Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3469905 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 30, 1969
Filing dateOct 24, 1966
Priority dateOct 24, 1966
Publication numberUS 3469905 A, US 3469905A, US-A-3469905, US3469905 A, US3469905A
InventorsBradford J Baldwin, William D Cornell, Paul R Hoffman, Jack A Russell
Original AssigneeBrunswick Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Spot projecting device
US 3469905 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept 30, 1969 9 B.. J. BALDWIN ETAL 3,469,905

SPOT PROJECTING DEVICE Filed Oct. 24, 1966 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 v SPIN {Vilac/TY: was I was @I 65 s @e z@ COMPUTER 672 1 l 7,6 v f I 770 v 722 7% We) 724 V ,l men/s.-

Morof? Marot :Moros Edad/n SYffFMI-fysraM :afn-M 2H' f f ,am

Sept. 30, 1969 Filed 0G15. 24. 1966 B. J. BALDWIN ETAL sPoT PRoJEcTING DEVICE 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Sept 30, 1969 a. J. BALDWIN ETAL 3,469,905

SPOT PROJECTING DEVICE Filed 001,. 24. 1966 I 4 ShQetS-Sheet 15 SPOT PROJECTING DEVICE Filed Oct. 24, 1966 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 United States Patent O 3,469,905 SPOT PROJECTING DEVICE Bradford J. Baldwin, Muskegon, William D. Cornell, Grand Haven, Paul R. Hoffman, Farmington, and Jack A. Russell, Muskegon, Mich., assignors to Brunswick Corporation, a corporation of Delaware Filed Oct. 24, 1966, Ser. No. 588,813 Int. Cl. G03b I 9/18, 21/32 U.S. Cl. 352-39 15 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DSCLOSURE In recent years, an ever increasing number of people have taken up the game of golf thereby overcrowding currently existing golf facilities. As a result of such overcrowding, indoor golf games of the type wherein a golfer may play several holes of a golf course from tee to green have seen a rise in popularity. Customarily, such indoor golf games use a screen-like target that receives the projected image of a scene on a golf course to provide a golfer playing the game with the view that he would 4observe if he were on an actual outdoor course. Computing means are provided to compute the trajectory of a ball hit from a tee area toward the screen-like target which intercepts the ball before it goes a substantial distance, and the computing means are utilized to provide the golfer with some sort of indication relative to the distance his shot Would have traveled.

Systems have been proposed for additionally utilizing the information provided by the computer for operating a projecting means that projects a small spot of light onto the screen-like target and for moving the spot in accordance with the outputs of the computing means so as to provide the golfer with a visible simulation of the flight of the ball relative to the terrain illustrated on the screen by means of the projected image of the scene. However, as far as is presently known, such ball spot projectors are not used in commercialized indoor golf game systems. It is believed that this fact is due in part to the failure of the proposed prior art systems to suggest a suitable projector construction that will rapidly respond to the constantly changing outputs of a computing system. Additionally, it is believed that the lack of ball spot projectors in commercialized indoor golf games is also due to the fact that previously proposed ball spot projectors are overly complex in their mechanism and are therefore impractical in an economic sense.

It is, therefore, the principal object of the invention to provide a new and improved ball spot projector for use with indoor golf games.

More specifically, it is an object of the invention to provide a projector comprised of means including a light source for directing a beam of light toward the screen, means mounting at least a portion of the directing means for universal movement, a first servo motor and feedback potentiometer for driving at least the portion in a iirst direction to cause movement of the projected spot in the rst direction and a second servo motor and feedback potentiometer for moving at least the portion in a second direction different from the first direction to provide for movement of the projected spot in the second direction, a means interposed between the light source and the screen for regulating the size of the projected spot and motor means for operating the regulating means.

Another object of the invention is the provision of a projecting device of a mirror, means mounting the mirror for pivotal movement about two mutually perpendicular axes, first and second driving means for pivoting the mirror about respective ones of the axes, one of the driving means including a movable knife edge spaced from one of the axes and elongated in a direction generally parallel with the other of the axes and a circular post connected to the mirror and in contact with the knife edge.

Still a further object is the provision in a spot projector such as that described in the preceding paragraph wherein the mirror mounting means includes a U-shaped member having its bight secured to a rotatable shaft that defines one of the axes and a means pivotally connecting the mirror to the legs of the U-shaped member to define the other of the axes.

A still further object is the provision of a spot projector comprising an elongated tube having a light at one end, mask means in the tube, a mirror adjacent the other end of the tube, a -U-shaped member pivotally mounting the mirror, a rotatable shaft mounting the U- shaped member, a cam for driving a cam follower mounted on an arm secured to the shaft, means for moving the cam, a second cam, means for moving the second cam, and means including a second cam follower engaged with the second cam for engaging the mirror.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent from the lfollowing specification taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of one environment in which a ball spot projector made according to the invention may be used;

FIG. 2 is a block `diagram of a data acquiring and computing system that may be used to drive the ball spot projector;

FIG. 3 is a side elevation of a ball spot projector made according to the invention;

FIG. 4 is a front elevation of a portion of the mechanism shown in FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 is a side elevation of a portion of the mechanism shown in FIG. 3 lwith portions thereof shown in section;

FIG. 6 is a front elevation of another portion of the mechanism illustrated in FIG. 3 with parts shown in section; and

FIG. 7 is a bottom view of the mechanism illustrated in FIG. 6.

One environment in which an exemplary embodiment of a ball spot projector made according to the invention may be used is illustrated in FIG. 1. Specifically, there is provided a tee area, generally designated 650, from which a golfer may strike a ball toward a screen-like target 652. A scene projector 654 is used to project a scene on the screen 652 that is illustrative of the view from a particular point on a hole on a golf course. Customarily, the scene projector 654 is provided with a plurality of frames or the like each bearing a different scene for projection on the screen 652 so that a golfer may change the scene projected on the screen as he advances his ball toward the hole to reflect the view as would be seen from the point of termination of his preceding shot.

A ball spot projector, generally designated 656, projects a small spot of light 658 on the screen 652 to simulate the position of the ball on the scene in accordance with the parameters of the trajectory of a ball hit from the tee 650 as computed by a computer. As in previously proposed systems, the projector 656 is arranged to be responsive to the computer to project the spot of light 658 in a constantly moving fashion throughout the calculated ight of the ball and to illustrate the trajectory thereof to a golfer playing the game and standing at the tee 650. When, according to the computer, the ball would have come to rest, the ball spot projector 656 will cease to move the spot 658 to depict on the scene on the screen 652 the point of termination of the shot.

A computing system for driving the ball spot projector 656 is illustrated in block form in FIG. 2. One form of a computing system that may be used to drive the ball spot projector 656 is described and claimed in the co pending application of Russell et al., Ser. No. 588,922, filed concurrently herewith and assigned to the same as signee as the instant application, the details of which are incorporated herein by reference.

The computing system includes a data acquisition means that may be arranged with relation to the tee 650 and the screen 652 according to the teachings of said Russell et al. application. The data acquisition means 660l include spin detecting means 662, means 664 for determining the initial velocity of a ball hit from the tee 65 0 toward the screen 652, means 666 for determining the initial elevational angle of a ball hit from the tee 650 toward the screen 652 and means 668 for determining the angle with regard to the azimuth of a ball hit from the tee 650 toward the screen 652.

This information is then fed to an analog computer 670 that includes an X distance determining circuit 672 for utilizing the above information to determine the in stantaneous distance from a theoretical straight shot line that the ball would be at any point in the flight thereof. The direction in which the circuit 672 determines the distance is horizontal and transverse to the intended line of the shot.

The computer 670i also includes a Y distance determining circuit 674 which determines the instantaneous displacement at all times during the flight of the ball as calculated by the computer between the ball and the ground which may be considered to be defined by a horizontal plane in a xed relation to the tee 650.

Finally, the computer 670` includes a Z distance determining circuit 676 which determines the instantaneous displacement of the ball at all points during the calculated flight thereof along the intended line of flight from the tee 650.

The outputs of the circuit 672, 674, and 676 are fed to corresponding electrical systems in the ball spot projector 656. In a manner to be described in greater detail hereinafter, the output from the X distance circuit 672 is utilized to control the position of the projected spot 658 in a right-left direction on the screen 652 as illustrated in FIG. 1. The output from the Y distance determining circuit 674 is utilized to control the position of the projected spot 658 on the screen 652 in an updown direction -as viewed in FIG. 1 while the output from the Z distance determining circuit 676 is utilized to control the size of the spot 658 projected on the screen 652 in a manner that simulates the increasing distance of the ball from the tee 650 during the flight thereof. In other Words, the Z distance determining circuit 676 will cause the ball spot projector 656 to project a spot that will diminish in size as the distance from the tee 650 increases.

'Ihe specific circuits utilized in interconecting the computer 670 to the electrical components of the ball spot projector 656 are described in detail in the aforementioned application of Russell et al. and reference may be had thereto for the details thereof.

Referring now to FIG. 3, the ball spot projector 656 is seen to comprise an elongated vertically arranged tube 700. One end of the tube 700 is supported by a circular collar 702 surrounding the tube 700 and which is mounted on a shaft 704 secured to a stationary, vertically oriented frame 706. The other end of the tube 700` is received in apertures in a pair of plates 708 and 710 which are also suitably secured to the frame 706.

At the end of the tube 700 adjacent the plates 708 and 710, a light source 711 and condensing lens system, generally designated 712 are disposed within the tube. At the opposite end of the tube 7001 and disposed therewithin is a suitable optical system, generally designated 714, for focusing purposes.

Just below the lower end of the tube 700` is disposed a mirror 716 which is mounted for universal movement by'means, generally designated 71S, on an extension 720 that is cantilevered from the lower end of the frame 706.

Also mounted on the extension 720 are rst moving means, generally designated 722, for moving the mirror 716 about one axis and Second moving means generally designated 724 for moving the mirror 716 about a second axis that is perpendicular to the first axis. A feedback potentiometer 726 is associated with the rst moving means 722 while a feedback potentiometer 728 is associated with the second moving means 724.

By merely moving a mirror to change the position of the spot projected on he screen as opposed to moving the entire projecting apparatus, the device has a more rapid response to changes in inputs from a computer due to the significant reduction in the size of the mass that must be shifted.

Near the upper end of the tube 700 and interposed between the light source 711 and the optical system 714 is a mask provided by an iris system and,associated operating mechanism, generally designated 730, which causes the beam of light from the light source 711 to the mirror 716 to be in the form of a spot.

The controlled spot of light from the light source 712 is directed to the mirror 716 and reected thereby to the screen 652 (FIG. l). Because the mirror 716 is universally mounted, it will be appreciated that the spot may be disposed at any point on the screen 652. As will lbe described in greater detail, the first moving means 722 are operative to shift the spot in the right-left or X direction while the second moving means 724 are operative to shift the spot in the up-down or Y direction. The iris mechanism 730 conntrols the size of the spot projected on the screen 106 so as to provide the illusion of distance, the Z directional effect.

Referring now to FIGS. 4 and 5, the first moving means '.722 will be described. A conventional AC servomotor 740 1s mounted on a collar 742 that depends from the extension 720 of the frame 706. The servomotor 740 includes an ouput shaft 744 which is surrounded by a sleeve 746 to which a coupling 748 is secured. The sleeve 746 and couplmg 7-48 form a clutch for safety purposes. The coupling 748 is also secured to the wiper shaft 750 of the feedback potentiometer 726. Thus, the position of the wiper of the potentiometer 726 will be controlled in accordance with the position of the output shaft 744 of the servomotor 740.

The sleeve 746 and the coupling 748 also serve to mount a cam 752. A cam follower 754 mounted on an arm 756 is in contact with the periphery of the cam 752.

The arm 756 is keyed to a shaft 758 journalled in bearing 760 within a bore 762 in the extension 720. The end of the shaft 758 opposite the arm 756 is secured to the bight 764 of a U-shaped member having arms 766 and 768. The ends of the arms 766 and 768 are provided with identical apertures 770 (only one of which is shown) which receive bearings 772 that journal stub shafts 774. The stub shafts 774 in turn support mounting plates 776 on which the mirror 716 is mounted thereby providing a pivotal axis for the mirror 716 that intersects and is perpendicular to the pivotal axis defined by the shaft 758.

A spring 777 is interposed between a bracket 778 secured to the bight 764 of the U-shaped member and a stationary post 779 mounted on the frame 706 to bias the cam follower 754 into constant contact with the cam 752.

From the foregoing description, it will lbe apparent that when the servomotor 740 is energized, the driving of the cam follower 754 by the cam 752 will cause the mirror 716 to rotate about the longitudinal axis of the shaft 758. As noted previously, the disposition of the projector is such that such movement of the mirror 716 will cause horizontal movement of the ball spot on the screen 106.

The second moving means 724 will now be described. As best seen in FIG. 4, the second moving means 724 includes a servomotor 780 that is secured to the frame 706. Referring now to FIG. 5, the servomotor 780 includes an output shaft 782 to which a cam 784 is keyed. A safety clutch arrangement (not shown) such as that mentioned above in conjunction with the servomotor 740 is also provided.

Returning to FIG. 4, the output shaft of the servomotor 780 is coupled coaxially to the wiper shaft 786 of the feedback potentiometer 728. Accordingly, itl will be apparent that the position of the wiper of the potentiometer 728 will be dependent upon the position of the output shaft 782 of the servomotor 780.

As best seen in FIG. 5, a cam follower 788 mounted on the lower end of a push rod 790 and is in contact with the periphery of the cam 784. The push rod 790 includes grooves 792 in both sides thereof and as seen in FIG. 12, rollers 794 pivotally mounted on a block 796 secured to the frame 706 are disposed within the grooves 792 to guide the push rod for reciprocal movement in a vertical plane.

At the upper end of the push rod 790, there is disposed an elongated knife edge 798. The knife edge 798 is arranged to be in contact with a post 800 that is circular in cross section extending between rearward projections of the mounting plates 776 on either side of the mirror 716. In order to insure contact between the post 800 and the knife edge 798, a spring 802 is interposed between a mounting bracket 804 secured to mounting plates 776 at one end thereof and to the bracket 778 secured to the lbight 764 of the U-shaped member to bias the post 800 against the knife edge. Where the projector 656 is generally vertically arranged as inthe exemplary embodiment, the spring 802 may be omitted as gravity will act in place thereof.

As a result of the above construction, it will be apparent that rotation of the output shaft 782 of the servomotor 780 will cause reciprocation of the push rod 790 which in turn will cause the mirror 716 to pivot about the axis provided by the stub shafts 774 to thereby provide vertical movement of the ball spot upon the screen.

The utilization of the knife edge 798 for transmitting motion to the mirror 716 that would cause rotation about the axis defined by the stub shafts 774 insures that movement of the mirror about the pivot axis provided by the shaft 758 will always cause the projected spot to move in a straight line. In this respect, it will be observed that if a push rod that only made point contact with the post 800 were to be used in place of the knife edge 798, for any position of such a push rod other than where the point of contact lies in a plane encompassing the pivotal axis provided by the stub shaft 774 and normal to the rotational axis of the shaft 758, rotation of the mirror about the axis provided by the shaft 758 would cause the projected spot to describe an arc on the screen. This would cause the position of the spot on the screen to vary in the Y drection as a function of the variation in the X direction thereby introducing an inaccuracy in the spot position and the simulation viewed by a golfer. If desired, a second knife edge could be used in place of the post 800.

Turning now to FIGS. `6 and 7, the iris and operating mechanism 730 will lbe described. A servomotor 810 is mounted on the plate 708 by means of a second plate 812 suitably secured to the plate 708. The output shaft 814 supports an extension 816 on which an overrunning clutch 818 and a gear 820 are mounted. The arrangement is such that the gear -820 will be driven by the shaft 814 except when a load in excess of a predetermined amount is placed upon the gear 820 at which time the overrunning clutch 818 will begin to slip and fail to transmit rotational motion to the gear 820.

Journalled in a suitable bearing 822 supported between the plate 708 and 710 is a shaft 824 which has one end connected to the wiper shaft 826 of a feedback potentiometer 828. The other end of the shaft 848 mounts a relatively large gear 830 having a cam track 832 machined in the upper side thereof.

An arm 834 is keyed to a shaft 836 journalled in a second bearing 838 `which is supported by the plates 708 and 710. As best seen in FIG. 7, the leftmost end of the arm 834 mounts a follower 840 which is disposed within the cam track -832 of the gear 830. At the rightmost end of the arm 834 there is disposed a sector gear 842 which is in mesh with a gear 844 that is mounted on a hollow sleeve 846. The sleeve 846 is in turn secured to a conventional iris or shutter mechanism 848 that is mounted Within the tube 700 by suitable mounting means anchored to the plate 708.

As a result of the just described construction, when the servo motor 810l is energized, the output gear 820 associated therewith will drive the gear 830. This in turn will cause movement of the arm 835 about the longit-udinal axis of the shaft 836 in that the follower 840 is disposed within the cam track 832 of the gear 830. Rotation of the arm 834 about the longitudinal axis of the shaft 386 will in turn cause arcuate movement of the sector gear 842 to rotate the gear 844 thereby rotating the sleeve 846 to operate the iris mechanism and cause the latter to increase or decrease the size of its light passing opening to regulate the size of the spot ultimately projected upon the screen. The potentiometer `828 due to its association with the iris mechanism 848 by means of the shaft 824, the gear 830, the arm 834, and the gear 844 will have its wiper positioned in accordance with the degree of opening of the iris mechanism 848.

Suitable stop means generally designated 850 are provided to limit the movement of the gear 844 and the sleeve 846 to preclude damage to the iris mechanism 848. When further movement of the gear 844 is limited by the stop means 850, the clutch `818 will begin to slip thereby precluding damage to the gear mechanism.

The mode of operation of the ball spot projector 656y in conjunction with the outputs provided by the computer 670 is as follows. If it be assumed that a golfer pushed (hit the ball to the right, assuming that the golfer is a right-handed golfer) a shot, the computer 670 Will be provided with suitable information relative to this occurrence by the data acquisition system 660. As a result, the computer 670 through its X distance determining circuit 672 will provide the first moving means 722 with a signal that will energize the servomotor 740 t0 cause it to rotate the mirror 716 to move the projected spot 658 toward the right on the screen 652.

Similarly, if it be assumed that the ball was hit into theair by the golfer, the data acquisition system 660 will apprise the computer 670 of this fact and the latter through its Y distance determining circuit y674 will cause ener gization of the servomotor 780 to move the mirror 716 in a. manner that will cause the projected spot 658 to be raised on the screen 652. This action will continue until such time as the computer determines that the maximum distance in the Y direction has been attained, and at this point, the computer output from the Y distance determining circuit `674 will cause the motor 780 to reverse its direction of rotation thereby ultimately causing the mirror 716 to lower the position of the projected spot y658 on the screen.

As the distance from the tee 650 increases as determined by the computer 670 in accordance with the data provided bythe data acquisition means 660, a signal from the Z distance determining circuit 676 will cause energization of the motor 810 and the resultant rotation thereof will be such as to cause the iris mechanism 848 to decrease the size of the projected spot 658 thereby providing the effect of distance.

It is to be noted that if the data acquisition system 660 informs the -computer l670` that a side spin was placed on the ball by the golfer such as to tend to make the ball hook or slice, the signal provided by the computer 670, and more specifically, by the X distance determining circuit `672, to the motor 740 would be such as to control movement of the spot in the right-left direction to reflect the hook or the slice. In this respect, if it be assumed that in addition to pushing the ball as stated in the foregoing example, a golfter also hooked the ball, it will be apparent that the ball would initially start out to the right and return leftwards as the effect of hook spin became observable. In such a case, the energization of the motor 740 by the computer 670 would be such as to cause initial movement of the projected spot toward the right as seen in FIG. 1 until such time as the hook spin became effective as determined by the computer y670 at which time, the direction of the rotation of the motor 740 would be reversed by the computer output from the X distance determining circuit 672 to begin to move the ball toward the left as seen in lFIG. 1.

While we have described specific embodiments of our invention for exemplication purposes, we do not wish it to be limited to the specific details set forth, but rather, to have the scope of our invention construed as set forth in the following claims.

We claim:

l. A spot projector particularly suited for use with a galf game comprising: means for providing a source of light, a mirror, means for directing light from said source towards sadi mirror in the form of a beam, means mounting said mirror including a U-shaped member and means mounting said U-shaped member for rotation about a first axis generally parallel to the legs thereof, means pivotally connecting said mirror to the legs of said U- shaped member to provide for movement of said mirror about a second axis, first driving means associated with said U-shaped member for rotating the same about said first axis, and second driving means, including a push rod having an elongated surface and means secured to said mirror and slidably engaging said surface, for pivoting said mirror about said second axis.

2. The invention of claim 1 wherein said elongated surface is a knife edge and said last-named means is a post circular in cross section.

3. The invention of claim 1 further including a screen spaced from said projector for receiving the bea-m of light reflected by said mirror, said driving means further including rotary motor means, cam means associated with said motor means and ca-m followers associated with said U-shaped member and said push rod.

4. A spot projector particularly suited for use with a golf game comprising: means for providing. a source of light, a mirror, means for directing light from said source toward said mirror in the form of a beam, means for mounting said mirror for movement about a first axis and comprising a U-shaped member having its bight secured to a rotatable shaft, means pivotally connecting said mirror to the legs of said U-shaped member to provide for movement of said mirror about a second axis, first driving means associated with said shaft for rotating the same, and second driving means, including a push rod having an elongated surface and means secured to said mirror and slidably engaging said surface, said light directing means being an iris interposed between said source of light and said mirror, third driving means for operating said iris, and clutch means drivingly interposed between said third driving means and said iris.

5. A spot projector for use in a golf game having a screen for receiving a scene depicting the view of a portion of a golf course, a tee from which a ball may be driven toward said screen, and a computer for computing the theoretical free iiight trajectory of a ball so hit, said projector comprising: means, including a light source, for directing a beam of light toward said screen; means mounting at least a portion of said directing means for universal movement; yfirst means connected to said directing means for driving at least said portion in one direction and including a first servomotor having an output shaft and a iirst feedback potentiometer associated with said output shaft; second means connected to said directing means for driving at least said portion in a second direction different from said one direction and including a second servomotor having an output shaft and a second feedback potentiometer associated with said shaft; means interposed between said light source and said screen for regulating the size of the beam of light passing to said screen; and motor means for operating said regulating means.

6. The invention of claim 5 wherein said regulating means comprises an iris, and said motor means comprises a third servo motor having an output shaft and a feedback potentiometer associated with said output shaft.

7. The invention of clai-m 5 wherein said directing means includes a mirror interposed between said light source and said screen and mounted lby said mounting means for pivotal movement about two mutually perpendicular axes, said first and second driving means being arranged to pivot said mirror about said axes.

8. A spot projecting device comprising: a mirror, means mounting said mirror for pivotal movement about two mutually perpendicular axes; first driving means for pivoting said mirror about one of said axes; and second driving means for pivoting said mirror about the other of said axes and including means providing a movable surface spaced from said axis and elongated in a direction generally parallel with said other axis, and motion transmitting means connected to said mirror and in slidable Vcontact with said surface.

9. The invention of claim -8 wherein said surface comprises a knife edge and said motion transmitting means comprises a circular post connected to said mirror.

10. A spot projector comprising: an elongated tube having light providing means at one end thereof; mask means disposed in said tube away from said one end; a mirror disposed adjacent the other end of said tube; a U-shaped member having a bight and a pair of legs; means pivotally mounting said mirror on the legs of said U- shaped member for movement about a first axis; a shaft secured to the bight of said U-shaped member and mounting the same for pivotal movement about a second axis intersecting and transverse to said first axis; a -first cam; a first cam follower mounted on an arm operatively associated with said U-shaped member; means for moving said first cam; a second cam; means including a second cam follower engaged with said second cam for engaging said mirror; and means for moving said second cam.

11. The invention of claim 10 wherein each of said moving means comprises a servomotor for moving its associated cam; and feedback means associated Iwith each of said servomotors.

12. The invention of clai-m 10 wherein said mask means comprises an iris; a servomotor for driving said iris; and feedback means associated with said servomotor.

13. The invention of claim 12 wherein said servomotor has a rotary output shaft; a third cam; means associated with said output shaft for driving said third cam and including an overrunning clutch; a third cam follower engaging said cam; and an arm mounting said third cam follower and associated with said iris for driving the same.

14. The invention of claim 10 wherein said means including a second cam follower includes a push rod having said second cam follower on one end thereof and a knife edge on the other end thereof, and a circular 9 10 post connected to said mirror and engaging said knife 2,772,606 12/1956 Walker. edge. 3,143,046 8/1964 Pennock et al.

15. The invention of claim 10 further including rst means for biasing said -rist cam follower into engage- FOREIGN PATENTS ment with said first cam and second means for biasing said second cam follower into engagement with said second cam.

1,228,123 3/1960 France. 736,213 6/1966l Canada.

JULIA E. COINER, Primary Examiner References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 10 U'S' Cl' X'R' 1,800,601 4/1931 Centeno. 240"44'13506352 40 131 2,581,738 1/1952 williams.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1800601 *Jan 7, 1929Apr 14, 1931Melchor CentenoTelevision apparatus
US2581738 *Feb 18, 1948Jan 8, 1952Earl E WilliamsGolf game
US2772600 *Aug 3, 1953Dec 4, 1956Walker Joseph BImage superimposition apparatus
US3143046 *May 8, 1962Aug 4, 1964Flight Res IncCamera exposure control
CA736213A *Jun 14, 1966Philips NvMultiple projector system
FR1228123A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3993309 *Mar 4, 1974Nov 23, 1976Marvin Glass & AssociatesGame apparatus utilizing a display screen
US4001949 *May 9, 1975Jan 11, 1977The Ansul CompanyDynamic fire simulator and trainer
US4160942 *Sep 12, 1977Jul 10, 1979Acushnet CompanyGolf ball trajectory presentation system
US4343469 *May 6, 1980Aug 10, 1982Nippon Gakki Seizo Kabushiki KaishaGolf game practicing apparatus
US5340108 *Nov 22, 1991Aug 23, 1994Donald A. WilsonApparatus for projecting and moving a spot of light in a scene projected on a screen and for controlling operation of a stepper motor used therewith
US7837572Jun 7, 2004Nov 23, 2010Acushnet CompanyLaunch monitor
US7959517Jun 14, 2011Acushnet CompanyInfrared sensing launch monitor
US8137210Dec 1, 2004Mar 20, 2012Acushnet CompanyPerformance measurement system with quantum dots for object identification
US8475289Jun 7, 2004Jul 2, 2013Acushnet CompanyLaunch monitor
US8500568Jun 7, 2004Aug 6, 2013Acushnet CompanyLaunch monitor
US8556267Jul 26, 2004Oct 15, 2013Acushnet CompanyLaunch monitor
US8622845Jun 7, 2004Jan 7, 2014Acushnet CompanyLaunch monitor
US8872914Feb 4, 2004Oct 28, 2014Acushnet CompanyOne camera stereo system
US9416959Mar 15, 2013Aug 16, 2016Donald SpinnerIlluminated golf
Classifications
U.S. Classification352/39, 362/306, 473/156, 352/40, 352/131
International ClassificationG03B21/26, A63B69/36
Cooperative ClassificationA63B2220/35, G03B21/26, A63B2220/80, A63B69/3658, A63B2220/16, A63B2220/30, A63B2024/0031, A63B2024/0034, A63B24/0021
European ClassificationG03B21/26, A63B69/36E, A63B24/00E