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Publication numberUS3468375 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 23, 1969
Filing dateFeb 15, 1968
Priority dateFeb 15, 1968
Publication numberUS 3468375 A, US 3468375A, US-A-3468375, US3468375 A, US3468375A
InventorsStates William H
Original AssigneeMidway Fishing Tool Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Oil well liner hanger
US 3468375 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 23, 1969 W. H. STATES OIL WELL'LINER HANGER Filed Feb. 15, 1968 FIGJ I -2 a ussnni ll.

2 Shee'Ls-Sheet 1 INVENTOR.

WILL/AM HUGH STA-res.

United States Patent 3,468,375 OIL WELL LINER HANGER William H. States, Garden Grove, Calil'l, assignor to Midway Fishing T 00] Company, Long Beach, Calif., a corporation of California Filed Feb. 15, 1968, Ser. No. 705,853 Int. Cl. E21b 33/126, 33/129 US. Cl. 166-120 11 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Field of the invention Oil well tools and equipment.

Description of the prior art In the past, numerous liner hangers have been devised and used that were set in a cased oil well bore hole by mechanical manipulation of a setting tool. Such prior liner hangers have involved constructions that were unduly complicated, expensive, and suffered from the operational disadvantage that they could be set inadvertently at other than a desired depth in a well.

The present liner hanger, including packing means forming a part thereof, can be moved upwardly and downwardly in a bore hold, as well as rotated in one direction therein without danger that the hanger will be set inadvertently, with the liner hanger being adapted to be set and reset only after it has been subjected to hydraulic fluid above a predetermined pressure, with the setting tool being subsequently moved downwardly relative to the liner hanger.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION A liner hanger and packer assembly that is run into a case bore hole on the lower end of a tubular setting tool and is adapted to be set and reset at various depths therein by sequential application of hydraulic pressure to the liner hanger, and then moving the setting tool downwardly relative to the hanger.

A major object of the present invention is to provide a liner hanger and packer for a cased well bore that is run to a desired depth therein by a tubular setting tool, with the liner hanger being adapted to be set only after first being subjected to hydraulic fluid above a predetermined pressure, with the liner hanger being set and the packer radially expanded by subsequent downward movement of the setting tool relative thereto.

Another object of the invention is to supply a liner hanger and packer assembly that can be set and reset at various desired depths in a well bore, cannot be stuck in a well bore, is of relatively simple mechanical structure, positive in operation, and cannot be inadvertently set by mechanical manipulation of the setting tool.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIGURE 1 is a side elevational view of the liner hanger and packer depending from a setting tool, and prior to being set in a cased well bore;

FIGURE 2 is a side elevational view of the liner hanger and packer in the cased well bore, after the setting tool 3,468,375 Patented Sept. 23, 1969 has been disengaged therefrom, with the hanger set, and the packer expanded into sealing contact with the casing;

FIGURE 3 is an enlarged, longitudinal, cross-sectional view of the liner hanger and packer, taken on the line 3-3 of FIGURE 1 before the hanger has been set and the packer expanded;

FIGURE 4 is an enlarged, longitudinal, cross-sectional v1ew of the liner hanger and packer, taken on the line 44 of FIGURE 2, after the hanger has been set and the packer radially expanded;

FIGURE 5 is a transverse, cross-sectional view of the liner hanger, taken on the line 55 of FIGURE 3;

FIGURE 6 is a second, transverse, cross-sectional view of the liner hanger, taken on the line 66 of FIGURE 3;

FIGURE 7 is a fragmentary, enlarged, longitudinal, cross-sectional of that part of the liner hanger within the oval shown in phantom line in FIGURE 3 and identified by the numeral 7;

FIGURE 8 is a fragmentary, enlarged, longitudinal, cross-sectional view of that part of the liner hanger within the oval shown in phantom line in FIGURE 3 and identified by the numeral 8;

FIGURE 9 is the same view shown in FIGURE 8, but after a third cylindrical sleeve has been moved by hydraulic fluid under pressure to sever a shear pin and free a lock element to permit longitudinal movement of a tubular mandrel relative to a slip assembly; and

FIGURE 10 is a fragmentary, perspective view of a portion of the liner hanger at the location indicated by the numeral 10 in FIGURE 4.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT In FIGURE 1 it will be seen that a liner hanger A depends from the lower end of an elongate tubular setting tool B whereby it can be lowered to a desired depth in the casing C within an oil well bore hole D. A perforated liner E extends downwardly from the liner hanger A into an uncased portion 12 of the bore hole D. The liner hanger A is set in casing C at a desired depth from the ground surface by first applying greater than a predetermined pressure to a column of hydraulic fluid (not shown) standing in the setting tool B, and then moving the setting tool downwardly relative to the hanger A. As the hanger A is set, a packer F also supported on the hanger, is radially expanded to bring it into sealing contact with the interior surface of casing C. After the liner hanger A has been set and packer F expanded, the exertion of pressure on the hydraulic fluid is terminated, with the setting tool B then being disengaged from the liner hanger and withdrawn to the ground surface (not shown).

The setting tool B (FIGURES l and 3) includes an elongate tubing string 14, which is provided with a sealed lower end 16. If desired, a valve (not shown) may be secured to the lower portion of tubing string 14 to provide the sealed lower end 16. First and second resilient packer cups 18 and 20 are supported in fixed longitudinally spaced relationship on the lower part of tubing string 14 by conventional means. First packer cup 18 is located at a greater depth on tubing string 14 than the second packer 20, and packer 18 occupies an upturned position, with packer 20 being in a downturned position.

One or more fluid discharge ports 22 are formed in tubing string 14 between the first and second packers 18 and 20, as illustrated in FIGURE 3. A third upturned packer 24 may be mounted on tubing string 14 above the second packer 20. A body 26 is also rigidly secured to the tubing string 14 above the third packer 24. Threads 28 are formed on the lower portion of body 26, as best seen in FIGURE 3.

The liner hanger A (FIGURE 3) includes a tubular mandrel 30, which is smaller in transverse cross section than that of the interior of casing C. External threads 32 and 34 are formed on the top and bottom portions of mandrel 30. Threads 32 engage interior threads 36 formed on a collar 38, from which collar a circular flange 38a projects outwardly and defines a body shoulder 40. The collar 38 also includes upper interior threads 42 that are adapted to engage threads 28 to removably support the mandrel from body 26 (FIGURE 3). Threads 34 on mandrel 30 engage interior threads 44 formed on the upper portion of liner E, also as shown in FIGURE 3.

The packer F comprises a cylindrical shell 44 of rubber or other resilient material mounted on the upper portion of mandrel 30 as illustrated in FIGURE 3, with the upper end of shell 44 being in abutting contact with the body shoulder 40. The external diameter of shell 44 is less than the interior diameter of easing C. A first tubular sleeve 46 formed from a rigid material is slidably mounted on the upper external surface of mandrel 30, with the upper end of this sleeve abutting against the lower end surface of shell 44. The exterior of first sleeve 44 defines a downwardly tapering frusto-conical surface 48.

The first sleeve 46 has a downwardly and outwardly tapering interior surface 50 that terminates in a flat circular body shoulder 52, as may be seen in FIGURES 3 and 7. The sleeve surface 50, external surface 54 of mandrel 30, and body shoulder 52 cooperatively define a circumferentially extending confined space 56 that is triangular in a longitudinally extending direction, as also shown in FIGURES 3 and 7.

A ring 58 is provided, as best seen in FIGURE 7, that is disposed in confined space 56 and rests on body shoulder 52. A number of downwardly and inwardly tapering teeth 60 are formed on the inside of ring 58, which teeth snugly engage the exterior surface 54 of mandrel 30. Teeth 60 are formed from a material that is harder than the metal from which mandrel 30 is fabricated. Ring 58 has a tapered exterior surface 62 that is of the same longitudinal angulation as surface 50. The teeth 60 permit downward movement only, of mandrel 34 relative to ring 58 for reasons to be later explained.

Prior to setting of the liner hanger A, the first sleeve 46 is held at a fixed longitudinal position on mandrel 30 by one or more transverse shear pins 64 (FIGURE 3). First and second longitudinally spaced rings 66 and 68, respectively, are slidably mounted on the external surface 54 of mandrel 30, and form part of a slip-supporting assembly S. A number of circumferentially spaced, longitudinally positioned bow springs 70 extend between rings 66 and 68, and these springs are in pressure frictional contact with the interior surface 72 of casing C.

A number of circumferentially spaced resilient fingers 73 extend upwardly from the first ring 66, and each of these fingers supports an externally serrated slip 75 on the upper end thereof. Before the liner hanger A is set, the slips 73 are spaced inwardly from the interior surface 72 of easing C, as best shown in FIGURES 1 and 3.

A number of circumferentially spaced, transverse bores 76 are formed in the second sleeve 74, which are in alignment with dimples 78 formed in the mandrel 30, as also shown in FIGURE 8. Balls 80 of a hard material are partially disposed in bores 76 and dimples 78 to prevent relative movement between the second ring 68 and mandrel 30 until such time as it is desired to set liner hanger A. The diameter of each of the balls 80 is greater than the length of the bore 76 with which it is associated. Rotation of the second ring 68 relative to mandrel 30 is prevented by a screw 77, which is supported on the second ring that slidably engages a vertical slot 79 formed in the mandrel, as shown in FIGURE 3.

A flat circular band 82 is rigidly secured to the external surface 54 of mandrel 30, and is so disposed thereon that the upper end of this band is located adjacent to the lower edge of second sleeve 74 prior to the setting of liner hanger A, as illustrated in FIGURES 3 and 8. The lower edge 84 of band 82 tapers downwardly and outwardly (FIGURES 3 and 10). One or more slots 86 are formed in the lower portion of band 82, and extend through the lower tapered edge thereof, as may best be seen in FIG- URE 10. Each of the slots 86 is in transverse alignment with a hydraulic fluid discharge opening 88 formed in mandrel 30, as illustrated in FIGURE 3. A circumferentially extending groove 89 is formed in the upper external portion of band 82. in which groove a resilient O-ring 92 is positioned. as shown in FIGURES 8 and 9.

A third cylindrical sleeve 90 is provided, a lower portion 96a of which is of thicker wall section than an upper portion 9% thereof. At the junction of wall portions 90a and 90b a circumferentially extending body shoulder 91 is defined, as seen in FIGURES 9 and 10. A lower recessed portion 74a is formed in the second sleeve 74, and this recessed portion is slidably engaged by a third sleeve portion 90a prior to setting of the hanger A (FIGURES 3 and 8) When sleeve 90 occupies the position shown in FIGURES 3 and 8, the balls are held in bores 76 and dimples 78 to prevent movement of second sleeve 74 relative to mandrel 30. However, when the third sleeve moves to the position shown in FIGURE 9, the sleeve portion 90b is disposed opposite balls 80, whereby the balls are free to move outwardly from dimples 7 8 to permit movement of second sleeve 74 relative to mandrel 30. The lower end of third sleeve 90 develops into an inwardly extending circular flange 93 that is in slidable contact with the external surface 54 of mandrel 30.

A circumferentially extending groove 94 is formed in the lower interior surface of flange 92, as shown in FIG- URE 8, and a resilient O-ring 96 is seated therein. O-ring 96 seals with the external surface 54 of mandrel 30, as shown in FIGURE 8. A shear pin 98 engages both flange 93 and mandrel 30 to maintain sleeve 90 in a fixed position on the mandrel prior to setting of the liner hanger A. The lower edge 84 of band 82, the upper edge 100 of flange 93, and interior surface of third sleeve portion 90b cooperatively define a circumferentially extending confined space 102 (FIGURE 8) into which hydraulic fluid under pressure may be discharged from openings 88. The extent of downward movement of sleeve 90 on mandrel 30 is limited by a helical spring 104 that encircles the mandrel. The upper end of spring 104 is con nected to flange 93. and the lower end of this spring rests on a circular rib 106 secured to the external surface of mandrel 30.

The use and operation of the hanger support A are most simple. Hanger support A and perforated liner E are supported from the body 26 by causing engagement of threads 28 and 42. The hanger support A is then lowered in casing C to a desired depth therein, as shown in FIGURE 1. Hydraulic fluid is caused to fill the tubing string 14, a second confined space 108 defined in mandrel 30 between the first and second packers 18 and 20, openings 88, and the first confined space 162. Space 162, as may be seen in FIGURES 8 and 9, is of variable volume. When the hanger A is in the position shown in FIGURE 3, the spring 104 tends to maintain the third sleeve 98 in such relationship relative to band 82 that the volume of confined space 182 is at a minimum.

Thereafter pressure is applied to the hydraulic fluid with suflicient magnitude to sever shear pin 98 to force the third sleeve 90 downwardly relative to mandrel 38. This downward movement of third sleeve 98 compresses spring 104 to the position illustrated in FIGURE 4. When the sleeve 90 is moved downwardly from the position shown in FIGURE 8 to that illustrated in FIGURE 9 the balls 88 are free to move outwardly out of locking engagement with dimples 78. Thereafter, mandrel 30 is no longer held in locked engagement with third sleeve 98, and may be forced downwardly a short distance relative to bow springs 70. due to the latter being held stationary relative to casing C by said how springs.

First sleeve 46 is held in a fixed position on mandrel 38 by a shear pin lit). After movement of the balls 80 to the outer positions, the setting tool B, mandrel 30, ring 58, first sleeve 46, and pin 110 may be forced downwardly relative to slips 75 until the slips move outwardly sufliciently to frictionally contact the interior surface of easing C. An increased force is then exerted by the setting tool B on mandrel 30 whereby the pins 110 are severed and the collar 38 and mandrel 30 move downwardly relative to first sleeve 46 and ring 58 to compress packer F and radially expand the latter to bring it into sealing contact with the interior surface of casing C. The hanger A is then set in casing C and the exertion of pressure on the fluid in mandrel 30 may be terminated.

After the hanger A has 'been set in the manner described, the setting tool B is disengaged therefrom and lifted out of casing C. When it is desired to remove the hanger A from a set position, the setting tool B is lowered in casing C and caused to engage collar 38. An upward force is thereafter exerted on the setting tool B, with mandrel 30 and ring 58 being moved upwardly as a unit. Hydraulic fluid under pressure need not be applied to the interior of hanger A when it is disengaged from a set position.

This upward movement of ring 58 forces first sleeve 46 upwardly relative to slips 75, which slips remain stationary in the casing C due to the bow springs 70 which are in frictional pressure contact with the interior surface thereof. Upward movement of first sleeve 46 relative to slips 75 allows the slips to move inwardly to occupy the positions shown in FIGURE 3.

The band 82 also moves upwardly with the mandrel 30, and by the time the slips are in the retracted position shown in FIGURE 3, the band has engaged the lower edge of second sleeve 74. As mandrel 30 moves upward- 1y relative to second sleeve 74, the dimples 78 are brought into transverse alignment with bores 76. The spring 104 concurrently urges the third sleeve 90 upwardly, with the sleeve portion 90a moving to the position shown in FIGURE 8 to force balls 80 into dimples 78 and lock the second sleeve 74 and mandrel 30 together as a unit. Further upward movement of setting tool B results in the travel of mandrel 30 and slip assembly S as a unit, without relative movement therebetween. Hanger A then occupies the position shown in FXGURE 3 and may be moved upwardly through casing C to the ground surface.

Should it be desired, the liner hanger A may be reset in casing C without withdrawing the hanger therefrom. In resetting the tool of the present invention the same procedure described herein is followed. In the resetting of the hanger A, the spring 104 rather than the pin 98 maintains the third sleeve 90 in the position shown in FIGURE 3 prior to the setting operation. Accordingly, the spring 104 must be sufficiently strong to prevent the hydrostatic head of the fluid column in tubing 14 and mandrel 30 from moving the third sleeve out of the position shown in FIGURE 3 to that illustrated in FIG- URE 4. Thus, the hanger A can only be reset if a substantial force from the ground surface is exerted on the fluid column in tubing 14. The slips 75 are reset in the same manner described with regard to the setting operation, but with the first sleeve 46 being moved downwardly by compression of the packer F rather than the downward force exerted on first sleeve 46 by pins 108.

I claim:

1. An oil well liner hanger adapted to be set and reset 'at predetermined depths in a string of casing by a setting tool that includes a tubing string having a closed lower end, two longitudinally spaced resilient packer cups mounted at fixed positions on the lower end portion of said tubing string, with at least one port being formed in said tubing string between said packer cups and an engageable member on said tubing string above said packer cups, which hanger comprises:

(a) a tubular mandrel in which a transverse opening is formed;

(b) first means for removably supporting said mandrel from said engageable member with said packer cups sealingly engaging the interior surface of said mandrel above and below said opening;

(c) a plurality of slips circumferentially spaced about said mandrel and inwardly positioned relative to the interior surface of said casing;

(d) a plurality of resilient fingers longitudinally positioned on the exterior of said mandrel, which fingers support said slips;

(e) second means slidably mounted on said mandrel for supporting said fingers, with said second means being in pressure frictional contact with the interior surface of said casing;

(f) third means for maintaining said second means in a fixed position on said mandrel until hydraulic fluid located in said tubing string between said packers in said mandrel and said transverse opening is subjected to greater than a predetermined pressure, whereupon said third means permits said mandrel to be moved downwardly relative to said second means; and

(g) fourth means on said mandrel for moving said slips outwardly into frictional gripping contact with the interior surface of said casing when said mandrel is moved downwardly in said casing relative to said third means.

2. An oil well liner hanger as defined in claim 1 wherein said first means comprises a collar having an outwardly extending flange, which collar is secured to the upper end of said mandrel and engages said engageable means, which hanger further includes:

(h) a cylindrical packer mounted on said mandrel between said fiange and fourth means that is radially expanded into sealing contact with the interior surface of said casing when said mandrel and collar are moved downwardly relative to said fourth means.

3. An oil well liner hanger as defined in claim 2 wherein said fourth means comprises a first sleeve mounted on the upper portion of said mandrel, which mandrel has a downwardly and inwardly tapering surface that slidably engages the interior surfaces of said slips at a wedging angle.

4. An oil well liner hanger as defined in claim 3 which further includes:

(i) frangible means for maintaining said first sleeve in a fixed position on said mandrel, which frangible means is broken to allow said mandrel to move downwardly by the continued application of a downward force thereon after said slips have been moved into pressure frictional contact with the interior surface of said casing.

5. An oil well liner hanger as defined in claim 4 which further includes:

(j) fifth means for moving said first sleeve upwardly with upward movement of said mandrel to release said slips out of pressure contact with the interior surface of said casing to permit said hanger to be moved longitudinally in said casing.

6. An oil well liner hanger as defined in claim 3 wherein said second means includes:

(h) first and second longitudinally spaced rings slidably mounted on said mandrel;

(i) a plurality of longitudinally extending, circumferentially spaced bow springs that frictionally engage the interior surface of said casing and extend between said first and second rings, with said first ring serving as a support for the lower ends of said fingers; and

(j) a second sleeve extending downwardly from said second ring, in which second sleeve a plurality of transverse bores are formed that may be brought into alignment with a plurality of dimples formed in the exterior surface of said mandrel, and which dimples and bores form a part of said third means.

7. An oil well liner hanger as defined in claim 6 wherein said third means includes:

(k) a flat band encircling said mandrel above said open- (l) a plurality of rigid balls of greater diameter than the length of said bores, with said balls when partially disposed in said bores and dimples blocking said second means in a fixed position on said mandrel;

(m) a third sleeve slidably mounted on said band,

which third sleeve includes a lower inwardly extending flange that slidably engages said mandrel, with said third sleeve when in a first position extending upwardly over said second sleeve a distance suflicient to maintain said balls in said dimples and bores, and with said third sleeve cooperating with said band to define a confined space of variable volume that is in communication with said opening in said mandrel; and

(n) spring means which at all times tend to maintain said third sleeve in said first position, but with said third sleeve being moved to a second position when hydraulic fluid under pressure is discharged from said setting tool into said confined space, which third sleeve when in said second position allows said balls to move outwardly into said bores to permit said mandrel to be moved relative to said second means to set said slips in casing.

8. An oil well liner hanger adapted to be set and re set at predetermined depths in a string of casing by a setting tool that includes a tubing string having a closed lower end, two longitudinally spaced resilient packer cups mounted at fixed positions on the lower end portion of said tubing string, with at least one port being formed in said tubing string between said packer cups and an engageable member on said tubing string above said packer cups, which hanger comprises:

(a) a tubular mandrel of lesser transverse cross section than the interior cross section of said casing, in which mandrel a transverse opening is formed;

(b) first means for removably supporting said mandrel from said engageable member with said packer cups sealingly engaging the interior surface of said mandrel and disposed above and below said opening, which first means includes a circumferential body shoulder that projects outwardly adjacent an upper portion of said mandrel;

(c) a cylindrical resilient packer mounted on said mandrel and in abutting contact with said body shoulder;

(d) a first sleeve having a downwardly and inwardly tapering external surface, which sleeve is mounted on said mandrel, with the upper edge of said first sleeve being in abutting contact with the lower edge of said packer;

(e) a slip assembly slidably mounted on said mandrel,

which assembly includes first and second longitudinally spaced rings, a plurality of bow springs extending between said rings that are in pressure frictional contact with the interior surface of said casing, a plurality of resilient fingers extending upwardly from said first ring, a plurality of slips mounted on the upper ends of said fingers, the inner surfaces of which fingers slidably contact said downwardly and inwardly tapering surface, with the outer surfaces of said slips being inwardly spaced from the interior surface of said casing, and a second sleeve that extends downwardly from said second ring and slidably engages said mandrel;

(f) a cylindrical protuberance located on said mandrel above said transverse opening formed therein;

(g) a third sleeve slidably mounted on said protuberance, which third sleeve includes a cylindrical flange that extends inwardly from the lower portion thereof to slidably engage said mandrel below said transverse opening, with said third sleeve and protuberance cooperatively defining a confined space of variable volume that is in communication with said transverse opening;

th) second means for removably locking said slip assembly in a fixed position on said mandrel when said confined space is of a minimum volume;

(i) spring means that at all times tend to move said third sleeve to a position where said confined space is of minimum volume, with said hanger being set by discharging hydraulic fluid into said tubular string, mandrel, transverse opening and confined space to increase the volume of the latter and permit second means to move out of a locking position, and said setting tool and mandrel thereafter being moved downwardly relative to said slip assembly to allow said first sleeve to radially move said slips into frictional pressure contact with the interior surface of said casing, with further downward movement of said setting tool and mandrel after said slips have been set, compressing said packet to the extent that it radially expands into sealing contact with the interior surface of said casing and will so remain after cessation of pressure on said hydraulic fluid; and

(j) third means for moving said first sleeve upwardly with upward movement of said mandrel and setting tool to permit said slips to move inwardly relative to the interior surface of said casing and allow said hanger to be moved vertically within said casing, with said spring means as upward movement of said mandrel takes place relative to said slip assembly moving said third sleeve into a position where said confined space is of minimum volume and said slip assembly is releasably locked in a fixed position on said mandrel.

9. An oil well liner hanger as defined in claim 8 wherein said first means comprises as threaded collar on the upper end of said mandrel and engages threads on said engageable member.

10. An oil well liner hanger as defined in claim 8 wherein said spring means is a helical spring that encircles the lower portion of said mandrel, with the lower end of said spring being held at a fixed position relative to said mandrel, and the upper end of said spring being in contact with said third sleeve.

11. An oil well liner hanger as defined in claim 8 wherein said third means is a ring that encircles said mandrel, which ring includes a plurality of downwardly and inwardly tapering teeth that are harder than the material defining said mandrel and that engage the exterior surface thereof, with said ring being disposed Within an upwardly and inwardly tapering surface defined by said first sleeve.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 12/1965 Mott 166-208 i2/l966 Mott l66208 JAMES A. LEPPINK, Primary Examiner

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3223170 *Nov 28, 1962Dec 14, 1965Cicero C BrownHydraulic pressure-set liner hanger
US3291220 *Apr 17, 1964Dec 13, 1966Cicero C BrownHydraulic set liner hanger
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3570599 *Jun 11, 1969Mar 16, 1971Brown Well Service & Supply CoLiner hanger
US3946807 *Dec 18, 1974Mar 30, 1976Otis Engineering CorporationWell tools
US4051896 *Mar 18, 1976Oct 4, 1977Otis Engineering CorporationWell bore liner hanger
US8056627Jun 2, 2009Nov 15, 2011Baker Hughes IncorporatedPermeability flow balancing within integral screen joints and method
US8069919Nov 11, 2010Dec 6, 2011Baker Hughes IncorporatedSystems, methods and apparatuses for monitoring and recovery of petroleum from earth formations
US8113292 *Dec 15, 2008Feb 14, 2012Baker Hughes IncorporatedStrokable liner hanger and method
US8132624Jun 2, 2009Mar 13, 2012Baker Hughes IncorporatedPermeability flow balancing within integral screen joints and method
US8151875Nov 15, 2010Apr 10, 2012Baker Hughes IncorporatedDevice and system for well completion and control and method for completing and controlling a well
US8151881Jun 2, 2009Apr 10, 2012Baker Hughes IncorporatedPermeability flow balancing within integral screen joints
US8159226Jun 17, 2008Apr 17, 2012Baker Hughes IncorporatedSystems, methods and apparatuses for monitoring and recovery of petroleum from earth formations
US8171999Jun 10, 2008May 8, 2012Baker Huges IncorporatedDownhole flow control device and method
US8555958Jun 19, 2008Oct 15, 2013Baker Hughes IncorporatedPipeless steam assisted gravity drainage system and method
DE2800856A1 *Jan 10, 1978Jul 20, 1978Baker Int CorpLiner-aufhaengeeinrichtung und bewegliches werkzeug
Classifications
U.S. Classification166/120, 166/208, 166/124
International ClassificationE21B23/06, E21B23/00, E21B33/12, E21B43/02, E21B33/1295, E21B43/10
Cooperative ClassificationE21B43/10, E21B33/1295, E21B23/06
European ClassificationE21B33/1295, E21B23/06, E21B43/10
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Oct 19, 1988AS06Security interest
Owner name: FIDELCOR BUSINESS CREDIT CORPORATION, 1925 CENTURY
Owner name: MIDWAY FISHING TOOL COMPANY
Effective date: 19880224
Oct 19, 1988ASAssignment
Owner name: FIDELCOR BUSINESS CREDIT CORPORATION, 1925 CENTURY
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:MIDWAY FISHING TOOL COMPANY;REEL/FRAME:004994/0755
Effective date: 19880224