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Publication numberUS3467 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 9, 1844
Publication numberUS 3467 A, US 3467A, US-A-3467, US3467 A, US3467A
InventorsEamuel Rust
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Eamuel rust
US 3467 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

RAISING LAMP-FUCHS Specification of Lettera Patent No. 3,467.

dated March 9, 18M; Antedated January 29, 18M.

To all whom t may concern Be it known that I, SAMUEL RUST, of the city of New York, county and State of New York, have invented a new and useful Improvement in Lamps for Lighting Houses, &c., which improvement is applicable to my former 1mprovement of the piece of metal,

spring, or heater as patented by me Sep? tember 14, 1843, and is also applicable to other lamps which have a roller to raise or depress the wick or a wick-raiser analegous to the roller, and that the following is a full and exact description ofthe same as invented or improved by me.

Whereas the former patent is made, with a raised or capped stopper as A, Figures 1 and 2, and a roller to regulate the wick below the cap as B, working in at the side of the tube C, on the wick, which patent consists of a piece of metal, spring or heater acting and pressing against the wick and roller as a spring which piece of metal, spring or heater is soldered to the bottom part of the tube as D, and extended down to E, Iand then bent and carried up through the tube to F, at the top, so as to run a hollow wick on to it, or to put the wick in all on one side either in a long tube or a short tube, my improvement now consists of a thumb piece, press or slide combined with the roller to manage the wick and a recess or opening in the side of the tube and stopper for the spring or thumb-piece to work in which recess or opening I use either with or without the thumb piece as is hereinafter described.

rIhe whole lamp with my improvement is represented as Fig. 3. One, two or more tubes or sockets to receive the wick, may be used in the stopper, but I first represent it with two, which tubes or sockets for the common candle wick I make round at the top of the ordinary size and round on one side where the roller is from end to end represented as G Fig. 4 and G Fig. 5 to receive the wick while the other side is made square or angular forming the recess or opening for the spring or thumb piece to work in as H Fig. 4 and H Fig. 5; also a recess cut in the stopper where the tube is received, opposite the recess or opening in the tube as I Fig. 4 and I Fig. 5 which allows more room for the spring to work and to have a gradual bend backat the top from the roller so as to receive the wick all on one side, without obstruction to the elasticity of the spring as would naturally be in the ordinary tube and stopper without the recess or opening. The spring is made .as wide as the recess or tube and soldered to the bottom art of the tube on the outside and bent an extended up the inside of the tube above .the top of the stopper into or opposite the recess or opening in the tube and stopper pressing against the wick and roller asJ Fig. 4 and J Fig. 5 and bent out through the recess or opening in the side of the tube above the top of the stopper as K Fig. 4 and K Fig.' 5 on the opposite side to the roller forming the thumb piece on the end of the spring, which spring I use in the recess or opening either with or without the thumb piece. But the thumb piece is better particularly for the common candle wick as a touch of the finger to the thumb piece presses back the spring and the wick is easily inserted and carried down by the roller. Also when the lamp is burning or not burning either wick can be raised or de pressed without moving the other, by pressing back the spring that is on the wick not requiring to be moved which will stand still while the other wick will be acted upon by the spring and roller to either raise or depress it when the roller is turned by which means the wick is beautifully adjusted. This thumb piece is used also with the spring pressing from the wick and roller as well as pressing to them which is re resented as L Fig. 6 precisely as describe by Fig. 4 and Fig. 5 above only the spring presses from the wick and roller so that the wick is entirely free from all pressure when the lamp is burning except the momentary pressure by the finger to raise or depress it which obviates the necessity of having grooves around the roller for the oil to circulate but the roller can be made with plain cogs or teeth lengthwise only in place of making them with the reversed grooves and by pressing the thumb or finger against the thumb piece so as to press against the wickand roller the wick can be instantly raised or depressed by turning the roller.

Either wick can be raised or depressed in the sameway while the other not ressed upon will remain unmoved which is very handy to adjust both wicks 'alike or to exe tinguish either or both the same as when the .spring presses against the w1ck and roller as in the former case. This thumb piece, press or slide I also use by means of small wires or other slides working through the side of the stopper with the spring soldered to the bottom part of the tube and extended up the tube as in the former case only bent back from the roller and turned downward at the end under the cap of the stopper as M Fig. 7, and M Fig. 8, with the wires or slides attached to the sprin loosely by means of a rivet notch or hea on the ends of the Wires through a hole or slit made in the end of the spring at M.

The other end of the wires or slides outside of the stopper at N Fig. 7, and N Fig. 8, has a notch, catch .or head to take hold of with the finger or thumb to press back the spring to regulate and manage the wick recisely in the same manner as describe by Fig. 4 and Fig. 5 with the thumb piece above the stopper which is the same. Also these wires or slides are used at the side of the stopper with the spring pressing from the wick and roller as O Fig. 9, in the same manner as described by Fig. 7, and Fig. 8, only the spring extends up to the inside of the stopper and bent a little back from the roller as O Fig. 9, without turning the end downward to attach the wires or slides to the spring, but the wires or slides simply press against the side of the spring without eing attached or fastened to the spring and used to ress upon the wick with the finger or Vthumli to ralse or depress it precisely as the thumb piece -above the stopper as described by Fig. 6, and is also the same.

' Likewise this thumb piece, press or slide with the recess or opening in the tube I use by means of these wires or slides working in at the side of the stopper in the same way as described by Fig. 7, and Fig. 8, only without any spring by a piece of tin as wide as the recess or tube about a half inch long more or less bent a little curving on each end and soldered to the ends of the wires onI the curved side and placed working into the tube and side of the stopper as P Fig. 10 with the convex side of the piece of tin next to the roller which by pressing the wick against the roller with the linger by means of this thumb piece and turning the roller raises or depresses the wick in the same manner as in the former cases and is the same. Or a spiral spring may be used on this wire or slide to either press it from the wick and roller or press it to them and made to perform either way the same as described by the flat spring and is the same.

All these different modes of using my improvement I have described as being the best for either the round one tube or two tube lamps for the common candle wick. But this thumb piece press or slide with the recess or o ening in the tube and stopper is likewise a mirably calculated for the fiat tube and woven fiat wick in the same manner as described above for the common candle wick only it is not necessary for the spring and roller to be as wide as the tube but have the part of the roller which acts on the wick about one-fourth of an inch wide and the spring the same width and place them in the middle of the tube and stopper which spring is soldered to the bottom of the tube as Q Fig. 11 and Q, Fig. 12 and bent and extended up the inside of the tube into or opposite the recess or opening in the side of the tube as R Fig. 11 and R Fig. 12 above the top of the stopper and bent out through the recess or openin at the side of the tube forming the thum piece on the end of the spring as S, Fig. 11 and S Fig. 12 which spring 1s made to press against the wick and roller as T Fig. 11 and T Fig. 12.

The spring may be 1n a separate piece soldered on to the bottom of the tube as described, or two slits ma be punched or cut lengthwise in the tube iom about a half an inch of the bottom yand extended up to the inside of the cap of the stopper and connected by a cross slit at the top leaving a strip in the center of the tube for the spring as U Fig. 13 and U Fig. 14 which slits also form the recess or opening for the spring to work in. The spring is bent in from the bottom as V Fig. 13, and V Fig. 14 pressing against the wick and roller and bent back at the end from the roller under the cap of the stopper to be convenient to take in the wick.

The recess or opening in the tube and stopper, allowin the spring to recede, 'as described. I use oth with and without the thumb piece, press or slide, but the thumb piece is best, as the woven wick can easily be inserted, without having any stiffness on the end, by pressing back the spring, and likewise the candle wick can be handlly inserted, and regulated in a fiat form, by making the tube also fia-t, and the spring as wide, as the inside of the tube, and the roller as wide or nearly so, so as to act lon the wick, from side to side of the tube. The spring is soldered to the bottom of the tube,

as W Fig. 15, and WFi 16, and extendedv up the inside of the tu e, as wide as the tube, to the under side of the cap of the stopper, pressing on the wick and roller at X Flg. 15 and X Fig. 16, and also, extended up, in the middle part of the spring, about an eighth of an inch wide, above the top of the stopper and bent out throughv the recess, or opening, at the side of the tube, forming the thumb piece on the end of the spring, above the top of the stopper. n

The recess or opening in the tube and sto per, is as wide, as the spring or a little wi er, both at the wide part and narrow part, so as to allow room for the spring to work; the whole of which is the same as Fig. 4 and Fig. 5, only this being a wide tube, the spring does not continue its whole width, above the stopper, but the sides recede under the cap of the stopper, which requires only a narrow recess or opening, in the stopper, for the narrow part ofthe spring to recede into, either for the spring to press to the wick land roller, or to ress from the wick and roller, which is a so used both ways. 0r, the same wide tube may be used with the top of the spring, below the top of the stopper, as Y Fig. 17, by means of the wires or slides, workin through the side of the stopper, both wit the spring, pressing to the wick and roller and with the spring pressing from the wick and roller, precisely as descrbed'by Fig. 8 and Fig. 9, only this is a wide tube and one in a stopper, while Fig. 8 and Fig. 9, are the narrow tube and two in a stopper. But this thumb piece, press or slide with the recess or opening, is likewise admirably calculated for the flat candle wick, by making two small flat tubes and soldering them in the stopper,l

with the edges together, as one wide flat tube or by making one wide fiat tube, with a division of a strip of tin, in the middle, lengthwise, |as Z Fig. 18 and Z Fig. 19, with the spring and roller, in each side, the same as has been described, by the two tubes, as Fig. 4 and Fig. 5 and Fig. 6, with the thumb piece, above the top of the stopper, and also as Fig. 7, Fig. 8, and Fig. 9, (and likewise Fig. 10 with the curved plate on the end of the slides) with the thumb piece by means of the wires or slides, working through the side of the stopper. The tube into and above the cap of the stopper is mlade round on the edges, as A Fig. 18, and A Fig. 19,( but may be made angular) and below the cap of the stopper it is made angular. on the edges as B Fig. 18, and B Fig. 19, which is necessary to make a square recess or opening, on each side for the spring to work.

The springs here are intended to press from the wick and roller, with the wires or slides, working through the'side of the stopper, as the thumb piece, as represented by Fig. 9. The advantage of this tube is, the wick can be easily inserted either side, which at once spreads at the top and forms 4the Hat wick, and when trimmed oii' and burning, either side can be raised or depressed, to adjust both alike, without trouble or cut 55 ting of. or to burn one side alone` which could not 'be done were all to be raised together, as in the case of the fiat woven wick, which' is not so cheap, or so easily obtained, neither are the capillary tubes so free, and open, to conduct the oil, as the candle wick.

Thel same thumb pie-ce, press or slide and recess or opening in the tube I also use with the roller, between two wicks, and between two Hat tubes, ias C Fig. 20 and C Fig. 21. with the recess or opening in the outward sides of the tubes, opposite to the roller, with the spring worklng into the recess or opening, pressing from the wickand roller as D Fig. 2O and D Fig. 21, with a wire in each side of the stopper, as E Fig. 2O and E Fig. 21, as the thumb piece, ress or slide, to press either wick, with t e thumb or finger, against the roller, which will raise or depress 1t, by turning the roller, while the other not pressed upon will remain un moved.

A heater may be used for lard, between the two tubes, which consists of a stri of thin metal about five eighths of an inch wide, folded or bent in the middle, with the two ends passing down each side of the roller, with a slit cut in each side, for the roller to work through. The common candle wick can be regulated, in the same way, by having the roller and spring act on the wick, from side to side of the tube. Two round tubes, like those described, by Fi 4, and Fig. 5, (or two square or small at tubes, placed edge to edge, in the sto per to make one wide flat tube) can be us in the same manner. Or I use the thumb piece, press or slide with the roller, also, between two wicks, by placing the roller crosswise, or in the center of one flat tube, as F Fig. 22, (so that the teeth of the roller are toward each edge of the tube) with a division of a strip of tin, lengthwise, in the tube, at the top above the roller, as G Fig. 22, and also with a division, at the bottom of the tube, below the roller, as H Fig. 22, to divide the wick, both above the roller and below it.

The position of the roller forms or allows the recess, in each edge of the tube, for the springs to work, which springs are soldered to the bottom of the tube, at the edges and extended up the tube, on each ed e, pressing from the wick and roller with t e wires or roller, in the same manner, as the wires or slides already described, in the former cases. Or as another mode of thumb piece, a circular piece of tin can be inserted vertically, in the side of the stopper, as J Fig. 23, working on a wire or pin, soldered to the side of the stopper, under the cap, with aprojection about three eighths-or a half 1nch, from the circle of the lower side, to press against the spring as L Fig. 23, also wlth another projection, on the circular piece of tin, outside of the sto per, as M Flg. 23,. to take hold of, with the t umb or finger, which by pressing downward, will force the sprmg against the wick and roller and perform the same oiiice. as the thumb pieces previously described.

Thus I have described and set forth a variety of modes of using my improvement,

eleven models ofthe same, all of which work recess or oplening in the tube or stopper combeautifully, and could describe still more, bined, Wit either the spring thumb piece,

but it is unnecessary, aspress or slide as above set forth or in any What I claim and desire to secure by Letother Way that is essentially the same. 5 ters Patent is- Wltness my hand and seal this twenty 15 A thumb piece, press or slide to manage fifth day of January eighteen hundred and the Wick by pressing the thumb piece, press forty four A. D.

or slide, against the wick or wick raiser SAMUEL RUST. [L.s.] with the finger or thumb or relieving the Witnesses: 10 ressure from the wick or wick raiser, com- I. N. RUST,

ined with the roller or any other wick -SAML. A. RUST,

raiser, analogous to the roller and also the SILAs CUMMINGS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5607448 *May 10, 1995Mar 4, 1997Daniel A. StahlRolling tourniquet