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Publication numberUS3471978 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 14, 1969
Filing dateOct 31, 1966
Priority dateOct 31, 1966
Publication numberUS 3471978 A, US 3471978A, US-A-3471978, US3471978 A, US3471978A
InventorsFenwick Jay G
Original AssigneeStreater Ind Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Display fixturing
US 3471978 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 14, 1969 J. G. FENWICK 3,471,978

DISPLAY FIXTURING Filed Oct. 31, 1966 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 I N VENTOR.

JAY G. FENWICK A Horn e y Oct. 14, 1969 J. G. FENWICK DISPLAY FIXTURING 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Oct- 3l, 1966 Attorney Oct. 14, 1969 J. G. FENWICK 3,471,978

DISPLAY FIXTURING Filed Oct. :51, 1966 3 Sheets-Sheet a FIG 3a I N VEN TOR.

(D JAY e. FENWICK Aflomev United States Patent 3,471,978 DISPLAY FIXTURING Jay G. Fenwick, Albert Lea, Minn., assignor, by mesne assignments, to Streater Industries, Inc, Albert Lea,

MillIL, a corporation of Minnesota Filed Oct. 31, 1966, Ser. No. 590,832 Int. Cl. A47f /00; A47g 29/02; 1204f 19/06 US. Cl. 52-416 6 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE The present invention relates to display fixturing for removably retaining a panel in a pair of first and second oppositely disposed, elongated pockets. A standard having a longitudinal side and a face on each end of the longitudinal sides is provided with a panel retainer. The panel retainer is provided with a central section and one of the opposed elongated pockets secured to the central section and slidable along one of the end faces. A resilient structure is interposed between the central section of the panel retainer and the longitudinal side of the standard for biasing the first pocket toward the panel to removably retain the panel in the pair of oppositely disposed first and second pockets. The panel may be urged toward the first pocket to collapse the resilient structure and permit removal of the panel from the second pocket.

In the past, wall systems have been provided in retail stores for dividing customer areas from stock areas. In addition, such wall systems have been utilized for supporting shelving, display cases and other fixtures for displaying goods to customers. Usually, the wall systems have been of a more or less permanent nature inasmuch as it has required considerable time and labor to modify the wall system once it has been constructed in place.

A characteristic of such prior wall systems is that of relatively high cost. Moreover, the systems have utilized as the main vertical support member, either single or double slotted standards, but the systems have not been adapted to use both single and double slotted standards. Further, vertical wall sections, such as panels, of the prior wall systems have been mounted permanently to or between the slotted standards. Accordingly, it has been necessary to remove nails, screws or other relatively permanent fasteners in order to dismantle the wall. If a permanent wall panel in the center of the wall system must be removed, it has been necessary to start the disassembly operation at one end of the wall and proceed to take down all the panels prior to removing the center wall panel.

Furthermore, the prior wall systems have utilized wall panels having bevelled edges. As a result, standard wall panels cannot be used, and special operations which are not easily performed in the field must be used to prepare a new wall panel if one is damaged during installation. In addition, most prior wall systems require wall panels that must be factory fabricated because of the close tolerances which are required to maintain module centers. A panel that is slighlty over size can in most cases be installed, but the dimensional error will multiply even in short runs. As a result, base assemblies, bunkers, tables, shelving, hangrod units, and wall hanging cases of many types cannot be installed because of the loss of the modular center line dimensions.

In addition to the relatively permanent nature of such prior wall systems, a number of such wall systems are inacceptable from the decor or aesthetic standpoint because the heavy steel facia of the slotted standards is exposed.

In an endeavor to provide more flexibility in display fixturing and to reduce the labor involved in modifying a wall system which has been installed, attempts have been made to provide individually removable wall panels between the upright standards. While in some cases the wall panels have been removable, this function has been provided by slotting the edges of the wall panels. The slotting operation is costly and, in general, cannot be easily accomplished in the field during the installation of a wall system. Thus, while such slotting operation may be suitable for a completely prefabricated installation, it is still desirable to provide a wall system which uses only standard wall panels.

Other attempts to provide removable wall panels have used clips and continuous moldings which extend behind the panels and are hooked over anchor points on the standards. In these situations, the panels are difficult to install because the anchor points or locking positions are hidden and the installer must depend on blind fastening. Panels can become disengaged and fall out or create alignment problems. Panels applied by such existing methods are loose and, when used in heavy traffic areas or where the noise level is high, they rattle or create a serious acousitcal problem.

Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide new and improved display fixturing which is relatively low in cost and which utilizes relatively few component parts.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a wall system which may be utilized in conjunction with both single and double slotted standards.

Still another object of the present invention is to provide display fixturing including a vertical wall system which is provided with easily removable, standard wall panels.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a pair of oppositely disposed, slotted, vertical standards for removably retaining veritcal wall panels in a wall system.

A still further object of the present invention resides in the provision of a channel shaped retainer mounted for movement relative to each of two oppositely disposed, vertical standards of a wall system, wherein each retainer is urged toward the other to removably retain vertical wall panels.

A related object of the present invention is to provide in a Wall system, panel retainers which are relatively movable in a horizontal direction to permit reception of vertical wall panels having non-uniform horizontal dimensions, such that the vertical wall panels are rigidly retained.

With these and other objects in view, the present invention contemplates display fixturing which may be in the form of a wall system including vertical wall panels which are easily removable yet firmly retained in position. The wall system may include a series of generally H-shaped modular components, including single or double slotted vertical standards interconnected with horizontally extending tie braces. When the modular components are utilized to form a wall system, rather than a short, individual wall unit such as a display fixture, a panel retainer having a resilient member, such as a spring, may be provided on each side of each vertical standard. On the other hand, only one retainer is used for each standard when a display fixture is provided with removable panels according to the present invention.

Channels are formed on opposite edges of each panel retainer. The retainers are biased toward each other by the springs for retaining a standard wall panel between the oppositely disposed channels formed in opposite pairs of the panel retainers.

The panel is mounted in the opposite channels by inserting one side of the panel into one channel and urging the channel toward the associated standard to provide sufiicient horizontal distance to allow insertion of the opposite side of the panel into the channel of the opposite panel retainer. With the opposite edge of the panel received in the opposite channel, the panel is released whereupon the springs urge the channels into firm engagement with the opposite sides of the panel to retain the panel in an upright position. The biasing action of the spnngs on the panel retainers exposes the single or double row of slots provided in the standard so that shelf brackets may be inserted into the slots if desired. Additionally, hooks provided on display fixture leg structures may be inserted into the slots to form the base of a display fixture which utilizes the wall panel as the back member.

The wall panel may be easily removed from the standards by merely urging the panel horizontally toward one of the standards to compress the springs against such standard and to release the other side of the panel from engagement with the opposite channel In th1s manner, the color or type of wall panels which are used can be easily changed in accordance with changing decor requirements or with seasonal changes. In addition, the ease of wall panel removal permits easy acceess to and utilization of storage space behind the wall system.

These and other objects will become readily apparent from the following details of a preferred embodiment of the present invention in connection with the accompanying drawings, wherein like reference characters refer to the same or similar parts throughout the several views and in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a vertical wall system provided with removable wall panels in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged view of the wall system of FIG. 1 illustrating wall panel retainers which are slidable relative to a single slotted standard of the wall system for removaby retaining a wall panel;

FIGS. 3a, 3b and 3c are cross-sectional views taken along line 3-3 in FIG. 2 illustrating the procedure used to insert a wall panel into opposite wall panel retainers; and

FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional view showing grooved wall panels received in and covering the wall panel retainers.

Referring now to FIG. 1 of the drawings, there is shown a perspective view of display fixturing embodied in a wall system 12 which may be constructed according to the principles of the present invention. In the alternative, the display fixturing 10 according to the present invention may be illustrated by a free standing, wall display fixture 14 which may be placed in line with the wall system 12.

The wall system 12 may include a ceiling support 16, such as a wooden 2 x 4, secured to the ceiling 18 of a building such as a store. Beneath the support 16, there is a base 22 mounted on the floor 24 of the store for defining a plane along which the wall system 12 extends. Mounted on the base 22 is a bottom panel retainer 26 which is generally U-shaped and is provided with a pair of channel-shaped grooves 28 which open upwardly. A series of short and long standards 32 and 33, respectively, provided with either single or double rows of slots 35, are shown mounted on the bottom panel retainer 26 at uniformly spaced intervals and extend upwardly toward the support 16. Ceiling ties 34 depend from the ceiling support 16 at uniform intervals and extend into the long, hollow standards 33 for maintaining the standards 33 vertical. Top cap 36 extends horizontally between pairs of standards 33 and are provided with tabs 38 for supporting the short standards 32. Between the ceiling sup- P and the p ps 36 there may be mounted common wood 2 x 4 studding for supporting an ordinary wall structure, such as dry wall construction, to provide a wall surface 42 extending from the top cap 36 to the ceiling 18. This structure may be fabricated from the relatively permanent dry wall construction inasmuch as the only changes which are usually made to the wall surface 42 between the top cap 36 and the ceiling 18 are color changes which are effected easily by painting the wall surface 42.

In many installations, however, relatively easy access must be provided to the area behind the wall system 12 where, for example, a service panel 44 having circuit breakers 48 or wall outlets 46 may be located. To permit such easy access, the standards 32 and 33 are substantially surrounded by a pair of oppositely disposed wall panel retainers 52 which are resiliently biased away from the standards 32 and 33. Standard panels 54, such as sheets of plywood, pegboard, glass or other suitable material, are retained by the wall panel retainers 52 in a vertical position as shown in FIG. 1. Edges 55 of the panels 54 need not have received any special machining other than that required to meet standard dimensional tolerances. The panels 54 may be used. for example, as the back of a display in conjunction with shelf brackets 56 for supporting horizontally extending shelves 58. In addition, the panels 54 may be used as back members in conjunction with leg assemblies 62 which are provided with hooked tabs (not shown) which extend into and engage the slots 35 provided in the standards 32 and 33 to provide a base 64 for a display fixture 66. Also, spaced brackets 63 which support cornices 72 may engage the slots 35 to provide an. easily removable cornice assembly which may support lighting fixtures 74 or other suitable equipment for permitting ready visibility of merchandise 76 displayed on the shelves 58.

Slotted standards 78 may also be provided as the vertical members of the fixture 14. Leg assemblies similar to the assemblies 62 may be used to maintain the fixture 14 upright. A wall panel retainer 52 is provided adjacent to each standard 78 of the fixture 14 for removably retaining a panel 54 in the same manner as the panels 54 of the Wall system 12 are retained.

Referring now in detail to FIG. 2, there is shown a perspective view of one of the slotted standards 32 or 33. The standards 32, 33 and 78 are fabricated with end faces 82 and longitudinal sides 84 between the end faces 82. The standard 32 is shown mounted vertically and secured to to top cap 36 and to the bottom panel retainer 26.

The standards 32 and 33 include fasteners 86 which are provided with a slot 88 for receiving tabs 92 which are formed on the ends 94 of the tie braces 96 for retaining the tie braces rigidly secured to the standards 32 and 33. The tie braces 96 maintain lateral rigidity of the standards 32 and 33 so that the wall system is sturdy. Side walls 98 of the fasteners 86 extend outwardly from the longitudinal side 84 of the standards 32 and 33 to position the end 94 of the tie brace at a given distance from the longitudinal side 84 of the standards 32 and 33.

On each side 84 of the standards 32 and 33, there is provided one of the wall panel retainers 52. The retainers 52 may be fabricated from rolled steel stock, for example, into a generally U-shaped section 102 corresponding generally to the cross-sectional configuration of the standards 32 and 33. Thus, the U-shaped section 102 has side walls 104 and a longer intermediate section 106 connecting the side walls 104. A channel-shaped extension or pocket 108 is formed on each opposite side wall 104 of the intermediate section 102. The width of the pockets 108 is sufficient to receive one of the edges 55 of the panels 54.

Each wall panel retainer 52 which is utilized in conjunction with one of the standards 32 and 33 is provided with an opening 112 which corresponds to the size of the fastener 86 secured to the standard 32 or 33. The opening 112 permits the wall panel retainer 52 to be inserted over the fastener 86 just prior to the assembly of the tie brace 96 with the fastener 86.

The intermediate section 106 of the wall panel retainer 52 is provided with offset sections 114. Resilient, generally B-shaped springs 116 are provided with a central flat section 118 which extends under the offset sections 114 and are retained thereby to secure the springs 116 to the wall panel retainer 52. The offset sections 114 are spaced at selected intervals, such as 12 inches, along the length of the wall panel retainer 52 to mount the springs 116 at frequent intervals. Each spring 116 may be designed to exert a substantial force, such as ten pounds, against the wall panel retainer 52 so that a panel 54 received in the opposite pockets 108 of the retainers 52 is securely held in position. The action of the springs 116 also exposes the slots 35 for reception of the brackets 56, for example.

Referring now to FIGS. 3a, 3b and 3c, the operation of the wall system 12 of the present invention may be understood. Spaced standards 124 and 126, similar to the standards 32 and 33, are shown (in cross-section) including the slots 35 formed in opposite end faces 82 thereof. The standard 124 is shown supporting a bracket 128 which extends outwardly therefrom in a direction parallel to the longitudinal axis of the standard 124. A pair of the wall panel retainers 52 is shown adjacent to opposite sides 84 of the standards 124 and 126. It may be noted that each intermediate section 106 of the wall panel retainers 52 is slightly longer than the longitudinal side 84 of the standards 124 and 126, so that a snug sliding engage-ment exists between the end faces 82 of the standards and the side walls 104 of the wall panel retainer 52. The springs 116 are interposed between the wall panel retainers 52 and the longitudinal sides 84 of the standards.

In FIG. 3a, there is shown the first step in mounting one of the panels 54 in vertical position in the wall system 12. It is noted that the wall panel retainer 52 is shown urged by the spring 116 so the left so that the intermediate section 106 of the wall panel retainer 52 abuts against the edge 94 of the tie brace 96. Thus, the wall panel retainer 52 is initially in what may be termed an out position wherein the intermediate section 106 is at the maximum permissible distance away from the standard 124. With the wall panel retainer 52 so positioned, the edge 55 of one of the panels 54 is inserted into the pocket 108 of the wall panel retainer 52.

As shown in FIG. 3b, the wall panel 54 is then urged to the right to compress the spring 116 and advance the pocket 108 of the wa 11 panel retainer to the right. The wall panel retainer 52 may tip or pivot slightly inasmuch as only one panel 54 is being inserted. When the panels 54 are inserted simultaneously into both pockets 108 of a given wall panel retainer 52, then the retainer slides along the end faces 82 without tipping. The movement of the panel 54 to the right is effective to permit reception of the opposite edge 55 of the panel 54 into the pocket 108 of the wall panel retainer to the right. The panel 54 is then released to permit the resilient action of the springs 116 to move the panel 54 into the position shown in FIG. 3c.

It may be appreciated that despite variations in the lateral dimensions of the panels 54, the springs 116 will be effective to snugly urge the opposite wall panel retainers 52 into engagement with the panels 54 to produce a tight fit for retaining the panels 54 in their vertical upright positions to form the wall system 12. It may be appreciated from FIGS. 3a-3c, that with the panels 54 having a generally uniform horizontal dimension, a space 132 will remain between adjacent edges 134 of the pockets 108 of the wall panel retainers 52 which straddle a single standard 122. The space 132 will be just sufficient to receive the shelf bracket 128, thus, when the wall system 12 is viewed as shown in FIG. 1, the space 132 that is visible between adjacent retainer pockets 108 is minimized. The only visible portion of the standards 124 and 126 is the row of slots 35 which must be exposed to permit use of the brackets. Thus, the entire end face 82 of the standards is not exposed, which renders the wall system 12 useful in a wide range of architectural applications.

To remove one of the panels 54 from the wall system 12, the panel is moved to the left, for example, as viewed in FIG. 3a, to compress the springs 116 and to release from the opposite pocket 108 the edge 55 of the panel that was received in such opposite pocket 108. The right edge of the panel is then pulled out of the right, opposite pocket 108. The panel is then moved to the right to remove the left edge 55 of the panel from the left pocket 108.

Referring again to FIG. 1, the fixture 14 may be fabricated in the same manner as the wall system 12 to provide removable wall panels 54, except that the wall panel retainer 52 need only be mounted adjacent and the fasteners 86 need only be provided on the inside longitudinal sides 136 of the standard 78. Thus, the panel 54 shown as a part of the fixture 14 may be easily removed and replaced as described in connection with FIGS. 3a3c to provide various types of panels, such as pegboard, etc., depending upon the intended use of the fixture 14.

While a primary advantage of the wall system 12 having the easily removable panels 54 is that the panels 54 can be standard panels requiring no unusual edge treatment that cannot be performed orr-the-job rather than at the factory, panels 142 shown in FIG. 4 may be used in conjunction with the wall panel retainers 52. The panels 142 have edges 144 provided with slots 146 for receiving flanges 148 of the pockets 108. The outer edges 144 cover the flanges 148 and may be bevelled to provide the appearance of a V-shaped groove in conjunction with the adjacent panel 142. In this manner, the wall panel retainers 52 are completely hidden from view while the panels 142 may be removed in the manner shown in FIGS. 3a-3c.

It is to be understood that the above-described arrangements are simply illustrative of the application of the principles of this invention.

What is claimed is:

1. A display fixturing assembly for retaining a panel, which comprises: A first standard having a longitudinal side and an end face on at least one end of said longitudinal side; panel retaining means including a channel member having a central section, a loop offset therefrom and end faces, said end faces of said channel member slidable along said opposite end faces of said standard, at least one of said end faces of said channel member terminating in an exterior channel-shaped pocket which receives a first vertical edge of said panel, resilient means including a spring extending under said loop and having arcuate sections on each side of said loop for engaging said first standard and urging said pocket into firm engagement with said panel edge, a second standard spaced from said first standard, said second standard having panel retaining means for receiving a second vertical edge of said panel, said resilient means allowing movement of said panel relative to said panel retaining means.

2. A display fixturing assembly, which comprises:

a standard having a longitudinal side and an end face on at least one end of said longitudinal side; first retaining means provided on said standard; tie bar means secured to said first retaining means, said tie bar means having an end spaced a given distance from said longitudinal side of said standard;

panel retaining means slidable along said end faces and between said longitudinal side and said end of said tie bar means, said panel retaining means having an elongated pocket formed thereon; and

resilient means interposed between said longitudinal side and said panel retaining means for urging said elongated pocket away from said standard;

said end of said tie bar means being effective to limit movement of said panel retaining means away from said standard.

3. A vertical wall system including a pair of display fixturing assemblies according to claim 2, wherein:

means are provided for mounting said standard of each assembly spaced from the other standard; and

a wall panel is provided having first and second opposite, vertical edges, one of said edges being received in each elongated pocket of said panel retaining means;

said resilient means permitting horizontal movement of said wall panel in the direction of said wall system, one of said ends of said tie bar means being effective during said wall panel movement to preclude movement of said corresponding panel retaining means so that further movement of said panel removes the edge of said panel from said pocket of said corresponding panel retaining means.

4. A display fixture, which comprises:

a pair of first and second elongated standards havin spaced front and rear end faces and at least one side wall connecting said front and rear faces, at least one of said front and rear faces having formed therein a series of slots;

means for mounting said first and second standards in generally vertical, spaced, parallel relationship with said side walls thereof positioned opposite to each other;

a first elongated member having a first intermediate section and a channel secured to each end of said first section, the inner walls of said channels slidably engaging said front and rear faces of said first standard;

a second elongated member having a second intermedidiate section and a channel secured to each end of said second section, the inner walls of said channels slidably engaging said front and rear faces of said second standard;

said channels having said inner walls slidably engaging said faces of said first standard being oppositely disposed from said channels having said inner walls slidably engaging said faces of said second standard;

a panel having opposed edges received in said opp'ositely disposed channels, said panel having a width which is less than the distance between the rows of slots in said first and second standards;

at least one spring secured to each of said first and second sections between said respective first and second members and said side walls of said first and second standards for urging said opposed channels toward said opposed edges of said panel to retain said panel, said springs urging said opposed channels along said front faces of said first and second standards to expose both said series of slots; and

shelving means including brackets having tabs extending into each of said exposed series of slots, and shelves mounted on said brackets.

5. In a store fixture provided with a pair of generally vertically extending, spaced standards and a base for vertically mounting said spaced standards, each of said standards having an inner side facing the other standard, the combination of:

a first generally U-shaped member facing said inner side of one of said standards, said member being provided On at least one end thereof with first channels which open oppositely with respect to said U- shaped member;

a second generally U-shaped member facing said inner side of the other of said standards, said second member being provided on at least one end thereof with second channels which open oppositely with respect to said second U-shaped member;

spring means interposed between each said standard and said associated one of said first and second members for urging said first and second channels toward each other; and

panel means having opposite sides received in said channels and maintained in assembled relationship with said standards by said urging action of said spring means on said first and second members.

6. A store fixture according to claim 5, wherein:

a tie bar is secured to each of said standards, said tie bar having opposite ends thereof spaced a selected distance from said associated inner sides of said standards;

said panel means being removable from said channels upon movement of said panel means toward said second member;

said end of said tie bar associated with a first of said standards being effective to limit movement of said first channel so that continued movement of said panel means removes one side of said panel means from said first channel.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,380,372 6/1921 Forsyth 52-397 1,706,469 3/1929 Swanson 52238 1,746,088 2/1930 McHugh 52-401 X 2,643,170 6/1953 Vanderveld 52238 X 2,994,413 8/1961 Levy et al 52495 X 3,174,592 3/1965 Berman et al. 52-36 X 3,189,135 6/1965 SlOWinSki 52-241 3,209,869 10/1965 Hammitt 52-239 X FOREIGN PATENTS 613,513 1/1961 Canada.

FRANK L. ABBOTT, Primary Examiner S. D. BURKE III, Assistant Examiner US. Cl. X.R.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3788378 *Jul 16, 1971Jan 29, 1974Osf Ind LtdFloor area divider
US3830374 *Apr 28, 1972Aug 20, 1974Levin Fixture CorpStrap peg board assembly for merchandise gondola
US3926486 *Jan 23, 1974Dec 16, 1975Gen ElectricModular furnishings
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US7261214 *Feb 5, 2004Aug 28, 2007Walgreen Co.Store lead-in fixture for a product dump table
US7950536 *Apr 11, 2007May 31, 2011Target Brands, Inc.System for displaying merchandise in front of backer material
US8091714Jan 10, 2012Target Brands, Inc.Method for displaying merchandise in front of backer material
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US20130145702 *Jun 13, 2013Yoshikazu ObaEarthquake-Resistant Structure and Earthquake-Resistant Construction Method
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/36.6, 52/481.2, 52/2.11, 52/28, 211/187, 108/42
International ClassificationA47F5/10, E04B2/78, E04B2/76
Cooperative ClassificationE04B2/78, A47F5/103
European ClassificationA47F5/10B1, E04B2/78
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Oct 3, 1984ASAssignment
Owner name: SECURITY PACIFIC BUSINESS CREDIT INC., A DE CORP
Free format text: CONDITIONAL ASSIGNMENT;ASSIGNOR:JOYCE INTERNATIONAL, INC., A DE CORP.;REEL/FRAME:004311/0487
Effective date: 19840525
Jun 29, 1984ASAssignment
Owner name: JOYCE INTERNATIONAL, INC. A CORP OF DE
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:LITTON BUSINESS SYSTEMS, INC., A NY CORP;REEL/FRAME:004285/0245
Effective date: 19840522
Jul 18, 1983AS03Merger
Owner name: LITTON BUSINESS SYSTEMS, INC.
Owner name: STREATER INDUSTRIES, INC.
Effective date: 19720705
Jul 18, 1983ASAssignment
Owner name: LITTON BUSINESS SYSTEMS, INC.
Free format text: MERGER;ASSIGNOR:STREATER INDUSTRIES, INC.;REEL/FRAME:004150/0305
Effective date: 19720705