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Publication numberUS3468536 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 23, 1969
Filing dateAug 29, 1966
Priority dateAug 29, 1966
Publication numberUS 3468536 A, US 3468536A, US-A-3468536, US3468536 A, US3468536A
InventorsMinshull Allen J, Minshull Glenda A, Minshull James B, Minshull Marilyn A
Original AssigneeMinshull Allen J, Minshull Glenda A, Minshull James B, Minshull Marilyn A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Racket and ball game
US 3468536 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

p 1969 A. J. MINSHULL ET AL 3,468,536

RACKET AND BALL GAME Filed Aug. 29, 1966 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Fig.l.

Fig .7.

' L 52 so INVENTORS Man J. Minshull, Marilyn A. Minshull, Glenda A. Minshull 8| Sept. 1969 A. J. MINSHULL Em. 3,468,536

RACKET AND BALL GAME 2 Sheets-Sheet 7;

Filed Aug. 29. 1966 Allen J Minshufl Marilyn A NinshuH,

Glenda A Minshull & James B. Mmshul! United States Patent 3,468,536 RACKET AND BALL GAME Allen J. Minshull, Marilyn A. Minshull, Glenda A. Minshull, and James B. Minshull, all of Box 175A, Rte. 1, Mercer, Pa. 16137 Filed Aug. 29, 1966, Ser. No. 575,791 Int. Cl. A6311 67/04 US. Cl. 27330 8 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE In a game apparatus, the combination comprising means for delineating a generally rectangular playing area, relatively low divider means extending transversely across said playing area and midway between the ends thereof, a ball adapted to be propelled from one side to the other side of said divider means, rackets for so propelling said ball, the diameter of said ball being a substantial proportion of the width of each of said rackets and of the height of said dividing means. The divider means can be in the form of a plurality of edge-abutting planar members. The playing area can be foldable. Preferably, the ball has an initial rebound characteristic of 40-50% of the drop height.

The present invention relates to a novel racket and ball game, and more particularly to a game of the character described which can be played in a relatively small playing area and which plane exhibits ballistic characteristics of such nature as to be enjoyed by young and old alike.

There are many games or sports played with a ball struck by a racket or the hand of the player, which utilize a divider such as a net to determine proper and improper ball returns. Many of such games or sports, however, require a considerable amount of expensive equipment such as is employed in outdoor lawn tennis, badminton or volleyball. These and other outdoor games and sports, moreover, usually require relatively large playing areas and thus involve considerable expense in grading and in laying out the necessary playing area or courts. In this connection, it should be pointed out that the great majority of private dwellings are lacking in sufficient total land area or in sufiicient level lawn areas to accommodate such large playing courts.

In addition to the aforementioned outdoor sports and games, there are a number of similarly played indoor games such as table tennis or Ping-pong. However, such games require specially constructed and dimensioned tables therefor which are usually inconvenient to assemble for use and diflicult to disassemble and store when not in use. Moreover, the procurement and maintenance of such table-mounted games are both expensive and dif- Among the aforementioned and similar known games and sports, none is adapted for playing both indoors and outdoors as desired. Moreover, the courts of the aforementioned outdoor games and similar games cannot be readily moved when once laid out or installed. Owing to the size of the necessary table for Ping-pong and the like, the latter game cannot be readily moved from room to room within a dwelling or from indoor to outdoor areas.

We overcome these difficulties of the aforementioned and other conventional games and sports by providing a racket and ball game which can be played with equal facility either outdoors or indoors and on any type of relatively hard surface. Moreover, our novel game requires only a relatively small playing area and thus can be readily set up or delineated upon any type of floor surface or area within a private dwelling or upon a porch, patio, base- 3,468,536 Patented Sept. 23, 1969 ice ment floor or lawn area which is frequently provided in conjunction therewith. Our novel game is played with a relatively small racket, a relatively large ball in comparison thereto, and a relatively low divider or net. The bounce and weight characteristics of the ball are such as to preclude the necessity of using relatively large court areas. On the other hand, the ballistic characteristics of the ball are such that the game can be played with a playing area or courts at floor or ground level so as to obviate the requirement of special playing tables or the like.

The ballistic characteristics of the ball in relation to the racket and court surfaces enable our novel game to be played either relatively fast or relatively slow, as desired, with the result that the game can be enjoyed by all age groups.

Specifically, the configurations of the playing area or courts, the height of the divider or net, and the sizes of the rackets and ball do not preclude smaller children from playing and enjoying the game. In relation to known games and sports, for example, young children are not prevented from playing our game as is the case of tennis and badminton with their relatively large and heavy rackets, or in the case of volleyball with its large and heavy ball, or in the case of table tennis owing to the height of the playing table, or by the height of the net as in volleyball or badminton, or by the large size of the playing court as in volleyball, tennis and badminton.

The playing field or courts of our game are of a size that they can be readily laid out or delineated with masking tape or the like upon any relatively smooth fiooor surface found in most homes. The relatively large, light weight ball employed with our game exhibits the slowing characteristics of a badminton shuttlecock for example, and thus is incapable of causing damage if misdirected during playing of our game in a relatively confined location. The size and shape of the playing court is such that the same can be delineated also by usage of commonly available sizes of plywood, hardboard, fiber board (such as Celotex or Homasote) or the like to form the playing court for either outdoor or indoor usage.

During the foregoing discussion, numerous objects, features and advantages of the invention have been alluded to. These and other objects, features and advantages of the invention will be elaborated upon during the forthcoming description of certain presently preferred embodiments of the invention together with presently preferred methods of practicing the same.

In the accompanying drawings, We have shown certain presently preferred embodiments of the invention and have illustrated certain presently preferred methods of practicing the same, wherein:

FIGURE 1 is an isometric view of one form of playing court and divider means utilized in conjunction with the game of the invention;

FIGURE 2 is an enlarged, and elevational view of the divider means shown in FIGURE 1 and taken generally along reference line II-ll thereof;

FIGURE 3 is an enlarged, partial side elevational view of the divider means shown in FIGURE 1 and taken along reference line III-III thereof;

FIGURE 4 is a top plan view of a ball and racket utilized in playing the novel game of our invention, and showing generally the relative sizes thereof;

FIGURE 5 is an isometric view of the ball and racket illustrated in FIGURE 4;

FIGURE 6 is an isometric view of another form of playing court and divider means arranged in accordance with the invention;

FIGURE 7 is an end elevational view illustrating the folded position of the court structure of FIGURE 6;

FIGURE 8 is an isometric view of still another form of playing court and divider means arranged in accordance with the invention;

FIGURE 9 is an isometric view of the game structure of FIGURE 8 in the folded position thereof;

FIGURE 10 is an isometric view of the game structure of FIGURES 8 and 9 illustrating a partially folded position thereof; and

FIGURE 11 is an enlarged, partial, isometric view of the game structure of FIGURE 8 and illustrating a portion of the net and binge arrangement thereof.

During the forthcoming detailed description of the novel game disclosed herein, certain dimensions will be employed with reference to components of the game equipment. Such dimensions are given only to serve to illustrate the relative sizes of the game components and are not otherwise limitative of the invention or of the specific sizes of such components. Moreover, it will be obvious that, depending upon given playing conditions, as desired by individual players, that the relative sizes of the game components also can be varied as required.

With reference now more particularly to FIGURES 1-3 of the drawings, an exemplary playing court and divider means are illustrated therein. In this arrangement of the invention, the novel game is provided with a playing area 10, which is delineated by pairs of longitudinally and transversely extending tapes 12 and 14 or other suitable marking means. In a typical layout, the markers 12 and 14 can be formed from suitable pressure-sensitive tape, which is applied to a wooden, steel-floated concrete, or tile floor or other relatively hard and smooth surface provided either indoors or outdoors. Other suitable marking means such as a chalk stick or chalk line can be conveniently employed, and are desirable for use on less smooth surfaces such as wooden-floated concrete, or asphalt surfaces.

The playing area 10 is divided transversely into equalsized playing courts 16 and 18 by divider means indicated generally by reference character 20, which are positioned intermediately of the ends of the playing area 10 and parallel to such ends. When thus arranged with a pair of playing courts 16 and 18, the game is played by two players in singles play. The game can be arranged for one form of doubles play involving individual service courts by further dividing the playing area 10 longitudinally as denoted by chain line 22 to form a pair of doubles courts 24 or 26 on each side of the divider means 20.

The playing area 10, in this example, is about twelve feet in length and between five feet and eight feet in I width. Thus, the singles courts 16 and 18 are each about six feet in the longitudinal dimension and between five feet and eight feet in the transverse direction of the playing area 10. On the other hand, the doubles courts 24 and 26 are desirably of the same longitudinal dimension but desirably are each about four feet in width.

With reference now to FIGURES 1-3 of the drawings, an exemplary form of the divider means of the invention will now be described in detail. The divider means 20, in this example then, includes a divider strip 28, which 'co-extends in length substantially with the width of the playing area 10. Desirably, the strip 28 is fabricated from a relatively thin, solid, planar material, such as plywood or hardboard. The divider strip 28 is conveniently supported upon a plurality of standards 30 with four such standards 30 being employed in this example for reasons discussed below. It will be obvious, however, that the number of standards or supports can be varied as long as the necessary support for the divider strip 28 is provided. In one supporting arrangement of the divider strip 28, the latter is mounted in transversely extending slots 32 formed respectively in the supports 30, as better shown in FIG- URE 2 of the drawings.

In the disclosed arrangement of the invention, the divider means 20 is provided with a total height of about one foot, which conforms to the ballistic characteristics of the ball described below when used with the aforementioned floor surfaces and with the relatively small sized racket structure also described hereinafter.

The divider strip 28 itself is, of course, less than the total height of the divider means 20 so that it can be supported conveniently by the slotted supports 30 without unduly weakening the latter. As better shown in FIG- URE 2, a space 33 remains between the lower edge of the divider strip 28 and the adjacent surface of the playing area 10. The space 33 does not interfere with playing of the game, since the fact that the ball goes over or under the divider strip 28 can be readily ascertained. Desirably, however, the space 33 is greater than th diameter of the ball to permit delivering the ball by rolling from one court to the other, if desired, when not in play.

The dividing means 20 thus are arranged to stand freely upon the playing area 10, although suitable fastening means, if desired, can be provided to secure the uprights 38 to the playing surface. To promote freestanding, the supports desirably are tapered downwardly and outwardly for at least part of their lengths, as shown in FIGURES l and 2. To facilitate mounting and aligning the dividing means 20, a length of tape or a chalk line or other suitable marking can be extended transversely of the playing area 10 midway between the ends 14 thereof, as indicated by chain line 37. When being mounted, the divider strip 28 can then be intially and easily aligned therewith. Moreover, the alignment of the dividing means 20 can be periodically checked during the progress of a game, particularly when the dividing means 20 are provided in the free-standing form as shown.

For convenience in shipping and storage, the dividerstrip 28 desirably is divided into two or more sections with three such sections of equal length being illustrated in this example. Thus, for a playing field 10 of about eight feet in width, the divider strip 28 can be subdivided into segments 34, with each segment being about two feet and eight inches in length. The divider strip 28 thus is supported at its ends by the endmost supports 30a respectively and at the junctions 36 between its segments 34 by the intermediate supports 3% respectively.

With reference now to FIGURES 4 and 5 of the drawings, exemplary racket and ball structures for use with the game are illustrated. The ball 38 is shown as lying on the racket structure 40 in order to denote the relative sizes thereof. In a typical example, the diameter of the ball 38 is about 40% of the minor diameter of the racket striking surface 42, which in this example is eliptical in contour. In this case, the striking surface 42 is substantially planer and is provided with hand grip 44 of circular cross-sectional configuration. In a specific example, the striking surface or plate 42 can be provided with a minor diameter of about 6 inches and a major diameter of about 7 inches can be surfaced with a sheet of pebbled rubber or plastic (not shown) or other suitable frictional material. The striking plate 42 can, of course, be provided with geometrical or non-geometrical configurations than others shown as long as the relative sizes of the ball and racket are substantially maintained.

Desirably, the ball is fabricated from a light-weight plastic or other suitable material with an overall density desirably in the neighborhood of 2-4 pounds per cubic foot with 2 /2 pounds being preferred for relatively hard playing surfaces. In order to conform the ballistic characteristics of the ball 38 with the relative sizes of the racket 40, the divider means 28, and the playing courts 16-18 or 24-26, the ball 38 is provided with a resilience such that when dropped from a height of six feet, it initially rebounds to a height of from 2 /2 to 3 feet. A convenient material from which the ball 38 can be fabricated is an expanded bead polystyrene plastic of ready availability:

The diameter of the ball 38 for most playing arrangements desirably is between two and three inches and, continuing the specific example of the invention, is about 2 /2 inches. The ball, therefore, is a substantial proportion of the width of the racket 42 and of the total height of the dividing means 20. In particular, the diameter of the ball 38 can be varied between about /3 and about /2 the width of the racket and between about and about A of the total height of the dividing means 20, to obtain a proper relationship of the ballistic characteristics of the ball 38 with the sizes of other components of the playing equipment and with the size of the playing field. More specifically, the diameter of the ball 38 lies in the neighborhood of 30% of the width of the divider strip 28.

Referring now to FIGURES 6 and 7 of the drawings, another arrangement of the invention for forming and delineating the playing area 10' is illustrated. In this arrangement of the playing area 10', the latter is formed from a foldable or separable structure 46, which in this example includes a number of plywood or hardboard sheets, 48, 50, 52 and 53 with this arrangement utilizing four such sheets, of suitable shape, so that each extends transversely of the playing area 10, laid side-by-side. The divider means 28 is supported at the junction between the intermediate sheets 50 and 52 and extends generally parallel thereo. The playing area 10' can be divided into singles or doubles playing courts in the manner described in connection with the playing area 10 of FIGURE 1. The sheets 48, 50, 52 and 53 can be hinged together as described below for folding or alternatively the sheets can be separate and merely laid side-by-side in edge contact, as desired. The foldable or separable playing structure 46 is particularly adaptable for providing a requisite hard playing area 10' upon a relatively soft surface as an outdoor lawn or indoor carpeting.

In a specific example of the last mentioned arrangement of the game, each of the sheets 48, 50, 52 can be fabricated from plywood or a hardboard such as masonite, or for the purpose of slowing the game slightly, at relatively softer fiber board such as Celotex or Homasote can be employed. In general, any relatively hard sheet material can be employed which is capable of maintaining its planarity. The sheets 48, 50, 52 and 53 can simply be placed side-by-side in the relationship shown in FIG- URE 6 without further connection, or alternatively, they can be hinged together as shown in FIGURE 7 to facilitate folding and storage. When so hinged, one of the junctions, for example the junction 54 (FIGURE 6) can be provided with hinges 56 on the playing surface of the sheets, while the other junctions 58 (FIGURE 6) can be provided with hinges 60 on the bottom surfaces of the sheets in order to provide a convenient zig-zag folding arrangement. With the arrangement, only the hinges 56 are exposed on the playing surface, and the latter hinges are disposed in an out of the way location generally beneath the net structure With reference now to FIGURES 8 and 9 of the drawings, there is illustrated another foldable playing field structure 62 suitable for use with the game disclosed herein. In the latter arrangement of the invention the foldable structure 62 is composed of four sheets 64, 66, 68 and 70 of one of the relatively hard surfaced materials described previously. In a specific example of the game structure 62 the sheets 64-70 can be fabricated from plywood or the like of a thickness which can be varied depending upon the hardness or firmness or evenness of the supporting surface. For example, plywood of minimal thickness, e.g., of the order of or A inch can be utilized where desired for most indoor surfaces, or for lawn areas which are exceptionally smooth or even.

Continuing the specific example of the foldable structure 62, each of the sheets 64-70 can be commercially available 4' x 6' sheets of plywood or the like, with the individual sheets extending longitudinally of the playing field and thus delineating individual playing courts 24' and 26, as noted previously in connection with FIG- URE 1.

The longitudinal junction 72 between sheets 64, 66 and 68, in this example is secured in a foldable manner by hinges 74 secured to the undersurface of the sheets so as not to interfere with the playing surface. On the other hand transverse junction 76 between sheets 64, 68 and 66, 70 is foldably secured by a number of hinges 78 and 80. In a preferred arrangement, the hinge pins or the like of at least those hinges 78 between one longitudinal pair of the sheets, for example sheets 64, 68 are removable to permit the complete folding of the game structure 62 to a size equal in plan to one of the sheets, as better shown in FIGURE 9. vVhen in the playing position as shown in FIGURE 8, the hinge pins, presently to be described, are inserted to secure the adjacent portion of the transverse junction 76 and when folding the structure 62 the hinge pins are removed to permit severance of the hinges 78.

Although the hinges 78 and 80 are mounted on the playing surface of the game structure 62 the location of the hinges 78-80 and the transverse junction 76 directly beneath the net structure 20' does not interfere with playing the game, as noted above with reference to FIG- URE 6.

When folding the game structure 62 from the position as shown in FIGURE 8 the game structure 62 is first folded along its transverse junction 76 as denoted by arrows 82 of FIGURE 8. Then, as better shown in FIGURE 10, sheets 64 and 68 are folded back along the adjacent portions respectively of the longitudinal junction 72 and against the undersurfaces of the sheets 66 and 70 respectively as denoted by arrows 84 and 86. The latter folding action is accomplished after the hinge pins of hinges 78 are removed, which permits the component parts of the hinges 78 to separate as the folding is commenced, as better shown in FIGURE 10.

When the playing field structure 62 is completely folded, as shown in FIGURE 9, a desirably U-shaped hinge pin 88 is inserted through the spaced hinge components 78a and 78b of at least one of the hinges 78 in order to retain the folded structure 62 in its folded position for either shipping or storaging purposes. As shown in FIGURE 9 the legs of the hinge pin 88 are inserted respectively into the spaced, pivot portions of the hinge components 78a and 78b, respectively. The U-shaped cor1 figuration of the severable hinge pins 88 also facilitates grasping the pins 88 when inserting and withdrawing the pins relative to the transverse severable hinges 78.

Referring now to FIGURES 8 and 11 of the drawings, it will be seen that the U-shaped hinge pins 88 desirably serve a dual function. Thus, when the game structure is in its unfolded or playing position as shown in FIGURE 8 one leg of each hinge pin 88 is inserted through the now juxtaposed hinge components of each transverse hinge 78 in order to foldably secure the adjacent portion of the transverse junction 76. The other leg 90 of the hinge pin 88, as better shown in FIGURE 11, is inserted into an aperture 92 or other suitable pin-receiving means of the net structure upright or standard 30 which in this example is normally disposed adjacent at least one of the severable hinges 78. In furtherance of this purpose the leg 90 of the hinge pin 88 can be made correspondingly longer than the other leg which is inserted through the pivot portions of the hinge components 78a and 78b. In like manner, as shown in FIGURE 8 the remainder of the standards 30' can be positioned by U-shaped hinge pins 88 which are similarly inserted into respectively adjacent hinges 78 or 80 of the transverse junction 76. When employed in place of conventional hinge pins the U-shaped hinge. pins 88 of the hinges 80, which need not be severable are desirably left in place when the game structure 62 is folded.

The net assembly 20" otherwise can be constructed as described previously.

When playing the novel game and using the novel equipment disclosed herein, in singles play, the serving player stands beyond the end line 14 of his respective court 16 or 18. He then drops the ball 38 onto the surface of the court 16 or 18 and on its first bounce bats it over the divider strip 28 with his racket 40. If the ball 38 hits or fails to go over the divider strip 28, or fails to drop within the opposing court 18 or 16, his opponent scores a point. The ball 38 must be returned by his opponent on the first bounce and bounces once in the servers court before being returned. The players are free to move in and out of their respective courts 16 and 18, except when serving. The serving player continues to serve until a total of five points are scored whereupon his opponent becomes the serving player for the succeeding five serves. After any one player receives fifteen points, the players change courts and continue playing. The first of the players to receive twenty-one points is the winning player.

When playing doubles, the play is conducted in the same manner with the exception of the service, when using the courts 16 and 18. The serving players partner drops the ball 38 onto the court 16 or 18 and the serving player bats the ball on the first bounce. Each player must in turn return the ball 38 over the divider strip 28. Failure of the ball to pass over the strip 28 or failure of the proper team member to return the ball in the proper manner results in a point for the opposite team. The serve is rotated between teams every five points with the team members alternating in serving.

When playing doubles as set forth above, the singles courts 16, 18 can be used and each serving team member in his turn can serve the ball to the opposite court without restriction as long as it bounces within such opposite court. On the other hand, the doubles courts 24, 26 can be utilized, with one of such courts being assigned to each player. Service in such case is diagonally across the divider strip 28 from one of the courts 24 to the diagonally opposite one of the courts 26 or vice versa. Each player when serving must then stand behind that portion of the end line 14 adjacent his assigned court. When the ball is volleyed between the teams, i.e., in play between serves, the ball 38 can be returned to either of the opposite doubles courts 24 or 26, but must be returned by the proper team member in his turn.

In either doubles or singles play, hitting the ball 38 before it bounces, even though it would have otherwise landed outside of the proper court, results in a point for the opponent.

From the foregoing it will be apparent that a novel, interesting, inexpensive and conveniently playable game and game structures have been disclosed herein. While we have shown and described certain presently preferred embodiments of the invention and have illustrated presently preferred methods of practicing the same, it is to be distinctly understood that the invention is not limited thereto but may be otherwise variously embodied and practiced within the scope of the following claims.

We claim:

1. In a game apparatus the combination comprising means for delineating a -generally rectangular playing area, relatively low divider means extending transversely across said playing area and midway between the ends thereof, a ball adapted to be propelled from one side to the other side of said divider means, rackets for so propelling said ball, the diameter of said ball being a substantial proportion of the width of each of said rackets and of the height of said dividing means, said divider means being formed from an elongated planar substantially solid strip extending transversely of said playing area and supported in a plane substantially perpendicular thereto by a number of supporting members, said divider strip being sub-divided into a plurality of segments thereto, said segments being supported in planar and tandemly abutting relationship by a number of said supports having slots therein for engaging said divider strip, one of said supports being disposed at each pair of juxtaposed ends of said segments, and a pair of said supports being disposed at the free outer ends respectively of the endmost ones of said segments.

2. The combination according to claim 1 wherein the diameter of said ball is about A to /2 of the width of each of said rackets and between /6 and A1 of the total height of said dividing means.

3. The combination according to claim 1 wherein said ball has a density of about 2 /2 pounds per cubic foot and an initial rebound characteristic of about 4050% of the drop height.

4. The combination according to claim 1 wherein said ball is fabricated from an expanded bead polystyrene material.

5. The combination according to claim 1 wherein the diameter of said ball lies in the neighborhood of 30% of the height of said divider strip.

6. In a game apparatus the combination comprising means for delineating a generally rectangular playing area, relatively low divider means extending transversely across said playing area and midway between the ends thereof, a ball adapted to be propelled from one side to the other side of said divider means, rackets for so propelling said ball, the diameter of said ball being a substantial proportion of the width of each of said rackets and of the height of said dividing means, said playing area being delineated by means including a plurality of sheets of a relatively hard material capable of maintaining its planarity, said sheets being disposable in aligned edge-to-edge relationship, said sheets in addition being generally rectangular and extending longitudinally of said playing area, hinge means mounted on the undersurface of said sheets for hingedly securing the longitudinal junction therebetween, additional hinge means mounted on the playing surface of said sheets for hingedly securing the transverse junction therebetween, said additional hinge means being disposed beneath said divider means, those transverse hinge means disposed between a longitudinal pair of said sheets being severable, removable hinge pin means for said severable hinge means to permit complete folding of said sheets, at least one of the removable pins being shaped for insertion of portions thereof respectively into a pair of component parts of at least one of said severable hinges, said hinge parts being spaced in the folded position of said hinged sheets, whereby said sheets are retained in their folded position by said pin means.

7. The combination according to claim 6 wherein said divider means include a plurality of supporting uprights, at least one of said uprights being disposed adjacent said transverse hinge means and having pin-receiving means therein, said pin-receiving means being spaced above the bottom surface of said upright a distance approximately equal to the combined thickness of said sheets in their folded position, and said hinge pin portions being insertable respectively into said pin-receiving means and into the pivot portions of said adjacent transverse hinge means.

8. In a game apparatus the combination comprising means for delineating a generally rectangular playing area, relatively low divider means extending transversely across said playing area and midway between the ends thereof, a ball adapted to be propelled from one side to the other side of said divider means, rackets for so propelling said ball, the diameter of said ball being a substantial proportion of the width of each of said rackets and of the height of said dividing means, said playing area being delineated by means including a plurality of sheets of a relatively hard material capable of maintaining its planarity, said sheets being disposable in aligned edge-toedge relationship, said sheets in addition being generally rectangular and extending longitudinally of said playing area, hinge means mounted on the undersurface of said sheets for hingedly securing the longitudinal junction therebetween, additional hinge means mounted on the playing surface of said sheets for hingedly securing the transverse junction therebetween, said additional hinge means being disposed beneath said divider means, those 2,665,908 1/1954 Gray 27330 X transverse hinge means disposed between a longitudinal 2,744,291 5/1956 Stastny et a1. pair of said sheets being severable, removable hinge pin 3,015,132 1/1963 Bunting. means for said severable hinge means to permit complete folding of said sheets, said divider means including a 5 OTHER REFERENCES plurality of snpporting uprights, at least one of said ph Sportill" Goods Dealer April 1962 vol 127 No rights being disposed adjacent said transverse hinge means 1 Page 218 and having pin-receiving means therein, and said hinge pin sporiing Goods Dealer April 1962 vol 126 No means being shaped for insertion both into said adjacent 7 p 218 hinge means and into said upright pin-receiving means to 10 POSIUOI1 sald one upnghfi ANTON o. OECHSLE, Primary Examiner References Cited T. BROWN, Assistant Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS Us CL 2,163,456 6/1939 Youngberg 273-30 15 273-61

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3760456 *Jul 31, 1972Sep 25, 1973Mark MFolding game board hinge assembly
US3814422 *Aug 4, 1972Jun 4, 1974B GirdenRebound board for table handball
US3858877 *Oct 3, 1972Jan 7, 1975William LundstromInvertible floating game board with ping-pong and pool table surfaces
US4307882 *Apr 30, 1979Dec 29, 1981Hay Eric IBall game for indoor use
US4335877 *Jun 27, 1980Jun 22, 1982Long Donald LRound table tennis table
US4779862 *Jun 29, 1987Oct 25, 1988Louis KepplerExercising apparatus for skaters
US5342260 *Aug 6, 1992Aug 30, 1994Joshua Group Ltd.Bumper attachment assembly for lateral movement trainer
US5375837 *Mar 26, 1993Dec 27, 1994Sds Honeycomb, Inc.Folding table tennis apparatus
US5462506 *Sep 24, 1992Oct 31, 1995Joshua Group Ltd.Lateral movement trainer selectively positionable for storage or use
US5470057 *Feb 2, 1995Nov 28, 1995Paddle Games Unlimited, Inc.Paddle game
US20110226165 *Sep 22, 2011Scott BallardConvertible Table and Method of Use
USD741413 *Jun 10, 2014Oct 20, 2015Howard SmikleToy
USRE34320 *Oct 15, 1990Jul 20, 1993 Exercising apparatus for skaters
EP0730888A1 *Mar 5, 1996Sep 11, 1996Strinivasen Krishna BangaarTable tennis net construction
WO1983000095A1 *Jul 1, 1982Jan 20, 1983Henrik SchlubachPaddle and table ball game and method of playing
WO1994022539A1 *Mar 17, 1994Oct 13, 1994Sds Honeycomb IncFolding table tennis apparatus
WO1994025539A1 *Apr 19, 1994Nov 10, 1994Mobil Oil CorpSynthetic layered material, mcm-56, its synthesis and use
WO1997027782A2 *Feb 3, 1997Aug 7, 1997Indian Ind IncTable tennis table
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/475
International ClassificationA63B67/04
Cooperative ClassificationA63B67/04, A63B2208/12
European ClassificationA63B67/04