Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3461609 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 19, 1969
Filing dateJun 3, 1968
Priority dateJun 3, 1968
Publication numberUS 3461609 A, US 3461609A, US-A-3461609, US3461609 A, US3461609A
InventorsHenry P Armstrong
Original AssigneeTruth Tool Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Manual operator for awning sash windows
US 3461609 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

19, 1969 H. P. ARMSTRONG 3,461,609

MANUAL OPERATOR FOR AWNING SASH WINDOWS Filed June 3, 1968 5 Sheets-Sheet l I TTORNEYS 19, 1959 H. P. ARMSTRONG 3,461,609

MANUAL OPERATOR FOR AWNING SASH WINDOWS Filed June 5, 1968 5 Sheets-Sheet B INVENTOR .Z egW/v ga /$471421? ATTORNEYS 19, 1959 I H. P. ARMSTRONG 3,461,609

MANUAL OPERATOR FOR AWNING SASH WINDOWS Fili ad June 5. 1968 s Sheets-Sheet as 43 45b 43a 43b IN VEN TOR ...Z%i, flaw f' XM A T TORNE Y8 Aug. 19, 1969 H. P. ARMSTRONG MANUAL OPERATOR FOR AWNING SASH WINDOWS Filed June 5, 1968 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 [NYE-"TOR 8y J mZZQQn YZI .7 ,hwuu m ArronNe'ys Aug. 19, 1969 H. P. ARMSTRONG 3,

MANUAL OPERATOR FOR AWNING SASH wINDows Filed June 5, 1968 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 I 39 Inn- 1 INVENTOR fifTOR/JEYS United States Patent 3,461,609 MANUAL OPERATOR FOR AWNING SASH WINDOWS Henry P. Armstrong, Islington, Ontario, Canada, assignor to Truth Tool Company, a Minnesota corporation Filed June 3, 1968, Ser. No. 733,938 Int. Cl. E05f 11/00 US. Cl. 49-324 19 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A Window operator for an awning-type, outwardly hinged window sash in which a pair of actuating arms are pivotally supported by a supporting means and extend therefrom for swinging movement relative to the frame and adapted for connection to the window sash. A manual handle lever is pivotally connected to the supporting means for oscillatory rotation of less than one complete turn about an axis parallel to but spaced from the arm pivots. The lever is adapted to be longitudinally extended perpendicular to the window sash to effect ejection of the supporting means to open the window. Motion transmitting means are supported in part by the supporting means and interconnected to the handle lever and to the sash actuating arms to effect swinging movement of the arms upon rotational movement of the handle lever.

Background of the invention This invention appertains to that general class of window sash operators disclosed in the following United States patents: No. 2,775,446, H. L. Stavenau, Dec. 25, 1956, No. 3,064,966, H. L. Stavenau, Nov. 20, 1962, No. 3,214,157, H. L. Stavenau Oct. 26, 1965.

The window operator disclosed in aforesaid patent No. 2,775,446 embodies a manual lever interconnected through scissors type linkage to the lower rail of an outwardly hinged sash. In that the sash connection is at the longitudinal center of the sash rail, substantial bending forces are applied to the sash rail in the closing, locking and opening operation, and over a period of time the lower rail of the sash becomes distorted. Furthermore, the lower rail of such a sash may become obstructed by snow or ice concentrated at one end or side of the operator connection. An operator of this type, in the initial opening operation, exerts sustantial leverage force against the sash rail and if the latter is obstructed or seized up, the sash may be damaged when forced open at the center thereof.

Deficiencies of the aforesaid type of window operator are well-known in the window manufacturing industry and in order to avoid same, operators of the classification disclosed in Patent No. 3,214,157 are now extensively used. This operator embodies a manual lever which actuates two oscillatable sash arms, ends of which are pivotally and slidably connected to a bar extending longitudinally of and affixed near to the outer ends of the lower rail of an awning sash, for transmitting opening and closing movement to the sash. In this type of operator, the extent of opening of the sash is determined by the length of the sash arms. Accordingly, it is not suitable for a narrow or horizontally short sash requiring average opening ejection, in that the sash lever arms must be proportionate to the sash width.

In the interests of low manufacturing cost, simplicity and durability, push-bar operators of the type disclosed in Patent No. 3,064,966 are now extensively use Operators of this general classification usually emody a window sill mounted guide which supports an awning sash connector. A push-bar lever is povited to the sash connector 3,461,609 Patented Aug. 19, 1969 'ice and slides through the said guide to open and close the sash. An objectionable characteristic of this type of operator is that the push-bar lever is disposed at a right angle to the window when the sash is in open position. When slight opening of the sash is desirale for limited ventilation, such as 'a crack, the push-bar extends inwardly over and well beyond the window stool, and this is generally objectionable. To limit such inward projection, folding push-bars have been developed, but leave much to be desired from an appearance point of view.

Summary of the invention An object of this invention is to provide a manned operator for opening and closing an outwardly hinged window sash, which operator is functionally practical, durable and economical to manufacture, and which combines several of the better design features of the various operators hereinbefore referred to, without the undesirable characteristics and limitations thereof.

An additional object of the present invention is to provide a manual operator embodying two oscillatable sash actuating arms, the outer ends of which are pivotally and slidably interconnected to an outwardly hinged sash, and manually operatable means for moving said sash arms to sash open and closed position and which will open the said sash to normal full open position, which operator is unusually compact and suitable for application to an uncommonly narrow width sash.

Supplementing the preceding objects, this invention is characterized by the provision of an operator wherein the sash actuating arms are motivated by an oscillatable and outwardly extendable push-bar type handle lever.

A further object of this invention is to provide an operator embodying two oscillatable sash actuating arms combined with pivotal and slidable hinged sash interconnecting means, and a push-bar type handle lever mechanically interconnected to the said sash actuating arms in suchwise that initial opening of the hinged sash is attained by swinging movement of the handle lever, and further opening of the sash is attained by outward projection of the handle lever in a direction normal to the hinged sash.

This invention is further characterized by the structural form of the aforesaid sash interconnecting means which is affixed to the lower rail of the sash at substantially quarterpoints of the sash rail length, so that opening and closed forces applied thereto are so distributed that warp and distortion of said sash rail is minimized.

Another object of this invention is to provide an operator as hereinbefore defined, which is so designed that when the pivoted handle lever is swung inwardly a short distance from closed position, for example, between 15 and 20 degrees, the sash will crack open a short distance, for example, between 78" and /2, to allow for limited ventilation between the sash and the window sill.

A further object of the invention is to provide an operator embodying two oscillatable sash actuating arms combined with hinged sash interconnecting means and a handle lever for actuating the said sash arms, which handle lever is disposed parallel to the sash when the latter is closed and is capable of being rotated substantially 180 degrees to cause the said sash actuating arms to swing outwardly not less than 60 nor more than degrees, so as to open the sash to approximately midway open position.

An additional object of this invention is to provide a manual operator for opening and closing an outwardly hinged window sash, which operator embodies an oscillatable handle lever combined with sash interconnecting means, said handle lever and sash interconnecting means being so formed and arranged that the hinged sash may be cracked open for minimal ventilation; opened about ha1fway; or extended to full open position; and wherein the handle lever in each such sash open position does not project inwardly beyond an underlying window sill stool of average width.

It is a further object of the invention to provide a manual operator of simple construction, durably made with capacity to resist wear and mechanical deterioration over a period of many years, and in which such parts as are necessarily disposed on the inside of the window are of functional simplicity and desirable architectural appearance.

Other objects and advantages of the invention are those inherent in the mechanism herein illustrated and described.

To the accomplishment of the foregoing and related ends, this invention then comprises the features hereinafter fully described and pointed out in the claims, the following description and accompanying drawings setting forth in detail a preferred illustrative embodiment of the invention, these being indicative, however, of but one of the various ways in which the principles of the invention may be employed.

Brief descripiion of the drawings FIGURE 1 is a generally vertical cross section of a typical awning sash window with a hinged sash in full open position, showing parts of the operator in section and parts in elevation, taken generally along the arrow line 1-1 of FIGURE 19;

FIGURE 2 is a vertical cross section of the window sill structure with the lower rail of the hinged sash shown in closed position, said view being magnified in proportion to FIGURES 1 and 3 and being generally in the vertical plane indicated by the arrow line 2-2 of FIGURE 3;

FIGURE 3 is a fragmentary horizontal transverse sec tional plan view of the window frame sill with the sash in section and closed position, with portions of the frame sill cover in section, and parts of the operator in section and in plan view, taken generally along the arrow lines 3-3 of FIGURE 2 and drawn to the scale of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 4 is a partial plan view showing a portion of the window frame sill cover and part of the top of the operator guide base, with the operator handle lever in closed sash position;

FIGURE 5 is a side view of the parts shown in FIG- URE 4;

FIGURE 6 is a fragmentary horizontal section and plan view taken on the arrow line 6-6 of FIGURE 2, the view being shown in magnified scale in relation to FIGURE 3 and drawn to the same scale as FIGURE 2;

FIGURE 7 is a vertical section showing part of the interconnecting means attaching the sash arms to the lower rail of the hinged sash, the view being taken on the arrow line 7-7 of FIGURE 3 and drawn at an enlarged scale in relation thereto;

FIGURE 8 is a vertical section of part of the mechanism referred to in the description of FIGURE 7, drawn to the scale of the latter and being taken generally on the arrow line 8-8 of FIGURE 3;

FIGURE 9 is a fragmentary horizontal transverse sectional plan view generally similar to FIGURE 3, with the hinged sash in cracked open position;

FIGURE 10 is a view similar to FIGURE 2 showing the hinged sash in the cracked open position shown in FIGURE 9, taken generally along the arrow line 10-10 of FIGURE 9;

FIGURE 11 is a vertical section showing parts of the operator, taken on the arrow line 11-11 of FIGURE 9 and drawn at a magnified scale in relation thereto;

FIGURE 12 is a view similar to FIGURE 11, taken generally on the arrow line 12-12 of FIGURE 9;

FIGURE 13 is an enlarged sectional plan view similar to and on the same plane as FIGURE 6, showing parts of the operator depicted in FIGURE 9 and in the same relative position;

FIGURE 14 is a horizontal sectional plan view .of the guide base forming part of the operator, the view being drawn at an enlarged scale in relation to FIGURE 9 and taken in the same horizontal plane as that of FIGURE 13;

FIGURE 15 is a vertical section of the guide base taken on the arrow line 15-15 of FIGURE 14;

FIGURE 16 is a fragmentary horizontal transverse sectional plan view of the window sill and sill cover, showing the lower rail of the hinged sash in substantially midway open position and the operator components in relative position, the view being taken generally along the arrow line 16-16 in FIGURE 17 and drawn to the scale of FIGURES 3 and 9;

FIGURE 17 is a fragmentary and enlarged vertical section taken on the arrow line 17-17 of FIGURE 16;

FIGURE 18 is a view similar to FIGURES 6 and 13 showing parts of the operator shown in FIGURE 17, the view being taken generally on the arrow line 18-18 of FIGURE 17;

FIGURE 19 is a view generally similar to FIGURE 16 showing the lower rail of the hinged sash in full open position, with the operator handle lever extended through the guide base, the view being taken generally along the arrow line 19-19 of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 20 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional plan view taken on the arrow line 20-20' of FIGURE 1; and

FIGURE 21 is a plan view of the plate member which forms part of the motion transmitting means also shown in FIGURES 6, ll, 12, 13 and 20.

Detailed description of the invention While this invention is susceptible of embodiment in different forms, there is shown in the drawings and will herein be described in detail a preferred embodiment of the invention with the understanding that the present disclosure is to be considered as an exemplification of the principles of the invention and is not intended to limit same to the form illustrated.

In the accompanying drawings the subject manual sash operator is shown with a window structure of the wood frame and sash type, the latter being hinged outwardly on surface mounted hinges having vertically slidable hinge pins, all known in the window manufacturing industry. This manual sash operator may be readily adapted for metal, plastic or other types of window and sash frames and any appropriate type of hinges, and it is to be understood that the present disclosure is not intended to limit its use application.

Referring now to the drawings in detail, an exemplary window structure is shown embodying a frame generally indicated at 30 and an outwardly hinged sash generally designated by the numeral 31. The window frame comprises a sill 30a, head 30b and two jambs connected to the ends of the said sill heads, one of which jambs 300 is shown in FIGURE 1. It is common practice to partially cover a sash operator of the type illustrated with a sill cover 30d extending longitudinally of and supported upon the top of the sill 300:. A standard type sill stool is shown and designated by the numeral 32. The window frame opening is usually covered with an insect screen 33, shown symbolically in FIGURE 1 only. The lower rail of the said screen is supported on the sill cover 30d which overlies the sash operator, whereby the sash 31 may be opened and closed with the said screen in place.

The hinged sash 31 embodies a glazed frame comprising a lower rail 31a, upper rail 31b and end stiles, one of which is shown in FIGURE 1 and indicated by the numeral 310. With manual sash operators of this general type it is preferable that the sash lowers as it is swung outwardly in order to minimize upward canting of the operator sash actuating arms and related linkage mechanism. A known and suitable type of sash hinge is shown in FIGURE 1 and generally designated by the numeral 34, and comprises a frame jamb mounted guide 3412, a friction type pivot shoe 34b slidably supported by the said guide and carrying a hinge pin 34c, the latter being pivoted in the upper end of the mounting arm 34d affixed to the outer edge of the sash stile 310. An oscillatable stap 34e is pivoted at 34 to the guide 34a and to the sash mounting arm 34d by pivot 34g. A like hinge is mounted on each frame jamb and confronting sash stile. As the sash 31 is swung outwardly by the sash operator, it is supported by the stays 34e and the upper sash rail 31b lowers vertically, to the position shown in FIGURE 1, thus minimizing uplift of the lower sash rail 31a, whereby upward canting of the sash actuating arms and related linkage is minimal, and is preferably less than to an angle of ten degrees above horizontal, for reasons hereinafter defined.

The sash operator constituting this invention includes a guide base generally indicated by the numeral 35, preferably embodying a metal die casting designated by the same numeral, and clearly shown in FIGURES 1, 14, 15 and 19. Three integral pins 35a extend downwardly from the bottom face of the said casting through matching holes in the guide base mounting plate 36, and the ends 35b of the said pins are upset to afiix the said mounting plate to the said casting, as is shown in FIGURE 15. The casting 35 is formed with an internal cavity 35c, and a molded plastic guide base liner 37 is retained in part in the said cavity, by the mounting plate 36. The guide base liner 37 has vertical end flanges 37a, 37b, 37c and 37d which overlie end faces of the casting 35, and such flanges prevent endwise movement of the said liner in the said casting. The liner 37 also embodies two side walls 37e and 37] which terminate under the top 35d of the casting 35, and a partially open web 37g overlying the mounting plate 36.

Referring now to FIGURES 1, 17 and 19, the guide base casting 35 has a top outward extension 352 overlying the guide base insect guard 38 which loosely interfits between the walls 376 and 37 of the liner 37, and the said insect guard is retained by the guide member 39 and the rivet 40 which affixes the latter to the casting extension 3512. The insect guard 38 may be formed of very light guage flexible stainless steel, or it may be in the form of a thin flexible molded plastic leaf, shaped to deflect downwardly to the position shown in FIGURE 1. The guide base mounting plate 36 has four countersunk holes 360! which receive the screws 41, shown in FIG- URE 19, and which connect the guide base to the window frame sill 30a. The guide base casting 35 has two outwardly extending lugs 35; which combinatively form a stop abutment for the sash actuating arms slidaible supporting means generally designated by the numeral 42.

Referring now to FIGURES 1, 2, 3, 9, l1 and 12, the sash actuating arms supporting means generally indicated by the numeral 42, may be in the form of a stamped flat metal plate also indicated at 42, having a bar shaped portion 42a with edges 42b and 420 which slidably interfit between the walls 37:: and 37 of the guide base liner 37. The tWo shoulders 42d of the said plate abut the stop lugs 35f of the guide base casting 35, when the two sash actuating arms 43 of the operator are positioned as shown in FIGURES 3, 9 and 16. A pair of shouldered and riveted pivot pin 42;; extend downwardly from the plate 42 through matching pivot holes in the arms 43, (see FIGURE 12) which in part overlie the motion transmitting means generally designated by the numeral 44.

The motion transmitting means 44 may be in the form of a stamped fiat metal plate (see FIGURE 21) indicated by the same numeral, having a bar shaped portion 44a with edges 44b and 440 designed to slidably interfit between the walls 37e and 37 of the guide base liner 37. A medial elongated guide slot 44d extends through the plate 44 and two shouldered and riveted guide pins 42 arranged in spaced relation, depend from the plate 42 through the said slot 44d. The flat head 42g on each pin 42 serves to hold the plates 42 and 44 and the pivoted ends 43a of the arms 43 in the assembled relationship shown in FIGURES 9, 11, 12 and 13. A cam slot 44e is formed in and across the bar portion 44a of the plate 44 close to the inward end 44f thereof, the longitudinal medial line A-A of the said slot being preferably at the angular relationship to the center line E--B of the guide slot 44d as is shown in FIGURE 21. A roller receiving recess 44g is formed in each side of the plate 44. A shouldered riveted roller pin 43b depends from each arm 43, and a roller 430 is retained on each said pin by the flat head 43d thereof, and interflts in the related roller recess 44g. To prevent ingress of insects through the slot 44d when the sash 31 is in the closed position shown in FIGURES 2 and 3, a flat plate 42k is positioned over part of the said slot, between the plates 42 and 44, and between the guide pins 42 The manual handle lever 45 may be formed from metal strip or bar having parallel edges 45a and 45b which slidably interfit between the side walls 37s and 37] of the guide base liner 37, when the said handle lever is extended through the guide base 35, as is shown in FIGURES 1 and 19, for maximum opening of the sash 31. The end portion 45c of the handle lever is reduced in width and has parallel edges 45d and 45e and a bulb shaped end 45,, which rotatably interfits between the inward end 42h of the plate 42 and the inward end 44f of the plate 44. A shouldered riveted pivot pin 42 depends from the inward end 42h of the plate 42, through a matching pivot hole in the bulb shaped end 45 of the handle lever, and a cam pin 45g depends from the latter through the cam slot 44e in the underlying plate 44. A handle loop 4512 is provided on the opposite end of the said handle lever.

The function of the handle lever 45 and the interconnected linkage above described is to transmit oscillatory outward projection or inward retraction movement to the sash actuating arms 43, to effect opening or closing of the sash 31. Referring now to FIGURE 6, when the handle lever 45 is in the position shown, the pivot pin 42 and the cam pin 45g are on the center line C-C. The axis of the said pivot pin is outward of the handle lever center line D-D and the axis of the cam pin 45g is inward of the said handle lever center line. Upon manual swinging of the said handle lever about the axis of pivot pin 42 the cam pin 45g swings about the said pivot pin and slides in the cam pin slot 44e in the motion transmitting plate 44. When the sash 31 is in the closed position shown in FIGURE 3, the handle lever 45 may be secured in locked position by engagement with the lock member 46 of known type, aflixed to the window frame sill 30a by the screw 46a.

The outer ends 43e of the sash actuating arms 43 are preferably pivotally and slidably interconnected to the lower rail of a hinged sash. Alternately, for certain types of hinged sash other forms of linkage such as is disclosed in the aforesaid United States Patent No. 2,775,446 may be advantageously used. Accordingly, the sash interconnecting mechanism shown in the accompanying drawings is to be regarded as exemplary, and the detail of same is not specifically defined in the claims hereof.

Referring now in particular to FIGURES 3, 7 and 8, the outer end 43a of each arm 43 is provided with a hole 431, through which a pivot stud 47 extends. The said pivot stud is rigidly aflixed to an angular shaped metal link 47a having an upstanding flange 47b to which a cylindrically shaped molded plastic slide shoe 47c is rigidly aflixed. The two slide shoes 47c are slidable longitudinally, when the arms 43 are swung in unison about their pivotal axis, in a stationary tubular guide member 48, which is aligned with and aflixed to the inward face of the sash lower rail 31a. The tubular guide member 48 has a slot 48a extending lengthwise thereof and of suitable width to accommodate tilting movement of the flange 47b of each link 47a, as the sash 31 is opened or closed.

The ends of the tubular guide member 48 are supported by the brackets 49, and a mounting screw 49a affixes each bracket to the sash lower rail 31a. A pin 4% and a key 490 are integrally formed with each bracket 49, and extend into the ends of the tubular guide member 48, to immovably support same in relation to the aforesaid sash rail.

In order to tilt the sash 31 by hand horizontally downwardly about the axis of the pivots 34g of the sash stays 34a to enable convenient washing of the exterior surface of the said sash, the outer ends 43e of the sash actuating arms 43 must be disconnected from the pivot studs 47. In operation, connection of the outer ends 432 of the said arms with the pivot studs 47 is maintained by known keepers 50 which are manually slidably adjustable on the outer ends 43s of the said arms. Each said keeper interlocks under light spring tension in an annular groove 47d in each pivot stud 47, shown in FIGURE 8. To disconnect the end 432 of a said arm from its related pivot stud 47, the said keeper is retracted manually by hand away from the said pivot stud, from which the end 43a of the said arm may then be lifted.

The sash actuating arms 43 and the handle lever 45 are proportionately drawn to scale with a sash glass pane 31d which is fourteen inches in height. To accommodate larger sash and opening movement greater than that shown in FIGURES 1 and 19, the sash arms 43 or the handle lever 45, or the said sash arms and handle lever, may be made longer. When the operator is designed for large sash, the said handle lever may advantageously be of the extendable or telescoping type, exemplified in principle in United States Patent No. 3,064,966.

Operation of the invention Referring now to FIGURES 2 and 3, the sash 31 is shown in closed and locked position in relation to the window frame 30. The operator handle lever 45 is parallel with the window sill cover 30d and in locked engagement with the lock member 46. In this position, the edge 45d of the handle lever is in contact with the flange 37a of the guide base liner 37, which said flange is a fulcrum for the handle lever. The plates 42 and 44 are positioned in part between the side walls 37e and 37 of the guide base liner 37, and the handle lever through pins 421' and 45g and related parts, holds the plates 42 and 44 in the position shown in FIGURE 3, with the shoulders 42d of the said plate in abutting relationship against the lugs 35 of the guide base 35. Relative position of the plate 44, the inner ends 43a of the arms 43, and the arm rollers 43c is shown in FIGURE 6. The arms 43 are nested under the window sill cover 30d, and the slide shoes 470 are positioned close to the ends of the tubular guide member 48.

To crack the sash 31 open a distance of between and to allow for minimal air ventilation between the sash and window frame, the handle 45 of the handle lever is raised manually to disengage it from the lock member 46. The handle lever is then swung inwardly by hand about the axis of the pivot pin 42, to an angle between and from its closed position above defined, and over the window sill stool 32 to approximately the position depicted in FIGURE 9. Such swinging movement of the handle lever 45 causes the sash actuating arms 43 to swing outwardly about the pivotal axis of the pivot pins 42. The slide shoes 47c interconnected to the outer ends 43e of the said arms slide along the interior of the tubular guide member 47 and force the interconnected sash 31 to swing outwardly and clear of the sill cover 30d and the underlying sill 30a, as is also shown in FIGURE 10". In this position, air may flow in restricted volume under the lower sash rail 31a, thus providing ideal ventilation under certain atmospheric conditions.

As the handle lever 45 is swung inwardly to the position shown in FIGURE 9, the weight of the sash 31 and frictional resistance of its hinges 34 is transmitted in part 8 through the sash actuating arms 43 to the plate 42, the shoulders 42d of which continue to bear against the lugs 35 of the guide base 35. The campin 45g is swung about the axis of the handle lever pivot pin 42j and slides in the cam slot 442 in the plate 44 causing it to move slightly outwardly in relation to the plate 42. The relative position of the plate 44, the inner ends 43a of the arms 43, and the arm rollers 430 is shown in FIGURE 13. As the plate 44 is moved outwardly in relation to the plate 42 as above defined, the arm rollers 43c interfitting in the roller recesses 44g are forced outwardly and in turn the arms 43 are swung outwardly. Obviously, continued inward swinging movement of the handle lever 45 from the position shown in FIGURE 9 will effect greater outward opening of the sash 31.

When the handle lever 45 is rotated about the axis of the pivot pins 42 through approximately 180 of'movement to the position shown in FIGURE 16 the sash actuating arms 43 are swung outwardly to the position illustrated in FIGURE 16. In the position shown in FIG URES l6 and 17 the sash is at about midway open position, and the handle lever 45 is again aligned with the sill cover 30d in overlying relation to the window stool 32. In the position shown in FIGURE 16, the shoulders 42d of the plate 42 remain in contact with the lugs 35 of the guide base 35, is shown in FIGURES 3 and 9. As the handle lever 45 is swung around to the position shown in FIGURE 16, the cam pin 45g slides along the cam slot 440 to the approximate position shown in FIG- URE 18 and the edge 452 of the said handle lever abuts the flange 37b of the guide base liner 37, which said flange forms a stop which prevents continued swinging movement of the said handle lever.

To open the sash 31 from the closed position shown in FIGURES 2 and 3 to the full open position shown in FIGURES 1 and 19, the handle lever 45 is swung around manually about the axis of the pivot pin 42 through approximately of rotational movement. Such movement causes the cam pin 45g carried by the said handle lever and projecting through the cam slot Me in the plate 44 to slide the latter lengthwise in relation to the plate 42 to the position shown in FIGURE 20. The rollers 43c in the recesses 44g in the plate 44 are moved outwardly, and in turn the arms 43 are swung to the angular position shown in FIGURE 19. As the said arms are swung outwardly the slides shoes 47c interconnected through the links 47a and the pivot studs 47 to the ends 436 of the said arms, slide towards one another in the interior of the tubular guide member 48. The latter being afiixed to the lower rail 31a of the sash 31, moves it outwardly. The handle lever 45 is then pushed manually lengthwise and outwardly into the guide base 35. The plates 42 and 44 with interconnected parts are in turn slidably ejected from the said guide base, and the arms-43 which are pivotally supported on the plate 42 are carried outwardly by the latter to the position shown in FIGURE 19.

The side walls 37e and 371 of the guide base liner 47 form a guide for the edges 45a and 45b for the handle lever 45, and slidably support same against lateral swinging movement when it is extended into the guide base 35. Referring now to FIGURE 20, when the handle lever 45 is extended through the guide base, the pivot pin 42 and and the cam pin 45g are in transverse axial alignment on the line C-C which parallels the pivotal axial line EE of the sash actuating arm pivot pins 420. The plate 42 and the interconnected plate 44 are held by the pins 42 and 45g against lateral swinging movement relative to the handle lever 45. The plate 44 is held immovable by the cam pin 45g extending through the cam slot 44c, in relation to the plate 42, and the arms 43 are thus held against oscillatory movement about the axis of the pivot pins 420.

In that the handle lever 45 is slidably supported in the guide base 35, the extent to which the sash 31 may be opened is variable and manually selective, being limited only by the length of the said handle lever and its relationship to the guide base 35.

To close the sash'31 from the position shown in FIG- URES 16 and 17, the handle lever 45 is manually returned to the position shown in FIGURE 3. As the said handle lever is rotated about the axis of the pivot pin 4 2, the cam pin '45g slides along the cam slot 44c'in the plate 44 and 'retractsthe saidplate longitudinally in relation to the plate 42 The edge'45d of thehandle lever 45. abuts the fulcrum flange 37a of the guide base liner 37, and the said handle lever through its pivot pin 42 urges the plate 42 inwardly and forces its'shoulders- 42d against the lugs 35f of the guide base 35. In this position, the plate 44 and the interconnected sash actuating arms 43 are returned to the position shown in FIGURES 3' and 6.

The sash 31 may be closed from the full open position shown in FIGURES 1 and 19 to the closed position shown in FIGURES 2 and 3 by manually withdrawing the handle lever 45 inwardly from the guide base 31, thereby retracting the plates 42 and 44 in part into and through the liner 37 of the said guide base. After the end 45 of the said handle lever is drawn almost through the said liner of the guide base 35, the said handle lever may be swung to the left about the pivotal axis of the pin 42 around to the closed position shown in FIGURE 3. Such rotational movement of the said handle lever will eflect relative movement of interconnected parts as is described in the preceding paragraph.

In sash closed and open positions, the sash actuating arms 43, the plates 42 and 44, and the handle lever 45 are and remain generally in co-planar relationship. When the sash 31 is extended to the open position shown in FIGURES 1 and 19 and in FIGURES 16 and 17, the said sash arms remain fiat, are not canted in relation to the plates 42 and 44, and the outer ends 43a of the sand arms are not bowed upwardly. Such operational characteristics may be achieved by suitable component design and relationship, and use of sash hinging detail as hereinbefore set forth. By avoiding sash actuating arm canting or bowing, excessive pivot pin wear is avoided, and manual operational loads diminished.

The dimensional proportions of the sash actuating arms 43 and the handle lever 45 as well as the relative oscillatory movements thereof; the leverage ratio of the arm rollers 430 in relation to the arm pivot pins 42c; and the leverage ratio of the cam pin 45g in relation to the handle lever pivot pin 42 combinatively provide a differentlal ratio of swinging movement between the said handle lever and arms which enables opening and closing of the sash 31 with minimal application of manual force to the handle lever 45. Having regard for the foregoing, and in order to project the sash 31 to approximately midway open position when the handle lever is swung around approximately 180" from its closed position, it is desirable that the length of the arms 43 be less than the length of the handle lever 45.

In the interests of good appearance and optimum operational characteristics, it is desirable that the overall extent of swinging movement of the handle lever 45 be approximately 180 and not more than 190; that the arms 43 swing outwardly not less than 60 from closed position when the handle lever 45 is fully opened to the position shown in FIGURE 16; and that the arms 43 open outwardly not less than 40 from closed position when the handle lever 45 is in the extended position shown in FIGURE 19.

I claim:

1. A manual operator for an awning sash window embodying a frame and an outwardly hinged sash, which operator comprises a guide base adapted to be mounted on a window frame sill, supporting means retainable by and also movable from said guide base, two oscillatable sash actuating arms pivotally supported by said supporting means, sash interconnecting means adapted to attach said arms to the lower rail of a hinged sash, a handle lever pivotally connected to said supporting means for oscillatory rotational movement relative thereto and also adapted tobe longitudinally extended into said guide base to elfect ejection of said supporting means therefrom, and motion transmitting means supported in part by said supporting means and interconnected to said handle lever and to said sash actuating arms to eifect swinging movement of the latter upon rotational movement of said handle lever.

2. A manual operator as defined in claim 1 in which said guide base supports said supporting means when said two oscillatable sash actuating arms are in sash. closed position. 7

, 3. A manual operator as defined in claim 1 in which said guide base supports said handle lever when said two oscillatable sash actuating arms are in sash open position.

4. A manual operator as defined in claim 1 in which said two oscillatable sash arms are in a plane substantially parallel to the plane occupied by said supporting means.

5. A manual operator as defined in claim 1 in which said motion transmitting means efiects a differential ratio of swinging movement between said handle lever and said sash actuating arms.

6. A manual operator as defined in claim 1 in which said two oscillatable sash actuating arms are limited to pivotal swinging movement of not more than one hundred degrees.

7. A manual operator as defined in claim 1 in which said handle lever is limited to rotational movement of not more than one hundred ninety degrees.

8. A manual operator as defined in claim 1 in which said two oscillatable sash actuating arms are swung not less than forty degrees coincident with ninety degrees rotational movement of said handle lever.

9. A manual operator as defined in claim 1 in which said two oscillatable sash actuating arms are swung at least sixty degrees coincident with rotational movement of one hundred eighty degrees of said handle lever.

10. A manual operator as defined in claim 1 in which said two oscillatable sash actuating arms are locked against oscillatory movement by said motion transmitting means and said handle lever when the latter is extended into said guide base.

11. A manual operator as defined in claim 1 in which each said oscillatable sash arm is short-er than said handle lever.

12. A manual operator as defined in claim 1 in which said supporting means, said two oscillatable "sash actuating arms, and said handle lever are generally in coplanar relationship.

13. A manual operator as defined in claim 1 in which said supporting means is in part horizontally slidably supported in said guide base.

14. A manual operator as defined in claim 1 in which said supporting means abuts and is held stationary in said guide base when said two oscillatable sash actuating arms are in sash closed position.

15. A manual operator as defined in claim 1 in which said motion transmitting means is in the form of linkage pivotally connected to said sash actuating arms and pivotally connected to said handle lever.

16. A manual operator as defined in claim 1 in which said sash interconnecting means is adapted to pivotally and slidably interconnect ends of said sash actuating arms to the lower rail of the hinged sash.

17. A closure operator for an awning sash window embodying a window frame and an outwardly hinged sash, which operator comprises a guide base mounted on the window frame, an actuating arm connected to said sash, ling means pivotally connected to said actuating arm and retainable by and movable from said guide base, and a handle lever pivotlly connected to said link means for oscillatory rotational movement relative to the window frame to efi'ect swinging movement of the actuating arm upon rotational movement of the handle lever and mov- 11 able with said link means relative to the guide base to eifect ejection of the link means to move the sash outwardly.

18. A manual operator as defined in claim 17 wherein said guide base has means coacting with said handle lever to permit said oscillatory rotational movement of the handle lever and to permit the handle lever to be'extended through the Window frame to effect said ejection of the link means.

19. A manual operator as defined in claim 18 wherein said means on the guide base permits the handle lever to be extended only when perpendicular to the window frame.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 12/1967 Hayman 49-356 X 10 DAVID J. WILLIAMOWSKY, Primary Examiner J. KARL BELL, Assistant Examiner US. Cl. X.R.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2775446 *Jul 7, 1955Dec 25, 1956Truth Tool CompanyClosure operator
US2785918 *Aug 29, 1952Mar 19, 1957Standard Thomson CorpClosure actuating mechanism
US2977810 *Oct 17, 1955Apr 4, 1961Truth Tool CompanyClosure operator
US3214157 *Feb 21, 1963Oct 26, 1965Truth Tool CompanyClosure operator
US3357735 *Jun 1, 1965Dec 12, 1967Leslie Welding Co IncWindow holder and operator
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4495728 *Mar 17, 1983Jan 29, 1985Gary LynnWindow escape device
US4843703 *Apr 28, 1988Jul 4, 1989Truth IncorporatedMethod of assembling a window operator
US4845830 *Jul 7, 1987Jul 11, 1989Truth IncorporatedMethod of assembling a window operator
US5103590 *Jun 25, 1990Apr 14, 1992Hanmar Motor CorporationWindow operator for use with awning assembly
US5339568 *Aug 4, 1992Aug 23, 1994Hanmar Motor CorporationAwning window assembly and operator therefor
US5815984 *Mar 27, 1996Oct 6, 1998Wright Products Corp.Casement window operator
US6044587 *Mar 10, 1997Apr 4, 2000Truth Hardware CorporationScissors-type window operator
US6829861 *Aug 15, 2002Dec 14, 2004Atwood Mobile Products, Inc.Awning-type insulated glazing assembly
US6941700Jul 13, 2004Sep 13, 2005Dura Global Technologies, Inc.Awning-type insulated glazing assembly
US8474184 *Aug 17, 2009Jul 2, 2013Stephen WisbeyApparatus for remotely opening a door
US20050066579 *Sep 25, 2003Mar 31, 2005Kurt WinnerLinear window operator
US20100071267 *Aug 17, 2009Mar 25, 2010Stephen WisbeyApparatus for and method of remotely opening a door
Classifications
U.S. Classification49/324, 49/356, 49/345, 74/25
International ClassificationE06B3/50
Cooperative ClassificationE06B3/5009, E06B3/50
European ClassificationE06B3/50A, E06B3/50