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Publication numberUS3467091 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 16, 1969
Filing dateJan 4, 1968
Priority dateJan 4, 1968
Publication numberUS 3467091 A, US 3467091A, US-A-3467091, US3467091 A, US3467091A
InventorsAragona Robert J
Original AssigneeAragona Robert J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Underwater breathing devices with valved air supply means
US 3467091 A
Images(4)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 16, 1969 R. J. ARAGONA UNDERWATER BREATHING DEVICES WITH VALVED AIR SUPPLY MEANS INVENTORS.

20 (05527 J AZAGO/VA 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 E 0 T *HVAKJ a r. n w 9 l, Aw 1: 5; w I; n 3: F .11.:

ATTORNEYS.

Sept. 16, 1969 R. J. ARAGONA UNDERWATER BREATHING DEVICES WITH VALVED AIR SUPPLY MEANS Filed Jan. 4, 1968 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 llrlTllidll INVENTORS (055K711 Am can/A ATTORNEYS.

p 16, 1969 R. J. ARAGONA 3,467,091

UNDERWATER BREATHING DEVICES WITH VALVED AIR SUPPLY MEANS Fl-led Jan. 4, 1968 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 [Ill/I II HG./6 MW ATTORNEY INVENTORS.

Se t. 16, 1969 R. J. ARAGONA 3,457,091

UNDERWATER BREATHING DEVICES WITH VALVED AIR SUPPLY MEANS Filed Jan. 4, 1968 4 Sheets-Sheet 4' FIG. 20. 82

' 76/ INVENTOR. 2/ 205597" 1 4e46oA/A A TORNEYS.

United States Patent 3,467,091 UNDERWATER BREATHING DEVICES WITH VALVED AIR SUPPLY MEANS Robert J. Aragona, Box 102, Westcott Road, Rotterdam, N.Y. 12303 Filed Jan. 4, 1968, Ser. No. 695,734 Int. Cl. A62b 7/00 US. Cl. 128-145 1 Claim ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE- A snorkel type of underwater breating apparatus including a float supported source of air under pressure connected with a valved air passage, and an air hose; the float and air hose being attached to a harness worn on the swimmers body whereby the float may be towed by the swimmer; and the mouthpiece has a pair of conduits which are supported on the harness, one being attached to the air hose and the other opening into the water. In an alternate construction, the air passage comprises an elongated length of a hollow tubular member having an end thereof normally exposed to the ambient atmosphere and the other end connected to the harness to be towed by the swimmer as before.

Cross-reference to related application This invention relates to an improvement over the co pending patent application of Jerome T. Fryling and myself, patent application Ser. No. 460,031, filed June 1, 1965, now Patent No. 3,370,586 and entitled Underwater Breathing Device With Valved Float.

Background of invention As in the patent supra, this invention relates to an underwater breathing device which is so constructed and arranged as to preclude the inadvertent inhalation of water by the user, and is directed to the achievement of the objects recited in its parent case and others, all of which are recapitulated and developed infra.

Thus, one of the primary objects of the instant invention is to provide an underwater breathing device which utilizes the breathing power of the user to inhale air from an above water air station.

Another object of this invention is to provide an above water air inlet station which precludes the inhalation of water into the air distribution system of an underwater breathing device.

A further object of this invention is to provide an underwater breathing device in which exhaust air is admitted rearwardly of the face of the user.

A still further object of this invention is to provide an underwater breathing device having .a single hose communicating with the surface in order to avoid tangling of hoses.

Still another object of this invention is to provide pivotally mounted pressure operated check valves to control the flow of air Within the apparatus.

The invention has as a still further object thereof the provision of a float having an air inlet station which precludes the entry of water into the breathing apparatus.

Still another object of this invention is to provide a float supported source of air under pressure valved to preclude entry of water into the air inlet system.

It is still another object of this invention to provide an elongated normally upright rigid air supplying conduit for direct connection at one of its ends with the air inlet system of the apparatus, the other end comprising a valved air inlet exposed to the ambient atmosphere.

As still a further object of this invention, it is proposed ice to provide threaded coupling means throughout the air inlet system of the apparatus.

This invention contemplates, as a still further object thereof, the provision of apparatus of the type described supra, the apparatus being noncomplex in construction and assembly, inexpensive to manufacture and maintain, and which is rugged and durable in use.

Other and further objects and advantages of the instant invention will become more evident from a consideration of the following specification when read in light of the annexed drawings.

In the drawings:

FIGURE 1 is a pictorial view showing the underwater breathing apparatus of the instant invention as it appears in use;

FIGURE 2 is a top plan view of the float device utilized in the underwater breathing apparatus of the instant invention, certain parts being broken away for clarity of illustration;

FIGURE 3 is a front elevational view of the float of FIGURE 2;

FIGURE 4 is a longitudinal sectional view of the float of FIGURE 2, taken along line 44 thereof and viewing in the direction of the arrows;

FIGURE 5 is a transverse sectional view of FIGURE 4 taken along line 55 thereof and viewing in the direction of the arrows;

FIGURE 6 is a cross-sectional view of the device of FIGURE 4 taken along line 66 thereof and viewing in the direction of the arrows;

FIGURE 7 is a cross-sectional view of the float of FIGURE 4 taken along line 77 thereof and viewing in the direction of the arrows:

FIGURE 8 is a top plan view of the inlet and outlet connections carried by a user;

FIGURE 9 is an end elevational view of the structure of FIGURE 8 as seen along line 9-9 viewing in the direction of the arrows;

FIGURE 10 is a longitudinal sectional view of the fresh air conduit, taken along line 1010 of FIGURE 8 and viewing in the direction of the arrows;

FIGURE 11 is a front elevational view of the structure of FIGURE 8;

FIGURE 12 is a top plan view of a mouthpiece and air conduits of the instant invention;

FIGURE 13 is a longitudinal cross-sectional view of the air conduits shown in FIGURE 12 taken along line 1313 and viewing in the direction of the arrows;

FIGURE 14 is a front elevational view of the mouthpiece of FIGURE 12;

FIGURE 16 is a transverse sectional view of the float of FIGURE 15, taken along line 1616 thereof and viewing in the direction of the arrows;

FIGURE 17 is a longitudinal cross-sectional view of the float of FIGURE 15, taken along line 17-17 thereof and viewing in the direction of the arrows;

FIGURE 18 is a cross-sectional view of the air inlet of the float shown in FIGURES 15 to 17;

FIGURE 19 is a detail cross-sectional view of a float supported means for supplying air under pressure to the air inlet distribution system of this invention, FIGURE 19 illustrating a still further embodiment;

FIGURE 20 is an end elevational view of the back or harness and air inlet means constructed according to a still further embodiment of this invention;

FIGURE 21 is an enlarged fragmentary detail crosssectional view FIGURE 21 being taken substantially on the vertical plane of line 21-21 of FIGURE 20, looking in the direction of the arrows; and

FIGURE 22 is a top plan view of the assembly shown in FIGURE 20.

Referring now more specifically to the drawings, reference numeral designates, in general, an underwater breathing apparatus constructed in accordance with the teachings of this invention and comprising a float or buoy shown generally at 12 which is adapted to ride on the surface 14 of a body of water, and an air distribution system which carries the general reference numeral 16, the latter being shOWn as secured to an underwater swimmer or user 18 to supply the user with suflicient quantities of air for breathing purposes.

Referring now to FIGURES 2 to 7 inclusive, float 12 includes two laterally spaced floatable supports or pontoons 20 which may be of wood, styrofoam or the like, and which are fixedly secured to a horizontal transverse platform 22 by a series of substantially vertical conventional nut and bolt connecting members 24. Dependingly secured to the under side of platform 22 between pontoons 20 is an eye 26 which acts as a securing means for a tow rope or wire 28 as more fully explained hereinafter. It should be noted that the configuration of pontoons 20 and eye 26 provides an easily towable float as shown in FIGURE 3. It is apparent that the configuration of FIGURE 3 is more easily towed than is an innertube, for example, which presents a frictional surface transverse to the direction of travel.

Secured centrally of platform 22 is a mushroom-shaped structure shown generally at 30 which houses the air inlet mechanisms of the instant invention. Mushroomshaped structure 30 comprises a vertical tube shown generally at 32 secured to platform 22 so that a portion of tube 32 extends below platform 22 and a horizontal disc indicated generally at 34 secured to the uppermost end of vertical tube 32.

Tube 32 includes a bottom wall 36 which is provided with a pair of openings 38 separated by a cross bar 39, each opening having the confiuration of a segment of a circle, and a top wall 40 having an aperture 42 for the entry of air as will be more fully explained hereinafter. Disposed within tube 32 is a valve closure indicated generally at 44 comprising a lower float 46, an upper ballshaped closure member 48 and a shaft 50 fixedly connecting float 46 and valve closure 48.

As more fully explained hereinafter, valve closure member 44 must be made of a material which floats in water, such as for example, wood, Styrofoam, plastic or the like. Secured between upper and lower walls 36, 40 and forming a guide means for valve closure member 44 are three spaced rods 52, 54, 56 to insure that valve closure member 44 reciprocates linearly so that ball closure 48 will close aperture 42. Also secured within tube 32 is a flange 53 having an aperture 55 that cooperates with ball valve or float 46 to create an air lock within tube 32 to preclude the entry of water into the air distribution system leading to a swimmer. Secured to one side of tube 32 and communicating with the interior thereof through opening 58 is an air outlet tube 60 to which is secured a fresh air conduit 62 as is more fully explained hereinafter.

Horizontal disc 34 includes an upper impervious circular plate 64 and a lower plate 66 having a central aperture 68 formed therein and in which is fixedly secured the upper end of the tube 32. The lower plate 66 is also provided with a series of laterally spaced air inlets 70. The plates 64, 66, as shown in FIGURE 4, are spaced apart at their center to provide an air conduit between the air inlets 70, opening 42, opening 58 in tube 32, tube 60 and fresh air conduit 62.

From the previously mentioned structure, it is seen that the fioat or buoy 12 provides an air supply for an underwater swimmer in which it is practically impossible in inhale water. For example, the positioning of air inlets 70 beneath horizontal disc 34 precludes the inhalation of 4 water produced by waves on surface 14. The use of a floating reciprocable valve 44 results in the closing of aperture 42 when float 46 is raised by an upsurging wave while the placement of opening 58 precludes the wave from entering tube 60 and fresh air conduit 62.

Referring now to FIGURES 8 to 11 inclusive, there is shown generally at 72 a support means comprising a substantially planar platform 74 having an elongate slot 76 at each end thereof for the reception of a body encompassing strap 77 which secures support means 72 to the torso of a swimmer as shown in FIGURE 1. Support means 72 includes a centrally mounted upstanding lug 78 having an aperture 80 into which is looped wire 28 for towing float 12. As previously mentioned, the relationship between eye 26, rope or wire 28, and lug 78 results in the movement of float 12 over surface 14 in a most expeditious manner.

Secured to platform 74 between upstanding lug 78 and one edge of platform 74 is an air inlet support generally shown at 82 comprising a cylindrical tube 84 having an interior conduit 86 and secured to plate 74 by a depending bracket 88. As shown in FIGURE 8 one end of air inlet 82 is secured to fresh air conduit 62 while the other end of fresh air conduit 82 is secured by a second fresh air conduit 90 to a breathing apparatus held in the mouth of a swimmer as is more fully explained hereinafter.

Secured on the support means 72 on the other side of upstanding lug 78 is an air exhaust support generally indicated at 92 including a first support section 94 secured to platform 74 in any conventional manner and having a first enlarged aperture 96, a second smaller aperture 98 communicating therewith and a shoulder 100 formed at the juncture of apertures 96, 98. Pivotally mounted on shoulder 100 is a flaptype check valve indicated generally at 102 comprising an annular upstanding sealing ring 104 secured to shoulder 100 and a circular closure plate 106 mounted on an S-shaped spring 108 one end of which is secured to shoulder 100. As shown in FIG- URES 8 and 10, closure plate 106 overlaps annular sealing ring 104 with spring 108 providing the biasing forces necessary to effectuate a one-Way closure.

Fitted about a smaller section 110 of first support 94 is an exhaust air conduit 112 which conducts the exhaust gas from a breathing apparatus held in the mouth of a swimmer as will be more fully explained hereinafter.

Secured within enlarged aperture 96 is a second cylindrical support 114 comprising a first frusto-conical aperture 116 communicating through a circular aperture 118 to an enlarged circular aperture 120. As shown in FIG- URES 8 and 10, the differences in diameters of apertures 118, 120 creates a shoulder 122 on which is mounted a flap-type check valve 124 of identical configuration with check valve 102.

As will be more fully explained hereinafter, the exhaled air from a swimmer travels through conduit 112 into aperture 98 and opens flap-type check valve 102 against the biasing forces produced by spring 108. Unless the swimmer is taking very short breaths, the amount of air exhaled will not only open check valve 102 and fill the volume between check valves 102, 124, but will also open check valve 124 with the exhaled air escaping through a body of water as indicated in FIGURE 1. It should be apparent that the use of two check valves in air exhaust support 92 precludes the possibility of an inflowing rush of water reaching a swimmer.

Referring now to FIGURES 12 to 14 inclusive, there is indicated generally at 126 a breathing apparatus including a mouthpiece indicated generally at 128 and a distribution T indicated generally at 130.

Mouthpiece 128 comprises an arcuate substantially semicircular flange 132 having a centrally disposed aperture 134 about which is secured a collar 136 for engagement with distribution T 130. Mouthpiece 128 also includes a pair of centrally mounted coplanar sections 138,

140 which a swimmer may grasp between his teeth in a conventional manner.

Distribution T 130 includes a male T shown generally at 144 having a first leg 146 formed with an aperture 148 fixedly secured in collar 136 of mouthpiece 128. T 144 also includes a second leg 150 and a third leg 152, legs 150, 152 forming a common aperture 154 communicating with aperture 148 and consequently with aperture 134 of mouthpiece 128.

Secured about leg 152 of T 1 44 is a connecting member shown generally at 156 comprising an enlarged cylindrical body 158 having an enlarged aperture 160 fixedly receiving leg 152. Connecting member 156 also includes a smaller cylindrical section 162 having a smaller aperture 164 communicating with aperture 160 and forming a shoulder 166 formed at the junction of the apertures. As intimated previously, fresh air conduit 90 connects fresh air support 82 with cylindrical section 162, thus providing fresh air communication between float 12 and mouthpiece 128.

Mounted on shoulder 166 is a flap-type check valve 168 of identical configuration with check valves 102 and 124, as more fully explained hereafter. Leg 150 of male T 144 forms an aperture 170 of smaller diameter than aperture 154 with a check valve indicated generally at 172 mounted 0n the annular ring of leg 150.

An exhaust connection indicated generally at 174 includes a first enlarged cylindrical section 176 forming an enlarged aperture 178 fixedly secured about leg 150 and a second smaller cylindrical section 180 forming a smaller aperture 182 communicaitng with opening 178. As previously indicated, exhaust hose 112 provides communication between exhaust air connection 92 and mouthpiece 128.

In the operation of breathing apparatus 126, mouthpiece 128 will be grasped in the teeth of a user so that the user may breathe through the mouth. Upon inhalation, check valve 172 will remain closed with check valve 168 opening, thus providing a flow of fresh air from float 12 through fresh air conduit 62, fresh air support 82, fresh air conduit 90 and distribution T 130. Upon exahalation, check valve 168 will close with check valve 172 opening thus allowing the flow of stale air from mouthpiece 128 to exhaust air support 92 through exhaust air conduit 112. As previously explained, check valves '102, 124 will open upon the flow of fresh air through support 92, thus discharging exhaled air rearwardly of the user as indicated in FIGURE 1.

Referring now to FIGURES 15 to 18 inclusive, there is indicated generally at 184 a modified form of a float which may be uti ized with the remainder of the components of the instant invention and which comprises a supporting structure indicated generally at 186, an air inlet tube shown generally at 188 and a horizontal disc indicated generally at 190.

Supporting means 186 is of similar configuration to that of float 12 and comprises a pair of parallel spaced apart floating supports or pontoons 192 secured to a horizontal transverse platform 194 by any conventional fastening means, such as nuts and bolts 196. Dependingly secured to the underside of platform 194 is an eye 198 for securernent with a tow rope or tow wire as previously explained. Air inlet tube 188 comprise an inverted J-shaped tube 199 forming a central aperture 200 and secured to platform 194 by a frusto-conical connecting member 202. Tube 199 extends below platform 194 and is connected to a fresh air conduit 62 by an intermediate connecting member 204.

The upper end of tube 199 is equipped with a ball-type check valve indicated generally at 206 which is composed of a valve cage shown generally at 208 in FIGURE 18. Valve cage 208 includes an upper plate 210 having a circular va ve seat 212 coaxial with opening 200 of air inlet tube 199. Valve cage 208 also includes a lower plate 213 having an aperture 214 and a plurality of valve guides 6 216 connecting plates 210 and 213. A ball valve 218 is positioned within valve cage 208 such that air may normally flow through valve seat 212 into tube 198, but should water attempt to enter tube 199 it wi l carry floatable ball valve 218 into seating engagement with valve seat 212.

Horizontal disc includes an upper surface 220 and a lower surface 222 spaced apart at their centers as shown in FIGURE 17. It should be apparent that horizontal disc- 190 isolates valves 206 from any wave action initiating from water surface 14 except for a breaker, which will necessarily approach valve 206 from an upwardly direction thus alowing valve seat 212 to be open under ordi' nary conditions. It is apparent that this construction provides a substantially continuous source of air for an underwater swimmer.

FIGURE 19 illustrates still another embodiment of this invention. In this figure, reference numeral 300 designates a float similar to the float 12. As such, the float 300- includes a pair of laterally spaced buoyant supports or pontoons 302, only one of which is shown in this figure. The pontoons 302 may be formed of Wood, styrofoam or the like, and are fixedly secured to the underside of a normally horizontal transverse platform 304 having a substantially rectangular configuration. The pontoons 302 and platform 304 may be connected together by a series of normally upright conventional bolt 306 and nut connecting members 308, or by other means known in the arts. Dependingly secured to the underside of the platform 304 and inwardly spaced from the peripheral edges thereof is an eye 310 which, if desired, may be utilized as means for securing a tow rope or wire 312, shown in dotted lines, in the manner fully explained hereabove.

Reference numeral 314 designates, in general, a conventional lightweight gasoline motor and of a type well known in the art. The motor 314 includes as a component thereof the drive shaft 316 which extends laterally and exteriorly from the crankcase 318. Fixedly connected on the drive shaft 316 is an off-center relationship is the eccentric disc 320. The crankcase 318 is flanged as at 322 to receive bolts 324 therethrough for connection with the platform 304 in the usual manner to fixedly connect the motor 314 thereto.

Reference numeral 326 denotes a conventional upright bushing having its lower end fixed'y connected to the platform 304, the upper end of the bushing 326 is bored as at 328 to provide an elongated transversely extending opening preferably cylindrical about a normally horizontal axis. The bore 328 slidably receives for reciprocation therethrough one end of an elongated substantially cylindrical shaft 330, the other end of the shaft 330 being integrally connected to the side wal 332 of an open oblong ring 334. As is seen in FIGURE 19, the ring 334 includes a second side wall 336 oppositely disposed with respect to the side wall 332, and a pair of opposed arcuate end Walls 338, 340, the side and end walls being integrally connected together to form the inner continuous peripheral oblong track 342. The ring 334 receives the eccentric disc 320 therein for sliding engagement with the track 342 to serve a function to be described.

Integrally formed with the side wall 336 and projecting laterally therefrom in a direction away from the shaft 330 is a bifurcated member 344 which includes a pair of elongated oppositely disposed laterally spaced and substantially parallel arms 346, 348 which are disposed adpacent their connected inner ends in vertically spaced relation and at diametrically opposed sides of an opening 350 which extends transversely through the platform 304 intermediate the opposed ends thereof.

Fitted in the opening 350 is the upper end of a substantially hollow cylindrical side wall 352 of a valve assembly 354. The lower end of the side wall 352 is reduced in diameter to provide a neck 356 to which is connected one end of a fresh air conduit 62 corresponding to and functioning exactly as the conduit 62 heretofore described.

Seated in the upper end of the side wall 352 and fixedly secured therein is the lower end of a substantially rigid vertically elongated and substantially hollow tubular cylindrical pipe 358 having its upper end disposed above the platform 304. The pipe 358 includes a cylindrical side wall 360 having an enlarged hollow cylindrical head 362. The upper terminal end of the side wall 360 terminates in a transversely extending closure wall 364 centrally aperturcd as at 366. A plurality of struts 368 radially project from the upper end of the cylindrical head 362 and the outer ends of the struts 368 are integrally connected to the circumferential marginal edge of a concave-convex wave shield 370, the shield 370 being mounted with its apex falling on the center line of the aperture 366. In forming the enlarged head 362 a shoulder 372 is provided which serves as an abutment for one end of a spiral spring 374, the other end of the latter receiving and supporting a ball check valve 376 and constantly biasing the same for movement to seat across the inner end of the aperture 366 to close and seal the same.

In a like manner, and in forming the neck 356, the construction provides an inwardly disposed cylindrical shoulder 378 on the side wall 352, and this shoulder serves as an abutment for one end of a spiral spring 380. As is seen in FIGURE 19, the other end of the spring 380 supports a second ball check valve 382 which is constantly biased for movement to seat against and close the lower end of the pipe 358. The side wall 360 of the pipe 358 is also provided with an integrally formed transversely extending divider wall 382 and a pair of air openings 384, 386, disposed, respectively, on opposite sides of the divider wall 382 and in longitudinally spaced coaxial alignment relative to the side wall 360.

Fixedly connected and sealed to the outer side of the side wall 360 and spanning and enclosing the openings 384, 386 is one end section 388 of a conventional air bellows 390 having an opposed end section 392 fixedly connected and sealed to an upright plate 394.

The pipe 358, bellows 390 and plate 394 are positioned between the arms 346, 348 intermediate the ends thereof, and the plate 394 is fixedly connected to a laterally extending lug 396, and the latter is connected by a pin 398 to the outer terminal ends of the arms 346, 348. The lower end of the plate 394 is integrally connected to a laterally projecting shoe 400 which is slidably received for reciprocable movement below a hold-down rail 402 which extends longitudinally of the platform 304. As is seen in FIGURE 19, the hold-down rail 402 is mounted in spaced relationship relative to the platform 304 on a block 404, and the latter is rigidly secured to the platform 304 by conventional means.

The construction and operation of the air pump described above is well known to those skilled in this art and needs but little description. With the driving motor 314 operating, the drive shaft 316 rotates to cause the eccentric disc 320 to move through its path and trace the track 342. With the eccentric disc 320 in the position shown in FIGURE 19, the bifurcated member 344 has moved to its maximum position to the right to effect the greatest expansion of the bellows 390. Now as the eccentric disc 320 is turned by the shaft 316 in either direction of its movement, the member 344 including its arms 346, 348 are moved to the left as viewed in FIGURE 19. This movement causes, of course, the collapse or compression of the bellows 390 in the conventional manner.

With the expansion of the bellows 390, air is drawn below the shield 370 and the ball check valve 364 is unseated to permit the air to pass through the aperture 366 and into the pipe 358. Air leaves the pipe 358 through the opening 384 and enters the bellows 390. As this operation takes place the ball check valve 382 is maintained in its seated position.

Now as the bellows is compressed as described below, the ball check valve 376 closes and the ball check valve 382 opens to admit the compressed air to pass into the fresh air conduit 62 to serve the functions heretofore described. It will be understood, of course, that as the disc 320 continues its turning movement, the bellows 390 will be expanded, as before, permitting the ball check valve 382 to again seat and the ball check valve 376 to open.

Any desired pump monitoring means (not shown) of a conventional design may be utilized in connection with the air pump apparatus to ensure that at no time will an excessive amount of fresh air under pressure be admitted to the underwater breathing equipment.

FIGURES 20, 21 and 22 illustrate a snorker device constructed in accordance with this invention. The snorkel is seen to comprise an elongated substantially hollow cylindrical conduit 500 having a cylindrical side wall 502. The snorkel 500, adjacent one of its ends, is reverted as at 504 to provide an extension 506 facing the other end of the conduit 500 and being disposed substantially parallel to the longitudinal axis of the side wall 502. The

extended end 506 is equipped with the ball check valve 508 identical in construction with respect to the check valve 206 described above.

The conduit 500 is formed of a rigid material, any desirable lightweight plastic material is preferable, and the other end of the conduit 500 is bent, substantially at right angles with respect to the longitudinal axis of the side wall 502 to terminate in the end 510.

The end 510 has fixedly secured therein by conventional means, one end of an elongated substantially hollow cylindrical sleeve 512, the other end of the sleeve being flanged as at 514. Slidably and rotatably mounted on the sleeve 512 is a coupler 516 which includes an internally threaded side wall 518 also cylindrical in configuration and a centrally aperturcd end wall 520 which is adapted to abut against the flange 514. This coupling construction is old and well known in the several arts.

With specific reference to FIGURES 21 and 22, reference numeral 72' designates substantially the same structure described above and illustrated in FIGURES 8 to 11, inclusive. As such, the support means 72' includes a substantially planar platform 74' having an elongated slot 76 at each end thereof for receiving the body encompassing strap (not shown) described above. The support means 72 includes a centrally mounted upstanding lug 78, as before, the lug being provided with the aperture 80' which serves the function heretofore described.

Secured to the platform 74' between the upstanding lug 78' and one edge of the platform 74' is an air inlet support 82', the structure of which is somewhat modified with respect to the structure of the support 82 described above. The air inlet support 82' comprises an elongated substantially cylindrical tube 84 having an interior conduit 86', and the tube 84' is secured to the platform 74 by a depending bracket 88. One of the ends of the tube 84 is externally threaded as at 522 for threaded engagement with the internally threaded coupler 516, and the other end of the tube 84 at its other end is externally threaeded as at 524 for threaded engagement with a second coupler 526 which is identical to the coupler 516. As such, the coupler 526 includes the internally threaded side wall 528 having a centrally aperturcd end wall 530 at one of its respective ends. The end wall 530 encompasses one end of an elongated substantially hollow cylindrical sleeve 532 flanged as at 534. As is seen in FIG- URE 21, the two flanges are adapted for abutting engagement with one another, and the coupler 526 is both slidably and rotatably mounted on the sleeve 532. The other end of the sleeve 532 is telescoped within and is fixedly secured to the adjacent end of a second fresh air conduit 90. The other end of the conduit 90' is adapted for connection to the breathing apparatus heretofore described above. Sealing gaskets 536 are, preferably, interposed between the flanges 514, 534 and the adjacent threaded ends 522, 524 of the tube 84'.

In the use of the apparatus described and shown in FIGURES to 22, inclusive, the conduit 502 is of such length as to permit the diver or swimmer to swim underwater to a depth which is substantially fixed by the length of the conduit. While the conduit may be free of all supports other than its coupled connection with the support 72', it is preferable that some means be provided to prevent the inadvertent turning of the conduit about the longitudinal axis of the end 510. To accomplish this object, the side wall 502 may have an eye 502 integrally formed therewith or otherwise secured thereto. A similar eye 84'A is formed on the tube 84, and the two eyes 502', 84A are then connected together via an elongated guy wire 525 as by conventional connector means 525 at each end thereof.

The threaded coupling means described and illustrated in this last embodiment of the invention provide means against the accidental separation of the fresh air supply conduits from the tube 84' which might otherwise take place during use by the wearer of the equipment.

The remaining elements mounted on the support means 72' are identical to those shown and described above and require no explanation here as to the nature and constructionthereof. Being identical, these elements bear the same reference numerals as before but to which has been added the prime mark.

Having described and illustrated a plurality of embodiments of this invention in detail, it will be understood that the same are offered merely by way of example, and that this invention is to be limited only by the scope of the appended claim.

What is claimed is: 1. Apparatus for supplying fresh air to underwater breathing apparatus comprising water buoyant support means including a platform having a transverse opening extending therethrough, a pair of pontoons secured to said platform on the underside thereof and in spaced relationship relative to one another and at opposite sides of said opening: means for supplying air under pressure mounted on the upper side of said platform and comprising an elongated substantially hollow pipe having a lower end secured in said opening and projecting below said underside of said platform, said pipe having an upper end extending above the upper side of said platform and opening to the atmosphere, an elongated conduit having one end thereof connected on said lower end of said pipe and its other end operatively connected with said underwater breathing apparatus, one-way check valve means normally biased to their closed positions and disposed adjacent, respectively, said upper and lower ends of said pipe, a divider wall extending transversely of said pipe intermediate its ends, said pipe having a pair of air openings formed therein, said air openings being disposed, respectively, one on each side of said divider wall;

a bellows air pump mounted on said platform and having an end of its bellows connected on said pipe and spanning said air openings;

said air pump being operable on expansion of said bellows to open the upper check valve against its bias to draw air into said upper end of said pipe, the adjacent air opening, and into said bellows, and said air pump being operable on compression of said bellows to force the air therein through the lower air opening to unseat the lower check valve means to force the air therein through the lower air opening to open the lower check valve means to pass the air under pressure through the lower end of said pipe through said conduit to said underwater breathing apparatus.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 667,840 2/1901 Guthrie 128-142.3

813,431 2/1906 Iwanami et a1 128-142.3

908,690 1/1909 Neubert 128-145 1,324,514 12/1919 Miiller 128-145 XR 1,824,512 9/1931 Szamier 128-145 XR 2,303,155 11/1942 Berge 128-145 XR 2,593,988 4/1952 Cousteau 128-142.5 2,780,224 2/ 1957 Wallace 128-145 2,974,331 3/1961 Dize 9-11 XR 3,051,170 8/1962 Benzel 128-145 XR 3,370,586 2/1968 Aragona et al 128-145 FOREIGN PATENTS 1,177,002 12/1958 France. 1,322,898 2/1963 France.

RICHARD A. GAUDET, Primary Examiner KYLE L. HOWELL, Assistant Examiner US. Cl. X.R. 128-147

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4022201 *Sep 4, 1975May 10, 1977Diggs Richard ERebreathing cap for skin divers in combination with floating snorkel attachment
US4472082 *Sep 16, 1981Sep 18, 1984Kroeling PeterFor underwater breathing
US4537276 *Sep 7, 1984Aug 27, 1985American Sterilizer CompanyMask/microphone system for voice actuated control
US4674493 *Jun 23, 1986Jun 23, 1987Mitchell Dan EUnderwater breathing apparatus
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Classifications
U.S. Classification128/201.11
International ClassificationB63C11/20, B63C11/02
Cooperative ClassificationB63C11/202
European ClassificationB63C11/20F