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Publication numberUS3462878 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 26, 1969
Filing dateNov 15, 1966
Priority dateNov 19, 1965
Also published asDE1603416A1
Publication numberUS 3462878 A, US 3462878A, US-A-3462878, US3462878 A, US3462878A
InventorsPerryman Ronald Thomas, Rix Frederick Noel
Original AssigneeLesney Products Co Ltd
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Toy and model vehicles
US 3462878 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

26, 1969 R. T. PERRYMAN ETAL 3,462,878

TOY AND MODEL. VEHICLES Filed Nov. 15, 1966 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Aug. 26, 1969 R. T. PERRYMAN ET AL TOY AND MODEL VEHICLES 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Nov. 15. 1966 & n

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United States Patent 3,462,878 TOY AND MODEL VEHICLES Ronald Thomas Perryman and Frederick Noel Rix, Essex, England, assignors to Lesney Products & Co. Limited, London, England, a British company Filed Nov. 15, 1966, Ser. No. 594,482 Claims priority, application Great Britain, Nov. 19, 1965, 49,235/ 65 Int. Cl. A6311 17/38, 17/00 U.S. Cl. 46-401 8 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A toy land vehicle having a chassis and at least two wheel-carrying axles supported in the chassis. One of the axles is angularly displaceable about a point located approimately centrally of its own length and in a plane extending substantially parallel to the general plane of the chassis. The toy vehicle also includes a manually operable adjusting device engaging the angularly displaceable axle in such a way that its own setting determines the angular setting of such axle about said point and thereby the angular settings of the wheels carried by such axle relative to the remainder of the vehicle.

This invention relates to toy and model vehicles all of which, for the sake of brevity, will hereinafter be referred to as toy" vehicles.

One object of the invention is to provide a simple form of steering for toy land vehicles which steering may, if desired, be preselectable in character.

Another object of the invention is the provision of a cheaply producable toy land vehicle which has a form of steering acceptable to young children together with a resilient suspension.

For a better understanding of the invention, and to show how the same may be carried into eifect, reference will now be made, by way of example, to the accompanying drawing, in which:

FIGURE 1 is a sectional view of a toy car constructed in accordance with the invention, the section being taken on the line I-I of FIGURE 2,

FIGURE 2 is a plan view corresponding to FIGURE 1 but with certain upper parts of the toy removed,

FIGURE 3 is a section taken on the line III-HI of FIGURE 1,

FIGURE 4 is a vertical section containing the longitudinal axis of an alternative form of toy car in accordance with the invention, and

FIGURE 5 is a plan view of the chassis or base of the toy of FIGURE 4 and shows various steering and suspension parts of the latter.

Referring to FIGURES 1 to 3 of the drawing, the toy land vehicle which is illustrated is a car having a body 1 made from die cast metal, a chassis or base 2 made from die cast metal and a rear axle 3 having rotatable wheels 4 mounted at its opposite ends. Details of the construction and arrangement of the body 1 are not relevant to the present invention and, therefore, no further description of that part will be given.

The rear axle 3 of the car is inserted through holes formed in lugs 5 that project upwardly from opposite lateral edge ribs 16 of the chassis or base 2. The toy has a similar front axle 6 with wheels 7, similar to the wheels 4, rotatably mounted at its opposite ends. A central region of the front axle 6 is inserted between two pins 8 that project perpendicularly upwards from the chassis or base 2 immediately in front, and to the rear, respectively, of said axle. The two pins 8 are parallel to one another and are spaced apart by a distance a little in excess of the 3,462,878 Patented Aug. 26, 1969 cross-sectional diameter of the axle 6. Opposite end regions of the axle 6 pass through slots 9 formed in profiled lugs 10 that project upwardly from the chassis or base 2.

It can be seen from FIGURES 2 and 3 of the drawing that the front axle 6, together with the wheels 7, is angularly displaceable about a point located approximately centrally of its own length and midway between the two pins 8. The axle 6 can be turned about said point in either of the opposite directions indicated by the arrows A and B in FIGURE 2 of the drawing, the opposite front and rear ends of the slots 9 limiting such turning movements to a range in which the wheels 7 will not interfere with parts of the body 1 or chassis or base 2, and the upper and lower edges of the slots 9 ensuring that the angular displacement about said point takes place in a plane extending substantially parallel to the general plane of the chassis or base 2.

The toy includes manually operable adjusting means that may conveniently, but not essentially, be formed of a single piece from a synthetic plastic material. The adjusting means is generally indicated by the reference numeral 11 in the drawing and includes an arched axleengaging portion 12 that can be seen best in FIGURE 1 of the drawing. In order to allow for the angular adjustment of the front axle 6, the arch of said portion 12, through which a region of the axle 6 close to one of the profiled lugs 10 is inserted, is of slightly greater width than the cross-sectional diameter of the axle. A block 13 projects downwardly from the body 1 and has its lowermost end in engagement with the upper side of the portion 12 in such a way that said portion can move forwardly and rearwardly of the toy in a direction parallel to the general plane of the chassis or base 2 but cannot move transversely of that direction.

The adjusting means 11 has a connecting portion 14 which extends longitudinally of the toy at one lateral side thereof and the leading end of which is integral with, or fastened to, the arched portion 12. As can be seen best in FIGURE 2 of the drawing, the connecting portion 14 is sandwiched between a longitudinal rib 15 projecting upwardly from the chassis or base 2 and one of the aforementioned edge ribs 16.

At its rearmost end, the connecting portion 14 is integral with, or secured to, an operating portion 17 which includes a handle 18 that projects laterally of the body 1 through a slot (not illustrated) formed therein. The chassis or base 2 is also formed with a longiutdinally extending slot 19 immediately beneath the operating portion 17 and a projection 20 of said portion 17 which is of inverted T-shaped cross-section has its upright entered through the slot 19 with its cross-bar overlapping opposite edges of the latter. This allows the operating portion 17 to move forwardly and rearwardly of the toy in a direction parallel'to the general plane of the chassis or base 2 but prevents it from moving transversely of said direction. The rearmost end of the slot 19 opens into a circular hole 21 through which the projection 20 can be initially entered to engage it with the slot 19. As can be seen in FIGURE 2, the slot 19 and hole 21 together have a keyhole configuration.

It will be evident from FIGURE 2 of the drawing and the preceding description that, if the projecting handle 18 is moved in the direction indicated by the arrow C in that figure, the arched portion 12 which engages the front axle 6 will move in like direction so that the front axle 6 and its wheels 7 will be angularly adjusted about the aforementioned point in the direction indicated by the arrow A. The toy car will thus steer to the left. Similarly, upon moving the handle 18 forwardly of the toy in the direction indicated by the arrow D in FIG- URE 2, the axle 6 and wheels 7 will be angularly displaced in the direction B and the toy car will steer to the right. As previously mentioned, it is preferred that the adjusting means 11 should be formed from a synthetic plastic material. That part of said material which forms the projection 20 may frictionally engage the opposite edges of the slot 19 in such a way that there is an appreciable degree of opposition to movement of the handle 18 in the directions C and D. Thus, if this construction is employed, the frictional opposition to movement of the adjusting means 11 tends to maintain the front axle 6 in the angular setting which it is occupying at any given moment so that the steering is preselectable in character.

FIGURES 4 and of the drawing show a toy car which is generally similar to the toy already described with reference to FIGURES 1 to 3. Accordingly, those parts that are equivalent to parts that have previously been described are indicated by the reference numerals that have already been employed and will not be described further. The principal feature by which the toy of FIGURES 4 and 5 differs from that of FIGURES l to 3 is that it is provided with a resilient suspension. The lugs 5 are formed with vertically extending slots 22 through which the rear axle 3 passes. It will be evident from FIG- URE 4 of the drawing that the slots 9 in the profiled lugs 10, through which the front axle 6 is inserted have a similar vertical extent to the slots 22.

A suspension strip 23 formed from a resilient synthetic plastic material, which may, as illustrated, be transparent, extends longitudinally of the toy car immediately above the chassis or base 2. The strip 23 is formed centrally with an aperture 24 which cooperates with a dowel 30 projecting upwardly from the chassis or base 2. The dowel 30 is peened over to secure the strip 23 to it after being passed through the aperture 24. A region of the strip 23 that surrounds the aperture 24 cooperates supportingly with an oval projection 25 on the base of an insert 26 of the toy that is moulded or otherwise formed to represent the seats and other parts of the car which the toy simulates. It is not necessary for the purposes of the present invention to described the insert 26 in detail. The strip 23 is formed symmetrically fore and aft of the aperture 24 with raised opposite end platforms 27 and lateral cutouts 28. The strip 23 can thus be fitted with either end at the front. The pins 8 lie between a pair of vertical plates 31 depending from the leading end platform 27 while a short guide rib 29 which serves the same purpose as the preivously described but longer guide rib 15 is disposed in the foremost cutout 28. A similar guide rib 32 abuts against the edge of the suspension strip 23 opposite the leading cutout 28. With the construction of FIGURES 4 and 5, the previously described block 13 is unnecessary since the lower surface of the leading platform 27 performs the same function.

In the use of the toy car, a central region of the strip 23 which includes the aperture 24 is maintained in contact with the chassis or base 2 by the dowel 30', the strip 23 and projection 25 cooperating with one another in such a way that the insert 26 cannot become displaced from the position thereof which is illustrated in the drawing to any appreciable extent. As previously mentioned, the strip 23 is of a resilient construction which is such that the part thereof between the platforms 27 tends to maintain a uniplanar configuration. The lowermost edges of the plates 31 bear against central regions of the front and rear axles -6 and 3 respectively and urge said axles towards the chassis or base 2. However, upon exerted manual pressure upon the toy in a downward direction, one or other or both of the axles 3 and 6 will be displaced upwardly in the slots 22 and/or 9 against the resilient opposition of the strip 23. A realistic resilient suspension etfect is thus achieved, the uppermost extremities of the slots 22 and 9 defining the furthest points to which the axles 3 and 6 can be deflected away from the chassis or base 2. The strip 23 cannot turn about the dowel 30 due to the provision of the guide ribs 29 and 32. It will be evident from the preceding description and from the drawing that the handle 18 can be employed in exactly the same way as described with reference to FIG- URES 1 to 3 to preselect the direction of steering of the toy car. It will be noted that the arched portion 12 of the adjusting means 11 is of sufiicient height to enable the region of the front axle 6 which is inserted therethrough to move vertically to the uppermost end of the corresponding slot 9. A block (not illustrated) projects downwardly from the insert 26 immediately to the rear of the operating portion 17 of the means 11 to prevent the insert from pressing on said portion 17 and to assist in preventing excessive rearward movement thereof. The block contacts the chassis or base 2.

Toys of the kind which have been described are intended principally for use by young children so that, in general, there is no disadvantage in the fact that the projecting handle 18 and primitive form of steering of the front wheels 7 detracts from the realistic appearance of the toy. The invention is applicable to toys having more than two wheel-carrying axles and other forms of adjusting means may be employed. For example, the handle 18 may be replaced to a finger wheel connected to a pinion whose teeth are adapted to move a rack that carries the arched portion 12 forwardly and rearwardly of the toy. However, the construction which has been described is preferred since it enables small-scale toys to be given preselectable steering in a manner acceptable to young chlidren without any great increase in the cost of production of such toys.

We claim:

1. A toy land vehicle having a chassis and at least two wheel-carrying axles supported in said chassis, one of said axles being angularly displaceable about a point located approximately centrally of its own length and in a plane extending substantially parallel to the general plane of the chassis, said toy vehicle comprising manually operable adjusting means engaging said one of the axles and being settable to determine the angular setting of said one axle about said point and thereby the angular setting of the wheels carried by said one axle relative to the remainder of the toy vehicle, said manually operable adjusting means comprising an arched portion engaging said one axle between said point and one of its ends, a connecting portion and an operating portion which has a handle projecting laterally of the toy vehicle, the operating portion including a downward projection of inverted T-shaped cross-section with an upright passing through a slot provided in said chassis and extending longitudinally of the chassis.

2. A toy vehicle as claimed in claim 1, wherein the manually operable adjusting means is formed in one piece from a synthetic plastic material.

3. A toy vehicle as claimed in claim 1, wherein the slot is defined in such a way that one end thereof is enlarged so that the cross-bar of said T-shaped projection can be initially entered therethrough.

4. A toy vehicle as claimed in claim 1, wherein said downward projection engages the slot frictionally in such a way that the manually operable adjusting means tends to remain in any setting dictated by prior manipulation of said handle.

5. A toy vehicle as claimed in claim 1, wherein said point is defined by two pins that are spaced apart from one another longitudinally of the toy vehicle by a distance a little in excess of the diameter of said one of the axles.

6. A toy vehicle as claimed in claim 1, including a resilient suspension between said axles and said chassis.

7. A toy vehicle as claimed in claim 6, wherein the suspension comprises a resilient strip that extends longitudinally of the toy vehicle.

8. A toy vehicle as claimed in claim 7, wherein the strip is symmetrical about a fixed midpoint thereof, each 5 6 end thereof having the form of a raised platform from 2,887,823 5/1959 Vaughan 46-201 which two vertical plates depend, and wherein the lower- 3,063,194 11/ 1962 Berguerand 46-201 most edges of one pair of said vertical plates contact said one axle at relatively opposite sides of said point. LOUIS MANCENE, Primary EXamiHel' References Cited 5 CHARLES R. WENTZEL, Assistant Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS U.S. C1. X.R.

2,260,679 10/1941 Neilson 46 221 46-221

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2260679 *Dec 9, 1940Oct 28, 1941Neilson Albert RSteering unit for toy trucks and cars
US2887823 *Sep 12, 1958May 26, 1959Vaughan Charles HSteering mechanism for toys
US3063194 *Oct 27, 1960Nov 13, 1962Mcccano LtdMiniature toy motor vehicles axle arrangement
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3603031 *Jan 19, 1970Sep 7, 1971Mettoy Co LtdToy or model vehicles
US3711989 *Oct 27, 1971Jan 23, 1973Ideal Toy CorpChassis assembly
US4411098 *Dec 11, 1981Oct 25, 1983John D. BirdsallToy vehicle
US6955580 *Oct 8, 2003Oct 18, 2005Osment Models, Inc.Weights for model and racing cars
US20050079788 *Oct 8, 2003Apr 14, 2005Fulton C. DwayneWeights for model and racing cars
US20110263181 *Oct 27, 2011Kreidler Bradley JWeight Receptacle System for Gravity-Driven Race Car
Classifications
U.S. Classification446/468
International ClassificationA63H17/26, A63H17/00, A63H17/36
Cooperative ClassificationA63H17/262, A63H17/00, A63H17/36
European ClassificationA63H17/00, A63H17/26B, A63H17/36