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Publication numberUS3464599 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 2, 1969
Filing dateJun 17, 1966
Priority dateSep 22, 1964
Also published asDE1561875A1
Publication numberUS 3464599 A, US 3464599A, US-A-3464599, US3464599 A, US3464599A
InventorsMeth Harry
Original AssigneeRainbow Crafts Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Spill-proof container
US 3464599 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 2, 369 H, T 3,464,599

S1 ILL-PROOF CONTAINER Filed June 17, 1966 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 WVENTOR.

HARRY METH ATTORNEYS Sept. 2, 1969 H. METH SPILL-PROOF CONTAINER 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed June 17, 1966 R H m T 6 E w m M H Y B e 6 6 FIG- Sept. 196% H; METH 3,464,599

SPILL-PROOF CONTAINER Filed June 17, 1966 4 Sheets-Sheet E INVENTOR. HARRY METH Sept. 2, 1969 H. METH 3,464,599

SPILL-4 11001 CONTAINER Filed June 17, 1966 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 INVENTOR.

HARRY METH FIG-l8 A ATTORNEYS United States 3,464,599 SPILL-ROOF CONTAINER Harry Meth, Cincinnati, Ohio, assiguor to Rainbow Crafts, Inc., Cincinnati, Ohio, a corporation of Delaware Continuation-impart of application Ser. No. 398,225, Sept. 22, 1964. This application June 17, 1966, Ser. No. 558,363

US. Cl. 222-589 Int. Cl. B431 23/02 29 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE This application is a continuation-in-part of my copending application, Ser. No. 398,225, filed Sept. 22, 1964, now abandoned.

This invention relates to a liquid container and, more particularly, to a liquid container that will not spill its contents when accidentally tilted or knocked over.

Various types of liquids, such as poster paint, ink, and the like are used by children for various purposes such as painting posters, lettering, etc. The present containers for poster paint, ink, and the like are subject to losing a part or all of the contents Whenever the container is tilted or knocked over by the user because the liquid may readily flow from the container.

As a result, the poster, which is being painted, for example, may be ruined by the paint from the container. Furthermore, the contents of th container or a portion thereof are lost when the container is tilted or knocked over.

The present invention satisfactorily solves the foregoing problems by providing a liquid container in which the contents are not spilled when the container is tilted or knocked over. The contents are only removable through the use of an exterior member such as a brush, pen, or the like depending on the contents of the container and its use.

An object of this invention is to provide a liquid container in which liquid may be easily removed therefrom by a brush or the like but remains therein when the container is accidentally tilted or knocked over.

Another object of this invention is to provide a liquid container for use by children without any accidental spilling of the liquid.

Other objects, uses, and advantages of this invention are apparent upon a reading of this description, which proceeds with reference to the drawings forming part thereof and wherein:

FIGURE 1 is a perspective view of one form of the container of the present invention.

FIGURE 2 is a vertical sectional view of the container of FIGURE 1 and taken along the line 22 of FIGURE 1.

FIGURE 3 is a vertical sectional view of the container of FIGURE 1 without the cover and disclosing a brush or the like removing liquid from the container.

FIGURE 4 is a vertical sectional view of another embodiment of the container of the present invention with the cover, partly in elevation, in spaced relation to the container.

FIGURE 5 is a vertical sectional view of the container of FIGURE 4 without the cover and showing a brush or the like removing liquid from the container.

FIGURE 6 is a vertical sectional view, partly in elevation, of a further modification of the container of the present invention with the cover in spaced relation to the container.

FIGURE 7 is a vertical sectional view of the container of FIGURE 6 without the cover and showing a brush or the like removing liquid from the container.

FIGURE 8 is a vertical sectional view of the container of FIGURE 6 in an inverted position without the cover.

FIGURE 9 is a vertical sectional view of still another form of the container of the present invention with the cover, partly in elevation, in spaced relation to the contamer.

FIGURE 10 is a vertical sectional view of the container of FIGURE 9 without the cover and showing a brush or the like removing liquid from the container.

FIGURE 11 is a still further embodiment of the container of the present invention.

FIGURE 12 is a vertical sectional view of the container of FIGURE 11 and taken along the line 1212 of FIGURE 11 with the cover, partly in elevation, in spaced relation to the container.

FIGURE 13 is a vertical sectional view of the container of FIGURE 11 without the cover and illustrating a brush or the like removing liquid from the container.

FIGURE 14 is a vertical sectional view, partly in elevation, of yet another embodiment of the container of the present invention with the cover in spaced relation to the container.

FIGURE 15 is a vertical sectional view of the container of FIGURE 14 with the cover shown partly in elevation and illustrating details of the container with one. of the passages between a cap and the bottom wall of the container being shown.

FIGURE 16 is an enlarged, fragmentary vertical sectional view, partly in elevation, of a portion of FIGURE l5.

.FIGURE 17 is a top plan view of a portion of the container of FIGURE 15 and taken along the line 17-17 of FIGURE 15.

FIGURE 18 is a perspective view of the cap used in the modification of FIGURES 14 to 18.

Referring to the drawings and particularly FIGURES 1 to 3, there is shown a liquid container 10 having a conical outer wall 12. A slanting top wall 14 is preferably formed integral with the outer wall 12 and terminates in a downwardly depending annular lip or flange 16. A hollow cylindrical wall 18, which surrounds the lip or flange 16, extends downwardly from the top wall 14.

The bottom or lower end of the inner wall 18 terminates a slight distance from the top of a circular bottom wall 20. A circular ring 20 is provided on/or integral with the bottom 29 and surrounds the lower end of the wall 18 as seen in FIGS. 2 and 3. The bottom wall 20 also has an annular depending shoulder 22, which is substantially perpendicular to the bottom wall 20. An annular flange or lip 24 extend substantially perpendicular from the shoulder 22 to support the bottom end of the outer wall 12. The lowermost portion of the bottom wall 12 is contiguous to the shoulder 22 (see FIGURE 2).

A compartment 26 is formed within the container 19 by the outer wall 12, the top wall 14, the inner wall 18, and the bottom wall 20. The inner wall 18 forms a chamber 28 therein with its lower end communicating with the lower portion of the compartment 26, which surrounds the chamber 28, through the spacing between the lower end of the inner wall 18 and the top of the bottom wall 20 to provide the only outlet for the compartment 26. The upper end of the chamber 28 communicates with the atmosphere through the opening formed by the lip or flange 16 of the top wall 14.

The top of the outer Wall 12 terminates in an annular flange or lip 30, which receives a. circular cover 32 having an annular depending shoulder 34. The shoulder 34 fits around the outside of the lip 30 of the outer wall 12 when the inner surface of the cover 32 rests on the top of the lip 30. Thus, the cover 32 closes the opening of the chamber 28 to the atmosphere.

In order to fill the container with liquid such as poster paint or ink, for example, the bot-tom wall is not secured to the outer wall 12 until the compartment 26 is filled with liquid when the container 10 is in an inverted position. When the compartment 26 of the container 10 has been filled with liquid, the bottom wall 20 is sealed to the outer wall 12 by suitable means to prevent any leakage of liquid from the container 10.

It should be understood that the container 10 may be formed of any suitable transparent or opaque material such as glass or plastic, for example. The bottom wall 20 may be formed of a flexible material to permit movement thereof to obtain more liquid from the compartment 26. The bottom wall 20 may be rigid and the device will still function; however, liquid will flow more slowly.

With the compartment 26 filled with liquid, atmospheric pressure in the chamber 28 is sufiicient to hold the liquid within the compartment 26 because of the very slight dis tance between the bottom of the inner wall 18 and the ring 20' on the bottom wall 20. Therefore, if the container 10 should be accidentally tilted or knocked over, liquid in the compartment 26 will not flow therefrom but remains therein because of atmospheric pressure in the chamber 28 acting on the small area of the outlet from the compartment 26 to the chamber 28.

The lip 16 cooperates with the inner wall 18 to form a trough 36 therebetween when the container 10 is inverted. If any liquid should be in the chamber 28 at this time, it will collect within the trough 36 rather than flow out of the chamber 28.

However, the chamber 28 is normally void of any liquid unless the bottom wall 20 is moved downwardly by a suitable tool such as a brush 38 (see FIGURE 3) if the liquid in the compartment 26 is poster paint, for example. If the liquid in the compartment 26 is ink, for example, a pen may be employed instead of the brush 38.

When the bottom wall 20 is moved downwardly by the brush 38, the distance between the bottom of the inner Wall 18 and the ring 20' on the bottom wall 20 increases sufiiciently to permit liquid to flow from the compartment 26 into the chamber 28. Of course, most of the liquid remains between the bottom of the inner wall 18 and the top of the bottom wall 20 so that it is collected by the brush 38.

When the brush 38 is removed from engagement with the bottom wall 20, the flexible bottom wall 20 returns to its rest position in which the ring 20 is only slightly spaced from the bottom of the inner wall 18. At this time, atmospheric pressure in the chamber 28 is suflicient to maintain the liquid within the compartment 26 because of the small area of the outlet from the compartment 26.

If any liquid remains in the chamber 28 after the bottom wall 20 returns to its normal rest position when the brush 38 is released, it remains therein until the brush 38 is again inserted. If the container 10 should tilt or turn over with this small quantity of liquid in the chamber 28, the liquid will be captured within the trough 36 to prevent it from being spilled from the container 10.

Referring to FIGURES 4 and 5, there is shown a container 40 having a conical outer wall 42 and a slanting top wall 44, which is preferably integral with the outer wall 42. The top wall 44 terminates in a hollow cylindrical inner wall 46, which extends downwardly from the wall 44. The bottom of the inner wall 46 is curved and completely enclosed except for a small aperture or opening 48 at its lowermost portion.

A circular bottom wall 50 cooperates with the outer wall 42, the top wall 44 and the inner wall 46 to form a compartment 52 therebetween. Liquid is supplied to the compartment 52 in the same manner as it is supplied to the compartment 26 of the container 10.

Furthermore, the bottom wall 50 is sealed to the outer wall 42 in the same manner as described with respect to the container 10. However, the bottom 50 need not be flexible as the bottom wall 20 of the container 10 so that the bottom wall 50 may be made of the same material as the remainder of the container 40.

A circular cover 54, which has annular depending shoulder 56, cooperates with an annular lip or flange 58 at the top of the outer wall 42 in the same manner as the cover 32 does to close the container 10.

The inner wall 46 forms a chamber 60, which is surrounded by the compartment 52 and connected therewith through the aperture or opening 48 in the bottom of the chamber 60 to provide the only outlet of the compartment 52. The Spacing between the bottom of the chamber 60 and the bottom wall 50 is not critical as in the container 10 since the liquid in the compartment 52 is held therein by atmospheric pressure acting on the liquid in the compartment 52 through the aperture or opening 48.

The area of the aperture or opening 48 is substantially the same as the area between the bottom of the inner wall 18 and the top of the bottom wall 20 of the container 10. The area of the aperture or opening 48 is very small in comparison with the chamber 60.

When it is desired to remove liquid from the compartment 52 of the container 40, the brush 38 is inserted through the aperture or opening 48 into the compartment 52 (see FIGURE 5). This breaks the surface tension of the liquid in the compartment 52 so that the liquid in the compartment 52 seeps through the aperture or opening 48 onto the bristles of the brush 38. If the liquid were ink, for example, then a pen would be the suitable tool to produce the same result.

If the container 40 is tilted or knocked over, atmospheric pressure within the chamber 60 is sufficient to maintain the liquid within the compartment 52 by acting through the opening 48. Furthermore, a trough it not required in the container 40 because liquid will not collect in the chamber 60 in the same manner as it does in the chamber 28 of the container 10 since there is no movement of the bottom wall 50. When liquid passes through the aperture or opening 48, it collects on the brush 38 because of the small size of the opening 48.

Referring to FIGURES 6 to 8, there is shown a container 62 having a conical outer wall 64 and a slanting top wall 66, which is preferably integral with the outer wall 64. The inner end of the top wall 66 terminates in a downwardly extending hollow cylindrical inner wall 68.

A circular bottom wall 70 cooperates with the outer wall 64, the top wall 66, and the inner wall 68 to form a compartment 72 therebetween to store liquid therein. Liquid is supplied to the compartment 72 of the container 62 in the same manner a liquid is furnished to the compartments 26 of the container 10. Thereafter, the bottom wall 70 is sealed to the outer wall 64 to prevent liquid leakage from the compartment 72 in the same manner as the bottom wall 20 is sealed to the outer wall 12 of the container 10. Since the bottom wall 70 need not be flexible it may be made of the same material as the rest of the container 62.

The bottom wall 70 has a curved recess or receptacle 74 in its center portion to support a spherical member such as ball 76. The ball 76 is disposed within the interior of the lower end of the inner wall 68 for cooperation with the inner surface of the lower end of the inner wall 68 to form an annular opening or passage 78 therebetween.

An annular member 80 extends across the lower portion of the inner wall 68 to limit movement of the ball 76 away from the recess 74 of the bottom wall 70 when the container 62 is tilted or knocked over. The member 80 has an opening or aperture 82 therein through which the upper portion of the ball 76 protrudes. When the ball 76 is resting in the recess 74, there is a space between the wall of the opening 82 and the ball 76 to provide an outlet from the compartment 72 to a chamber 84, which is formed within the inner wall 68 above the member 80 and is surrounded by the compartment 72.

A circular cover 86, which has an annular depending shoulder 88, cooperates with a flange or lip 90 at the top of the outer wall 64 of the container 62 to close the container 62. The cover 86 is held in position on the container 62 in the same manner as the cover 32 is retained on the container 10.

With the container 62 in its upright position, liquid may be removed from the compartment 72 by inserting the brush 38 through the outlet, formed between the ball 76 and the wall of the opening 82 (see FIGURE 7). When the brush 38 enters the compartment 72, it breaks the surface tension of the liquid therein to pick up the liquid. It should be understood that the ball 76 need not rotate when contacted by the brush 38 for the device to function.

If the container 62 is tilted or knocked over the ball 76 moves away from the curved recess 74 to close the opening 82 in the member 80. This prevents escape of liquid from the compartment 72 into the chamber 84. The position of the ball 76 when the container 62 is in its inverted position is shown in FIGURE 8.

The upper end of the chamber 84 in the container 62 communicates with the atmosphere in the same way as the chamber 28. A trough, which was required in the container 10, is not needed with the container 62 because the liquid from the compartment 72 does not enter the chamber 84 when the brush 38 is inserted in the same manner as it does in the container 10. Accordingly, the chamber 84 remains void of liquid at all times.

Referring to FIGURES 9 and 10, there is shown a container 92 having a conical outer wall 94, which is preferably formed integral with a slanting top wall 96. The inner end of the top wall 96 terminates in a downwardly extending hollow cylindrical inner wall 98, which forms a chamber 100 therein.

A circular bottom wall 102 cooperates with the outer wall 94, the top wall 96, and the inner wall 98 to form a compartment 104 therebetween for liquid such as poster paint, for example. The bottom wall 102, which need not be flexible as is the bottom wall 20 of the container 10, may be made of the same material as the rest of the container 92.

Liquid is supplied to the compartment 104 in the same manner as it is furnished to the compartment 26 of the container 10. To prevent liquid leakage from the compartment 104, the bottom wall 102 is sealed to the outer wall 94 in the same manner as the bottom wall 20 is sealed to the outer wall 12 of the container 10.

The bottom of the inner wall 98 is spaced from the top of the bottom wall 102 to provide an outlet from the compartment 104 to the chamber 100, which is surrounded by the compartment 104, at the lower end of the chamber 11. The upper end of the chamber 100 communicates with the atmosphere.

A circular movable member 106 cooperates with the bottom of the inner wall 98 to close the lower end of the chamber 100 to prevent the flow of liquid from the compartment 104 to the chamber 100. The top surface of the movable member 106 is slanted around its edge to cooperate with the slanting edge at the bottom of the inner wall 98.

The movable member 106 is biased into engagement with the lower end of the inner wall 98 by suitable means such as coil spring 108. The spring 108 is disposed within an annular depending flange 110 of the member 106 and has its lower end resting on a dished circular center por- 6 tion 112 of the bottom wall 102. The dished center porton 112 also receives the depending flange 110 of the movable member 106 to act as a guide therefor.

A circular cover 114, which has an annular depending shoulder 116, cooperates with an annular lip 118 at the upper end of the outer wall 94 to close the container 92. The cover 114 is held in position on the container 92 in the same manner as the cover 32 is retained on the container 10.

When the container 92 is in its normal position, the spring 108 holds the movable member 106 in engagement with the bottom end of the inner wall 98 to prevent flow of liquid from the compartment 104 to the chamber 100 through the only outlet of the compartment 104. When the brush 38 is pushed downwardly against the movable member 106, it overcomes the force of the spring 108 (see FIGURE 10) to permit flow of liquid from the compartment 104 to the chamber 100. The downward movement of the movable member 106 is limited by engagement of the bottom of its surface with the top of the bottom wall 102 and by engagement of the bottom of the flange 110 with the top surface of the dished center portion 112.

When the brush 38 is removed from contact with the movable member 106, the spring 108 returns the movable member 106 to its normally closed position whereby further flow of liquid from the compartment 104 to the chamber 100 is prevented. If the container 92 should he accidentally tilted or knocked over, the movable member 106 remains in its normally closed position wherein it closes the outlet of the compartment 104 so that no liquid is spilled from the compartment 104 when the container 92 is tilted or knocked over.

Referring to FIGURES 11 to 13, there is shown a container having a conical outer wall 122 and a slanting top wall 124, which is preferaby integral with the outer wall 122. The top wall 124 terminates in an annular downwardly depending lip or flange 126. A hollow cylindrical inner wall 128, which is preferably integral with the top wall 124, also extends downwardly from the top wall 124 between the lip 126 and the outer wall 122. The lip 126 and the inner wall 128 cooperate to form a trough 130 therebetween.

A circular bottom wall 132 cooperates with the outer wall 122, the top wall 124; and the inner wall 128 to form a compartment 134 therebetween. The inner wall 128 forms a chamber 136, which communicates at its lower end with the lower portion of the compartment 134 and with the atmosphere through the opening formed by the lip 126.

The bottom wall 132 has a circular dished center portion 138, which has its top surface spaced from the bottom of the inner wall 128 (see FIGURE 12). The edges of the bottom wall 132 adjacent the outer surface of the inner wall 128 cooperate therewith to prevent communication from the compartment 134 to the chamber 136, which is surrounded by the compartment 134.

The bottom wall 132 must be made of a flexible material while the remainder of the container 120 may be made of other material such as glass, for example. The outer wall 122 and the bottom wall 132 should fit together in manner to retain liquid in the compartment 134. Accordingly, the outer wall 122 terminates in a pair of spaced downwardly depending annular flanges and 142 with a groove 144 formed therebetween. The bottom wall 132 has an upstanding annular flange 146, which is disposed within the groove 144. The upstanding flange 146 is spaced from the end of the bottom wall 132 to form a groove 148 therebetween for receipt of the inner flange 142 of the outer wall 122.

It should be understood that the bottom Wall 132 is not placed in sealing relation with the outer wall 122 of the container 120 until the compartment 134 is filled with liquid. The filling of the compartment 134 must be done with the container 120 in an inverted position in the same manner as the compartment 26 of the container is supplied.

A circular cover 150, which has an annular depending shoulder 152, cooperates with an annular flange or lip 154 at the top of the outer wall of the container 120 to close the upper end of the container 120. The cover 150 is retained on the container 120 in the same manner as the cover 32 is held in position on the container 10.

When the bottom wall 132 is in its normal position, there is no communication from the compartment 134 to the chamber 136 because of the cooperation between the bottom wall 132 and the inner wall 128 blocking the only outlet of the compartment 134. However, when the brush 38 is inserted into the container 120 and acts on the dished center portion 138 of the bottom wall 132, the bottom wall 132 is moved to permit liquid to flow from the compartment 134 into the chamber 136.

When the bottom Wall 132 is moved downwardly by the brush 38 to allow fiow of liquid from the compartment 134, the liquid is picked up by the bristles of the brush 38. When the brush 38 is removed from the chamber 136, the bottom wall 132 returns to the position in which the outlet of the compartment 134 to the chamber 136 is closed by the bottom wall 132.

Some liquid may remain in the chamber 136, which is normally void of liquid, when the brush 38 is removed therefrom. If this occurs and the container 120 is tilted or knocked over, the liquid will be trapped in the trough 130 to prevent it from leaving the chamber 136. Of course, no additional liquid can flow from the compartment 134 into the chamber 136 when the container 120 is tilted or knocked over because of the cooperation between the bottom wall 132 and the inner wall 128.

Referring to FIGURES 14 to 18, there is shown a container 156 having a conical outer wall 158 and a slanting top wall 160, which is preferably integral with the outer wall 158. The top wall 160 terminates in an annular downwardly depending lip or fiange 162. A cap 161 forms a temporary seal for the member 162 and is easily pushed out of the way, into the dotted line position, with a paint brush prior to the first use of the device. A hollow cylindrical inner wall 164, which is preferably integral with the top wall 160, also extends downwardly from the top wall 160 between the lip 162 and the outer wall 158. The lip 162 and the inner wall 164 cooperate to form a trough 166 therebetween.

A circular bottom wall 168 cooperates with the outer wall 158, the top wall 160, and the inner wall 164 to form a compartment 170 therebetween. The inner wall 164 forms a chamber 172, which communicates at its lower end with the lower portion of the compartment 170 and with the atmosphere through the opening formed by the lip 162.

A cap 174 is slidably mounted on the lower portion of the inner wall 164 and rests on the upper surface of the bottom wall 168. The cap 174 cooperates with lower edge 176 of the inner wall 164 to prevent communication from the compartment 170 to the chamber 172, which is surrounded by the compartment 170.

The cap 174 includes a base portion 178, which has its upper surface engaging the lower edge 176 of the inner wall 164. The bottom surface of the base 178 of the cap 174 rests on ribs 180 (see FIGURE 17), which form substantially parallel passages 182 therein. The ribs 180 are flush with the rest of the upper surface of the bottom wall 168.

As shown in FIGURES and 16, the lower edge 176 of the inner wall 164 is tapered to a point. Thus, an annular line of contact is provided between the upper surface of the base 178 of the cap 174 and the lower edge 176 of the inner wall 164 to form a seal therebetween when there is contact therebetween.

A rim 184 extends upwardly from the peripheral edge of the base portion 178 of the cap 174 for cooperation with the outer surface of the inner Wall 164. The distance of the extension of the rim 184 from the base portion 178 is slightly greater than the tapered portion of the inner wall 164.

As clearly shown in FIGURE 16, both the inner and outer surfaces of the inner wall 164 are cut away before the tapering which forms the lower edge 176, begins. Accordingly, a slight downward movement of the cap 174 not only breaks the seal between the tapered edge 176 of the inner wall 164 but also allows liquid to flow between the rim 184 and the inner wall 164 due to the inner wall 164 being cut away before tapering begins.

A plurality of tabs 186 extends upwardly from the rim 184 for cooperation with the outer surface of the inner wall 164 to guide the cap 174 during its sliding movement on the inner wall 164. Each of the tabs 186 extends a substantially greater distance than the rim 184 from the cap 174.

An annular ridge or ring 188 is formed on the upper surface of the base portion 178 of the cap 174 to prevent the bristles of the bush 38 from entering between the upper surface of the base portion 178 and the tapered lower edge 176 of the inner wall 164 when the cap 174 is moved downwardly. Otherwise, the bristles of the brush 38 might be trapped between the tapered edge 176 and the upper surface of the base portion 178 of the cap 174 when downward pressure on the cap 174 by the brush 38 is released.

The bottom wall 168 of the container 156 must be made of a flexible material in order that the bottom wall 168 will resiliently urge the upper surface of the base portion 178 of the cap 174 into sealing engagement with the tapered edge 176 of the inner wall 164. One suitable example of the material of the bottom wall 168 is a high impact styrene. The remainder of the container may be formed of any other suitable material such as clear styrene.

The outer wall 158 and the bottom wall 168 should fit together in a manner to retain liquid in the compartment 170. The arrangement preferably is the same as shown in the modification of FIGURES 11 to 13.

It should be understood that the bottom wall 168 is not placed in sealing relation with the outer wall 158 of the container 156 until the compartment must be done with the container 156 in an inverted position in the same manner as the compartment 26 of the container 10 is supplied.

Since a sealing relation is provided between the bottom wall 168 and the outer wall 158 of the container 156, the cap 174 must be formed of a material, which cannot be accidentally sealed to the bottom wall 168 through inadvertence. One suitable example of the material of the cap 174 is polyethylene, which is capable of being sealed only by heat. Thus, the cap 174 cannot be sealed inadvertently to the bottom wall 168 by a solvent, which is used to seal the bottom wall 168 to the outer wall 158 of the container 156.

A circular cover 190, which has an annular depending shoulder 192, cooperates with an annular flange or lip 194 at the top of the outer wall 158 of the container 156 to close the upper end of the container 156. The cover 190 is retained on the container 156 in the same manner as the cover 32 is held in position on the container 10.

When the bottom wall 168 is in its normal position, there is no communication from the compartment 170 to the chamber 172 because of the cooperation between the upper surface of the base portion 178 of the cap 174 and the tapered edge 176 of the inner wall 164 blocking the only outlet of the compartment 170. However, when a tool such as a brush 38 is inserted into the container 156 and acts on the cap 174, the bottom wall 168 and the cap 174 are moved downwardly to permit liquid to flow from the compartment 170 into the chamber 172.

When the bottom wall 168 is moved downwardly by a tool such as the brush 38 to allow flow of liquid from the compartment 170, the liquid is picked up by the bristles of the brush. As previously mentioned, the ridge 188 prevents the bristles from being disposed between the tapered lower edge 176 of the inner wall 164 and the base portion 178 of the cap 174. Thus, when the brush 38 is removed from the chamber 172, the bristles are not trapped. Furthermore, removal of the brush 38 from contact with the cap 174 results in the bottom wall 168 returning to the position in which the outlet of the compartment 170 to the chamber 172 is closed by the cap 174.

Some liquid may remain in the chamber 172, which is normally void of liquid, when the brush 38 is removed therefrom. If this occurs and the container 156 is tilted or knocked over, the liquid will be trapped in the trough 166 to prevent it from leaving the chamber 172. Of course, no additional liquid can flow from the compartment 170 into the chamber 172 when the container 156 is tilted or knocked over because of the Sealing relation between the base portion 178 of the cap 174 and the tapered edge 176 of the inner wall 164.

When the compartment 170 is filled with liquid, air is trapped within the compartment 170 when the bottom wall 168 is sealed to the outer wall 158. If filling of the compartment 170 occurs in an area having a high density of air in comparison with a mountainous area, for example, where the density of the air is relatively low and the container 156 is then transported to a mountainous area having the relatively low density of air, the relatively higher pressure Within the compartment 170 would tend to urge the bottom wall 168 downwardly. With the bottom wall 168 no longer capable of supporting the cap 174, the low atmospheric pressure would move the cap 174 downwardly to allow liquid to flow from the compartment 170.

However, when the pressure within the compartment 170 exceeds atmospheric pressure so as to move the bottom wall 168 downwardly, liquid within the compartment 170 will flow into the passages 182 in the upper surface of the bottom wall 168. The pressure of this liquid within the passages 182 is suflicient to maintain the cap 174 in sealing engagement with the tapered edge 176 of the inner wall 164 whereby the outlet of the compartment 170 remains closed. At the same time, if a tool such as the brush 38 is inserted into the container 156 and acts on the cap 174, there still would be downward movement of both the cap 174 and the bottom wall 168 to permit liquid to flow from the compartment 170 into the chamber 172.

Thus, the modification of FIGURES 14 to 18 utilizes the bottom wall 168 to normally maintain the movable cap 174 with its base portion 178 in sealing engagement with the annular tapered edge 176 of the inner wall 164 to close the outlet of the compartment 170. However, if the container 156 is transported to an area having a relatively low air density, then the liquid will flow from the compartment 170 into the passages 182 in the upper surfaces of the bottom wall 168. Accordingly, the modification of FIGURES 14 to 18 insures that there is movement of the cap 174 to permit flow of liquid from the compartment 170 into the chamber 172 only when the cap 174 is positively moved downwardly by a tool such as the brush 38.

While the passages 182 have been shown as being formed in the upper surface of the bottom wall 168, it should be understood that the passages could be formed in the bottom surface of the base portion 178 of the cap 174. Furthermore, and other suitable means, which will permit liquid to flow from the compartment 170 into the contact area between the base portion 178 of the cap 174 and the upper surface of the bottom wall 168 may be utilized. Of course, it is necessary that such means permit the liquid to easily and quickly flow across the entire contact surface between the base portion 178 of the cap 174 and the upper surface of the bottom wall 168 to provide the desired pressure on the cap 174.

It should be understood that the passages 182 preferably have a very slight depth such as .005 inch, for example, in order to provide more compression from the bottom wall 168 on the cap 174 to hold it in sealing or closing position. This small depth of the passages 182 permits the cap 174 to separate from the bottom wall 168 and also allows the liquid therein to function as a lubricant.

As long as atmospheric pressure exceeds the pressure within the compartment 170, no liquid will flow into the passages 182. This is because of the normally tight engagement between the upper surface of the bottom wall 168 and the bottom surface of the base portion 178 of the cap 174. It should be understood that the formation of the passages 182 in the upper surface of the bottom wall 168 provides a rough surface cooperating with a smooth surface, which is the bottom surface of the base portion 178 of the cap 174. This causes the cap 174 and the bottom wall 168 to adhere to each other except when the bottom wall 168 moves downwardly due to the low atmospheric pressure. When this occurs, the liquid rapidly flows into the passages 182 to support the cap 174 to block the outlet of the compartment 170 and to separate the cap 174 from the bottom wall 168.

While the present invention has been described with respect to a conical outer wall and a generally circular arrangement of the other parts, it should be understood that the container may have any desired polygonal shape. If desired, the sealing arrangement between the outer wall 122 and the bottom wall 132 of the container may be employed with the container 10, 40, 62, or 92 and vice versa.

An advantage of this invention is that it prevents spilling of liquid from a liquid container when the container is overturned. Another advantage of this invention is that it permits full utilization of the liquid contents of the container without any loss by spilling or drying out.

For purposes of exemplification, particular embodiments of the invention have been shown and described according to the best present understanding thereof. However, it will be apparent that changes and modifications in the arrangement and construction of the parts thereof may be resorted to without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention.

The embodiments of the invention in which an exclusive property or privilege is claimed are defined as follows:

1. A container comprising an outer wall; an inner wall spaced from said outer Wall and surrounded by said outer wall; a bottom wall; a top wall; said outer wall, said inner wall, said bottom wall, and said top wall cooperating to form a compartment therebetween for liquid; the bottom of said inner wall being disposed in spaced relation to said bottom wall; said inner wall having a chamber therein; one end of said chamber communicating with the bottom portion of said compartment to provide the only outlet for said compartment and the other end of said chamber communicating with the atmosphere; said chamber normally being void of liquid; the bottom of said inner wall being spaced from said bottom wall a slight distance whereby atmospheric pressure in said chamber normally prevents flow of liquid from said compartment of said chamber; and said bottom Wall being resilient for movement to increase its distance from the bottom of said inner wall to allow flow of liquid from said compartment to said chamber.

2. A container comprising an outer wall; an inner wall spaced from said outer wall and surrounded by said outer wall; a bottom wall; a top wall; said outer wall, said inner wall, said bottom wall, and said top wall cooperating to form a compartment therebetween for liquid; the bottom of said inner wall being disposed in spaced relation to said bottom wall; said inner wall having a chamber therein; one end of said chamber communicating with the bottom portion of said compartment to provide the only outlet for said compartment and the other end of said chamber communicating with the atmosphere; said chamber normally being void of liquid; a spherical member resting on said bottom wall when said container is in its normal position; means extending across said one end of said chamber for limiting movement of said spherical member from said bottom wall when said container is displaced from its normal position; said extending means having an opening therein to form said outlet to permit communication from said compartment to said chamber; and said spherical member closing said opening in said extending means when said container is displaced from its normal position to prevent flow of liquid from said compartment to said chamber.

3. A container comprising an outer wall; an inner wall spaced from said outer wall and surrounded by said outer wall; a bottom wall; a top wall; said outer wall, said inner wall, said bottom wall, and said top wall cooperating to form a compartment therebetween for liquid; the bottom of said inner wall being disposed in spaced relation to said bottom wall; said inner wall having a chamber therein; one end of said chamber communicating with the bottom portion of said compartment to provide the only outlet for said compartment and the other end of said chamber communicating with the atmosphere; said chamber normally being void of liquid; said bottom wall being flexible and having a dished center portion spaced from the bottom of said inner wall; and the portions of said bottom wall adjacent said dished center portion contacting the outer surface of said inner wall to prevent flow of liquid from said compartment to said chamber when said bottom wall is in its rest position.

4. Apparatus as defined in claim 3 wherein the bottom of said outer wall terminates in a pa'u of spaced depending flanges forming a groove therebetween, said bottom wall has an upstanding flange for disposition in said groove, and said upstanding flange cooperates with a spaced portion of said bottom wall to form a groove for the inner of said flanges of said outer wall to seal said outer wall and said bottom wall together.

5. A container having a compartment therein for storing liquid and means defining a chamber having two ends within said container surrounded by said compartment, said chamber being in communication with the atmosphere at one end thereof and with the bottom portion of said compartment at its other end thereof, said chamber being normally void of liquid, said other end of said chamber being closed except for an outlet, said container including a member having an opening therethrough defining said outlet, said container including a bottom wall having a recess formed therein, a substantially spherical member disposed within said recess and having a portion thereof normally spaced from said member, said spherical member being adapted to engage said member and close off said outlet when the container is inverted.

6. Apparatus as defined in claim 5 wherein said substantially spherical member comprises a ball loosely received within said recess and adapted to move into said opening when the container is inverted to prevent the escape of liquid from the container.

7. Apparatus as defined in claim 5 wherein said container includes an inner wall defining said chamber therewithin, said spherical member comprising a ball which when resting in said recess extends partly within said inner wall, an annular member extending across the lower portion of said inner wall to limit movement of the ball away from said recess when the container is tilted, said annular member defining an aperture therein through which the upper portion of the ball protrudes.

8. A container having a compartment therein for storing liquid and means defining a stationary chamber within said container surrounded by said compartment,

said chamber being in communication with the atmosphere at one end thereof and with the bottom portion of said compartment at its other end to provide the only outlet for said compartment, said chamber being normally void of liquid, said other end of said chamber being closed except for said outlet, said outlet being defined between a first portion of said container and a second portion of said container, a movable member adapted to engage said second portion for preventing communication between said chamber and said compartment, guide means for guiding movement of said movable member into and out of engagement with said second portion, and means normally maintaining said movable member in engagement with said second portion.

9. Apparatus as defined in claim 8 wherein said normal maintaining means is resilient.

10. A container comprising an outer wall; an inner wall spaced from said outer wall and surrounded by said .outer wall; a bottom wall, a top Well; said outer wall,

said inner wall, said bottom wall, and said top wall cooperating to form a compartment therebetween for liquid; the bottom of said inner wall being disposed in spaced relation to said bottom wall; said inner wall having a chamber therein; one end of said chamber communicating with the bottom portion of said compartment to provide the only outlet for said compartment and the other end of said chamber communicating with the atmosphere; said chamber normally being void of liquid; means slidably mounted on the lower portion of said inner wall for cooperating with the lower edge of said inner wall to close said outlet when in contact with the lower edge of said inner wall; said bottom wall contacting said slidably mounted means to normally maintain said slidably mounted means in contact with the lower edge of said inner wall; and means in one of the adjacent surfaces of said bottom wall and said slidably mounted means to allow liquid within said compartment to flow therebetween to maintain said slidably mounted means in contact with the lower end of said inner wall when the pressure in said compartment exceeds atmospheric pressure.

11. Apparatus as defined in claim 10 wherein said slidably mounted means includes a cap having a surface in contact with the lower edge of said inner wall, and guide means extending from the peripheral edge of said inner wall contacting surface of said cap for sliding engagement with the outer surface of said inner well.

12. Apparatus as defined in claim 11 wherein the lower edge of said inner wall is tapered to a point for sealing contact with said cap.

13. Apparatus as defined in claim 12 wherein said inner wall contacting surface of said cap has a continuous ridge formed therein of a size for disposition within said inner wall when said cap contacts the lower edge of said inner wall, said ridge extending for a greater distance from said inner wall contacting surface of said cap then the distance of the tapered portion of said inner wall.

14. Apparatus as defined in claim 12 wherein a rim extends from the peripheral edge of said inner wall contacting surface of said cap to contact the outer surface of said inner wall, said rim extending from said inner wall contacting surface of said cap for a lesser distance than said ridge but for a greater distance than the distance of the tapered portion of said inner wall, and said guide means comprising a plurality of spaced tabs extending from said rim for a substantially greater distance than said ridge extends from said inner wall contacting surface of said cap to guide said cap in its sliding movement on said inner wall.

15. A spill-proof container comprising a generally frusto-conical outer wall, a top wall extending inwardly from the top portion of said outer wall, said top wall sloping downwardly toward the center of said container, an inner wall extending downwardly from the central portion of said top wall and defining a chamber therewithin, said container including a bottom wall removable from said outer wall for filling the container and engageable with said outer wall to provide a liquid-tight seal therewith when in operative position, said outer wall, said top wall, said inner Wall and said bottom wall defining therebetween an annular compartment surrounding said chamber, means for providing communication between said compartment and said chamber, means for normally preventing flow of liquid from said compartment to said chamber, said chamber opening in an upward direction whereby suitable means may be inserted downwardly into said chamber.

16. Apparatus as defined in claim 15 wherein the top of said outer wall terminates in an annular flange, a cover member including an annular depending shoulder adapted to fit around the outside of said flange when the inner surface of the cover rests on the top of said flange to close off said chamber from the atmosphere.

17. Apparatus as defined in claim 15 wherein said normal flow preventing means comprises a cap slidably mounted on the lower portion of said inner wall, said cap having a portion normally maintained in contact with the lower end of said inner wall by said bottom wall, and means in one of the adjacent surfaces of said cap and said cap and said bottom wall to allow liquid within said compartment to flow therebetween to maintain said cap in contact with the lower end of said inner wall when the pressure within said compartment exceeds atmospheric pressure.

18. Apparatus as defined in claim 17 wherein the lower edge of said inner wall is tapered to a point for sealing contact with said cap.

19. Apparatus as defined in claim 18 wherein the surface of said cap in contact with the lower edge of said inner wall has a continuous ridge formed therein of a size for disposition within said inner wall when said cap contacts the lower edge of said inner wall, said ridge extending a greater distance from said inner wall contacting surface of said cap than the distance of the tapered portion of said inner Wall.

20. Apparatus as defined in claim 19 wherein a rim extends from the peripheral edge of said inner wall con tacting surface of said cap to contact the outer surface of said inner wall, said rim extending ,from said inner wall contacting surface of said cap for a lesser distance than said ridge but for a greater distance than the distance of the tapered portion of said inner wall, and a plurality of spaced tabs extending from said rim for a substantially greater distance than said ridge extends from said inner wall contacting surface of said cap to guide said cap in its sliding movement on said inner wall.

21. Apparatus as defined in claim 17 wherein said liquid flow means in the surface of one of cap and said bottom wall comprises a plurality of substantially parallel passages formed in the surface of said bottom wall, said passages being disposed only in the area contacting said cap.

22. A container comprising an outer wall; and inner wall spaced from said outer wall and surrounded by said outer wall; a bottom wall; a top wall; said outer wall, said inner wall, said bottom wall, and said top wall cooperating to form a compartment therebetween for liquid; the bottom of said inner wall being disposed in spaced relation to said bottom wall; said inner wall having a chamber therein; one end of said chamber communicating with the bottom portion of said compartment to provide the only outlet for said compartment and the other end of said chamber communicating with the atmosphere; said chamber normally being void of liquid; the bottom of said inner wall being spaced from said bottom wall a slight distance whereby atmospheric pressure in said chamber normally prevents flow of liquid from said compartment of said chamber, and said bottom wall being resilient for movement to increase its distance from the bottom of said inner wall to allow flow of liquid from said compartment to said chamber, and said top of said inner wall having a lip extending into said chamber for cooperation with said inner wall to form a trough when said container is inverted.

23. A container having a compartment therein for storing liquid and means defining a chamber Within said container surrounded by said compartment, said chamber being in communication with the atmosphere at one end thereof and with the bottom portion of said compartment at its other end to provide the only outlet between said chamber and said compartment, said chamber being normally void of liquid, said other end of said chamber being closed except for said outlet, said outlet being completely free and unobstructed and providing continuous communication between said compartment and said chamber, said outlet being of very small area in comparison with the area of said chamber whereby atmospheric pressure in said chamber and the surface tension of the liquid normally provide the only means for preventing flow of liquid from said compartment to said chamber, and said container including a wall portion having a lip extending into said chamber so as to form a trough when said container is inverted to prevent liquid which may be dis posed within said chamber from spilling out of said container.

24. A container having a compartment therein for storing liquid and means defining a chamber within said container surrounded by said compartment, said chamber being in communication with the atmosphere at one end thereof and with the bottom portion of said compartment at its other end to provide the only outlet between said chamber and said compartment, said chamber being normally void of liquid, said other end of said chamber being closed except for said outlet, said outlet being completely free and unobstructed and providing continuous communication between said compartment and said chamber, said outlet being of very small area in comparison with the area of said chamber whereby atmospheric pressure in said chamber and the surface tension of the liquid normally provide the only means for preventing flow of liquid from said compartment to said chamber, and said container comprising an outer wall, an inner wall spaced from said outer wall and surrounded by said outer wall, a bottom Wall, a top wall, said top wall, said outer wall, and said inner wall as well as said bottom wall cooperating to form said compartment therebetween, the bottom of said inner wall being disposed in spaced relationship to said bottom wall to define said outlet between said chamber and said compartment, and the top of said inner wall having a lip extending into said chamber for cooperation with said inner wall to form a trough when the container is inverted to prevent liquid which may be disposed within the chamber from spilling from the container.

25. A container having a compartment therein for storing liquid and means defining a stationary chamber within said container surrounded by said compartment, said chamber being in communication with the atmosphere at one end thereof and with the bottom portion of said compartment at its other end to provide the only oulet for said comparrnent, said chamber being normally void of liquid, said other end of said chamber being closed except for said outlet, said outlet being defined between a first portion of said container and a second portion of said container, a movable member adapted to engage said second portion for preventing communication between said chamber and said compartment, guide means for guiding movement of said movable member into and out of engagement with said second portion, and means normally maintaining said movable member in engagement with said second portion, and an annular flange portion provided on said container, said movable member engaging said annular flange portion to be guided thereby in its movement.

26. A container having a compartment therein for storing liquid and a chamber therein surrounded by said compartment, said chamber being in communication with the 15 a I atmosphere at one end thereof and with the bottom portion of said compartment at its other end to provide the only outlet for said compartment, said chamber being normally void of liquid, said other end of said chamber being closed except for said outlet, said outlet being defined between a first portion of said container and a second portion of said container, a movable member adapted to engage said second portion for preventing communication between said chamber and said compartment, guide means for guiding movement of said movable member into and out of engagement with said second portion, and means normally maintaining said movable member in engagement with said second portion, and said first portion of the container including an annular flange portion, said movable member being slidably disposed within said flange portion to be guided thereby in its sliding movement, said resilient means also being disposed within said annular flange portion and engaging said first portion of the container.

27. A container having a compartment therein for storing liquid and means defining a stationary chamber within said container surrounded by said compartment, said chamber being in communication with the atmosphere at one end thereof and with the bottom portion of said compartment at its other end to provide the only outlet for said compartment, said chamber being normally void of liquid, said other end of said chamber being closed except for said outlet, said outlet being defined between a first portion of said container and a second portion of said container, a movable member adapted to engage said second portion for preventing communication between said chamber and said compartment, guide means for guiding movement of said movable member into and out of engagement with said second portion, and means normally maintaining said movable member in engagement with said second portion, and said normal maintaining means comprising the bottom wall of said container, a portion of said bottom being said first portion of said container, said bottom wall having a surface in contact with a surface of said movable member, and means in one of the contacting surfaces of said bottom wall and said movable member to permit liquid within said compartment to flow therebetween to maintain said movable member in contact with said second portion of said container when the pressure in said compartment exceeds atmospheric pressure.

28. A container having a compartment therein for storing liquid and means defining a stationary chamber within said container surrounded by said compartment, said chamber being in communication with the atmosphere at one end thereof and with the bottom portion of said compartment at its other end to provide the only outlet for said compartment, said chamber being normally void of liquid, said other end of said chamber being closed except for said outlet, said outlet being defined between a first portion of said container and a second portion of said container, a movable member adapted to engage said second portion for preventing communication between said chamber and said compartment, guide means for guiding movement of said movable'member into and out of engagement with said second portion, and means normally maintaining said movable member in engagement with said second portion, and said normal maintaining means com:

prising the bottom wall of said container, a portion of said bottom wall being said first portion of said container, said bottom wall having a surface in contact with a surface of said movable member, and means in one of the contacting surfaces of said bottom wall and said movable member to permit liquid within said compartment to flow therebetween to maintain said movable member in contact with said second portion of said container when the pressure in said. compartment exceeds atmospheric pressure and said movable member being a cap having a rim on its peripheral edge said guide means is a plurality of tab extending from said rim.

29. A container having a compartment therein for storing liquid and means defining a stationary chamber within said container surrounded by said compartment, said chamber being in communication with the atmosphere at one end thereof and with the bottom portion of said compartment at its other end to provide the only outlet for said compartment, said chamber being normally void of liquid, said other end of said chamber being closed except for said outlet, said outlet being defined between a first portion of said container and a second portion of said container, a movable member adapted to engage said second portion for preventing communication between said chamber and said compartment, guide means for guiding movement of said movable member into and out of engagement with said second portion, and means normally maintaining said movable member in engagement with said second portion, and said normal maintaining means comprising the bottom wall of said container, a portion of said bottom wall being said first portion of said container, said bottom wall having a surface in contact with a surface of said movable member, and means in one of the contacting surfaces of said bottom wall and said movable member to permit liquid within said compartment to flow therebetween to maintain said movable member in contact with said second portion of said container when the pressure in said compartment exceeds atmospheric pressure and said movable member being a cap having a rim on its peripheral edge said guide means is a plurality of tabs extending from said rim and said second portion of said container tapering to an annular edge for sealingly engaging said cap to close said outlet.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 104,300 6/1870 Grimes 2225 876,726 1/ 1908 Owens l2059 X 1,226,821 5/1917 Siever 222457 X 1,278,016 9/1918 Rigerman '59 1,778,291 10/1930 Burke 222-211 X 2,554,658 5/1951 Bosey 222-211 X 2,943,767 7/ 1960 Moro-Lin 222-21l X FOREIGN PATENTS 774,071 9/1934 France.

8,160 1/ 1911 Great Britain.

ROBERT B. REEVES, Primary Examiner FREDERICK R. HANDREN, Assistant Examiner US. Cl. X.R.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3610263 *May 31, 1968Oct 5, 1971Walters Gary AlanFuel tank safety valve assembly
US5678684 *Aug 11, 1995Oct 21, 1997Binney & Smith Inc.Container for liquids
US5758797 *Jun 25, 1996Jun 2, 1998Martindale; Jack E.Spill resistant powder container
US6446827Oct 3, 2001Sep 10, 2002R. W. AkinsPaint container and dispenser apparatus for use with a paint brush
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Classifications
U.S. Classification222/589, 401/120, 222/518, 222/213, 222/500, 15/257.75, D09/503
International ClassificationB43L25/00
Cooperative ClassificationB43L25/00
European ClassificationB43L25/00
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jan 7, 1988AS06Security interest
Owner name: FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF CHICAGO
Owner name: KENNER PARKER TOYS, INC.
Effective date: 19871013
Jan 7, 1988ASAssignment
Owner name: FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF CHICAGO
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:KENNER PARKER TOYS, INC.;REEL/FRAME:005271/0001
Effective date: 19871013
Jul 14, 1986ASAssignment
Owner name: KENNER PARKER TOYS INC.
Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:CPG PRODUCTS CORP.;REEL/FRAME:004619/0307
Effective date: 19851121