilient packing element 16 which surround the tubular support 10 between the lower end of the upper abutment 12 and the upper end of the anchoring assembly A and is adapted to be forced radially outward into sealing engagement with the interior of casing C when it is compressed longitudinally therebetween.

The anchoring assembly A includes the upper expander 18, which has an inner shoulder adapted to be supported by the snap ring 20 on the exterior of the tubular support 10; the lower expander 22, which is adapted to be supported in running position by the external upwardly facing shoulder 24 on the lower end of tubular support 10; and the gripping body 26. The gripping body 26 includes the central body ring 28 surrounding the tubular support 10 and supported in running position by the snap ring 30 and a plurality of fingers 32 spaced apart and extending upwardly and downwardly from the body ring 28 with each finger having an external tooth surface or gripping element 34 adapted to be moved into gripping engagement with the interior of the casing C. Each of the expanders 18 and 22 is provided with a wedge-shaped suiface adapted to engage a similar tapered surface on the underside of each of the fingers 32 to wedge the outermost portion of the fingers and their gripping slips 34 into engagement with the interior of the casing. As shown, the shear pins 36 connect the upwardly extending fingers to the upper expander 18 to prevent inadvertent setting of the anchoring assembly and similarly the shear pin 38 connects the downwardly extending fingers 32 to the lower expander 22. The lower expander 22 is shown threadedly connected to the lower abutment 14. The interior of the lower abutment 14 is provided with the threads 40.

The releasable locking means 42 include the split ring 44 and the back-up ring 46. The split ring 44 is positioned in surrounding relation to the backing ring 46 in a tapered portion thereof. It should be noted that the taper on the exterior of the backing ring 46 is tapered downwardly and outwardly. The exterior of the split ring 44 is provided with teeth adapted to engage in the threads 40 on the interior of the lower abutment 14. On setting, however, the split ring 44 is adapted to ratchet downwardly over the internal threads 40, thus allowing a downward movement of the upper abutment 12 and the tubular support to set the packing and anchoring assemblies as hereinafter explained. The shear pin 48 connects the backing ring 46 to the lower extremity of the tubular support 10.

As best seen from FIGURES 1 and 8, the lower abutment 14 is connected by the collar 50 and the sleeve 52 to the liner L. The upper end of the liner L is provided with the external ring 54 positioned within the sleeve 52 and providing a downwardly facing shoulder 56 which is adapted to engage the upwardly facing shoulder 58 on the internal ring 60, which is threaded into the lower end of the sleeve 52. Strips 62 are secured to the upper exterior of the liner L and extend through slots in the ring 60 to allow for relative longitudinal movement between the liner L and the sleeve 52.

The shoe 64 is connected to the lower end of the liner L and is provided with the usual ports 66 and the valve 68 which allow flow downwardly through the shoe but prevent flow upwardly therethrough. The liner L defines a plurality of perforations 70 through which well fluids may freely enter the liner L.

In running the combined liner-hanger and well packer into the well, it is supported from the tubing string T by the setting means S. The setting means S includes the upper collar 72; the outer sleeve 74 connected thereto and depending therefrom; the inner sleeve 76, which is connected to the outer sleeve 74 by the annular ring 73; and the piston, generally designated as 80 which is adapted to be positioned within the cylinder 82 defined between inner and outer sleeves 74 and 76. The piston 80 defines at its upper end the upwardly facing seat 84 and is provided with external packing 86 adapted to seal against the interior of sleeve 74 and internal packing 88 adapted to seal against the exterior of sleeve 76. A plurality of push rods 90 are secured to the piston 80, extend downwardly through suitable holes in the annular ring 78 and terminate in holes in the ring 92 which is adapted to engage the upper end of upper abutment 12 to transmit the downward movement of the piston 80 thereto and to move the upper abutment 12 and the tubular support 10 downwardly to effect a setting of the packing and anchoring assemblies. The interior of the upper abutment 12 is recessed as at 94 and includes the pins 96 which are adapted to engage in suitable J-slots on the exterior of a production string for the reasons hereinafter set forth.

The lower end of the inner sleeve 76 is connected to the sleeve 98 which extends downwardly therefrom into sealing engagement through the seal ring 100, which is suitably secured within the liner L at a position below the perforations 70. The sleeve 76 is secured to the lower abutment 14 by the connecting ring 102. It should be noted that connecting ring 102 is secured to the inner sleeve 76 by the usual type threads but is threadedly secured to lower abutment 14 by the threads 104 which are relatively friction free as compared to the usual threads, whereby when tubing string T is rotated to release the setting tool S, it unthreads the threads 104 rather than any other threads in the structure. If desired, these threads may be left-hand threads to assure that they will release on releasing right-hand rotation of the tubing string T.

In operation, the well tool of the present invention is lowered through the well casing to the position illustrated in FIGURE 7 on the tubing string T to position the anchoring assembly A immediately within the lower end of the casing string C and to position the liner L within the well bore B below the lower extremity of the casing C. In this position, the well may be washed by circulating suitable fluids downwardly through the tubing string T. These fluids pass through the inner sleeve 76, the sleeve 98 and are discharged through the valve 68 and out through the port 66 in the shoe 64. The fluids then circulate up through the annulus surrounding the well tool and the tubing string and are discharged from the annulus at the surface of the well.

Thereafter, whenever it is desired to set the packing and anchoring assemblies, the ball 106 or other suitable plug is injected into the tubing string T at the surface and pumped down until it seats on the seat 84 formed by the upper edge of the piston 80. When the ball 106 is seated on the seat 84, tubing pressure is increased. This pressure is exerted across the upper portion of the piston 80 and forces the piston downwardly with respect to outer sleeve and inner sleeve 76. This movement moves the push rods 90, the ring 92 and the upper abutment 12 downwardly with respect to the lower abutment 14. The relative movement of the upper abutment 12 and the tubular support 10 downwardly with the lower abutment held stationary, shears the shear pins 36 and 38 and causes the expanders 18 and 22 to wedge underneath the outer ends of the fingers 32 to force the gripping slips 34 into gripping engagement with the interior of the casing C and also compresses the packing element 16 longitudinally so that it expands radially outward into sealing engagement with the interior of the casing C. Thus the packing and anchoring assemblies are set.

Additionally, during such setting, the downward movement of tubular support 10 sets the locking means 42 by moving the backing ring 46 downwardly. The split ring 44 initially remains stationary until engaged by the lower end of the tubular support 10 and then is moved downwardly with respect to the lower abutment 14 since it is compressible inwardly, its ends being spacedapart as at 45 to avoid engagement of the teeth 40 on the interior of the lower abutment 14. It should be noted that the teeth 40 are slanted downwardly to facilitate this ratcheting movement of the split ring 14 downwardly. In this downward position, the teeth on the split ring 44 engage the teeth 40 on the lower abutment 14 to lock the packing and anchoring assemblies in set position until positively released as hereiuafter set forth. During setting, the lower abutment 14 is restrained from moving down by its direct connection to the tubing string T through the collar 72, the outer sleeve 74, the annular ring 78, the inner sleeve 76, and the connecting ring 102.

In this set position, the liner L is supported by the engagement of the anchoring assembly A with the interior of the casing C. It should be noted, however, that the sleeve 98 effectively blocks off the perforations 70 so that to commence production of the well fluids from the well bore B, the setting tool S must be removed. This is accomplished by rotating the tubing string to unthread the connecting ring 102 from the lower abutment 14. This position is illustrated in FIGURE 3. From this position, the tubing string T and the setting tool S may be thereafter pulled from the well bore. It should be noted that pulling of the setting tool S does not in any way release the set position of the packing and anchoring assemblies since the releasable locking means 42 including the engagement of the teeth on split ring 44 with the teeth 40 on the interior of the lower abutment 14 prevent any movement of the tubular support 10 and upper abutment 12 away from the lower abutment 14. The inner taper on the backing ring 46 is such that any force tending to move the tubular support 10 upwardly causes the split ring 44 to be more tightly wedged into engagement with the threads 40 thereby assuring that the set position of the packing and anchoring assemblies is maintained. The port defined in the outer sleeve 74 provides conununication from the interior to the exterior of the setting tool S to facilitate its removal after setting.

readily from FIGURE 4, by rotation of the production string T-1 in a clockwise direction at the surface. The collar 108 is provided with suitable external packing 110 to seal against the interior of tubular support and assure that there is no leakage into the annulus above the packing element 16 during the production of well fluids therethrough.

Whenever it is desired to release the packing and anchoring assemblies and to remove the well tool from the Well bore, it is only necessary to rotate the tubing string to cause the threads on split ring 44 to move upwardly on the threads 40 of the lower abutment 14. This movement moves the tubular support 10 upwardly whereby the packing element 16 is relaxed. Further upward movement of the tubular support 10 brings the snap ring 20 into engagement with the upper expander 18 and pulls it from under the upper fingers 32 of the anchoring assembly and the snap ring 30 into engagement with the body ring 28 to pull the lower fingers 32 oil the lower expander 22. Also, the upper abutment 12 is moved upwardly to allow packing element 16 to relax. Once this is accomplished, the packing and anchoring assemblies are completely unset and the complete well tool may be removed from the well bore by lifting the production string T-1. This release position is clearly illustrated in FIGURE 5.

If difficulty is encountered in this type of release, it is possible to release the packing and anchoring assemblies simply by exerting an upward force on the production string T-1 suflicient to shear the shear pin 48. Thereafter, since the locking means 42 of the split ring 44 and the threads 40 connecting the tubular support 10 to the lower abutment 14 is completely released, the lifting of the production string T-1 causes the upper abutment 12 and the tubular support 10 to be lifted and release of the packing and anchoring assemblies to unset position takes place as previously described. This unset position is shown in FIGURE 6.

From the foregoing, it can be seen that the present invention provides a new liner hanger which may be readily set by a hydraulic setting tool within a well bore to position the liner below the lower end of the well casing. The liner hanger includes, whenever desired, a packing element to seal between the exterior of the tool and the interior of the well casing. Further, this tool remains in set position when the setting tool is removed and is adapted to receive a production string and to be releasable either by rotation of the production string or by a straight upward force exerted by the production string on the upper abutment for complete removal of the well tool from the well bore whenever desired.

The foregoing disclosure and description of the invention are illustrative and explanatory thereof, and various changes in the size, shape and materials, as well as in the details of the illustrated construction, may be made within the scope of the appended claims without departing from the spirit of the invention.

What is claimed is:

1. A liner hanger adapted to be set in a well bore, comprising a tubular support defining an upper external abutment and means for releasably connecting a well string thereto,

an anchoring assembly mounted on said tubular support and having gripping elements adapted to be moved outwardly into pipe gripping position,

a lower abutment,

means connecting said lower abutment to said tubular support and adapted to allow relative setting movement therebetween and to releasably lock said tubular support to said lower abutment when said anchoring assembly is set,

means on said lower abutment for releasably connecting a well string thereto,

said upper and lower abutments adapted to be moved relative to each other to set said anchoring assembly, and

a liner connected to and depending below said lower abutment,

said connecting means being released from locking said tubular support to said lower abutment responsive to movement of said tubular support whereby said anchoring assembly is released from set position and said liner hanger may be retrieved from the well bore.

2. A liner hanger according to claim 1, wherein said connecting means between said lower abutment and said tubular support includes,

a backing ring having an external recess and being connected to said tubular support,

a split ring having external threads and adapted to be positioned partly within said recess in said backing rlng,

said lower abutment defining internal threads adapted to engage the external threads on said split ring to lock said tubular support to said lower abutment when said anchoring assembly is in set position and to allow said tubular support to be threaded upwardly to unset said anchoring assembly.

3. A liner hanger according to claim 2, wherein said backing ring is releasably connected to said tubular support whereby said connection between said tubular support and said lower abutment when said anchoring assembly is set may be released by an. upward pull on said tillbular support to thereby unset said anchoring assemb y.

4. A liner hanger according to claim 3, wherein said recess in said backing ring is tapered downwardly and outwardly whereby said split ring may move straight downward with respect to said threads on said lower abutment but is wedged by said taper against said threads on said lower abutment after setting movement to hold said tubular support in set position with respect to said lower abutment.

5. A liner hanger according to claim 1, including a packing assembly mounted on said tubular support and having a packing element adapted to be set with the setting of said anchoring assembly and unset with the unsetting of said anchoring assembly.

6. A liner hanger according to claim 1, including a. setting tool adapted to releasably engage said upper abutment and said connecting means on said lower abutment to achieve relative movement between said abutments to set said anchoring assembly,

means on said setting tool for connecting to a well string whereby said hanger may be supported on a well string for lowering into a well bore, and

said well string connecting means on said tubular support providing connection to a production string when said anchoring assembly has been set and said setting tool released and removed from said well bore.

7. A liner hanger adapted to be set in a well bore, comprising a tubular support defining an upper external abutment and means for releasably connecting a well string thereto,

an anchoring assembly mounted on said tubular support and having an upper expander, a lower expander and gripping elements therebetween adapted to be moved outwardly into pipe-gripping position,

means connected to said lower expander to allow movement of said tubular support downwardly through said lower expander and releasably prevent upward movement of said tubular support through said lower expander,

means connected to said lower expander for releasably connecting a setting tool thereto whereby said lower expander is restrained from moving as said tubular support is moved downwardly therethrough for setting said anchoring assembly, and

a liner connected to and depending below said lower expander,

downward movement of said tubular support through said lower expander setting said anchoring assembly and upward movement of said tubular support through said lower expander unsetting said anchoring assembly.

8. A liner hanger according to claim 7, including a setting tool adapted to set said liner hanger,

a shoe connected in the lower end of said liner and defining ports communicating therethrough,

a valve in said shoe preventing flow of fluids inwardly through said ports,

said liner defining perforations communicating from the exterior to the interior of said liner, and

means associated with said liner and adapted to cooperate with said setting tool to prevent flow of fluids through said liner.

9. As a subcombination with a liner hanger having an upper abutment, a lower abutment, a liner depending from said lower abutment, a tubular support and an anchoring assembly,

a setting tool comprising,

an inner sleeve,

an outer sleeve,

an annular cylinder defined by said inner and outer sleeves,

an annular piston positioned in said cylinder and defining an internal seat,

said piston adapted to move responsive to fluid pressure above said seat and to engage said upper abutment to set said anchoring assembly,

means releasably connecting one of said sleeves to said lower abutment,

means on one of said sleeves for connecting to a well string on which said liner hanger and said setting tool are lowered into a well bore.

10. The subcombination according to claim 9, wherein said liner defines perforations,

said inner sleeve extends downwardly through and in sealing relationship to said liner to prevent flow of fluids through said perforations while said setting tool remains connected to said liner hanger.

11. A liner hanger adapted to be set in a well bore,

comprising an upper abutment,

a tubular support connected to said upper abutment,

an anchoring assembly mounted on said tubular support and having an upper expander, a lower expander and gripping elements adapted to be moved outwardly by said expanders into pipe-gripping position,

means on said tubular support adapted to support said lower expander in running position,

a lower abutment connected to said lower expander,

a liner connected to and depending from said lower abutment,

threaded locking means releasably secured to said tubular support and adapted to connect to said lower abutment to resist upward movement of said tubular support wtih respect to said lower abutment,

said lower abutment defining low friction internal threads which are adapted to receive a setting tool,

said anchoring assembly being set by a force exerted downwardly on said upper abutment while said lower expander is held against movement,

said anchoring assembly being unset by rotation of said upper abutment to thread said locking means upwardly on said lower abutment and lifting said upper abutment to unset said anchoring assembly,

said anchoring assembly also being unset by lifting said upper abutment to disconnect said threaded locking means from said tubular support.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,606,402 11/1926 Crowell l66208 3,342,268 9/1967 Brown 166124 JAMES A. LEPPINK, Primary Examiner US. Cl. X.R.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1606402 *May 18, 1925Nov 9, 1926Erd V CrowellCasing extension
US3342268 *Sep 7, 1965Sep 19, 1967Brown Joe RWell packer for use with high temperature fluids
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3913670 *May 28, 1974Oct 21, 1975Vetco Offshore Ind IncApparatus for setting and locking packing assemblies in subsurface wellheads
US4051896 *Mar 18, 1976Oct 4, 1977Otis Engineering CorporationWell bore liner hanger
US4281711 *Mar 5, 1975Aug 4, 1981Texas Iron Works, Inc.Apparatus for positioning a liner on a tubular member in a well bore with a retrievable pack off bushing therebetween
US4372390 *Sep 2, 1980Feb 8, 1983Hughes Tool CompanyWell valve
US4669538 *Jan 16, 1986Jun 2, 1987Halliburton CompanyDouble-grip thermal expansion screen hanger and running tool
US4926938 *May 12, 1989May 22, 1990Lindsey Completion Systems, Inc.Rotatable liner hanger with multiple bearings and cones
US5058671 *Aug 13, 1990Oct 22, 1991Lindsey Completion Systems, Inc.Pipe insert assembly
US5058672 *Aug 13, 1990Oct 22, 1991Lindsey Completion Systems, Inc.Landing collar and float valve assembly
US7114573May 20, 2004Oct 3, 2006Weatherford/Lamb, Inc.Hydraulic setting tool for liner hanger
US7789134 *Feb 1, 2006Sep 7, 2010Baker Hughes IncorporatedDownhole/openhole anchor
US8684096 *Nov 19, 2009Apr 1, 2014Key Energy Services, LlcAnchor assembly and method of installing anchors
US8919431May 14, 2012Dec 30, 2014Cobra Tool, Inc.Wellbore anchoring system
US9303477Apr 5, 2012Apr 5, 2016Michael J. HarrisMethods and apparatus for cementing wells
US20050006106 *May 20, 2004Jan 13, 2005Hirth David E.Hydraulic setting tool for liner hanger
US20070175629 *Feb 1, 2006Aug 2, 2007Harris Robert DDownhole/openhole anchor
US20100252278 *Nov 19, 2009Oct 7, 2010Enhanced Oilfield Technologies. LlcAnchor assembly
US20130292119 *Apr 11, 2013Nov 7, 2013Welltools LimitedDownhole plug
DE2800856A1 *Jan 10, 1978Jul 20, 1978Baker Int CorpLiner-aufhaengeeinrichtung und bewegliches werkzeug
WO2004104370A1 *May 20, 2004Dec 2, 2004Weatherford/Lamb, Inc.Hydraulic setting tool for liner hanger
WO2014160972A3 *Mar 28, 2014Apr 23, 2015Weatherford/Lamb, Inc.Big gap element sealing system
Classifications
U.S. Classification166/124, 166/208
International ClassificationE21B33/12, E21B23/00, E21B23/04, E21B33/129
Cooperative ClassificationE21B33/129, E21B23/04
European ClassificationE21B23/04, E21B33/129
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Apr 5, 1982ASAssignment
Owner name: HUGHES TOOL COMPANY A CORP. OF DE
Free format text: MERGER;ASSIGNOR:BROWN OIL TOOLS, INC. A TX CORP.;REEL/FRAME:003967/0348
Effective date: 19811214