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Publication numberUS3468260 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 23, 1969
Filing dateDec 1, 1967
Priority dateDec 1, 1967
Publication numberUS 3468260 A, US 3468260A, US-A-3468260, US3468260 A, US3468260A
InventorsBelden Katherine Arnel, Belden William Perry
Original AssigneeBelden Katherine Arnel, Belden William Perry
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Rotary pump with axially movable radial vanes
US 3468260 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Se t. 23, 1969 w. P. BELDEN ROTARY PUMP WITH AXIALLY MOVABLE RADIAL VANES Filed Dec. 1, 1967 2, Sheets-Sheet 1 1.\'VI;'1\"IT)K. wllllam Per; Be/den BY WWW m Fig.2

Sept. 23, 1969 w, P, BELDEN ROTARY PUMP WITH AXIALLY MOVABLE RADIAL VANES Filed Dec. 1, 1967 Z Sheets-Sheet 2 Fig.5

W1 lll'am P r ir fi g lden United States Patent f 3,468,260 ROTARY PUMP WITH AXIALLY MOVABLE RADIAL VANES William Perry Belden, 310 E. Pine St, Millvilie, N.J.; Katherine Arnel Belden, executrix of said William Perry Belden, also known as Perry Belden, deceased Filed Dec. 1, 1967, Ser. No. 687,368 Int. Cl. F04c 1/16, 3/00;F01c 3/04 U.S. Cl. 103-139 8 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A pump vane assembly including four radially positioned vanes in a rotating assembly, each vane including a U-shaped notch through one traverse edge thereof for pressure balancing. The vanes move in an axial direction in accordance with complementing camming surfaces which sandwich the transverse edges of the vanes. As the vanes rotate, they move axially thereby causing a cyclical decrease in the volume and commensurate increase in pressure between adjacent vanes and an associated camming surface. An outlet port is provided at the point of minimum volume (maximum pressure). Likewise, an inlet port is provided at the point of maximum volume (minimum pressure).

The field of the present invention relates to liquid pumps and more particular to a rotary pump with axially movable vanes.

Prior art pumps have been constructed of materials prone to corrosion when transferring liquids such as fuel oil or gasoline. Further, prior devices employ an impeller or diaphragm which is dimensionally designed for the transfer of a particular fluid. It has been customary to utilize rubber impellers and diaphragms to avoid the aforementioned corrosive effect. However, these rubber components take a set, swell or stick so that the utility of the pump is eventually destroyed. In addition, objectionable noise usually accompanies the use of a rubber impeller or diaphragm type pump.

In summary, the present invention includes an electric motor driven pump, the shaft of which drives a rotating assembly including four radially positioned vanes mounted therein. The vanes move in an axial direction in accordance with complementing camming surfaces positioned to sandwich the transverse edges of the vanes thereby creating rotating chambers subjected to a varying volumetric dimension. As the vanes rotate, they move axially and traverse an associated camming surface thereby causing a cyclic decrease in the volume between adjacent vanes and commensurately cause an increase in the pressure contained therein. An outlet port is provided in the camming surface at the point of minimum volume (maximum pressure). At this point the pressure effectuates the outflow of fluid from the outlet port. Likewise, an inlet port is provided at the point of maximum volume (minimum pressure) thus supplying the pump with a continuous flow of inlet fluid. The moving parts of the present pump are fabricated from the trademarked inert resin materials Delrin or Teflon, these materials providing corrosive free components. Further, the instant invention utilizes axially movable vanes adapted to pump a wide variety of liquids in an eflicient manner. The present pump is self-priming to over three feet and will pump water in a fifty foot head. It can be used in many ways, including water systems, waste drains, bilges, and provides a most satisfactory type of pump construction for filling storage tanks from a creek because the electric motor need only draw from six to seven amps. The Delrin and Teflon mechanical components completely elimi- Patented Sept. 23, 1969 nate the problem caused by rubber impellers that take a set, swell or stick. Components fabricated from these materials also eliminate the noise from a rubber impeller or diaphragm type of pump. The present construction requires a negligible starting or operational torque thereby minimizing the amperage drain.

These together with other objects and advantages which will become subsequently apparent reside in the details of construction and operation as more fully hereinafter described and claimed, reference being had to the accompanying drawings forming a part hereof, wherein like numerals refer to like parts throughout, and in which:

FIGURE 1 is a view in perspective illustrating the instant electric driven pump.

FIGURE 2 is a fragmentary sectional view taken along a plane passing through section line 2-2 of FIGURE 1.

FIGURE 3 is a fragmentary sectional view taken along a plane passing through section line 33 of FIGURE 2.

FIGURE 4 is a transverse sectional view taken along a plane 4 4 of FIGURE 2.

FIGURE 5 is a transverse cut away view illustrating the camming surface and inlet-outlet ports communicating with associated inlet-outlet connectors.

FIGURE 6 is a detail perspective view of the component parts of the present pump structure.

FIGURE 7 is a perspective View of the present pump structure including a camming surface therein.

Referring specificially to the drawings, a specific embodiment of the present invention is generally denoted by reference numeral 10. Typical dimensions of the unit are 3%" high, 4 /8" Wide, and 6%" long. The assembly includes a suitable electric motor 12 which is energized by electrical conductors 14. The electric motor 12 rotatably drives the pump assembly 16, the input end portion of which is connected to the driving end of the electric motor 12 so that a unified construction is effectuated between the pump and motor. A mounting bracket 18 is attached to the electric motor by means of a suitable fastener 19.

FIGURE 6 of the drawings illustrates the component portions of the pump 16. A generally cylindrical port chamber housing 18 is positioned against the driving end of the electric motor 12. A vane assembly 20 is concentrically mounted within the port chamber housing 18 and is maintained in engaging position therein by a vane assembly cover 22. Vane assembly 20 includes insertable vane members 24 operating to effectuate pump operation as explained hereinafter. Screw fasteners 26 hold the vane assembly cover 22, cylindrical port chamber housing 18 and the electric motor in cylindrical alignment by virtue of fastener receiving bores 28 formed within the associated wall structure of the aforementioned aligned portions.

The port chamber housing 18 includes a tubular connector 30 appending outwardly from the wall of the housing and will be referred to as the inlet connector for purposes of convenience. It is appreciated that this connector may function as an outlet connector depending upon the rotation of the electric motor drive shaft. A second tubular connector is axially aligned with the first and is referred to as the outlet connector for convenience. This outlet connector 32 also appends outwardly from the cylindrical wall of port chamber housing 18.

Referring to FIGURE 2 of the drawings, a threaded bore 34 is included in the electric motor housing and receives the threaded fasteners 26 for firmly fastening the aligned portions of the pump to the motor housing. A cylindrical recess 36 is formed around the interior circumferential edge of the port chamber housing 18, along the edge abutting the electric motor housing. A second cylindrical recess 38 of smaller diameter than the first extends outwardly and concentric with the cylindrical recess 36. This second recess communicates outwardly with a third cylindrical recess 40 of smaller diameter than the second cylindrical recess, the combination of aforementioned recesses are adapted to permit snug engagement between the driving end of the electric motor housing and the associated end of the port chamber housing 18. A motor drive shaft 42 extends centrally through the combination of recesses and is employed to rotate a pump vane assembly as explained hereinafter. A drainage port 44 is formed through the walls of the second and third recesses, this port being in linear alignment with an aperture 46 formed within the outer cylindrical wall portion of port chamber housing 18 to provide for drainage from the recess area should liquid find its way therein. A fourth recess 50 is positioned concentrically with the third recess and communicates outwardly therefrom to receive a cylindrical seal 52 therein. The central outward portion of the seal includes a bossed collar portion 53 with a bored center therethrough for permitting passage of the motor drive shaft therethrough. A circular spring clip 54 retains the bossed cylindrical seal within the cylindrical recess 50.

The outward configuration of the port chamber housing 18 may best be appreciated by referring to FIGURE of the drawings. An outward vertical wall portion 56 is disposed concentrically outwardly from the cylindrical recess 50 and provides an upwardly and outwardly inclined camming surface reaching a high point upon a vertically disposed arcuate shoulder 59. Circumferentially oblong and inwardly inclined recesses 58 are formed within the vertical wall 56. These recesses are symmetrically disposed about a vertical diameter passing through the port chamber housing 18. The top ends of the inclined recesses 58 confront each other, the two ends being separated by a shoulder portion 59 of vertical wall 56. These confronting ends 62 form the deepest dimension of the oblong inclined recesses 58. The opposite ends of these recesses extend circumferentially around the bottom portion of the cylindrical recess 50, these latter ends being denoted by reference numeral 60 form the initial area of inward inclination from the vertical wall 56. The deeper ends of the oblong recesses communicate with their correspondingly positioned horizontally aligned inlet and outlet connectors 30 and 32 via curvilinear apertures or ports 64 formed through the port chamber housing wall 18 and adjacent the deep end 62 of the oblong inclined recesses.

Referring back to FIGURE 6, the vane assembly 20 is seen to include four circumferentially orientated arcuate separators 68, each separator including a radially outward cylindrical wall 69 disposed perpendicularly to an inward wall portion 70. Radially orientated wall portions 72 are integrally connected with the outer cylindrical wall portion 69 integrally connected with a radially inner cylindrical wall 74. Radial slots 76 form confronting radial wall portions of adjacent separators. The separators are radially mounted upon a concentric hollow shaft portion 78 which includes radial web portions 80 connected between the shaft and a second inner shaft portion 82 the interior of which includes a D-shaped aperture or bore to receive a similarly D-shaped drive shaft 42 from the electric motor.

The construction of the vane assembly cover 22 is best shown in FIGURE 7 of the drawings. The assembly cover 22 is basically constructed from a cylindrical section 84 including a generally perpendicular circular wall section therein, the latter is characterized by a variably inclined camming surface 85 including a vertically arcuate planar segment 86 appending to two downwardly and outwardly inclined arcuate segments 88 at either end thereof, the latter further appending to a final arcuate segment 90 characterized by a vertical planar surface. The center portion of the circular cam surface 85 ineludes an outwardly extending cylindrical cap 92 for 4 permitting the cylindrical shaft 78 of the vane assembly 20 to rotate therein.

For an understanding of the operation of the present invention, attention is directed to FIGURE 5 of the drawings which illustrates the camming surface upon which the inward transverse edge of the vanes rotate during operation of the pump. It is appreciated that the outer transverse edge of the vanes cam against an identically inclined camming surface parallel to that shown in FIG- URE 5 and contained within the vane assembly cover. Accordingly, the vanes are sandwiched between two parallel camming surfaces shown in FIGURE 6 of the drawings, these sandwiching camming surfaces cause the axial displacement of the vanes as they revolve around the surfaces. Thus, the vanes form a plurality of rotating volumes, each volume defined by; two adjacent vanes, the inward surface 70 of the vane assembly and the inward camming surface 56. Referring back to FIGURE 5 of the drawings, and assuming a clockwise rotation of the vanes (now shown) against the camming surface, the volume contained between those adjacent vanes overlying the right upward oblong end 62 assumes a maximum volume condition. The volume contained therein is supplied by the tubular connector 30 via the right port 64 which functions as an inlet port. As this aforementioned set of adjacent vanes rotates clockwise the inclination between the vane assembly back 70 and the inward inclination camming surface 56 converges in a manner decreasing the volume contained between the adjacent vanes. This decrease in volume is elfectuated by the radial displacement of the vanes into the vane assembly cover 22 during vane traverse of this converging inclination. As each vane pair rotates past 270 the converging inclination of the camming surfaces increases to a maximum at the point over the oblong recess end 62 which communicates with the left outlet port 64. The volume overlying this port will be in a minimum condition which commensurately defines a maximum pressure. The establishment of this maximum pressure volume over the left outlet port 64 causes the volume of fluid to be conducted through the outlet port and outwardly through the left tubular connector 32 which functions as an outlet connector. Accordingly, in the steady state condition, continuous inlet and outlet flow is provided. In order to increase pump eflieiency, each outward transverse end of each vane includes a U-shaped notch therein to equalize the pressure surrounding these ends thereby eliminating suction drag on the vanes.

The foregoing is considered as illustrative only of the principles of the invention. Further, since numerous modifications and changes will readily occur to those skilled in the art, it is not desired to limit the invention to the exact construction and operation shown and described,

and accordingly all suitable modifications and equivalents may be resorted to, falling within the scope of the invention as claimed.

What is claimed as new is as follows:

1. A pump assembly comprising a generally cylindrical housing, a plurality of vane means, each of the vane means comprising a generally rectangular plate having radial edges and transverse edges and each plate including a U-shaped notch formed within an outwardly disposed transverse edge of said plate, rotatable means inserted within said housing and concentric therewith for holding said vane means radially of said inserted means, said vane holding means including a central cylindrical shaft portion and a plurality of circumferentially spaced arcuate hollow separators appending perpendicularly of said shaft, confronting radial wall portions of said separators being in spaced relation for allowing insertion of said vanes therebetween, means for rotating said vane means, means for cyclically displacing said vane means in an axial direction whereby the volume between adjacent vanes is cyclically varied thus causing a commensurate variation in the pressure of a fluid contained between said adjacent vanes, first port means communicating with a volume created between two adjacent vanes, said volume maintained in a maximum condition and second port means communicating with a volume created between two adjacent vanes, said volume maintained in a minimum condition.

2. The apparatus set forth in claim 1 wherein said means for cyclically displacing said vane means include confronting camming surfaces transversely disposed of each transverse end of said means for holding said vanes, said camming surfaces being in mutually parallel relation for allowing the transverse edges of said vanes to rotate thereon.

3. The apparatus set forth in claim 2 wherein said camming surface includes two circumferentially oblong recesses the latter including confronting ends being formed to a greater depth than their respective opposite ends, and each said port means communicating with one of said confronting ends of said oblong recesses.

4. The apparatus set forth in claim 3 wherein each said port communicates outwardly with a tubular connector integrally appending from the radially outward housing surface.

5. The apparatus set forth in claim 4 together with a cylindrical cover for said vane holding means, said cover concentrically connected to engage an abutting end of said concentrically disposed housing, said cover including an interior transverse wall surface, the interior surface of said wall including one of said confronting cam surfaces, and fastening means for retaining said cover and housing in axial and cylindrical relation.

6. The apparatus set forth in claim 5 wherein the combination is fabricated from the material Delrin.

7. The apparatus set forth in claim 5 wherein the combination is fabricated from the material Teflon.

8. A motor driven pump with axially concentric and abutting connection of parts comprising, a port chamber housing, a vane assembly cover, a vane holding assembly disposed between said housing and said cover, a plurality of vanes, each of the vane means comprising a generally rectangular plate having radial edges and transverse edges and each plate including a U-shaped notch formed within an outwardly disposed transverse edge of said plate, said port chamber housing being transversely disposed adjacent the drive end of said motor, said housing including a central bore surrounded by an apertured rubber seal permitting a motor shaft to pass therethrough, a transverse wall of said housing characterized by an outwardly disposed variably inclined surface, said inclined surface including arcuately confronting oblong recesses formed in that portion of said surface characterized by the minimum inclination thereof and inclining outwardly therefrom, a minimum incline surface including the confronting oblong ends of said recesses, said latter ends being formed to a greater depth than their respectively oppositely disposed oblong ends, said vane holding assembly including a hollow axial shaft section for permitting passage of said motor shaft therethrough, a plurality of arcuate separators appending perpendicularly from said shaft in circumferential spaced relation, radially confronting walls of said separators forming a passageway for said vanes, said vane assembly cover including a cylindrical wall portion, a transversely orientated wall portion, the inward wall characterized by a variably inclined surface identical and parallel with said variably inclined surface of said port chamber housing, the transverse ends of said vanes rotating between said parallel inclined surfaces thereby effectuating a cam-like motion of said vanes between camming surfaces.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,743,977 1/1930 Petersen 91126 X 2,154,458 4/1939 Knapp 103--139 2,371,081 3/ 1945 Tucker et al. 2,491,100 12/1949 Frei. 2,966,860 1/ 1961 Maynard. 2,980,030 4/1961 Couturier 103-139 3,166,019 1/1965 Krawacki 103139 3,187,993 6/ 1965 Rhodes 230152 3,223,044 12/1965 Adams et al 91138 X 3,304,879 2/1967 Hanson 103-l36 X DONLEY I. STOCKING, Primary Examiner WARREN I KRAUSS, Assistant Examiner US. Cl. X.R.

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Referenced by
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Classifications
U.S. Classification418/152, 417/410.3
International ClassificationF04C2/344, F01C21/00, F01C21/10, F04C2/00
Cooperative ClassificationF05C2225/04, F04C2230/60, F04C2/3448, F01C21/10
European ClassificationF01C21/10, F04C2/344D