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Publication numberUS3470085 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 30, 1969
Filing dateNov 20, 1967
Priority dateNov 20, 1967
Publication numberUS 3470085 A, US 3470085A, US-A-3470085, US3470085 A, US3470085A
InventorsRobin J Parker
Original AssigneeUniversal Oil Prod Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method for stabilizing pyrolysis gasoline
US 3470085 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 3,470,085 STABILIZIN G PYROLYSIS GASOLINE Robin J. Parker, Western Springs, Ill., assignor to Universal Oil Products Company, Des Plaines, 11]., a corporation of Delaware Filed Nov. 20, 1967, Ser. No. 684,173 Int. Cl. C10g 35/18, 35/08; C07c 5/06 US. Cl. 208-143 METHOD FOR 7 Claims ABSTRACT OF DISCLOSURE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to the hydrogenation of hydrocarbons. It particularly relates to the stabilization of pyrolysis gasoline.

It is known in the art that one of the commercially advantageous routes to the production of valuable normally gaseous olefinic hydrocarbons, such as ethylene, propylene, etc., is the thermal cracking or pyrolysis of hydrocarbons, such as the light paraffin hydrocarbons and/ or naphtha fractions obtained from petroleum. Usually, the pyrolysis reaction is effected in the substantial absence of a catalyst, often at high temperatures and usually in the presence of a diluent such as super-heated steam utilizing a tubular reactor or a plurality of cracking furnace coils. Depending upon the characteristics of the charge stock and specific pyrolysis operating conditions employed, the effluent from the cracking zone may comprise light olefinic hydrocarbons, such as ethylene, propylene, butylene, etc., or mixtures thereof, all of which may constitute the principle product or products. In addition to these light olefinic gases, there is normally produced a significant quantity of pyrolysis gasoline which contains undesirable quantities of diolefin hydrocarbons and/or sulfur compounds. The pyrolysis gasoline frequently is rich in aromatic hydrocarbons, but it has been found that usually the aromatic portion of the pyrolysis gasoline is also heavily contaminated with olefin hydrocarbons which renders recovery of aromatics in high purity extremely difiicult. As used herein, the term diolefins and olefins is intended to include contaminating quantities of these unsaturated compounds which are normally present in the pyrolysis gasoline product from an ethylene unit.

Conventional prior art, schemes for producing light olefinic gases, such as ethylene, may charge ethane, propane, or straight-run naphtha fractions containing about 5% by weight aromatic hydrocarbons to a pyrolysis unit. The pyrolysis effluent is separated into desired fractions, one fraction of which usually comprises a debutanized C -400 F. gasoline fraction Which represents,

for example, approximately 1% to 40% by weight of the original naphtha feed depending, of course, upon the charge stock characteristics and severity of cracking. Since the pyrolysis gasoline fraction is heavily contaminated, as previously mentioned, it is usually hydrotreated for saturation of the olefins and/or diolefins and/ or removal of sulfur compounds. Not infrequently, the prior 3,470,085 Patented Sept. 30, 1969 art schemes also charge the hydrotreated pyrolysis gasoline fraction to an aromatic extraction unit for recovery of aromatic hydrocarbons, such as benzene, toluene, and xylene therefrom. Typical extraction procedures utilizing a selective solvent, such as sulfolane or the glycols are well known to those skilled in the art for aromatic extraction purposes.

However, as is Well known by those skilled in the art, the diene content of such pyrolysis gasoline as measured by its well known Diene Value is usually within the range of from 20 to 70 for C -400 F. gasolines. The diolefins pose particular difiiculty in the operation of the hydrotreating facilities since these compounds cause extensive equipment fouling and catalyst bed fouling. So far as is known, the prior art hydrotreating process will experience this fouling from polymer formation to some considerable extent. Usually, the prior art will attempt to improve the on-stream efliciency of the hydrotreating unit by either promoting the polymerization prior to the hydrotreating step thereby preventing the polymer from reaching downstream equipment and/or by utilizing operating techniques and schemes which tend to minimize polymer formation. None of the prior art approaches, however, are completely successful in overcoming the fouling difliculties resulting from the olefins present in pyrolysis gasoline.

More important, perhaps, the prior art schemes do not provide selectivity in the hydrotreating unit. For example, the hydrogenation reaction may not stop with the conversion of diolefins to olefins, but will frequently saturate the olefin hydrocarbons present and in some cases even hydrogenate substantial portions of the aromatic hydrocarbons. Such non-selectivity, of course, results in 'a decrease of desirable products in the pyrolysis gasoline. Even though aromatic hydrocarbons may not be hydrogenated, more frequently, the olfin hydrocarbons are completely saturated thereby significantly decreasing the octane blending value of that portion of the pyrolysis gasoline which is normally utilized in motor fuel. Therefore, it would be desirable to provide a process for selectively hydrogenating pyrolysis gasoline which minimizes polymer formation, minimizes product degradation, and operates in a facile and economical manner.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION Accordingly, it is an object of this invention to provide a method for hydrogenating hydrocarbons.

It is another object of this invention to provide a method for stabilizing pyrolysis gasoline.

It is a specific object of this invention to provide a method for removing diolefins from pyrolysis gasoline without destroying the olefins while simultaneously removing diolefins, olefins, and sulfur compounds from the aromatic portion of the pyrolysis gasoline in a facile and economical manner.

Therefore, the practice of the present invention provides a method for stabilizing sulfur-containing pyrolysis gasoline which comprises: (a) introducing an unstable pyrolysis gasoline feedstock containing diolefins, olefins, sulfur compounds, and pre-formed gum-like compounds into a first separation zone maintained under distillation conditions; (b) withdrawing from said first zone a distillate fraction having a Diene Value in excess of 30 comprising C to 400 F. hydrocarbons including sulfur compounds, diolefins, and olefins, and a residual fraction containing gum-like compounds; (c) admixing said distillate fraction with a hereinafter specified liquid recycle stream and introducing the admixture into a first reaction zone containing a palladium catalyst under hydrogenating conditions including a temperature from 200 F. to 500 F., pressure from p.s.i.g. to 1200 p.s.i.g., liquid hourly space velocity from 1 to 10 based on total hydrocarbon charge and a molar excess of hydrogen sufiicient to convert diolefins to olefins without substantial conversion of sulfur compounds to hydrogen sulfide such that the hereinafter specified liquid stream of Step (d) has a Diene Value of less than 1.0; (d) introducing the total effluent from said first reaction zone into a second separation zone maintained under conditions sufficient to produce a vaporous stream comprising hydrogen and a liquid stream comprising C hydrocarbons containing olefins and sulfur compounds; (e) recycling a portion of said liquid stream of Step (d) to Step (c) as said specified recycle liquid; (f) passing another portion of said liquid stream of Step (d) into a second reaction zone maintained under desulfurization conditions including the presence of said vaporous stream of Step (d) suificient to convert sulfur compounds to hydrogen sulfide; and (g) recovering stabilized pyrolysis gasoline from the efiluent of said second reaction zone.

Another embodiment of this invention includes the method hereinabove wherein said palladium catalyst comprises palladium or palladium compounds disposed on lithiated alumina base.

The selectivity of the present invention is based on the discovery that the unique two-stage system utilizing a palladium catalyst in one stage and a desulfurization catalyst in another stage for hydrogenation accomplishes the desired results of removing diolefins, selectively removing olefins, and removing sulfur compounds simultaneously from various fractions of pyrolysis gasoline including the aromatic portion of such gasoline such that the maximum recovery of the products may be obtained. With respect to the hydrogenation reactions in the first stage utilizing a palladium catalyst and relatively low temperature, these conditions selectively convert diolefins to olefins without substantial desulfurization and without substantial saturation of olefins. The relatively low temperature is that which is below desulfurization temperature for the same system. It was surprising to discover that the palladium catalyst and relatively mild operating conditions could achieve these results to an extent such that the liquid recycle stream obtained from the etfluent of the first reaction stage has a Diene Value of less than 1.0, e.g. about 0.2, and, therefore, can be recycled directly to the reaction zone for diluent purposes. Also, by the use of this recycle stream it was found advantageous to supply maximum heat to the recycle stream and minimum heat to the unstabilized charge stock in order to achieve sufficient temperature for reaction purposes. Operating in this manner, of course, minimizes the formation of gum in the charge stock prior to introduction into the palladium catalyst reaction zone.

Therefore, satisfactory operating conditions for the first reaction zone include a temperature from 200 F. to 500 F., a pressure from 100 p.s.i.g. to 1200 p.s.i.g., a liquid hourly space velocity from 1 to based on combined charge, and a molar excess of hydrogen typically within the range from 500 to 2,000 standard cubic feet of hydrogen per barrel of combined charge.

The operation performed in the second reaction zone of the present invention is primarily one of desulfurization and saturation of olefins boiling within the C to C boiling range utilizing any of the well known desulfurization catalysts. It was found that the conventional nickel-containing desulfurization catalyst (hereinafter referred to as nickel catalyst) was particularly satisfactory in removing sulfur from the C to C aromatic concentrate fractions while simultaneously saturating any olefin compounds therein. By proper selection of operating conditions it was found that no substantial saturation of the aromatic hydrocarbons was achieved. Particularly satisfactory operating conditions for the second reaction zone of the present invention include a relatively high temperature in the range from 550 F. to 750 F., a pressure from 400 p.s.i.g. to 800 p.s.i.g., a liquid hourly space velocity from 1 to 10, and a molar excess of hydrogen such as from 500 to 2,000 s.c.f. hydrogen/ barrel of charge. A particularly useful catalyst for desulfurization and olefin saturation in the second reaction is, for example, nickelmolybdate supported on alumina.

It was noted from the description of the embodiments of the invention presented hereinabove that a portion of the C hydrocarbons obtained from the effiuent of the first reaction zone is recycled directly to the reaction zone in a manner which minimizes the formation of gum-like compounds. Since the pre-formed gum in the feedstock has been removed in the first separation zone, the entire system is now maintained substantially gumor polymerfree. This gum-like compound formation is not exactly understood by those skilled in the art. However, it is known that the dimer or polymer material of which these compounds generally resemble lead to undesirable product quality or to coking or fouling of the second reactor system in the present invention. These difficulties are particularly acute if the second reactor system is operating at an appreciably higher temperature. Those skilled in the art also are aware that it is frequently desirable to admix a diluent with the feed material to the first reactor system in order to reduce the Diene Value of the total feed to the reaction zone to a relatively low figure. Preferably, the Diene Value of the combined charge to the first reaction zone is less than 25 and, typically, will be about 20. It has been found that the pyrolysis gasoline contains, for example, 5% to 35% by weight conjugated diolefin hydrocarbons generally concentrated in the C fraction. These diolefins, as previously mentioned, will contribute significantly to polymer formation in the reactor; however, utilizing the operating conditions previously mentioned, and the satisfactory palladium catalyst including the tWo-stage separation feature of the present invention these diolefins are selectively converted to olefins at a temperature from 200 F. to 500 F., preferably, from 300 F. to 400 F. and therefore problems resulting from polymer formation are minimized.

By way of emphasis, it is to be further noted that the present invention is based on the discovery that the palladium-containing catalyst is particularly useful in effectuating the desired reactions in the first reaction zone particularly when the system is operated in accordance with the practices of the present invention. Contrary to teachings found in the prior art, a platinum-containing catalyst was not satisfactory in the practice of the present invention. It was also distinctly discovered that palladium deposited on lithiated alumina support produced excellent results. The amount of lithium on the support achieved remarkable results in reducing gum formation caused by polymerization of the dienes on the acid sites of the catalyst.

The preferred palladium-containing catalyst employed in the present invention is prepared utilizing spherical alumina particles formed in accordance with the well known oil drop method as described in U.S. Patent No. 2,620,314 issued to James Hoekstra. These preferred catalysts contain either 0.75% or 0.375% by weight of palladium incorporated by way of an impregnation technique using the proper quantities of dinitro-dianisole palladium. Following evaporation to visual dryness and drying in air for about an hour at F the palladium impregnated alumina is calcined at about 1100 F. for about two hours. The lithium component is then incorporated using the necessary quantities of lithium nitrate to produce catalysts of 0.33% and 2.0% lithium in an impregnation procedure and the composite is again dried and calcined. A distinctly preferred catalyst contains 0.4% by weight palladium, 0.5% by weight lithium on a ,5 spherical alumina base. Broadly, then, the preferred catalyst for the first reaction zone of the present invention comprises lithiated alumina containing from 0.05% to about 5.0% by weight of palladium.

The practice of the present invention, as previously noted, is particularly applicable to an aromatic hydrocarbon feedstock obtained from the pyrolysis of hydrocarbons such as napthas for the production of light olefinic gases such as ethylene. As used herein the term aromatic hydrocarbon feedstock is intended to include those feedstocks containing sufiicient quantities of aromatic hydrocarbons to warrant the desirablity of recovering these aromatic hydrocarbons as a separate product stream substantially free of olefin hydrocarbons and sulfur compounds. In other words, the term stabilized pyrolysis gasoline is intended to include aromatic hydrocarbons substantially free of olefins as well as fractions obtained from a suitable feedstock which may be subsequently used in gasoline blending.

The pyrolysis reaction for the conversion of hydrocarbons into normally gaseous olefinic hydrocarbons is generally obtained at operating conditions including a temperature from 1000 F. to 1700 F., preferably 1350 F. to 1550 F.; a pressure from to 20 p.s.i.g., preferably from to p.s.i.g.; and a residence time in the pyrolysis reaction zone of from 0.5 to 25 seconds, preferably, from 3 to 10 seconds. In order for the pyrolysis reaction to proceed subsequently without undue plugging of the reaction zone an inert diluent such as steam, light gases, and the like, is used. The prior art distinctly prefers to use super-heated steam as the diluent which is added to the pyrolysis reaction zone in an amount from 0L2-to 1.0 pounds of steam per pound of hydrocarbon, preferably pounds of steam per pound of hydrocarbon, preferably, from 0.3 to 0.7 pounds per pound, and typically, about 0.5 pounds per pound.

The invention may be more fully understood with reference to the appended drawing which is a schematic representation of apparatus which may be used in practicing one embodiment of the invention.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING Referring now to the drawing, a typical C pyrolysis naphtha stream obtained from a conventional ethylene facility is introduced into the system via line 10 and passed into distillation column 11 which is maintained under distillation conditions. Preferably, the material boiling about 400 F. and pre-formed gum-like compounds are removed from column 11 via line 12 and conventionally passed into a fuel oil system. A distillate fraction comprising, say, C to 400 F. hydrocarbons is withdrawn from distillation column 11 via line 13.

This distillate fraction is heated to substantially reaction temperature by means of heaters not shown, admixed with a herinafter specified liquid recycle stream from line 14 which also contains hydrogen gas and the mixture passed into reactor system 15 containing a palladium catalyst. The amount of liquid material being admixed via line 14 is generally that amount sufiicient to reduce the Diene Value of the material in line 13 to a suitably low level, for example, about Diene Value.

As previously mentioned, it was found that optimum reaction conditions may be obtained by minimizing the degree to which the feedstock is heated, e.g. the material in line 13, and maximizing the heat input through the recycled liquid and hydrogen stream; these conditions being consistent with effective vaporization and preferably limiting of temperature of any single stream to 550 F. and further limiting, preferably, the temperature of fresh feed in line 20 to a temperature of no higher than about 420 F. By utilizing these cautious procedures it has been found that formation of gum in the system may be minimized.

The charge material, including recycle liquid and hydrogen, is passed through reactor 15 over a bed of the preferred palladium catalyst under conditions suflicient to substantially convert diolefins to olefins without substantial saturation of olefin compounds and without substantial conversion of sulfur compounds present therein to hydrogen sulfide. The total efiluent from reactor 15 is passed via line 16 into cooler-condenser 17 for removing heat and the cooled effluent is passed into separator 18 under conditions to produce a vaporous stream in line 21 comprising hydrogen gas and a liquid stream in line 19 having now a Diene Value of about 0.2 and which contains sulfur compounds and olefin compounds.

Operating conditions suitable for the achievement of the proper liquid phase in separator 18 include a temperature from 250 F. to 450 F., typically, about 330 F.

Operating under these conditions, a stabilized liquid stream is passed from the material in line 19 via line 14 into admixture with hydrogen gas from line 38, more fully discussed hereinbelow, and the mixture of recycle liquid and hydrogen passed into heater 20 which supplies sufficient heat for reaction purposes to the recycle liquid and hydrogen. The heated mixture of hydrogen and recycle liquid is passed -via line 14 into admixture with the incoming feed material in line 13, as previously mentioned.

The remaining material in line 19 is passed via line 22 into a relatively low pressure flash chamber 23, according to a preferred embodiment of'this invention. The conditions maintained in separator 23 are sufficient to produce a gas fraction in line 24 which comprises residual dissolved hydrogen gas and light hydrocarbons, such as methane and ethane. These are removed from the system via line 24 and sent, for example, to a fuel system. The remaining liquid stream comprising sulfur-containing hydrocarbons including C minus material and C pentenes are withdrawn from vessel 23 and passed via line 25 into distillation column 26. Distillation column 26 is maintained under suitable conditions to separate as an overhead product the C minus material and C pentenes which are withdrawn via line 27 and sent to recovery facilities. A bottoms material comprising C material having included therein aromatic hydrocarbons and sulfur compounds are passed through pump means 29 into admixture with the hydrogen-containing vapor stream in line 21 which is being passed from first separator 18. The admixture of hydrogen gas and C material is passed through exchanger 30 and heater 31 into second reaction zone 32. Second reactor 32 contains the preferred nickelmolybdate desulfurization catalyst. Proper operating con ditions are maintained in reactor 32, as previously mentioned, to effectuate saturation of the olefins contained in the aromatic portion of the liquid charge to the reactor as well as to effectuate substantial conversion of any sulfur compounds present therein to hydrogen sulfide.

The total efiluent from reactor 32 is withdrawn via line 35, condensed and cooled in exchangers 34 and passed into separation zone 35. Suificient conditions are maintained in separation zone 35 to produce a gaseous fraction in line 37 which contains hydrogen gas and hydrogen sulfide gas which is withdrawn from the separation 'via line 37. The stabilized pyrolysis gasoline fraction is withdrawn from separator 35 via line 36 and sent to, for example, recovery facilities, such as for example a sulfolane solvent extraction system, for the recovery therefrom of high purity aromatic hydrocarbons, such as benzene, toluene and xylene. These recovery facilities are well known to those skilled in the art and have not been shown for convenience.

If desired, the gaseous material in line 37 comprising useful hydrogen gas can be passed through compressor means 39 and the compressed hydrogen-containing gas can be passed therefrom via line 38 into admixture with the liquid recycle stream in line 14, as previously mentioned, for passage into the first reaction zone 15. Also, if desired, by means not shown, the hydrogen sulfide gas may be removed from the hydrogen gas by conventional treating facilities, such as an amine treating unit. In such case, the hydrogen-containing gas in line 38 may be of significantly higher purity than would perhaps otherwise be the case.

7 PREFERRED EMBODIMENT A preferred embodiment of the present invention includes broadly the process or method referred to hereinabove with reference to the attached drawing. For example, it is distinctly preferred to practice this invention utilizing the two-reactor system wherein the first reactor contains palladium catalyst and operates at relatively loW temperature with the second reactor containing a nickel catalyst with operations being performed at relatively high temperature. It is also distinctly preferred that the gasoline portion of the pyrolysis gasoline which is passed through the first reaction zone be separated prior to the second reaction zone so that the desirable high octane blending value olefin hydrocarbons may be retained and recovered for use in gasoline blending.

Specifically, then, the preferred embodiment of the present invention provides a method for stabilizing sulfurcontaining pyrolysis gasoline feedstock having a Diene Value in excess of 30 which comprises the steps of: (a) admixing said feedstock with hereinafter specified liquid recycle stream in an amount suificient to produce an admixture having a Diene Value of less than 25; (b) passing said admixture into a first reaction zone containing a hydrogenating catalyst comprising from 0.05% to 5.0% by weight palladium on an alumina base containing from 0.3% to 2.0% by weight lithium maintained under hydrogenating conditions including a temperature from 200 F. to 500 F., pressure from 100 p.s.i.g. to 1200 p.s.i.g., liquid hourly space velocity from 1 to 10 based on said admixture, and a molar excess of hydrogen, sufficient to convert dienes to olefins without substantial conversion of sulfur compounds to hydrogen sulfide and sulficient to produce a hereinafter specified liquid stream having a Diene Value of less than 1.0; (c) introducing the total eflluent from said first reaction zone into a first separation zone maintained under conditions suflicient to produce a vaporous fraction containing hydrogen and a first liquid stream having a Diene Value of less than 1.0 as said specified liquid stream; (d) recycling a portion of said liquid to Step (a) as said specified recycle stream; (e) passing the remaining portion of said liquid stream into a second separation zone maintained under conditions sufficient to produce a light product stream comprising C olefin and lighter components and a second liquid stream comprising sulfur compounds and C components; (f) introducing said second liquid stream into a second reaction zone containing desulfurization catalyst under conditions including the presence of said vaporous fraction of Step (d) to provide a molar excess of hydrogen, a temperature from 550 F. to 750 F., pressure from 400 p.s.i.g. to 800 p.s.i.g., and a liquid hourly space velocity from 1 to 10, suflicient to substantially convert sulfur compounds to hydrogen sulfide; and (g) recovering stabilized pyrolysis gasoline from the elfluent of said second reaction zone.

The invention claimed:

1. Method for stabilizing sulfur-containing pyrolysis gasoline which comprises:

(a) introducing an unstable pyrolysis gasoline feedstock containing diolefins, olefins, sulfur compounds and pre-formed gum-like compounds into a first separation zone maintained under distillation conditions;

(b) withdrawing from said first zone a distillate fraction having a Diene Value in excess of 30 comprising C to 400 F. hydrocarbons including sulfur compounds, diolefins, and olefins, and a residual fraction containing gum-like compounds;

(c) admixing said distillate fraction with a hereinafter specified liquid recycle stream and introducing the admixture into a first reaction zone containing a palladium catalyst under hydrogenating conditions including a temperature from 200 F. to 500 F., pressure from 100 p.s.i.g. to 1200 p.s.i.g., liquid hourly space velocity from 1 to 10 based on total hydrocarbon charge, and a molar excess of hydrogen, sufficient to convert diolefins to olefins without substantial conversion of sulfur compounds to hydrogen sulfide such that the hereinafter specified liquid stream of Step (d) has a Diene Value of less than 1.0;

(d) introducing the total efiluent from said first reaction zone into a second separation zone maintained under conditions suificient to produce a vaporous stream comprising hydrogen and a liquid stream comprising C hydrocarbons containing olefins and sulfur compounds;

(e) recycling a portion of said liquid stream of Step (d) to Step (c) as said specified recycle liquid;

(f) passing another portion of said liquid stream of Step (d) into a second reaction zone maintained under desulfurization conditions including the presence of said vaporous stream of Step (d) sufiicient to convert sulfur compounds to hydrogen sulfide; and,

(g) recovering stabilized pyrolysis gasoline from the etfiuent of said second reaction zone.

2. Method according to claim 1 wherein said palladium catalyst comprises palladium or palladium compound deposited on a lithiated alumina base.

3. Method according to claim 1 wherein said distillate fraction of Step (b) has a Diene Value in excess of 50.

4. Method according to claim 2 wherein said stabilized pyrolysis gasoline includes aromatic hydrocarbons substantially free of olefins.

5. Method for stabilizing sulfur-containing pyrolysis gasoline feedstock having a Diene Value in excess of 30 which comprises the steps of:

(a) admixing said feedstock with hereinafter specified liquid recycle stream in an amount sufiicient to produce an admixture having a Diene Value of less than 25;

(b) passing said admixture into a first reaction zone containing a hydrogenating catalyst comprising from 0.05% to 5.0% by weight palladium on an alumina base containing from 0.3% to 2.0% by weight lithium maintained under hydrogenating conditions including a temperature from 200 F. to 500 F pressure from p.s.i.g. to 1200 p.s.i.g., liquid hourly space velocity from 1 to 10 based on said admixture, and a molar excess of hydrogen, sufiicient to convert dienes to olefins without substantial conversion of sulfur compounds to hydrogen sulfide and suflicient to produce a hereinafter specified liquid stream having a Diene Value of less than 1.0;

(c) introducing the total efiluent from said first reaction zone into a first separation zone maintained under conditions sufiicient to produce a vaporous fraction containing hydrogen and a first liquid stream having a Diene Value of less than 1.0 as said specified liquid stream;

(d) recycling a portion of said liquid to Step (a) as said specified recycle stream;

(e) passing the remaining portion of said liquid stream into a second separation zone maintained under conditions suflicient to produce a light product stream comprising C olefin and lighter components and a second liquid stream comprising sulfur compounds and C,+ components;

(f) introducing said second liquid stream into a second reaction zone containing desulfurization catalyst under conditions including the presence of said vaporous fraction of Step (d) to provide a molar excess of hydrogen, a temperature from 550 F. to 750 F., pressure from 400 p.s.i.g. to 800 p.s.i.g., and a liquid hourly space velocity from 1 to 10, sufiicient to substantially convert sulfur compounds to hydrogen sulfide; and,

(g) recovering stabilized pyrolysis gasoline from the efiiuent of said second reaction zone.

9 10 6. Method according to claim 5 wherein said desulfuri- 3,239,449 3/ 1966 Graven et a1. 208--143 zation catalyst comprises a nickel-containing catalyst. 3,310,485 3/1967 Bercik et a1. 208143 7. Method according to claim 6 wherein a hydrogen- 3,394,199 7/1968 Eng et a1. 208-143 containing gas stream is separated from the effluent of said second reaction zone and returned to the first re- 5 HERBERT LEVINE, Primary Examiner action zone of Step (b) as at least part of said molar excess of hydrogen.

208-57; 260-477 References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 10 3,221,078 11/1965 Keith et a1. 208-143

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3221078 *Jul 6, 1961Nov 30, 1965Engelhard Ind IncSelective hydrogenation of olefins in dripolene
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3537981 *May 7, 1969Nov 3, 1970Universal Oil Prod CoMethod for stabilizing pyrolysis gasoline
US3671603 *Jun 10, 1970Jun 20, 1972Eastman Kodak CoButene recovery
US3764521 *Oct 18, 1971Oct 9, 1973Dow Chemical CoProcess for the upgrading of heavy cracking residues by hydrogenation
US3969222 *Feb 21, 1975Jul 13, 1976Universal Oil Products CompanyHydrogenation and hydrodesulfurization of hydrocarbon distillate with a catalytic composite
US4208271 *Nov 29, 1978Jun 17, 1980Institut Francais Du PetroleProcess for the selective hydrogenation of gasolines comprising both gum-generating compounds and undesirable sulfur compounds
US4235701 *Mar 30, 1979Nov 25, 1980Atlantic Richfield CompanyAromatics from dripolene
US5057635 *Feb 8, 1990Oct 15, 1991UopProcess for isomerizing olefins in gasoline streams
US5157178 *May 20, 1991Oct 20, 1992UopProcess for producing oxygenated gasoline
US5254789 *Aug 28, 1992Oct 19, 1993UopProcess for isomerizing olefins in gasoline streams
US5430221 *Oct 19, 1993Jul 4, 1995UopProcess for isomerizing olefins in gasoline streams
US6090270 *Jan 22, 1999Jul 18, 2000Catalytic Distillation TechnologiesIntegrated pyrolysis gasoline treatment process
US6677496 *Oct 23, 2001Jan 13, 2004David NetzerProcess for the coproduction of benzene from refinery sources and ethylene by steam cracking
EP0011906A1 *Dec 3, 1979Jun 11, 1980Shell Internationale Research Maatschappij B.V.Process for selective hydrogenation of dienes in pyrolysis gasoline
EP0582723A1 *Aug 4, 1992Feb 16, 1994NEUMANN + STALLHERM GmbHProcess for upgrading crude benzene
EP0685552A1May 29, 1995Dec 6, 1995Institut Francais Du PetroleProcess and installation for the selective hydrogenation of catalytic cracking gasoline
EP1702045A1 *Dec 23, 2003Sep 20, 2006China Petroleum & Chemical CorporationA process for reducing sulfur and olefin contents in gasoline
EP1702045A4 *Dec 23, 2003Aug 17, 2011China Petroleum & ChemicalA process for reducing sulfur and olefin contents in gasoline
WO2000043467A1 *Jan 14, 2000Jul 27, 2000Catalytic Distillation TechIntegrated pyrolysis gasoline treatment process
Classifications
U.S. Classification208/143, 585/841, 585/273, 208/57
International ClassificationC10G65/06, C10G45/40
Cooperative ClassificationC10G2400/02, C10G45/40
European ClassificationC10G45/40