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Publication numberUS3468086 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 23, 1969
Filing dateApr 9, 1968
Priority dateApr 9, 1968
Publication numberUS 3468086 A, US 3468086A, US-A-3468086, US3468086 A, US3468086A
InventorsWarner Walter J
Original AssigneeA C Hathorne Co The
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Prefabricated roofing construction and method
US 3468086 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 23, 1969 w. .1. WARNER 3,468,086

PREFABRICATED ROOFING CONSTRUCTION AND METHOD Filed April 9. 1968 INVENTOR WALTER J WARNER ATTORNEYS United States Patent 3,468,086 PREFABRICATED ROOFING CONSTRUCTION AND METHOD Walter J. Warner, Westford, Vt., assignor to The A.C.

Hathorne Company, South Burlington, Vt., a corporation of Vermont Filed Apr. 9, 1968, Ser. No. 719,947

Int. Cl. E04d 3/24 U.S. Cl. 52173 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE The present invention provides a prefabricated roofing panel having a panel core and sheet material adhered to one face of the panel core to form the weather surface of the panel. Each panel is generally rectangular and two adjacent edges of the sheet extend beyond corresponding panel core edges to form flaps. To protect the flaps, the long flap is folded back and taped to the outer face of the sheet material, the tape covering the-preapplied adhesive disposed on the underface of the fiap. The second flap, including the end portions of the first folded flap, is also folded back and taped to the outer face of the sheet material. When installing the roof panels, the tapes are re leased and the flaps are unfolded to overlie adjacent roof panels to form a complete weather surface for the entire roof structure with the flaps adhered to adjacent panels.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to prefabricated building structures and particularly relates to a method and apparatus for protecting, prior to use, the flaps on roof panels of the type having outer weatherized sheet material projecting beyond the panel edges to form flaps for overlying and forming weather seals with the adjacent roofing panels.

With the advent of prefabricated, oftentimes lightweight,

roofing panels, there has arisen the need for effective methods and apparatus for installing the roof panels to form a completed roof structure, particularly in a manner to concurrently provide an effective weatherproof surface. Current roof panels of the prefabricated type and which may comprise expanded polystyrene foam, combinations of asbestos, and cement, or the like, are usually secured along their edges one to the other by an interlocking or grouted joint or the like to form a completed roof structure. Once the panels are assembled, sheets of weather resistant material, for example, sheets of bituminous roofing paper, are often applied to the assembled panels to provide a complete weather resistant roof surface. This, however, requires additional time and labor which adds to the cost of the completed roof structure.

In some instances, prefabricated roof panels have been formed with weather resistant sheet material preadhered to the panels prior to installation. The preadhered sheet material usually lies coextensive with the panel, that is, the edges of the sheet material lie flush with the edges of the panel. An additional operation is therefore required to weather seal the roofing panels at their joints. In US. Patent No. 3,111,787, this problem has to some extent been overcome. In this patent, a panel is provided having a roofing sheet with a flap along an edge thereof which overlies and is adhesively secured to an adjacent panel. Release paper is applied to the adhesive surface of the flap of the sheet material so that the adhesive is effective upon stripping the release paper when the panels are installed. However, it has been found that the flap on prefabricated panels of this type are easily damaged during handling, transit and installation. Often the flap is torn,

'ice' punctured or otherwise damaged whereby an effective We atherproof seal with an adjoining panel cannot be made.

SUMMARY OF THE PRESENT INVENTION The present invention provides a prefabricated, generally rectangular roofing panel having a panel core and a Weather resistant sheet material preadhered to the core and forming the weather face of the panel. The sheet material is applied concurrently with the fabrication of the panel core and, as such, forms an integral part of the panel during all subsequent transportation, storage, handling and the like. The sheet material is adhered to and completely covers the outer face of the panel core in a manner providing a pair of adjacent edge portions or flaps which extend beyond the corresponding panel core edges. The opposite edges of the sheet material lie flush with the corresponding opposite edges of the panel core. During prefabrication of the panel, adhesive is applied to the undersurfaces of the flaps whereby, when the roof panels are installed to form a completed roof structure, the flaps overlie and may be adhered to the edge portions of adjacent panels.

In order to protect the flaps against puncture, tearing or other damage which may be caused during handling of the panels prior to installation and to protect the adhesive surface of the flaps, the flaps are folded back onto the sheet material and tapes are applied to the adhesive surfaces of the flaps to protect the same and to secure the flaps to the sheet material. In this manner, the sheet material is substantially coextensive with the panel core and the flaps are preclude-d from projecting beyond the lateral confines of the panel. This not only protects the flaps against damage, but also facilitates panel handling and storing.

Specifically, the flap along the long side of each panel is first folded back. A tape coextensive in length with the fiap is applied to the adhesive surface of the latter and to an adjacent portion of the overlyin sheet material to maintain the flap in the folded position. The short flap, as well as the folded end flap portion of the long flap, is similarly folded back on the panel. A tape is applied to the adhesive surface of the short flap, an adjacent portion of the sheet material, and a portion of the first folded flap to retain the short flap in folded position.

To provide a roof structure, the panels are arranged and joined to adjacent panels in a conventional manner to form a continuous roof surface. The tapes may then be stripped from the flaps and the flaps folded over onto adjacent panels and adhered thereto. In this manner, an effective seal is provided at the juncture of the adjacent panels and a complete weatherproof roof structure is thus formed.

Accordingly, it is a primary object of the present invention to provide an improved prefabricated roofing panel.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a prefabricated roofing panel of the type having a weather surface including flaps and extending beyond the edges of the panel for forming weather seals with adjoining panels wherein damage to the unprotected flaps during handling, transportation, and the like, of the panel prior to use is precluded.

It is a related object of the present invention to provide a prefabricated roofing panel having the foregoing characteristics wherein the adhesive coated undersurfaces of the flaps are fully protected throughout all phases of panel handling and remain tacky to facilitate final securement of the flaps to adjoining panels.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide a simple and inexpensive method of protecting the overlapping fiaps of weather resistant sheet material of prefabricated roofing panels and the adhesive coated undersurfaces of the flaps whereby the flaps may be readily and easily secured to form effective seals with adjoining roof panels.

These and further objects and advantages of the present invention will become more apparent upon reference to the following specification, claims and appended drawings.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING FIGURES FIGURE 1 is a fragmentary perspective view of a roof structure employing the roof panel construction of the present invention;

FIGURE 2 is an enlarged fragmentary cross sectional view of a joint formed between adjacent panels and taken about on line 22 of FIGURE 1;

FIGURES 3-6 are perspective views illustrating the manner in which the weather resistant sheet material is folded back from the panel edges and the tapes applied to retain the flaps in folded position; and

FIGURE 7 is an enlarged fragmentary cross sectional view of a panel edge illustrating a flap retained in the folded position by a tape and taken about on line 77 of FIGURE 6.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring to the drawings and particularly to FIGURES 1 and 2, there is shown a plurality of prefabricated roofing panels 10 assembled and joined one to the other along their end and lateral edges to form a completed integral roofing structure. Panels 10 may comprise a panel core, indicated at 12, having sheet material 14 adhered along a face thereof and forming the weather surface of panel 10. The materials comprising panel core 12 and sheet 14 may comprise any of the well known roofing materials. For example, core 12 may comprise a sandwiched plywood and foam core construction or may be formed entirely of a plastic material such as a sheet of expanded polystyrene. Sheet material 14 may comprise, for example, a plastic sheet, roofing felt, or any other type of material conventionally employed as weather resistant material. In the preferred embodiment, panel core 12 comprises a first and primary layer 16 of mineralized fiber bound under pressure with portland cement and a second layer 18 of smooth concrete overlying the primary layer 16 and to which weather resistant sheet material 14 is adhered. Sheet material 14 preferably comprises a waterproof membrane, for example, the sheet material known under the trade name Tedlar, manufactured by the Du Pont Company.

In the illustrated form, panel cores 12 are preferably rectangular in shape with the long or lateral edges thereof stepped as at 20 whereby overlapping and interlocking joints between laterally adjacent panels may be formed. Other types of panel joints may, however, be employed. For example, the edges of the panels may be formed to provide bulb T and grout joints or ship lap joints, or the like.

Referring now to FIGURES 3-6, it will be seen that sheet 14 is also rectangular in shape and is cut to a length and width substantially greater than the length and width of panel core 12. An adhesive, preferably an adhesive of the elastomeric type, is applied to the undersurface of sheet 14, and the latter is applied against the upper surface of panel core 12 or secondary layer 18 such that two adjacent edges 22 and 24 of sheet 14 lie flush with the corresponding edges of panel core 12. The opposite edges 26 and 28 of sheet 14 thus extend outwardly of the corresponding edges of panel core 12 to form end and lateral flaps 30 and 32 respectively. It will be noted that the adhesive is applied to the entire undersurface of sheet 14 and that, as seen in FIGURE 3, the undersurfaces of flaps 30 and 32 are accordingly also coated with adhesive.

To prevent damage to flaps 30 and 32 as by puncturing, tearing or otherwise damaging the same during panel handling, transit, storage, etc., it is a feature of the present invention that flaps 30 and 32 are folded back onto panel 10 upon initial fabrication of the panel and in a particular manner as will become clear with the flaps being retained in the folded position until installation whereby the longitudinal, lateral and vertical confines of the panel with the flaps folded are substantially identical to the longitudinal, lateral and vertical confines of panel core 12. concomitantly, the flaps 30 and 32 are folded and retained in their folded position in a manner such that the adhesive undersurfaces of flaps 30 and 32 are fully protected and retain their adhesive qualities throughout panel handling, storage, etc., whereby the flaps are readily and easily joined to and form high integrity waterproof seals with adjoining panels when installed in a manner as will be presently set forth.

To these ends and as illustrated in FIGURE 4, one of the flaps, preferably the longer fiap 32, is folded back to overlie the adjacent portion of the upper face of sheet 14 such that its fold or crease line 36 lies substantially flush with the corresponding long edge of panel core 12. Note that the portion 34 of flap 32 which projects beyond the end of panel core 12 is folded back to overlie an adjacent portion of end flap 30 such that the fold or crease line 36 extends beyond the end of the panel for reasons which will become apparent. A stri of tape 38, which is coextensive in length with flap 32 and of a slightly larger width, is applied to the adhesive undersurface of fiap 32 (which in the folded position thereof illustrated in FIGURES 4-6 is its upper surface) and a portion of the upper face of sheet 14 adjacent folded edge 28. Tape 38 preferably comprises a gummed paperback tape with the gummed tape surface extending lengthwise along one edge of the underside of the tape to adhere to the upper face of sheet 14. The remaining portion of the underside of the tape, that is, that portion engaging the adhesive surface of flap 32, can be plain and devoid of gum. Other types of tape can be employed, such as silicone treated tapes and including those tapes which have a gum applied coextensively along their undersurfaces.

The remaining end flap 30 is then folded back to overlie sheet 14 such that its crease or fold line 40' lies substantially flush along the end edge of panel core 12. Note that the end portion 34 of flap 32, together with the end portion of tape 38 which overlies portion 34, are also folded back with end flap 30 about its crease line 40. A tape 42 having a length equal to the width of panel core 12 and a width slightly larger than the width of flap 30 is applied to the adhesive undersurface of flap 30 (which in the folded position thereof illustrated in FIGURES 5 and 6 is its upper surface), a portion of the upper face of sheet 14 and a portion of tape 38. Tape 42 is similar to tape 38 in that only the lengthwise extending edge portion which overlies the adjacent portion of sheet 14 need have a gummed surface, the remaining undersurface of tape 42 being plain paper. In this manner, flaps 30 and 32 now lie substantially within the longitudinal, lateral, and vertical confines of core panel 12 with the adhesive surfaces thereof fully protected whereby the completed panel 10 may be shipped, stored, or otherwise handled without the danger of puncturing, tearing, etc., the flaps.

To assemble panels 10 and form a completed weatherproof, high integrity roof structure, panels 10 are mounted on supports, not shown, with their lateral edges interlocking as at 20. Tapes 42 and 38 are successively stripped from the adhesive surfaces of flaps 30 and 32, respectively, and the adjacent portions of sheet 14 whereby the flaps can be folded about their respective fold or crease lines to overlie the lateral and end edge portions of adjacent panels. As the adhesive on the undersurface of flaps 30 and 32 has been protected and unexposed throughout handling, storage, etc., by the tapes and thereby remains tacky, the flaps 30 and 32 can be pressed against the sheet material 14 forming the upper surfaces of adjacent panels 10, forming Weatherproof, high integrity seals therewith.

A roller may be used for this purpose if desired. Note that by forming sheet 14 both longer and wider than panel core 12, the corner areas of adjoining panels, as indicated at A in FIGURE 1, are completely covered by flaps and 32 whereby additional sealing in the corner areas is eliminated.

While the size of the panel is limited only by convenience of handling, panels 10, in a preferred form hereof, are 96 inches long and 30 inches wide. Sheet material 14 is preferably 102 inches long and 36 inches wide, whereby flaps 30 and 32 have a 6 inch width. Tapes 38 and 42 are preferably formed in lengths of 102 and 30 inches, respectively, and are preferably 7 inches wide. With these tape dimensions, a 1 inch wide gummed undersurface if preferably provided along a longitudinal edge of the tapes to adhere the tapes to the upper surface of sheet 14 as previously described. The remaining 6 inch width of tape is preferably devoid of a gummed or adhesive material as the tapes 38 and 42 may be releasably secured in overlying position on flaps 30 and 32 by the adhesive provided on the undersurfaces of the latter flaps. It will be understood, however, that the undersurface of taps 38 and 42 may have gummed surface over their entire width.

As seen in FIGURES 1 and 2, an insulating material may be applied to the undersurface of the completed integral roof structure. Preferably, a layer of urethane insulation may be sprayed onto the undersurface of panel cores 12 providing a complete weatherproofed and insulated roof structure.

It is thus seen that the objects of the present invention are fully accomplished in that there is provided a prefabricated roofing panel having a preadhered weather resistant surface including flap portions extending beyond the panel to overlie adjacent panels when installed to form an effective weather seal therewith. By folding the flaps back in the foregoing manner and retaining them in the folded position throughout handling, storage, transportation, etc., until final installation of the panels, damage to the flaps which may affect the integrity of the roof structure is avoided. Moreover, by taping the flaps back in the foregoing manner, the adhesive undersurfaces of the flaps are fully protected and remain tacky to form an effective seal with the adjacent panels when the panels are in stalled to form completed roof structures.

What is claimed and desired to be secured by United States Letters Patent is:

1. A method of protecting the overlapping edge portions of flexible sheets carried on the outer faces of building construction panels comprising the steps of applying the sheet to a face of the panel such that at least a pair of adjacent edge portions of the sheet project outwardly beyond the corresponding edges of the panel forming a pair of flaps, folding both of said flaps back to overlie portions of the sheet with their fold lines lying substantially flush along the corresponding edges of the panel and applying tapes to the upper faces of the respective folded flaps and to adjacent portions of the sheet to retain the folded flaps in position overlying the sheet portions and back from the edges of the panel.

2. The method according to claim 1 including the steps of applying protective tapes along the upper faces of the respective folded flaps and along laterally adjacent portions of the sheet whereby the upper faces of the folded flaps are covered entirely by the tapes.

3. The method according to claim 1 including first folding one of the flaps, applying tape along said one flap and along the adjacent portion of the sheet to retain said one flap in position overlying a portion of the sheet and back from the corresponding panel edge, then folding the other flap back such that it overlies both the adjacent portion of the sheet and a portion of the first folded flap, and applying a tape along the upper face of the other folded flap and along both the adjacent portions of the sheet and the upper face of the first folded flap to retain the second folded flap in position overlying the sheet and said first flap portion.

4. The method according to claim 3 wherein said one flap is folded such that it overlies a portion of the sheet and an end portion thereof overlies a portion of the unfolded second fiap, including the step of folding the second flap including the folded end portion of the first flap as to overlie both an adjacent portion of said sheet and a portion of the first folded flap.

5. The method according to claim 4 including removing the tape from the upper faces of the flap and the adjacent portions of the sheet and respectively folding said flaps in directions opposite to the direction in which they were first folded to overlie adjacent panels.

6. The method according to claim 3 including the step of applying adhesive to the upper faces of the folded flaps prior to applying the tapes thereto, and applying the tapes to the folded flaps as to cover substantially the entire adhesive coated upper faces of the folded flaps and removing the tapes from the adhesive coated faces whereby the fiap may be located in overlying position and adhesively adhered to an adjacent panel.

7. A roofing panel comprising a panel core, a sheet of weather resistant material, adhesive means for adhering said sheet to one face of said panel core, said sheet having at least one edge portion extending beyond the corresponding edge portion of said panel core to form a flap, said flap being folded back to overlie a portion of said sheet with the fold line lying substantially flush with said corresponding core panel edge, and means releasably securing said flap to said sheet to retain said flap in folded overlying position relative to said sheet portion.

8. The roofing panel according to claim 7 wherein the undersurface of said flap when lying in the extended position carries an adhesive, said securing means including a tape overlying the adhesive surface of said flap and an adjacent sheet portion when said flap lies in the folded position.

9. The roofing panel according to claim 7 wherein an adjacent edge portion of said sheet material extends beyond the corresponding edge portion of said panel core to form a second flap adjacent said first flap, said second flap being folded back to overlie a portion of said sheet with an end flap portion of said second flap overlying an adjacent end portion of the first flap, said second flap having a fold line lying substantially flush with its corresponding panel core edge, and means releasably securing said second flap to said sheet to retain said second flap in folded overlying position relative to the corresponding sheet portion.

10. The roofing panel according to claim 9 wherein the undersurfaces of said flaps when lying in extended positions carry an adhesive material, said securing means including a pair of tapes overlying the adhesive surfaces of the respective flaps and adjacent sheet portions when said flaps lie in the folded position.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,849,869 3/1932 Fischer 52540 2,120,644 6/1938 Harper 52-447 2,303,737 12/1942 Hampson 52-448 2,913,104 11/1959 Parker 20660 3,111,787 11/ 1963 Chamberlain 52420 X 3,121,649 2/1964 Oliver 52-420 X ALFRED C. PERHAM, Primary Examiner US. Cl. X.R.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification52/173.1, 52/540, 156/202, 206/321, 52/746.11
International ClassificationE04D3/35
Cooperative ClassificationE04D3/351, E04D3/355, E04D3/352, E04D3/358
European ClassificationE04D3/35A3, E04D3/35A1, E04D3/35A, E04D3/35F